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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




THE COUNCIL IN BOSTON 



aH" <nV 



January, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. I 



Entered as S€£ond-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phi'ta., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, r933 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920 

rk- -4. - „* T„, « /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

Directors at Large i Alice Sachs Plaut, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I MARGUERrrE Mellen Dewet, 1913 

District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddbll Pickens, 1922 

District IV Adeline Werner Vorys, 1916 

District V Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI Erna Rice, 1930 

District VII Jer]6 Bensberg Johnson, 1924 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

Virginia McKennby Claiborne, 1908 Florance Waterbury, 1905 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen Faulkner, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maguire, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 



Jform of ^equesit 



I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OF Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Ellenor Morris, '27 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Elinor Amram Nahbi, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Pamela Burr, '28 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV JANUARY, 1934 No. 1 



It is significant in a number of ways that some report, either on the Graduate 
School or from a representative of the School, has become an intrinsic part of the 
Council, and often arouses the most lively discussion. Dean Schenck, in her report 
which is carried in this number of the Bulletin, touched on a number of points, 
any one of which was interesting enough to deserve a whole article to itself. One 
has the picture of the gracious life that has been created as a focus for the graduate 
interests. This plays its part in fostering, by its charm and ease of intercourse, all 
sorts of intellectual interests, aside from a student's own particular field. There is 
in the Graduate School that richness and diversity of background for which we all, 
alumnae and college authorities alike, work in the Undergraduate College. No one 
can read over the list of colleges which for the last five years have sent the 98 
students who have won their M.A.'s at Bryn Mawr, without feeling that here is a 
cross-section of the academic life of the whole country. And the quality of the 
intellectual background is even more diversified by the fact that at the present 
time there are in Radnor fifteen students out of fifty-nine who have had some 
European experience. The present writer is in a seminar of four students, one of 
whom is a Canadian and Oxford trained, and another of whom is French, with 
consequently a quite different method of approach, from either the English or the 
American. This diversity of previous training has always been true in some degree 
of the graduate students. The really new thing is the diversity in teaching as a 
result of cooperation on the part of the University of Pennsylvania, Haverford, 
Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr. Bryn Mawr is giving a seminar at Pennsylvania, 
and Pennsylvania is giving a Seminar at Bryn Mawr, both in the Department of 
Mathematics. The possibilities of such academic inter-relationships are endless. It 
was pleasant to have some one with the detached point of view of Dean Morriss 
say what Bryn Mawr alumnae increasingly feel: "The reputation and standing of 
the Bryn Mawr Graduate School is high enough to continue indefinitely to draw to 
it a full quota of the ablest women students in the country." 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE COUNCIL MEETING IN BOSTON 

NOVEMBER 16th, 17th and 18th, 1933 

New England's tradition of government by Town Meeting stood the Associa- 
tion in good stead throughout the three days' Council meetings in Boston^ resulting 
in splendid attendance and clear-headed discussion. In last month's Bulletin 
Mrs. Otey called attention to the large numbers at the Winsor School meeting and at 
the dinner in honor of President Park^ but it is perhaps even more remarkable that 
about one hundred alumnae came to one or more of the three business sessions, 
held at the hospitable homes of Elizabeth Townsend Torbert, 1906, and Eleanor 
Little Aldrich, 1905. More than eighty-five were actually present at one time during 
Friday's meetings. Of the regular twenty-five members of the Council proper (see 
inside front cover of Bulletin) only four were absent: Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 
1918, Alumnae Director; Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912, Editor of the Alumnae 
Bulletin; Jere Bensberg Johnson, 1924, Councillor for District VII., and Vinton 
Liddell Pickens, 1922, Councillor for District III. Mary Hardy, 1920, acted as 
alternate and read the report sent by Mrs. Pickens, who is abroad. Mrs. Johnson 
and Miss Thompson also submitted written reports. This year's Council had as 
specially invited guests Helen Evans Lewis, 1913, Councillor-at-large ; Ellinor H. 
Collins, representing the Class of 1933; Mary B. Nichols, the Class of 1934; 
Eunice Morgan Schenck, 1907, the Faculty; Dean Margaret Morriss, of Pembroke 
College, Brown University, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr, 1911, representing the Graduate 
School; Caroline McCormick Slade, 1896, and Frances Fincke Hand, 1897, Direc- 
tors-at-large of the College. 

This very much abridged summary of the proceedings is meant to give only 
the barest outline of the busy three days. As the Council is a deliberative and not 
a legislative body, all important decisions affecting the Association will be referred 
to the Annual Meeting. Full minutes of the discussions, however, are on file at the 
Alumnae Office and may be consulted when desired. 

The first session of the Council opened promptly at 1.30 p. m., on Thursday, 
November 16th, 1933. After a cordial welcome by Marguerite Mellen Dewey, 1913, 
Councillor for District I., Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895, President of the Alumnae 
Association, introduced Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909, Treasurer, and Lois Kellogg Jessup, 
1920, Chairman of the Finance Committee, who each reported briefly on the finances 
of the Association. Miss Ehlers exhibited two charts showing the income and the 
expenditure of the last two years, calling attention to the fact that the expenditures 
for each item correspond so closely as a result of careful management of expenses. 
In presenting the tentative budget for 1934 she spoke of the plan of having the 
Association books audited by a committee of members instead of having a profes- 
sional audit, which is expensive. She suggested dividing the budget into two parts, 
one having to do with genuine expenses and one with gifts, such as the President's 
Fund and the Rhoads Scholarships, and added that it would then seem more logical 
to include in this second part the $7,000 pledge to the College, if the Finance Com- 
mittee recommends this to the vote of the Association. Mrs. Jessup spoke of the 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



problem which confronted the Association: "Without any nestegg, how to raise 
$1,000 more than we raised in 1932, when it seemed as if every Class Collector 
had done her utmost." The committee had decided to cut down expenses by omitting 
printed reports and publicity material, and had concentrated on personal letters, 
enclosing a message from President Park on the value of the Alumnae Fund to the 
College, together with some comparative statistics of. class contributions. The results 
have been most encouraging, as up to November 15th, 1933, the number of con- 
tributors exceeds by 40 last year's record for the same period and the amount 
received is $600 greater. Thanks to one particularly generous contribution of $1,000 
and to the profit which has already been made from the sale of Bryn Mawr plates, 
the prospects are bright for meeting all obligations by the end of the year. She 
closed by saying: "We are not down-hearted, for the first two weeks of November 
are running well ahead of the first two weeks of last November (and many pre- 
cincts not yet heard from!). We feel that there are some voters who must have 
forgotten to go to the polls; but at least we know that the machines are never 
tampered with, even though there may be some intimidating on the part of the 
faithful workers. And we are hopeful that the results will be, if not a landslide, 
at least a comfortable majority in favor of Bryn Mawr and its academic needs." 

Following an animated discussion about the Alumnae Register, three resolu- 
tions were passed. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the Council recommends that a Register he 
published before the end of lOSJf^. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the Executive Board instruct the Alumnae 
Directors to ask the Board of Directors of the College for their share of the appro- 
priation necessary to publish the Register. 

Moved, seconded and carried that the proposed budget for 193 Jf. be approved 
with the figure allowed for the Register left open. 

Before the close of this first session considerable difference of opinion was 
expressed on the policy of saving toward another year's pledge anj^ surplus whicTu 
might be on hand at the end of the fiscal year. Arguments for both sides were 
heard, but no formal recommendation was made. The matter will come up in the 
routine business of the Annual Meeting in February. 

That evening, at the home of Mary Richardson Walcott, 1906, the District 
Councillors and a few others actively connected with scholarships met with Elizabeth 
Maguire, 1913, Chairman of the Scholarships and Loan Fund Committee, to discuss 
some specific problems. Next morning, after the reports of the Councillors (see 
pages 7 to 18), Miss Maguire reported on the general situation at the College and 
gave a summary of the decisions of the evening conference. She will report formally 
at the Annual Meeting. Miss Maguire told of the large number of students now 
receiving help, and of the excellent standing of the scholarship holders. It was 
mentioned that Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, and Mount Holyoke, at a recent meeting 
of the Five College Conference, held at Bryn Mawr, had agreed not to award any 
Freshman Scholarships until after the results of the College Board Examinations 
is known, and Regional Scholarships Committees were urged to cooperate in this 
policy. As a natural result of the nation-wide depression, repayments to the Loan 
Fund have been seriously reduced. The Councillors had agreed to help the com- 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



mittee to make collections in their respective neighborhoods. It was again requested 
that, to help the Loan Fund tide over this crisis^ alumnae might make loans to the 
Loan Fund, which will be a first charge on the Loan Fund resources and will be 
repaid without fail in two years. 

The morning's discussion centered around two points. The first of these was 
brought out in the report for District III., where Mrs. Pickens emphasized the 
importance of using the Regional Scholarships to secure variety in the student 
body, whicli she believes can be best done by sending promising girls from rural 
communities to Bryn Mawr. It was the sense of the meeting that this policy is 
a good one, and that it can be furthered by encouraging also the girl who will be 
an addition to the college community and who can at the same time pay her own 
way. Both these ideas, it was believed, will be accepted by the districts gradually 
as tliey are carefully explained by the Councillors. The second point, specially 
stressed by Mrs. Lewis in her report as Councillor-at-large (page 19) — the need 
for closer contact between the College and the alumnae — seemed to strike a respon- 
sive chord in every heart. Mrs. Chadwick-Collins said that a new "movie" of the 
College would shortly be ready for distribution. It was the sense of the meeting 
that this should be shown at the Annual Meeting. A number of people expressed 
the wish that the time of Annual Meeting be changed, either to Commencement 
Week or to some time when College is in session. A formal recommendation was 
made to the Executive Board asking them to consider this matter. It seemed to be 
the general opinion, however, that since comparatively few can return to Bryn Mawr 
\'ery often, what is most needed is to have news of the College brouglit at frequent 
intervals to groups of alumnae and to schools. It was agreed that speakers must 
be chosen with great care, and the discussion closed with the acceptance of the 
following resolution: 

Moved, seconded arid carried that the Executive Board appoint a coinmittee 
to consider meaiis of establishing closer contact between the College and the alumnae, 
and that this committee report at the Annual Meeting if possible, or at the next 
Council. 

After luncheon short reports were made for the Academic Committee, for the 
Committee on Health and Physical Education, and for tlie Nominating Committee 
by their respective chairmen, Ellen Faulkner, 1913, Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918, 
and Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898; and Alice Hawkins, 1907, Alumnae Secretary, 
read a report on the Alumnae Bulletin sent by Miss Thompson, who was ill. All 
will report formally at the Annual Meeting. Mrs. Bancroft said that the committee 
would welcome suggestions for an Alumnae Director to be nominated this spring. 
She reminded tlie Council of the plan to ask the Councillors to secure suggestions 
from their districts each year by means of a plan worked out by the special committee 
last year. She asked for an expression of opinion as to the desirability of nominating 
some one who had served some time previously. The sense of the meeting seemed 
to be in favor of using new material, but no action was recorded. 

Each Council has its high spots, and there is no doubt that this was reached 
in Boston in Mrs. Slade's report on the Deanery. Not many of those present had 
been able to attend the opening of tlie Deanery, and all listened breathlessly to every 
syllable of t?\e account of tlie committee's untiring labors to transform the building 
from Miss Thomas' home — so full of memories for the alumnae in general — into a 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



practical Alumnae House^ whicli can be of constant service to College with its 
many entertainments^ and yet be always a dignified and delightful hostel for the 
alumnae from far and near. The many personal and historical touches that Mrs. 
Slade was able to give^ added to the wealth of detail^ helped materially to answer 
many questions which had been in the minds of the hearers^ and heightened the 
interest of the occasion. In the discussion that followed^ Mrs. Slade said that the 
committee expects gradually to be more flexible than in its original regulations, and 
thatj while they wish to safeguard the prior rights of tlie alumnae^, they will be glad 
to make arrangements to offer hospitality to such groups as girls from the secondary 
schools and parents of undergraduates. With great enthusiasm a resolution of 
thanks was proposed. 

Moved, seconded and carried that a formal expression of appreciation he sent 
to Preside?it-Emeritus Thomas from the Council. 

At end of the afternoon session, Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, Alumnae 
Director, spoke briefly for her committee on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Found- 
ing of the College. She said that the committee had met recently with Mr. Cram, 
consulting architect of the College, and had found his ideas very stimulating. The 
committee has made no new plan, but hopes to follow the one outlined several years 
ago, according to which it desires to secure, from one of the large foundations, funds 
for a new Science Building, while the College would undertake to build a new dor- 
mitory from unrestricted funds, and the alumnae would endeavor to raise the money 
necessary for a wing of the Library in honor of Miss Thomas. Mention was made 
of the recent Haverford Centenary Celebration, which seems to have been extremeh^ 
satisfactory, and to have established new contacts between the alumni and the college. 
Mrs. Maclay reminded the Council that the date to be commemorated is less than 
two years off, October, 1935, and that suggestions for an appropriate form of 
celebration are in order. Accordingly it was 

Moved, sec07ided and carried that a committee of five he appointed to make a 
special recommendation as to the proposed gift to he made in honor of the Fiftieth 
Anriiversart/ of the Founding of the College, and on the forin of celehration desired; 
and that this committee report at the next Council ineeting. 

At the concluding session of the Council, held on Saturday morning, November 
18th, the Council had the pleasure of hearing about the undergraduate point of 
view from Ellinor Collins, President of the Class of 1933, and from Mary Nichols, 
1934, President of the Undergraduate Association. They will be printed in the 
January Bulletin. 

The addition to the Council of representatives from the Faculty and from tlie 
Graduate School has proved to be a great success, and this jxar's members con- 
tributed greatly to the importance of the discussions, while their papers upheld 
the fine record established by their forerunners of the past two Councils (pages 
20 to 24). 

The last two events of tlie program completed the picture of the many groups 
concerned with the College. In the enforced absence of Mrs. Frantz, the Senior 
Alumnae Director, who will report formally at the Annual Meeting, Virginia 
McKenney Claiborne, 1908, spoke briefly for that group, mentioning interesting 
features of its make-up, its activities, and some of its plans. She alluded to the 
question of Honorary Degrees which has recently been under discussion, and said 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



that the Directors would welcome alumnae opinion on this and other subjects. 
Mrs. Hand gave a spirited account of the work of the Seven Colleges Committee, 
saying that all Seven were convinced that it is desirable and important to continue 
their annual appropriation of $1,000 each, and to maintain the excellent organiza- 
tion and liaison work established by their Executive Secretary, Mrs. Maude White 
Stewart. They believe that some tangible results of their efforts have already been 
achieved in the form of gifts and bequests received by several of the Seven, where 
no actual connection had previously existed. 

During the morning there was a short discussion of the idea of holding an 
"Alumnae College." Josephine Young Case, 1928, Secretary of the Association, 
said that she had been impressed with the account given of the successful one held 
at Smith last June, and Miss Hawkins read a letter from Esther Lowenthal, 1905, 
Professor of Economics at Smith, expressing her approval of the project. It seemed 
the sense of the meeting that the alumnae would prefer to this some plan which 
would bring them in contact with the College in its ordinary functioning, and a 
recommendation was again made that the Association change the time of the Annual 
Meeting in order that those attending might have an opportunity to see the College 
in action. 

Miss Rice, in her Councillor's report, had extended a most cordial invitation 
to the Council to meet next 3^ear in St. Louis, and Mrs. Slade had concluded her 
report on the Deanery with an enthusiastic offer of the Deanery as a meeting place. 
After a discussion of the relative advantages of the two places at this particular 
time, and expressing the hope that St. Louis would repeat the invitation for another 
year, it was 

Moved, seconded and canned that the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Council accepts 
with pleasure the invitation of the Deanery Committee to meet at the Deanery 
in 193Jf, 

Before the motion for adjournment was made, Mrs. Clark, on behalf of the 
Council, expressed to Mrs. Dewey, Mrs. Walcott, Mrs. Aldrich, and all their com- 
mittee, appreciation of the great efficiency, combined with charming hospitality, 
which had all added to the enjoyment and success of the meetings. 

The Council then adjourned at 12.30 p. m. 



NEWS FROM THE CLUBS 

The Bryn Mawr Club of New York will hold its annual dinner in honour 
of President Park on Tuesday, January 16th, at half-past seven, at the Park Lane. 
All alumnae and former students are invited to come, but should make their 
reservations early through the club. After dinner. President Park will talk about 
the College and recent happenings. 

Tlie Bryn Mawr Club of Washington announces that on Monday night, Decem- 
ber 18th, at the National Theatre, it was sponsor for the first performance of 
Katharine Hepburn, 1929, in The Lake, for the benefit of its Scholarship Fund. 
The President of the club is Mrs. G. S. Jamieson, 3914 McKinley Street, Chevy 
Chase, D. C. 

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BRYN MAWIl ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



COUNCILLORS' REPORTS 

The Reports are for the most part carried in full except for some omissions of names 
and specific personal information about the holders of the Regional Scholarships. 

REPORT OF DISTRICT I. 

(Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Rhode Island) 

District I. is very fortunate in the compactness of its geography^, and even its 
far corners are not very far apart. We still hope that in time^ as Bryn Mawr 
College graduates more daughters of Maine and Vermont^ these two states will 
become as alert in Bryn Mawr activities as the other four states. 

District I. is also fortunate in the quality and quantity of its schools. They 
are a fertile field for the development of Regional Scholars^ thus making the problem 
of the Regional Scholarship Committee one of choosing rather than of seeking for 
promising students. Here the competency and understanding of our Regional 
Scholarship Chairman^ Mrs. Talbot Aldrich^ is unfailing^ and^, with her committee, 
untiring in the spending of time and effort. 

New England has eleven Regional Scholars in College today: three Seniors, 
one Junior, three Sophomores, four Freshmen. Of these girls, seven are from 
public schools and four from private schools (all held scholarships in school) ; 
nine from Massachusetts and two from Connecticut. 

For the future we have eight applications for Regional Scholarships. Seven 
are for 1934-35 and one for 1935-36. Of these, four are from Massachusetts, three 
from Connecticut, one from Rhode Island; five are from private schools and three 
from public. 

We have in District I. our three same centers of interest, for, try as we may, 
we cannot change the centers of Bryn Mawr population in New England. The 
New Haven Club reports a successful year and is well represented here today by 
Helen Evans Lewis, 1913, former Councillor of District I. and Councillor-at-Large 
for this meeting. Mrs. Lewis and Jeannette Peabody Cannon, 1919, often come 
from New Haven for the Boston meetings of the Regional Scholarship Committee. 
The New Haven Club (President, Mabel Smith Cowles, 1921) has held five meet- 
ings during the year, at which President Park, Mrs. Learned Hand, Louise 
Dillingham, 1916, Head of Westover; Helen Evans Lewis, 1913, and Marguerite 
Mellen Dewey, 1913, were the speakers. 

The Providence Club (President, Emily Noyes Knight, 1915) met only last 
Monday to try to dig up some problems for us, but report that they have none. 
Two of their members, Elizabeth Matteson Farnsworth, 1921, and Barbara Clarke, 
1922, are members of the Regional Scholarship Committee, and one or the other is 
always on hand for the meetings. While there is no club in Nashua, New Hampshire. 
Anna Stearns, 1911, tries valiantly to keep interest alive, and herself consistently 
comes to all Scholarship meetings. The Boston Club met four times last winter, and 
this fall is concentrating its energy and enthusiasm on these Council meetings, 
planned under the able leadership of Mrs. Robert Walcott, our President this year. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Our money for scholarships in District I. is secured from an appeal to alumnae 
sent out in the spring, and special alumnae gifts for special girls, from outside 
donors, and gifts for special girls from the Boston, the Providence, and the 
New Haven clubs. 

In 1929 the appeal brought in $885 from seventy-four alumnae; in 1933 the 
appeal sent out last March brought in $899 from one hundred and eight alumnae. 
It is interesting to note an increase of thirty-four subscribers for an increase also 
of $14. In 1929, five alumnae contributed special gifts totaling $375; in 1933, 
three alumnae contributed $155. In 1929, thirty outside donors contributed $2,185; 
in 1933, twenty-three outside donors contributed $1,185. Adding the club contri- 
butions to the figures already given for 1929, our total sum collected was $4,570, 
with an additional sum of $78.56 interest money. I add this, as our Treasurer pays 
for all expenses from her interest sum each year. The number of our students 
having scholarships awarded to them in 1929 was nine. In 1933, adding to the sums 
already given in my contrasting figures, the club gifts of $1,100 (which are made 
up annually: $100 from Providence Club, $200 from the New Haven Club, $800 
from the Boston Club), our total sum was $3,339, with an additional sum of $64.70 
interest money. We have awarded this year eleven scholarships, to the amount of 
$3,505. We have in College, as I have said previously, seven upper classmen and 
four Freshmen. We hear and read much today about the "Road to Recovery," but, 
as I look back over these contrasting data of 1929 and 1933, and over the complete 
record of Regional Scholarships in New England for the past twelve years, I should 
say that we have proof here that there is always a place for a worth-while activity. 
To be sure, it is true that the funds are now much harder to secure, but so also is 
the individual need of the applicant more compelling this year than ever before. 
One of our leading automobile engineers remarked recently, "There is nothing 
wrong with this country, only the bookkeepers have got all balled up." We are 
humbly thankful in New England that we have Susan Walker Fitz Gerald at our 
financial helm. 

For those who wonder whether there is room in the ranks of the employed for 
the Regional Scholars who graduate from College, the five Seniors who graduated 
last June are faring better than many of their brothers. All are doing something. 
One is a graduate student at Radcliffe, another sells books for an educators' associa- 
tion, another is teaching. The fourth is working in the translation department of 
the Christian Science Publishing Society, and the fifth is a medical student at 
Johns Hopkins. The last mentioned is carrying out the plan she had mapped out 
for herself before going to College. All efforts to bring four years at Bryn Mawr 
within the reach of these and other girls is worth while when we realize such sus- 
tained determination in a chosen field, together with a broadening mental perspective. 

Marguerite Mellen Dewey, 1913. 

REPORT OF DISTRICT II. 
(New York, Southern Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Delaware) 

District II. covers so varied a territory that, as a new Councillor, I cannot be 
in personal touch with all of the alumnae, but must rely on such information as is 
included in the reports of the committees in the district. These reports come from 
the four sections of the district, as follows: 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Beatrice Sorchan Binger^ 1919^ of the New York and Southern Connecticut 
Scholarship Committee^ reports a most interesting year. She says: "We had nine 
candidates for our freshman scholarsliip^ which we finally gave to a high school 
girl with an unusually excellent record;, who entered college as the eighth out of 
187 candidates. Three of the other applicants were fortunately able to go to 
Bryn Mawr without help. 

"Our four other scholars in College^, two Seniors^, one Junior and one Sopho- 
morc;, have also done extremely well in their studies^ receiving many high credits 
and credits. 

"This' year^, unfortunately, we were able to raise only $1,800, so that we could 
not give our scholars as much as usual. Through a special arrangement with the 
College they are receiving $300 each, while we have given the Freshman $500. We 
hope to be able to give them more help next year, however, as our two Seniors will 
graduate in the spring." 

Jean Clark Fouilhoux, 1899, of the Northern New Jersey Committee, reports 
that her committee has four students now in College. The Junior also holds a 
scholarship from the Colonial Dames. Of the two Sophomores, one has won two 
scholarships for herself. There is also a Freshman in College at present. Mrs. 
Fouilhoux says that the total sum raised this year was $1,000, which is less than 
last year. She, however, gives us one hint which may be useful to people in other 
parts of the country, for she says that book sales have been most helpful in raising 
the money. In other words, everyone contributes those used books which fill up 
our spare shelves all too fast, and they are resold for small sums which mount up 
most pleasantly to benefit our scholars. 

Martha Sheldon Nuttall, 1912, of the Western Pennsylvania Committee, 
reports that her committee is seeing through its scholar, who is now a Senior, and 
that they hope to have enough money to send a Freshman next year. 

Marjorie Canby Taylor, 1920, Chairman of Eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware, 
and Southern New Jersey, reports that her committee had fifteen applications for 
the freshman scholarship, which was finally awarded to a Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Daughter. They have two Seniors, both with splendid records, and one Junior with 
very high marks in all her subjects. Unfortunately, the Sophomore was unable to 
return for financial reasons. Mrs. Taylor adds a cheerful note to her report, 
saying, "Our financial problems have cleared up." They have been able to meet 
their pledge to the College to repay part of a loan made to cover last year's deficit. 
They raised money by their annual pansy and delphinium sales, bridge parties 
during the winter, and pledges covering a three-year period. Some of these methods 
may suggest ideas to you elsewhere. 

It seems obvious that in all parts of the district. Chairmen have found it 
difficult to collect the money needed. I do not believe that there is any lack of 
interest, but that even our most loyal friends are hard pressed to help us, and I 
feel that I should like to thank everyone who has given of her time and effort to 
keep the torch of Scholarship burning at Bryn Mawr. 

Before I close this account of District II., I should like to quote from the 
report of Helen Riegel Oliver, 1916, the President of the Bryn Mawr Club in 
New York: "The New York Bryn Mawr Club is well pleased with its move to an 
attractive apartment in the Park Lane. The club's very existence tends to arouse 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and maintain interest in the College^, and, in a manner of speaking, it represents 
the College in New York, making contacts with the other women's college clubs, 
participating in various allied enterprises, as well as serving as headquarters for 
Bryn Mawr activities. The Bryn Mawr Summer School has found there a willing- 
ness to cooperate in furthering its interests. The great annual event is the dinner 
for the President of Bryn Mawr. Upon this occasion, last January, when President 
Park brought a special message to an eager audience, old college loyalties had a 
great revival. 

"This past October the club assisted with the dinner planned by and for the 
Affiliated Schools for Workers in honor of President-Emeritus Thomas. The radio 
broadcasting, newspaper publicity, and photographs at this delightful dinner in the 
Park Lane ballroom certainly brought out the light of Bryn Mawr from under the 
bushel for a time." 

It seems to me that, with the exception of Bryn Mawr itself, more Bryn Mawr 
interests in this district can be cleared through the club in New York than in any 
other one place, and I hope that old friendships and new interests may be cemented 
there. 

Again I thank all alumnae for their suggestions and cooperation, and I wish 
them all success next year in their efforts to enlist the help of an ever-widening 
circle of friends and students worthy to carry on the scholarship and traditions of 
Bryn Mawr. 

Harriet Price Phipps, 1923. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT III. 

(Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, 

Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Tennessee) 

District III. is proud to report that its 1932-33 scholar, from Cocoa, Florida, 
received the Longstreth Scholarship of $500 for her sophomore year. As a Fresh- 
man she made only one grade under 80, and that was a 79. The regional award of 
$500 went this year to a daughter of a professor at Duke University, who ranked 
among the first twenty Freshmen admitted. The girls now or formerly supported 
by the Baltimore and Washington clubs have also done well. Washington is help- 
ing one Junior, and Baltimore one Sophomore and two Freshmen who also rank 
among the first twenty. 

The organization of the district into state groups proceeds satisfactorily. We 
have local Chairmen everywhere but in Louisiana, Alabama, and South Carolina. 
As there were last year only fifteen Bryn Mawr women in the three combined, it is 
not strange that all of those who have been asked to serve have reported that they 
were already too much involved in local affairs to undertake anything new. 
Margaret Scribner Grant, '06, is the new Chairman of the Scholarships Committee 
for the Washington Club, and Julia Cochran Buck, '20, for the Baltimore Club. 
Jeannie Howard, '01, continues tlie Richmond work. 



When every contribution means, as it does in these days, a genuine sacrifice 
on the part of the contributor, we, who handle other people's money, should think 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BUIvLPyilN 



very carefully about what we do with it. Councillors and Scholarships Chairmen 
everywhere must ask themselves plainly whether their work is really carrying out 
the idea back of the regional awards. The Regional Scholarships were founded to 
bring to Bryn Mawr girls from less-well-to-do families and from sections of the 
country not already heavily represented. The scholarships benefit only incidentally 
the girls who receive them. Their purpose is to benefit the College by diversifying it. 

This purpose is a good one and should always be kept in mind. It is more 
important than details of organization, local interests or sympathy for girls who, 
however deserving, merely repeat the type to which we are supposed to provide a 
contrast. I should like all alumnae in District III. to consider very carefully 
whether their scholarships really do supply variety for spicing college life. 

The district is composed of the ten southeastern states and the District of 
Columbia. Within it exist the Bryn Mawr Clubs of Washington and Baltimore, and 
also what is generally referred to as the "Richmond group." The clubs of the two 
larger cities work only to serve the financially handicapped girl, for Washington 
and Baltimore are always so well represented by students able to pay their own 
way that the geographical aspect of scholarship work need not there be considered. 
Must not the city clubs keep more clearly in mind than ever the purpose of the 
scholarships which they award .^ Must they not ask of every candidate not only, 
"Is she a good student and a valuable member of society.^" but "Will this girl 
contribute to college life something that the other girls from this city cannot give.'^" 

In the South the geographical, rather than the financial, aspect of the work 
has always been more important. District III.'s duty and ambition has always 
been to see that the viewpoint of the agricultural southern states should be repre- 
sented in what will always remain a preponderantly northern college. This ambition 
within the years of my experience in this work has always been fulfilled. The 
scholars of the last two years are southern born and southern prepared; this year's 
scholar, while not southern born, is southern prepared and closely affiliated with 
the South through her father's professorship in a North Carolina college. 
District III. Regional Scholarships really help in adjusting the geographical balance 
of the student body. 

District III. is heavily handicapped. Exclusive of former graduate students, 
who rarely contribute interest, work or dollars, and the members of the Washington. 
Baltimore, and Richmond organizations, it numbers scarcely more than a hundred 
alumnae. In practice this means that every year about a hundred letters are written 
and that an average response of $5 must be received in reply to each one if our 
goal is to be reached. I need not explain to women grown sad, if not old. in 
money-raising experience, that such response is unheard of in any work in any 
community. 

Now it seems to me wrong for District III. to abandon or heavily reduce its 
scholarship while Baltimore and Washington, alwaj'^s largely represented, send 
more and more girls to College. Since the two cities are part of District III. it 
seems to me fair for their clubs to help the district fund. I have been told that the 
interest of the club members was purely local and that there would be no attempts 
to raise money were every penny not to be used at home. This I cannot believe. 
A Bryn Mawr club is, after all, not a chamber of commerce, and Bryn Mawr 
education would not be wortli working for if its graduates held such narrow views. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



I do not suggest that the Baltimore and Washington scholarships be given up. 
I propose only that they be either combined or offered in alternate years, or handled 
in some other way that will release surplus funds for the district at large. In 
prosperous years each city might send its scholar and still help the district. In the 
lean ones, one of the two cities might be unrepresented by scholarship students, but 
the geographical balance of undergraduate life would be maintained because the 
district would still send its scholar. 

I urge the Scholarships Chairmen in Washington and Baltimore to consider the 
problem of District III. as a whole and to give me suggestions in regard to it. 
I should like them to consider also the fact that by offering one scholarship for the 
two cities they would necessarily raise the standard of the winners. A girl receiving 
such an award would have to be of exceptional intellectual capacity, and a wholesale 
rivalry between the clubs to provide the winner might, therefore, bring better 
results to the College than either the present system or the one of alternating the 
years for the award. Please do not think that as Councillor I am less interested in 
Washington and Baltimore than in the South as a whole. Ideally, all three units 
should send students, but as financial conditions in the country are far from ideal 
I am suggesting what I believe to be the best way to do what the regional scholar- 
ships are intended to do. As Baltimore and Washington are always represented by 
students able to pay all their own expenses, it seems to me that of the three scholar- 
ships that of District III. can least well be spared. Perhaps a percentage system 
would work in Washington and Baltimore and Richmond, leaving each city's own 
plan undisturbed, but each bearing its fair share of the district's burden. 

Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT IV. 
(Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Kentucky, West Virginia) 

Our two senior scholars finished their college years with much credit to them- 
selves. Our Indianapolis scholar graduated cum laude with distinction in Archeology, 
and following her special field of interest, she is acting as secretary to Dr. Swindler 
in Bryn Mawr this winter. Our Cleveland scholar spent last year in Germany, 
completing her work there for her degree. It is with regret that the district can no 
longer report on the undergraduate fortunes of these two students, whose college 
achievements promise so fair for future days. The certain knowledge that they will 
fill their respective places as citizens of the world with judgment and intelligence, 
made surer and keener because of their Bryn Mawr experience, is tremendously 
satisfying to those of us who have watched them and helped them come through 
to a successful conclusion. 

Another scholar from District IV., from Cleveland, is now in her junior year. 
Her final examination record in June would be a joy to give, but I must content 
myself with saying tliat it is a report that would make any Councillor purr with 
satisfaction. In addition, she has received a college scholarship, and a special grant. 

Tliere were tliree good applicants for our one freshman Regional Scholarship, 
and after much deliberation a girl from Huntington, West Virginia, received this 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



scholarship. From our district, too, goes the first student to receive the Louise 
Hyman Pollak Scholarship, to be awarded every second year to a girl entering 
from the Middle West. 

Last March you will recall that Mrs. Clark sent a letter to the Councillors 
asking us to widen the scope of our activity by endeavoring to interest girls of 
ability, who were able to pay, to go to Bryn Mawr. I cannot refrain from men- 
tioning what I feel to be the direct result of such activity by stating that two 
students have entered Bryn Mawr from Columbus and vicinity this fall. For the 
past three years we have given a tea to which we have invited all girls expecting to 
go East to college. At these meetings we have shown pictures of the campus, 
class books, song books, and last year we showed the May Day movies. In addition 
to these informal meetings we have spoken to the pupils of the Columbus School 
for Girls at morning chapel on several occasions. I feel that our efforts had much 
to do with the decision made by these two students. And what is even more encour- 
aging, there is a fine group considering Bryn Mawr for the next few years. Before 
this activity on our part there had been a lapse of almost ten years since the last 
Central Ohio student entered Bryn Mawr. I speak of this to show what I believe 
can be done in luke-warm districts with just a very little effort. 

I belong to a study group which has as the subject of its winter program 
"Sore Spots of the World." Narrowing the area down, I might well transfer the 
forbidding title .to ''Sore Spots in District IV" and write volumes. As the matter 
is carefully analyzed, however, in this year 1933, I am more and more convinced 
that the sore spots are imposed from without and not due to any inner disinclination 
or unwillingness to cooperate. The chaos of the world has made our middle-western 
alumnae unable to take part in or to organize enthusiastically and whole-heartedly 
Bryn Mawr projects. We have been sorely tried in places such as Detroit, Toledo, 
Cleveland, Akron, Louisville. 

Take Detroit, for example; a good organization exists there today and all one 
might wish for in interest, but economically so deeply touched. Louisville and 
Toledo are victims of tragic bank failures. Individual alumnae in the district have 
written to me that it is not unwillingness on their part to help, but inability to help. 
It is this at present that is creating the sore spots of our district. And because of 
this situation we are not able as yet to meet our pledge in full to the College. When 
bread-lines are the order of the day an appeal for scholarships falls largely on 
deaf ears. 

This I do know, that the awareness of our plans and purposes of scholarships 
is filtering through to more and more alumnae, and the district is more interested. 
more alert, more ready to help with each passing year, because each year our 
contacts with alumnae in the district increase. Last spring a sample copy of the 
Bulletin went out, suggesting that all non-members of the Alumnae Association 
join. Again this September our News Sheet informed every alumna in the district 
of our scholarships and our obligations. In addition to this, Mrs. Farrar, our district 
Scholarship Chairman, and I have carried on a large volume of correspondence with 
candidates, mothers of candidates, principals of schools, and alumnae. Our letters, 
our News Sheet, our personal contacts, visits such as Mrs. Manning made last 
spring to our district, the newspaper publicity that occurs from time to time, is 
keeping the name of Bryn Mawr more and more before the middle-western eye. All 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



this must have its results^, and when times are favorable again we must reap the 
harvest of this present planning. 

The candidates are here — the loyal alumnae are here — the enthusiasm is here — 
and when the ability to give and give generously returns^, District IV. will stand 
ready to match the results of its devotion with any district. 

With sincere regret I am reading my last report of District IV. I cannot 
bring it to a close without an expression of gratitude and appreciation for having 
been able to serve as Councillor. It has given me great joy and I have deemed it 
a great privilege. 

Adeline Werner Vorys^ 1916. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT V. 

(Illinois, Iowa, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, 
Wyoming, Montana) 

Madam Chairman, Members of the Council: 

I present the report of District V., comprising eight states, including Wyoming, 
with a question mark. I was informed by one authority that Wyoming was within 
our fold and by another that it belonged elsewhere, but as the population for our 
purposes is just two I will not fight for possession of the state. 

As to our Regional Scholars; last year's two Seniors graduated with honors. 
This year we have a Sophomore, who entered as a Matriculation Scholar and has 
made a satisfactory record so far, and our freshman scholar is from Dubuque, 
Iowa. We had two other applicants ; one, the daughter of an alumna, had excel- 
lent entrance marks and was given a special scholarship offered by the Directors 
of the College. 

We had no benefit this year, and though we fine-combed the district for contri- 
butions we have still not quite completed paying the necessary $800. We are now 
in the throes of trying to plan some sort of big push for next year's funds, as we 
must be able to take on a Freshman. We are already overwhelmed with good 
applicants. 

The most novel event in the district this year was the participation by 
Bryn Mawr with seventeen other colleges in the organization called the Woman's 
College Board for a Century of Progress. The movement was started by Mrs. 
Howells, President of the Chicago Vassar Club. A board was formed, composed 
of two members from each college. Caroline Daniels Moore, '01, served with 
Grace Wooldridge Dewes, '09, who was the President of the Chicago Bryn Mawr 
Club. 

Space in the Hall of Social Science was first considered. The rent for the 
summer would have amounted to $2,000. When, therefore, Time-Fortune generously 
offered to give a corner of their big reading room for the booth free of charge or 
obligation, their offer was gratefully accepted. The women's colleges had a corner 
at one end near the entrance, with space for a desk where alumnae registered and 
could examine tlie files for locating fellow alumnae, a wall rack displaying photo- 
graphs of tlie different colleges, a book of pictures of each college, and other 
information. 

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BIIYN MAWIl ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Two paid secretaries alternated days and were on duty from 10 to 10. Tlie 
college groups provided in rotation four assistant hostesses per day^, two for tlie 
time from 10 to '%, and two from 4 to 10. They supplemented the work of the 
secretary and took charge of the booth while she was out for meals. 

Mrs. Dewes was General Chairman of Hostesses for all the colleges and 
Mrs. Moore was on the committee which sent questionnaires to the colleges, the 
answers to which were bound in two volumes (arranged by college and by subject 
matter);, which could be consulted by prospective students. 

The secretaries made a final report to the board, from which I quote: "As 
secretaries we have kept the registration of visitors, which has been a source of 
much interest and will constitute a valuable record for the alumnae associations. 
The day of highest registration was August 21st, with 82, and the total of all 
colleges was 5,210. Of these, 179 were from Bryn Mawr. Giving information about 
the colleges has been a major service. In many cases we have suggested sending 
for catalogues, thus giving the college the names of interested students. But the 
number of catalogue requests does not represent the whole of our consultation 
service. Of a total of 538 such requests 32 were sent to Bryn Mawr. It is difficult 
to interpret figures, but we know that the service has been of definite value to 
each college." 

For purposes of comparison, Mrs. Dewes gave me the figures on requests for 
catalogues from some of the other colleges: Bryn Mawr 32, Smith 40, Vassar 58, 
and Wellesley 70. 

Now that the Century of Progress is to be reopened next summer, the board 
is not going to disband but will hold itself in readiness, pending a decision by the 
colleges whether or not to continue the booth another year. 

The Chicago alumnae have hoped that the representation of Bryn Mawr at the 
Century of Progress would in some measure fulfill President Park's request that 
the scope of the Scholarship Committees be broadened to include the finding of 
students able to pay their way at Bryn Mawr. Now we are anxious to know how 
best under ordinary circumstances a district remote from Bryn Mawr can help the 
College in this way. A year ago, when the Council meeting brought President Park 
to Chicago, she spoke in several schools in the district, which, of course, is just 
what is needed to inspire girls to go to Bryn Mawr, but there are many lean years 
when we cannot hope for her or for any visitor from the College. If we attempt to 
get permission from schools to have alumnae speak to their high school girls on tlie 
advantages of a Bryn Mawr education, is not the recent graduate, who can best 
answer questions on the College as it is constituted today, the most effective speaker ? 
If recent graduates are needed for our publicity work, how can the older alumnae 
who are more or less in charge of affairs in the districts know which returning A.B.'s 
are really good speakers? Could the College prime the districts as to prospective 
speakers.^ Many qf them might be too busy with their first jobs, but some might 
have the time and the inclination to help the College in this way. Could the Colle2:e 
or the Alumnae Association have a suggested list of points to be made in any talk 
to prospective students? One of our alumnae at a recent committee meeting in 
Chicago suggested that we try entertaining groups of high school girls at teas 
where good food and talk about the College could be judiciously mixed. 

Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF DISTRICT VI. 
(Missouri, Texas, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico) 

I have recently reread the past few reports from District VI.;, and have decided 
that enough pessimism is enough. The Council lias heard annually such detailed and 
emphatically reiterated accounts of our difficulties, that a map which colors the 
Middle West anything but blue must seem to you intrinsically incorrect! This year 
I have the dubious pleasure of announcing that we have reached a new all-time 
record shade of deepest blue! District VI. has not even done its usual meager bit; 
we have sent wo scholar to College this fall. I use the word pleasure, however, 
advisedly; the situation cannot be worse, so any change must be for the better. We 
have allowed this year to pass without visible result, but there are changes. So, if 
you will bear with my new-found, sanguine philosophy, this year's report from 
District VI. will be, for variety, optimistic! 

First of all, a wave of enthusiasm for the higher education of women spread 
over St. Louis when the austere heads of the seven women's colleges met there two 
weeks ago. This is not for widespread publicity, but I suspect that the local 
Bryn Mawr brain-trust (of which I don't claim membership!) had a great deal to 
do with bringing them there. It is common knowledge, however, that our Mrs. 
Gellhorn ran the dinner, turned the town out in its finest feathers, and made all the 
arrangements behind the scenes that such an outpouring of brilliance demands. 

The highest compliment I can pay Miss Park's contribution to that evening is to 
tell what happened the following day. Emily Lewis, ex-'31. President of the 
St. Louis Bryn Mawr Club, invited the local alumnae to meet Miss Park at break- 
fast. The club had hitherto never boasted more than fifteen active members; that 
morning avowed Bryn Mawrters appeared from the most unexpected corners, and 
Emily served up eggs and bacon to twenty-five of them ! That afternoon Miss Park 
listened with the patience of an experienced saint to the questions of ten mothers 
and their Bryn Mawr-bound daughters, when she met them at a tea. So I'm con- 
fident that the situation in St. Louis is well under control; that city has always 
been the greatest source of income for our scholarship fund, and I think I'm not 
being too optimistic in believing that its support of next year's fund will be just as 
generous. We have also a very promising candidate from one of the St. Louis 
schools for our scholarship in 1934, so St. Louis, aided by Sedalia, which has sent 
us an applicant for 1935, can shed its glow over the rest of Missouri to lighten 
that blue blot on the alumnae map ! 

One of my earlier and more practical sources of optimism arrived by mail last 
summer — the first and only unsolicited check, as well as the largest, that I have 
ever received for the scholarship fund. It came from Oklahoma, a state which I 
now hold near and very dear. Dorothy Deneen Blow, 1916, has just resigned as 
its Scholarship Chairman, but I am hoping that Stanley Gordon Edwards, European 
Fellow in 1930, will take over the job. 

Arkansas, too, brightened up considerably on my mental map when the State 
Chairman, Marnette Wood Chesnutt, of the Class of 1909, wrote this fall about a 
possible candidate for the scholarship in 1935, and promised to contact the other 
six alumnae in her state to see what interest and help she can stimulate in order to 
send the girl to College. Lucy Harris Clarke, 1917, State Chairman for Kansas, 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



put her situation very graphically when she wrote "the general run of Kansans 
think Bryn Mawr an educational realm apart^ reserved for the very rich. They 
won't even attempt to pronounce its name^ and I fear many think I am sweetly 
lying about having been there." But Mrs. Clarke goes on with the good news of a 
bright hope in Kansas — the daughter of an ex-Bryn Mawrter who wants to apply 
for the scholarship in 1935. The thrill of these applications may seem paradoxical 
to you^ who know that we haven't sent a single scholar to College this fall from our 
district, but you must remember from the years of pessimism that the difficulty of 
rousing interest in applicants for the scholarship outside of St. Louis has always 
been one of the most disheartening parts of the Councillor's job. 

The frontier of optimism has not yet been pushed back into Texas, Colorado, 
or New Mexico, but Nebraska now ranks among the brightest states of them all. 
Last winter Exilona Hamilton, ex-'30, went all the way home to Omaha from a 
vacation in California to get things under way in the formation of a Bryn Mawr 
Club. She left it in the very capable hands of Laura Richardson, also of the Class 
of 1930, who reports as follows: "At our first meeting, last March, everyone was 
most enthusiastic about organizing a Bryn Mawr Club, which should meet at regular 
intervals, try to build up a scholarship fund, and create interest in the College 
among the Nebraska schools. There are now eleven active members in the Omaha 
group, five non-resident members, and several Lincoln alumnae who have agreed to 
cooperate with iis as associate members. At a second meeting last spring we dis- 
cussed the new plans for entrance into Bryn Mawr, and subsequently interviewed 
the dean of girls at the public high school most likely to provide Bryn Mawr 
material. She was interested in the new plan of entrance requirements, and talked 
to the girls about it, as well as about the future possibility of a scholarship. Our 
most fertile ground is, I believe, Brownell Hall, a private school which has prepared 
two girls who are now at Bryn Mawr. I gave a talk and showed May Day films 
there shortly before our club was organized, and found there several girls who have 
Bryn Mawr in mind. This fall we are holding regular monthly meetings; we are 
establishing a connection with the Omaha College Club, giving Bryn Mawr some 
publicity in the newspapers, and planning to give a benefit movie performance this 
winter to raise money for the scholarship fund." 

So, with Missouri, Arkansas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska out of the 
blue blot that District VI. has always made on the alumnae map, my sources of 
new-found optimism have been summarized. 

Erna Rice, 1930. 



REPORT OF DISTRICT VII. 

(California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, Nevada, Utah, Arizona) 

Things have been very quiet all during the summer. We hear cheering rumors 
that the eastern part of the country is enjoying rejuvenated business, and the con- 
sequent return of enthusiasm and interest. On the coast we were fortunate enougli 
to withstand the panic for a couple of years. But apparently it works both ways, 
for we are unfortunate in that the tide of prosperity is slow in penetrating our 
district. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



As a consequence tlie Brvn Mawr Club of Southern California has found it 
difficult to keep up its scholarship fund, and when our scholar graduated last year 
it was decided at that time that in all probability we would not attempt to send 
another scholar this year. It seemed that it was too much to ask the few members 
who always carry the burden to contribute again. This state of quiescence is, we 
hope, temporary. 

The Bryn Mawr Club of Northern California has fared a little better and has 
been successful in raising the necessary money for its scholar's senior year. Also^ 
there is a daughter of an alumna who expects to be ready to go to Bryn Mawr the 
fall of 1935. She is a most bright and attractive girl^ and the northern club has 
decided to send her as its next scholar. 

It will probably be quite some time before another section of our district can 
be sufficiently populated with Bryn Mawr enthusiasts to develop a third nucleus of 
a club. We keep looking toward the northwest^ namely;, Portland and Seattle^ but 
I believe that so far our expectations have been slightly anticipatory and have had 
no real chance of consummation. I am sure that it would give any Councillor great 
pleasure to report that a flourishing club had been organized in the northwest. It is 
bound to come, and I hope that my successor may have that pleasure. 

Jere Bensberg Johnson, 1924. 

EVENTS AT THE DEANERY 

The Deanery has so immediately become a part of the life not only of the 
alumnae and of the College itself, but also of that pleasant but rather nebulous 
group known as the Friends of the College, that every one wonders what we all did 
before President Thomas made it possible for us to gather in that gracious setting. 
In a later number of the Bulletin there will appear some concrete figure from 
the report to be submitted to the Directors. These figures, however, immensely 
significant as they are, can not suggest the feeling of gaiety and charm that has 
characterized the two events that have already taken place, setting the standard. 

For the first event, on Sunday, November 26th, the Entertainment Committee 
of the Deanery brought Mr. Lawrence Binyon, Curator of Oriental Prints at the 
British Museum and Exchange Professor at Harvard, to give an illustrated talk on 
"Chinese Painting." Tea was served before the lecture to a large and interesting 
group, of both men and women, members of the faculty. Directors of the College, 
alumnae and their husbands and sons, and invited guests from Philadelphia and 
the neighborhood. Afterwards chairs were put in the great room which even under 
those circumstances does not lose its mellow warmth. One could see and hear 
admirably, and the setting definitely enhanced as delightful and distinguished a 
lecture as has been given in the College for a long time. 

On Sunday afternoon, December 10th, the second event took place. Opening 
the programme, the choir and all the audience sang with gusto Adeste Fidelisj 
then Katherine Garrison Chapin (Mrs. Francis Biddle) gave, in costume, her one- 
act Christmas play, "The Lady of the Inn." The play, or poem, is of amazing and 
beautiful simplicity. She gave it in the manner in which she wrote it, tenderly, 
poignantly, and very quietly. Following the play, the choir gave a programme of 
Christmas Carols interestingly chosen and beautifully sung. 

(18) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAK BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE COUNCILLOR-AT-LARGE 

It may sound to you as if I had picked a most unsuitable and unseasonable 
subject when I tell you that I am about to talk on "Cultivating Our Garden." Let 
no one think that I am a horticulturist. I can tell a dandelion from a rose and I 
know that bone meal is a food for flowers and not for children, but there my 
knowledge ends. What may some day be my garden is now a well-worn, grassy 
baseball field, with a border of velocipedes and swings. 

It is not of that type of garden that I want to speak, but of our corporate 
garden — that group of hardy perennials to which are added each year new annuals. — 
the alumnae of Bryn Mawr College. And I wish to suggest that that garden, like 
our own real ones, needs a good deal of cultivation, and, like our real ones, will 
produce results in proportion to the amount of watering, weeding and fertilizing 
that we give it. 

This corporate garden has one great advantage. It sows itself. And it has 
one great disadvantage. After the plants have been transplanted they have to be 
kept attached to the parent stem. This requires considerable long-distance fertiliz- 
ing, and I am of the opinion that we do not do as much as we might to help along 
this operation. 

I am continually impressed by the amount of care that Yale — and I think the 
same is undoubtedly true of Harvard and Princeton — takes to keep their alumnae 
informed and interested. . . , They are continually sending to their groups all over 
the country men who can give first-hand accounts of present-day happenings, and 
of plans for the future. Now I realize, of course, that our funds for any such 
arrangement are limited. But I realize also that from a purety mercenary point of 
view we are much more likely to get good financial returns from a well-informed 
and interested alumnae group than from one that has been allowed to bloom unseen 
in its own corner. Have we any system whereby our groups are watched and suit- 
able fertilizer provided even if not requested? 

Another type of fertilizing that interests me is one that our sisters at Vassar 
and Smith use. I do not know the details of their systems, but they have some 
arrangement whereby elected representatives from each class go en masse to the 
College once or twice a year and return, full of information and with renewed 
interest. I do not feel that our Alumnae Meeting fills that bill at all. In the first 
place, any one can go to it. And though it may be a sad commentary on human 
nature, it is true that if A and B have been elected or officially asked to attend 
anything to which C, D, and E are not eligible, A and B will go rejoicing. If not, 
they will probably stay home. 

I am casting no aspersions on that glorious band, the chosen few, the alumnae 
of Bryn Mawr College. But I think that they would be a more valuable group to the 
College if they were exposed to the direct sun of the Bryn !Mawr Campus, or if its 
rays were more often refracted officially on them. 

Helen Evans Lewis. 191.'1. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE INCREASING SIGNIFICANCE OF THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Extracts from Speech Made at the Alumnae Council by Eunice Morgan Schenck, 1907, 
as a Member of the Faculty of Bryn Mawr College 

It is particularly gratifying to have an opportunity here in Boston to give 
some account of the Graduate School_, as it was the Boston Bryn Mawr Club that 
gave me my first chance to speak before a group of alumnae about the plans to 
make Radnor a Graduate Hall. That was in the spring of 1929;, and now that we 
are in our fifth year of residence in Radnor a generation is in college for which 
any other arrangement for graduate students is lost in the depths of the past. 
I believe that the consensus of opinion is that the establishment of the Graduate 
Hall has made a more profitable and agreeable life on the Bryn Mawr campus for 
the graduate students. It has certainly helped to make a delightful life for the 
dean who was fortunate enough to be placed in residence with them. I can testify 
to the unending interplay of interests^, points of vieW;, and ideas that goes on under 
Radnor's roof. 

The subdivision of the Bryn Mawr Self-Government Association into graduate 
and undergraduate branches has enabled the graduate students to make their own 
regulations and the Graduate Hall gives them a background for the organization of 
whatever social life they want and have time for. I cannot speak^ in this connec- 
tion, too highly of the skill, tact, and wisdom of the Bryn Mawr alumna who 
has been, since the opening of the Graduate Hall, its Senior Resident, Catherine 
Robinson, 1920. 

The Wednesday Hall Teas bring to Radnor faculty, undergraduates, alumnae 
of the neighborhood and the lions of the day who may be lecturing at Goodhart 
in the evening or sojourning at the Deanery. An hour of music is arranged on 
Sunday evenings from nine to ten. The programmes are announced in the halls 
and the College is invited. The music is really good because of the generosity of 
the Music Department in lending its records and because Radnor has a Victrola, 
unmatched on the campus, the gift of a group of our neighbors. Last week, the 
first of a series of dinners, to be followed by informal speeches, took place. Profes- 
sors William Roy Smith and Marion Parris Smith were the guests of honor, Marion 
Smith giving an account of her glorious defeat at the polls the week before and 
of political conditions generally in Lower Merion Township. This series, so bril- 
liantly launched, is expected to include other speakers from the Bryn Mawr faculty 
and from the faculties of neighboring institutions. 

One of the most interesting developments in connection with the Graduate 
School this year has been the start made in a movement of cooperation by the 
University of Pennsylvania, Haverford, Swarthmore, and Bryn Mawr. The initia- 
tive came from President Gates, the new President of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, who presented a proposal for cooperation to the Board of Graduate Education 
and Research of the University, of which President Park and the Presidents of 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Swarthmore and Haverford are members. The working out of the plan has been 
in the hands of a joint committee under the chairmanship of Dean Crosby^ of the 
Graduate School of the University of Pennsylvania^ to which I had the honor to 
be appointed by President Park as the representative of the Bryn Mawr Graduate 
School. Already agreements have been reached among the libraries of the cooperat- 
ing institutions which will, we hope, lead to economies in book-buying and increased 
facilities in book-lending. Departmental cooperation has also made a beginning, 
and we believe that it is difficult to estimate the help that in the end we may give 
to one another. 

One of the first calls was by the University of Pennsylvania to Professor Anna 
Pell Wheeler, the head of our Department of Mathematics, to give a seminary in 
Linear Functional Equations at the University of Pennsylvania. This seminary 
has a registration of 12 students, which Dean Crosby considers remarkable because 
of the advanced character of the work. Four are from Bryn Mawr and eight (men 
and women) from the University of Pennsylvania. In exchange for Professor 
Wheeler's seminary, Bryn Mawr has asked Professor Howard H. Mitchell, of the 
University of Pennsylvania, to come out and give a seminary at Bryn Mawr in 
Theory of Numbers. Six Bryn Mawr students are enrolled. This course, so Profes- 
sor Wheeler tells me, is proving to be a very useful introduction to the graduate 
work that Dr. Kmmy Noether, of Gottingen, will offer this year and next at Bryn 
Mawr College. We are very fortunate in having on the campus, thanks to the 
Rockefeller Foundation and the Emergency Committee in Aid of Displaced German 
Scholars, this outstanding mathematician, one of the group that made Gottingen so 
great a center for mathematical activity. Dr. Noether, whose English is excellent, 
contrary to first reports, will work informally with students during the first semester 
of this year and begin her course in February. Next year she will lecture through- 
out the year. We shall hope to place about her a particularly well equipped group 
of young scholars. 

The Graduate School of 1933-34 numbers 112 students, of whom 59 are in 
Radnor Hall, 7 in Low Buildings, and 11 others have some appointment at the 
College, as instructors, demonstrators, wardens, etc. Seventy-four are giving their 
full time to graduate work. 

Thirty-two are Bachelors of Arts of Bryn Mawr College. The others, as usual, 
came from a very large number of different institutions and form a most interesting- 
cross section of American education. One hundred five hold their first degrees 
from 41 different colleges and universities in the United States. Five Canadians 
represent 4 different Canadian universities (Dalhousie, McGill, New Brunswick, 
Saskatchewan), and one English university (Oxford). Two foreign students, both 
French, one in Radnor Hall and one a teacher at The Shiplc}^ School, come from 
the Universities of Paris and Lille. 

For the first time in many years we have in Radnor only one European holding 
a Bryn Mawr scholarship. Under the financial stress, it seemed to the Directors 
unwise to load the College budget with the item of $5,000 needed for the five 
scholarships that we usually offer to foreign women, but it is, I understand, their 
intention to restore the fund at the first possible moment. Our one foreign Scholar, 
a French agregee d' anglais, Jeanne Laumain, was awarded her scholarship in 1932, 
but was unable to use it last j^ear because of illness. 



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BRYN MAM'R ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



There are^ however^ in Radnor 15 students, Americans and Canadians, who 
have already studied in Europe and bring training from Oxford, Glasgow, Paris, 
Lyons, Florence, Rome, Athens, Berlin, Bonn, Frankfurt a/Main, and Freiburg. 

Some specific examples among our present students of academic experience 
outside the United States are: 

Constance Brock, A.B. McGill University, 1928, M.A. Somerville College, 
Oxford, 1930. 

Dorothy Burwash, also a Canadian student, A.B. Somerville College, Oxford, 
1931. 

Virginia Grace, Bryn Mawr, 1922, just returned from Athens, has been work- 
ing for two years in connection with the excavations in the Agora, Miss 
Hetty Goldman's excavations in Boetia and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania's expedition in Cyprus. 

Agnes Lake, Bryn Mawr, 1930, was Fellow at the American Academy in 
Rome, 1931-33. 

Eleanor O'Kane, A.B. Trinity College, 1927, M.A. University of Pennsylvania, 
1933, the present President of the Graduate Club and Scholar in Spanish, 
taught for three years in the schools of Porto Rico. 

Another gratifying element in the makeup of the Graduate School of this year 
is the unusually large number of students- who have come to study at Bryn Mawr 
on scholarships awarded to them from outside sources : These are : 

Elizabeth Armstrong— The Caroline Duror Memorial Fellowship from Barnard, 
Geology. 

Adelaide Davidson — Arnold Archaeological Fellowship from Brown University. 

Dorothy Schierer — The Joseph A. Skinner Fellowship in Art and Archaeology 
from Mount Holyoke College. 

Elizabeth Marshall — Wilson College Fellowship (awarded to their alumnae). 
Physics. 

Maurine Boie — Non-resident Fellowship from the Family Society of Philadel- 
phia for use in the Department of Social Economy. 

Mildred Moore — Ella Sachs Plotz Fellowship awarded by the National Urban 
League for use in the Department of Social Economy. 

Vesta Sonne — Y. W. C. A. Fellowship in Social Economy. 

Helene Coogan — Y. W. C. A. non-resident Scholarship in Social Economy. 

A still more significant picture of the varied elements that make up the Bryn 
Mawr Graduate School can be had from the list of colleges sending the 98 students 
to whom we have awarded the degree of Master of Arts in the last five years. 
They are: 

Bryn Mawr College, 26; Mount Holyoke College, 11; Hunter College, 6; 
Smith College, 5; Barnard College, Oberlin College, 4 each; University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Swarthmore College, 3 each; University of California, Mills College, North- 
western University, Wellesley College, University of Wisconsin, 2 each. 

Twenty-six colleges sending 1 each: Boston University, Butler University, 
University of Delaware, Duke University, Earlham College, Goucher College, 
University of Illinois, Indiana University, University of Kansas, University of 
Nebraska, New York University, Pembroke College in Brown University, Penn 
College, Pennsylvania College for Women, Radcliffe College, Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College, Vassar College, University of Vermont, University of British 
Columbia, University of Manitoba, University of Toronto, University of Budapest, 
Universiity of Bonn, University of Cologne, London School of Economics (student 
also held B.A. from Girton), University of Zurich. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Many of these Bryn Mawr Masters^ like Masters of Arts everywhere, will go 
into teaching or other work and not continue their graduate studies. The Master's 
degree is another terminus like the Bachelor's degree. Of those who go on to the 
doctorate, some will present themselves at Bryn Mawr, some elsewhere. This is a 
normal and proper Graduate School pattern. It is important, to my way of think- 
ing, that no one should do all the work for the doctorate at any one institution, 
be it Bryn Mawr or the largest university in the world. If possible, the work should 
not be done in any one country. Not to go beyond academic considerations, the 
stimulation of foreign methods of work and teaching is invaluable. It is our habit 
at Bryn Mawr to send our own students off for some part of their work and we are 
happy, in return, to have students from other places sojourn for a time with us. 

It has been said of late that too many Doctors of Philosophy are being made 
in this country. With the economic pressure of today, the output must be, and is, 
carefully watched. All our candidates of June, 1932, and June, 1983, are placed: 

Degree Conferred June, 1932: 

Aline Abaecherli, A.B. University of Cincinnati, 1927 — Fellow at the American 

Academy in Rome. 
Belle Beard, A.B. Lynchburg College, 1923 — Head of the Department of 

Economics and Sociology, Sweet Briar College. 
Josephine Fisher, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1922 — Warden of Pembroke Hall 

and Instructor in History, Bryn Mawr College. 
Katharine Jeffers, A.B. University of Missouri, 1927 — National Research 

Fellow studying with Professor Collip at McGill University. 
Myra Richards Jessen, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1915 — Associate in German, 

Bryn Mawr College. 
Katharine McBride, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1925 — Research in Psychology 

carried on in Philadelphia hospitals under grant from the Commonwealth 

Fund. 
Anne Morrison, A.B. University of Missouri, 1914 — Supervisor of Case Work 

in Northumberland, Union and Snyder Counties, under Pennsylvania 

County Relief. 
Dorothy Wyckoft', A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1921 — Associate in Geology, 

Bryn Mawr College. 
Helen Young, A.B. Boston University, 1919 — Head of the English Department, 

The Shipley School. 
Degree Conferred June, 1933: 
Edith Fishtine, A.B. Boston University, 1925 — Assistant Professor of Spanish, 

Simmons College. 
Edna Fredrick, A.B. Mount Holyoke College, 1927 — Part-time Instructor in 

French, Mount Holyoke College and at the Hartford Branch for Freshmen 

of Mount Holyoke College. 
Margaret Jeffrey, A.B. Wellesley College, 1927 — Instructor in German, 

Wellesley College. 
Mary Pease, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1927 — Research Fellow, American 

School of Classical Studies, Athens. 
Grace Rhoads, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1922 — Part-time Assistant to the 

Secretary of the American Friends Service Committee. 
Irene Rosenzweig, A.B. W^ashington University, 1921 — Teacher of Latin, 

The Bennett School. 
Mary Woodwortli, A.B. Bryn INIawr College, 192 1 — Instructor in English. 

Bryn Mawr College. 
Jean Wright, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1919 — Associate Professor of French. 

Westhampton College, University of Richmond. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



And thiS;, Madam President^ brings me to my last point. In recent years the 
number of excellent applications for our graduate fellowships and scholarships has 
increased so markedly that the choice is one of very great difficulty. It is impos- 
sible to arrange, in the large majority of cases, the meeting between departments 
and candidates that would so often be desirable. My office, which carries on the 
correspondence with candidates, is going to ask certain Doctors of Philosophy of 
the College who are in active academic life to serve as correspondents who will be 
willing, at our request, to give interviews to candidates and report to us. We believe 
these interviews may be as useful to candidates as to the College itself. The work 
of our correspondents would be analogous to much of the work of the Regional 
Scholarship Committees, and I ask that the Alumnae Board consider inviting them 
to form in each region a sub-committee for graduate fellowships and scholarships. 
In this way, the work that we are asking these distinguished academic women to 
do for the College will be accredited, as is due, to alumnae activity, and a new link 
between Alumnae Bachelors, Masters, and Doctors will be established. 



POINTS FROM DEAN MORRISS' SPEECH ON THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The three Deans of Pembroke College, Mrs. Allinson, Miss King, Miss Morriss, 
all studied in the Bryn Mawr Graduate School; Mrs. Allinson, a Bachelor of Arts 
and a Doctor of Philosophy of Bryn Mawr; Miss Morriss, a Bachelor of Goucher 
and a Doctor of Bryn Mawr; Miss King, holder of one year of the Bryn Mawr 
Resident Fellowship in Latin. Miss Morriss paid a warm tribute to the training- 
she herself received and said emphatically that she knew no place where one gets 
a better sense of what constitutes a scholar. 

Basing her knowledge of the school today on the experience of recent Pembroke 
graduates, she rejoiced in the warmth of the welcome given to graduates of other 
colleges, and signified academically by the opening of the M.A. degree to the alumnae 
of all accredited institutions. In the Bryn Mawr requirements for the M.A., how- 
ever, she deplored the insistence upon a Latin prerequisite for all candidates, 
believing that Bryn Mawr thereby loses more than it gains, because scientific students 
who have come to their graduate years without Latin are deterred by what seems 
to them an unreasonable demand. She approved, however, all the more flexible pro- 
visions of the new requirements for the Ph.D. degree. 

Among Miss Morriss' students there have been some who chafed at the limits 
of the Bryn Mawr horizon, but as one with another point of view put it, "It is 
not a huge mill grinding out an education," and still another said, "If you enlarge 
the school, you take away its special advantage and you cannot have it both ways." 
In conclusion Miss Morriss said that she believed that the point of view of the 
Pembroke students could be summarized as follows: "The reputation and standing 
of the Bryn Mawr Graduate School is high enough to continue indefinitely to draw 
to it a full quota of the ablest women students in the country." 



(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 

In November the new building of the Philadelphia High Schools for Girls at 
17th and Spring Garden Streets was dedicated. On such an occasion it would be^ 
I suppose^ almost a matter of course to ask the Provost of the University of 
Pennsylvania and the President of Bryn Mawr to speak; they have an inborn 
interest in a college preparatory high school in Philadelphia. But if I had not 
been invited on this occasion I should have been inclined to force my way in^, for 
the actual record of the alliance between the Girls' High School and Bryn Mawr 
College is so remarkable that not only the audience gathered to take part in the 
dedication^ but all Bryn Mawr graduates should, I think, be made aware of it. 
Each year we are faced with the fact that the great majority of Bryn Mawr 
students enter from private schools. It is worth our attention to realize what the 
graduates of a single public high scliool have done at Bryn Mawr College. 

First, as a matter of numbers, the Philadelphia High School for Girls has sent 
237 of its graduates to Br^m Mawr, 6% of the whole number of undergraduate 
students who have entered the College. Only two schools in the country have sent 
a larger number of girls than this — the Baldwin School and the Shipley School in 
Bryn Mawr itself, and the number from the latter exceeds the number from the 
Girls' High Scliool only by two. Again, the record of the Philadelphia High School 
for Girls is unique in the city. Eight Trustee Scholarships are available each year 
to students prepared in the Philadelphia high schools, and seventy of these scholar- 
ships have been awarded in all, fifty-seven to graduates of the Girls' High School. 

Of the students entering Bryn Mawr from the Girls' High School, some in the 
natural course of things have dropped out without completing the work for a 
degree, a few to take the A.B. elsewhere, and others to marry or to go directly into 
work. One hundred and eighty-six graduates of the school have, however, taken the 
A.B. degree at Bryn Mawr, and done it with a remarkable record. 

*Eighty-one of these 186 have taken the degree with distinction — cum laude, 
magna cu7n laude, or summa cum laude; further, of the 19 degrees given by the 
College summa cum laude, three of the holders (Helen Lowengrund, Clara Wade, 
and Marguerite Darkow) are graduates of the Girls' High School. Of the 16 
Bryn Mawr European Fellowships given from 1889 to 1933, nine have been given 
to Girls' High School graduates (Ellen Ellis, Helen Lowengrund, Clara Wade, 
Mayone Lewis, Helen Bley, Marguerite Darkow, Marion Kleps, Ernestine ]\Iercer, 
Eleanore Boswell). At the present moment there are at Bryn Mawr five graduates 
of the school, and three of them have at this time inagna cum laude ratings. 

The later record of these 186 joint graduates of the school and College has 
been equally notable. Many of them have gone on into graduate work, 61 to win 
the degree of Master of Arts, and 20 that of Doctor of Philosophy or its equivalent. 
Fifty-one are teaching in schools, for the most part in public high schools, but in 
three instances as heads of flourishing private scluiols. Others like Gertrude Hartman 
and Nellie Seeds have done conspicuous work in tlie field of progressive education. 

*Total number of degrees with distinction conferred by B. M. C. = 719. 

(25) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Fifteen are at the moment on college faculties — at Bryn Mawr, Goucher^ Hunter, 
Mount Holyoke, Smith, Brooklyn, and the State Teachers Colleges at Stroudsburg 
and Shippensburg. 

The cooperation between the school and the College has always been main- 
tained. The two recent principals, Miss Jessie Allen and Dr. Olive Hart, have been 
keen to send able girls to Bryn Mawr, and in several cases a special fund has been 
called upon to provide tuition for more girls than the college scholarships could 
cover, while the teachers in the school have in several instances given additional 
scholarship aid to make residence at the College possible for the Trustee Scholars. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. Elizabeth Hannan, 1934 

Varsity Dramatics Club, the group which sponsors more innovations than any 
other in College, thought up something new and different for the dull period 
between Thanksgiving and Christmas, when football games and quizzes are over 
and all minds are focussed on the day vacation starts. Their full-length play this 
fall is to be given by a cast of Bryn Mawr undergraduates, with no aid and com- 
fort from Princeton, Haverford, or the faculty. An all-female cast in a Bryn Mawr 
play may seem neither new nor startling to many alumnae, but for the present 
college generation it is a departure from well-established custom. After some dis- 
cussion the board decided that the doubtful benefit of playing with rather inferior 
men actors could be dispensed with, at least for the present, and that there were 
enough deep voices on campus to provide "men" for a period play. At the time this 
goes to press the play has not yet been given, but The Knight of the Burning Pestle, 
an Elizabethan comedy by Beaumont and Fletcher, has been selected as giving most 
scope to our peculiar talents. 

After the Saturday night performance of the play there will be a dance, as 
usual, and so the audience will include men, as well as Bryn Mawr undergraduates 
and bevies from the surrounding schools. We think we can prophesy that the team 
of Beaumont and Fletcher will get as enthusiastic a reception as Gilbert and 
Sullivan, also staged with an all-female cast, have been accorded by similar audi- 
ences. The advantage of having a mixed audience is really something to be 
reckoned with, especially since the entertainment to follow makes everyone more 
receptive to the mood of the play. Indeed, the dances, formerly a novelty in our 
cloistered life, have become a very pleasant accompaniment to the drama; and tlie 
crowded condition of the gym in times past has amply proved how popular they are. 

The Playwriting class continues to be one of the most vocal groups in College, 
carrying, as it does, the gospel of the theater to every nook and corner of the 
campus and beyond, and also one of the most prolific. A "play" is written by each 
member of the class about every other week and a certain number produced with 
little rehearsal or ceremony at each meeting. Since about half the class are taking 
Playwriting for a second year, there is a chance that some regular plays may be 
written and produced at College, or perhaps published. 

(26) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAP: BULLKTIN 



Another grouj) wliicli ministers to this desire to do practical work in aesthetics 
is the Art Club. According to its write-up in the News, "It is trying to make 
possible real work and practice in the essentials of art . . . (but) is not trying to 
fill the place of a full-time and many-sided art school. That sums up the attitude 
of such undergraduate activities — and perhaps of the academic wing of College, 
too — a calm invitation to 'take it or leave it.' It seems to us an eminently practical 
point of view, and refreshing to anyone who has lived through a Progressive 
Education Conference made up of undergraduates who apparently demanded every- 
thing from college but a continuous pension for the rest of their natural lives. We 
congratulate ourselves in a pharisaical way on the fact that at Bryn Mawr a prep- 
aration for 'Life' is not the dominating feature in the schedule, nor does anyone try 
to stuff down our throats the makings for a good citizen, a happy wife, or a success- 
ful artist. One is allowed to acquire one's knowledge quietly with a few un- 
chaperoned excursions into the practical side of a Liberal Arts Education." 

However, we do not wish to give the impression that the College is immersed 
in a study of drawing and playwriting, for that would be quite false. The Anna 
Howard Shaw lectures have caused an orientation to international affairs which 
would probably no less amaze than please the League of Nations. Under the stim- 
ulating instruction of Mrs. Dean, Mrs. Slade, and Miss Jane Addams, the College 
has shown a surprising desire to untangle the mysteries of foreign policy, inter- 
national alignments, and the past and future of peace. In fact, the interest has been 
so widespread that there is a very good chance that a course in International 
Relations may appear on next year's curriculum. 

Although we have said a great deal about the curriculum, we might as wxll 
continue until we have disburdened ourselves of every scrap of academic informa- 
tion. The quizzes this fall brought more than the usual number of complaints, so 
the News, that faithful oracle of public opinion, immediately vented several edi- 
torials on the subject. The first one was called "College Humor" and dealt with 
the iniquity of professors who set "amusing" quizzes, "At present, " the indignant 
editor cries, "the only possible advantage in attending classes and doing the 
assigned reading is to find out what we will not be asked on the quiz. . . . The 
questions which are evolved for our pleasure are those which the professor considers 
'amusing,' and they have very strange senses of humor for people otherwise so 
normal. What they consider 'amusing' is to give a course in Botany" (Ed.: a purely 
mythical course, we assure you) "and then ask the students what they know about 
philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and life, thereby ignoring the material in 
six weeks' notes and as much reading." We are pleased to report that the editorial 
penetrated to the minds and hearts of the faculty, to one especially, who killed a 
quiz that was tainted with the "amusing" and substituted one more suited to our 
comprehension. Not till we get to Heaven, though, shall we ever find quizzes that 
cover the material we have covered, and until then the only help the undergraduate 
will have is her own rusty wits. 

The second editorial was concerned with the rules of hours of work required 
for unit and half-unit courses, and protested the infringement of the rule by many 
professors. It pointed out quite sensibly that "If the professors would ask only a 
standard amount of work, they would get much better results, and a good deal of 
bluffing and 'chiselling' so current in a community where the motto is sauve qui pent 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



would disappear." This j)rotest also received sympathetic attention from certain of 
the faculty, and manna, in the form of books cut from reading lists, fell. 

Another recognition of the undergraduate urge — to be treated with fairness and 
liberality by the authorities — came this month from the Self-Government Association. 
In the future the rules of this association, which are supposed to be of mutual 
benefit to College and administration, will be somewhat relaxed. Under the former 
regulations only a stated list of places were recognized by the Self-government 
Board as places of entertainment or lodging. Under the new rules, 2 o'clock per- 
mission may be obtained for informal dancing at "any reputable place," and over- 
night permission to spend the night at "any reputable hotel or boarding house." 
This, in the words of the President of Self-government at the meeting to pass the 
new rules, "will allow students to go to the place they sign out for and sign out 
for the place they go." There are other small changes which will obviate the 
necessity to break rules and which present a clear restatement of the Association's 
stand on the matter of drinking. The rule on drinking is as follows: "No fermented 
beverages shall be allowed on campus. Cases of intoxication shall be severely dealt 
with." The board feels that this should "take care of Repeal." The changes are 
all, on the whole, made with the intention of placing more emphasis on the exercise 
of good judgment by the individual, and they will undoubtedly make for more 
complete observance of Self-government regulations. 

In the midst of the flood of Anna Howard Shaw Foundation lectures, rehearsals 
for the Varsity play, and preparation for Thanksgiving vacation, James Stephens, 
the Irish critic, poet, and novelist, paid Bryn Mawr a visit. He spoke in 
Goodhart on a subject sufficiently detached from the matters we had been hearing 
from our other lecturers as to be very stimulating in an entirely different way. His 
subject, Our Overdue Renaissance, was welcomed by his hearers as explaining 
the literary and artistic trends of the time, which do not get much attention from 
speakers on world affairs; in fact, these trends are disregarded for the most part as 
being rather frivolous results of world-stirring problems, such as the death of 
commerce in certain European countries, the resurgence of nationalism in others, 
and the acquisition of wealth by still others. Mr. Stephens connected the two 
forces, economic and artistic, in his lecture, predicting the transfer of artistic energy 
to Russia and America, and the fulfillment of a renaissance in these two countries. 
Not only did he please the undergraduates by his talk in Goodhart, but by his 
interest and approval he encouraged a small group of Bryn Mawr poets who read 
their verses to him in Mrs. Hortense Flexner King's poetry class. When the 
conversation at tea veered around to ghosts and spirits, Mr. Stephens announced 
that he believed in reincarnation and that "He has a definite feeling that in his 
next reincarnation he will be a female and will in that case be able to come to 
Bryn Mawr. The prospect pleases because he considers this campus, with its 
atmosphere of quiet seclusion, one of the most beautiful campuses he has ever 
visited." We can only say that Mr. Stephens, in view of the excellent speech he 
gave, scarcely needed to ingratiate himself by compliments ; we are, however, always 
ready to be told our good points, so we wait for the return of Mr. Stephens with 
some eagerness. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 

Within This Present, by Margaret Ayer Barnes. Houghton Mifflin. $2.50. 

Although certain of us may have specialized interest in novels of particular 
periods^ or about particular sorts of people, by far the largest human taste is for 
stories about people like ourselves, living in our own time. It is the natural desire 
for books of this kind that Margaret Ayer Barnes fulfills to the most satisfactory 
extent in such novels as Years of Grace and — her latest piece of work — Within 
This Present. 

It is almost impossible not to compare the two, for they deal with the same 
variety of people in the same surroundings. In spite of this similarity, however, 
and in spite of the broad plan and large number of characters, the author has not 
repeated herself in the slightest degree. We have here a veritable throng of new 
friends and acquaintances, Sally Sewall, the heroine; Alan MacLeod, whom she 
marries; Sally's intense and elusive mother, so unlike the other members of the 
family clan. Sally's mother is, indeed, one of the notable achievements of the book. 
Another is Tim O'Hara and Bee, his wife, whom Sally and Alan came to know 
in those utterly' democratic days of the war, when young wives hung about the 
outskirts of the army training camps, snatching such moments of companionship 
with their husbands as military routine would allow. The record of that friendship, 
begun at Camp Grant, continuing through Tim's cheery career as a bootlegger, torn 
with tragedy when he is riddled by gangster bullets, rallying to the aid of his 
young widow, is an amazing yet perfectly natural bit of contemporary story-telling. 
Sally herself is a more volatile heroine than Jane Carver and rather more self- 
centered as, perhaps, is appropriate to her upbringing in an age of quicker tempo 
than the years of grace. She can, nevertheless, at the crucial moments of her life, 
summon strength of spirit and intrepid good sense to meet the problems before her. 

The background of the book covers the World War, the years of spending 
thereafter, and the lean years coming in their wake. Nothing could be better char- 
acterized than that period of wild prosperity when the men of the family were so 
frantically overworked making money that they could think of nothing else, when 
the women were strained and on edge, conscious that they were not happy, but not 
understanding in the least what was wrong. True worth of character comes forward 
after the final crash, so that we find the family circle united and courageous, facing- 
reconstruction when the book closes on March fourth, 1933, with Franklin Roosevelt's 
inaugural address giving its message to each one of them. That the M'hole dizzy 
course of our recent spectacular history is compassed by an extraordinarily small 
number of years is made evident by the fact that Sally's spirited grandmother, an 
old woman at the beginning of the book, telling of Chicago's great fire and of how 
the city rose boldly from its ruins, is still alive at the end, and has the last word, 
in fact, as they all turn each in his or her own fashion, to face the future. 

The characters in this book maj^ be, in a certain degree, less likable than those 
in Years of Grace. Yet there is, without question, an advance of power in this novel. 
There is stronger and more compact handling of plot, there is greater concentration 
upon the central figures making a far more united and steadily moving narrative. 

(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Margaret Barnes has shown great ability in giving so graphic a picture of our own 
times, but she has done something more. Her peculiar talent is for making minor 
details absorbingly interesting^ so that the everyday things of life, housekeeping, 
settling the children's problems, contacts with relatives and friends, are all of 
significant value in themselves. She makes us feel, after we have put the book aside, 
that not only are the routines of living of her characters of vital interest, but that, 
somehow, our own are as well, and that life, as she describes it, is always exciting, 
be its complications great or small. 

Cornelia Meigs, 1907. 



PORTRAIT OF PRESIDENT PARK 

President Park has chosen Mr. Charles Hopkinson to paint the portrait of her 
to be presented to the College by the Class of 1898. Mr. Hopkinson will come to 
Bryn Mawr in January or February for the work, and the portrait, when finished, 
will hang in the Library Reading Room near the Sargent portrait of President 
Thomas. Chief Justice Holmes of the United States Supreme Court, President 
Neilson of Smith College, President Lowell of Harvard, Colonel Edward M. House, 
Mrs. Theodore Roosevelt have been painted by him. Of interest to Bryn Mawr 
alumnae is the fact that Mr. Hopkinson is the father of four Bryn Mawr daughters. 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Wednesday, January 1 0th — 8.20 p. nn., Goodhart Hall 

Dorothy Sands In theatrical innpersonations, "Our Stage and Stars," under the auspices of 

the Cosmopolitan Club of Philadelphia. 

Reserved seats, $1.50 and $2.00; Unreserved, $1.00. 

Sunday, January I4fh — 4 p. m., The Deanery 

Third of the series of entertainments: Talk on the Eskimoes of Prince William Sound, 

with slides, by Frederica de Laguna, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr European Fellow, 1927; 

now assistant in the American Section of the University Museum, Philadelphia. 
Tea will be served at 25 cents a person. 

Sunday, January 14th — 7.30 p. nn., Music Room 
Sunday Evening Service 
conducted by the Reverend W. Russell Bowie, D.D., Rector of Grace Church, New York City. 

Thursday, January 18th — 8 p. nn., Goodhart Hall 

Concert by the hiampton Quartet. 



The Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held in the Deanery 
on Saturday, February 3rd, 1934, at 9.45 a. m. An informal buffet supper 
will be served in the Deanery on Friday, February 2nd, at 6.45 p. m., and 
President Park's luncheon will be held in Pembroke on Saturday, at 1.30 p. m. 



(30) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Edik)r: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

1889 

No Editor Appointed. 

1890 

No Editor Appointed. 

Marian Macintosh had an exhibition — "The 
Feast of St. Peter and Other Gloucester Paint- 
ings" — at the Present Day Club in Princeton 
during November. 

1891 

No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., New York. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 
c/o The Brearley School 
610 East 83rd St., New York City. 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 
Katharine Cook did, it seems, go to Germany 
this summer, and sends me the following ac- 
count of her impressions on her brief visit: 
";I did go to Berlin for nine days, but my 
'impressions' would be more highly colored if 
Hitler and his cohorts had not been at Nurem- 
burg for their Partei Tag. I only once saw 
troops marching, and that was also the only 
time I saw anyone give the Nazi salute, and no 
one paid any attention to my failure to do so. 
People struck me as shabbily dressed and pale, 
and all the children looked undernourished. I 
saw literally hundreds, and not one with good 
color and most of them painfully thin. No 



sign of hatred of Americans. I took a twelve- 
hour motor bus and boat trip to the lovely 
Spree Wald with a lot of Germans, all of whom 
were very friendly, and the courteous consid- 
eration of the passport, customs, and money- 
counting officials at the border both ways was 
marked. When I crossed back, the man re- 
fused to look at my money, taking my count. 
However, I do not think our newspapers have 
at all exaggerated the Nazi point of view, as 
shown in the German papers. I read at least 
a dozen different papers, all, of course, Nazi 
organs, and all just alike, and I had to rub 
my eyes to realize that they were written in 
the twentieth century. How many Germans 
disapprove, there is no way of knowing, as they 
are frightened into silence. A German woman 
on the steamer, now living in America, who 
had been spending six months in Germany with 
her parents, told me that they were fiercely 
anti-Nazi, and that the Nazis were as cruel to 
any non-Nazi as to Jews and Communists." 

Katharine also says that as she has no school 
classes she has seized the chance to take a 
course at New York University in Washington 
Square in Elementary Spanish, four mornings 
a week. She is also tutoring in Greek and 
Latin. 

Elizabeth Kirkbride could not resist the 
Deanery reception, so was one of repre- 
sentatives of '96 at that time. She writes: 
"Anna Hoag and I went together to the College 
and found many old friends. '96 was repre- 
sented by Caroline Slade, Emma Tobin, Clara 
Farr, Elizabeth Jones, Mary Mullin, Cora 
Jeanes, Mary Swope, and I think I saw 
Charlotte McLean in the distance. Estimates 
of the number there ran from 750 to 900. yet 
the house never seemed crowded. It looked 
delightful and I long to go and stay there." 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East Dunkirk. N. Y. 

Frances Hand, who went to Boston for the 
November meeting of the B. M. Council, was 
the guest of Elizabeth Higginson Jackson and 
her family at their home on Pegan Hill, Dover. 

In October, Edith Edwards attended a meet- 
ing of the National Board of the U. S. Daugh- 
ters of 1812 at Chicago. Sessions were held at 
Fort Dearborn on the grounds of the "Century 
of Progress," and in the Trustees' Lounge in 
the Administration Building. The banquet was 
at the Palmer House. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Marion Taber, writing from the office of the 
New York City Visiting Committee, a part of 
the State Charities Aid Association, where she 
has been secretary for a number of years, says: 

"The '97 Reunion was most reviving, but 
the constant work here among people sunk in 
the depression made things seem rather gray 
again, until all of a sudden I rented my house 
and joined Katharine Cook, '96, for a trip in 
Norway and Sweden. 

"Scandinavia may have lost money, but her 
people do not show it much, and were busy 
harvesting their grain and hay in large red 
barns or helping the tourist see some of the 
marvelous beauty of their country. 

"Forgetting the depreciated dollar, we put 
all our faith in the solid little kroner. We 
didn't take a cruise on a liner. Instead of that 
we sat for hours on delightful little boats with 
red smoke stacks which take you along narrow 
waterways among high mountains to glaciers, 
which form blue ice caves at the ends of the 
fjords. We shivered with cold and also with 
delight, and stayed at least a week at several 
nice pensions, which only charge you 6 to 9 
kroner per day, 'complete.' 

"It was to me a bit like Berkeley Square as 
well, since I carried in my handbag some letters 
which my Quaker grandmother had written to 
her daughters in England when she traveled in 
Norway in 1866. Grandmother and her friends 
were rowed up the fjords by eight good oars- 
men, or slid up and down the passes on moun- 
tain ponies 'to carry the message of Friends to 
the Norwegians.' 

"When I went to Stockholm and Copenhagen 
later on I felt that we could learn a lot from 
Scandinavia. They seemed so courageous, honest 
and self sustaining. One enjoys their genius 
for color, too, and the imagination which light- 
ens all their art and architecture. I brought 
home some interesting plans of their hospitals." 



1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 
Edith Schoff Boericke has rented her home 
and is at present with her eldest son at 22 
Hampstead Circle, Wynnewood. She writes 
enthusiastically of her summer in Nevada and 
her visits, first to her son Fred and her new 
granddaughter, and then to her daughter Edith. 
Later she and her younger son went to Cali- 
fornia and he was enrolled as a student in the 
Boering School of Aviation at Alameda, Cali- 
fornia, where he is to take the transport pilot 
course, followed by the master mechanics 
course. Edith had a delightful trip East by 
way of the Panama Canal. 



1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 

(Mrs. Warren Thorpe) 

15 East 64th St., New York City. 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike D. Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

It is, alas! a feast or a famine for 1902. 
We hope that those who have written will not 
take it amiss if their news has been curtailed. 

First, our President, Grace Douglas Johnston, 
apologizes for not having discovered a new 
star or a new germ or even run for Congress, 
and then leaps lightly over what she has done 
to write this message to the class: "Our next 
reunion is in 1935, and what with one thing 
and another, I suggest that we all begin saving 
for it now — ^^though why we should save when 
what we save grows less valuable every day! — 
however, prepare for it anyway." 

Helen Stewart Huyler's only daughter is des- 
tined for Bryn Mawr in 1935. She writes from 
Honolulu that the one drawback about living 
in that beautiful place is the distance from old 
friends, and begs any members of 1902 who 
come that way please to let her know. Her 
address is 2330 Beckwith Street, Honolulu. 

Harriet Vaille Bouck's husband, having been 
elected a Justice of the Colorado Supreme Court 
for ten years, she has moved to Denver, where 
her address is now 1401 Franklin Street. 

Marion Balch put in last summer at work in 
a painting class at Goose Rocks Beach, Maine. 
Her niece, Ellen Stone, is a Sophomore at 
Bryn Mawr. 

Josephine Kieffer Foltz is painting portraits, 
but says the proceeds wouldn't exactly fill the 
larder to repletion. Her son, Charles, Jr., was 
married last May. He is with the Associated 
Press and his wife is research librarian at the 
Fifth Avenue-42nd Street Library, New York. 
Her husband, Charles S. Foltz, recently pub- 
lished a biography of his father, who was 
Surgeon-General of the Navy under Farragut, 
called Surgeon of the Seas. 

Mary Ingham put in some intensive weeks 
at the Wellesley Institute last summer, studying 
the N. R. A. and the New Social Order. She 
has worked for several years on the Philadelphia 



(32) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Conference on Government, the object of which 
is to make certain fundamental changes in city 
and state government through revision of the 
ancient and outworn Constitution of Pennsyl- 
vania. Her main interests continue to be 
government and politics. She has gone to live 
in Bryn Mawr, where her address is F-2, 
Bryn Mawr Court. 

Emily Dungan Moore writes most cheerfully 
that she is on top in -spite of depression, has 
two children in high school, is active in Cyn- 
wyd Woman's Club, continues her music lessons, 
and has sung in her church quartets for years. 

Mabel Wright is teaching French in the 
Olney High School, Philadelphia. 

Lucile Porter Weaver is marrying off a daugh- 
ter at time of writing. She refers to herself 
as a "very busy widow with six children at 
home," and few among us would have the 
temerity to argue the adjective. 

Helen Trimble, A.B. and A.M., Bryn Mawr, 
and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, is head 
of the Department of Social Studies in the 
State Teachers' College at East Stroudsburg, 
Pennsylvania. She -also teaches in the regular 
six weeks' summer session there, except in 
seasons off, when she goes abroad — in 1930 
she studied at the tsummer session in Cam- 
bridge University, England. She has also taken 
an active part in the evolution of State Normal 
Schools into State Teachers' Colleges. 

Fanny Cochran parked her two adopted chil- 
dren in Miss Kingsbury's Camp in Maine last 
summer and took a five weeks' trip to the 
Coast, including a riding trip through Glacier 
Park, Montana. 

Virginia Willets Burton, whose son Paul is 
an ensign in the Navy, has moved permanently 
to 2844 Wisconsin Avenue, N. W., Washington. 

Elizabeth Corson Gallagher splits her inter- 
ests between Boston and New Haven. She 
dwells officially in Brookline, but her older son 
is an instructor, her younger son a Freshman, 
at Yale; and her daughter, whose husband is a 
Master in the Taft School, is, therefore, also 
near New Haven. 

Frances Morris Orr has an evening life class 
of men and women, which meets in her studio 
once a week. Her own canvases have been 
well hung lately. Her daughter Charlotte is 
Secretary of the Knickerbocker Democrats, 
fighting Tammany, and writing a novel. Her 
son John married last June and has a job in 
a tool steel works outside Pittsburgh, com- 
fortably near the parental home. 

Frances Seth goes right on farming. She 
confesses, however, to "many trying vicissi- 
tudes" in that undertaking last summer. Her 
main jobs for the winter are Treasurer of the 
College Club and President of the Board of 
Managers of the Presbyterian Hospital 
of Baltimore. 



1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Michi Kawai has published a book entitled 
Japanese Women Speak. Michi's address is 
1090 Funabashi, Chitosemura, Tokyo-Fuka. 

Bertha Brown Lambert spoke at the Meeting 
House, 12th Street below Market, Philadelphia, 
on Tuesday afternoon, December 5th. 

Phyllis Green Anderson writes: 

"This fall I became involved as usual in a big 
job — this time the Woman's Crusade and I had 
charge of sending speakers to all women's clubs 
and societies in a five weeks' campaign just 
prior to our Golden Rule Drive. I had 75 
speakers to send out to over 100 meetings. I'm 
now thinking of taking a 25-year Sabbatical 
and indulging in wine, women and song. I 
haven't tried that yet, and have a feeling that 
the next 25 years might hold more of the 
things I want to do. 

Attention: 1904 — I've sacrificed some of 
Thanksgiving Day in your cause. Won't you 
sit down and send in your life history, so I'll 
know what you're doing these busy but inter- 
esting days? I realize that I've hardly men- 
tioned the rest of my family. Well, I still have 
a husband and the same one I started with in 
1908; our boy is a Junior at Amherst, not too 
long on studies, but a beautiful dancer." 

The Class wishes to extend its sympathy to 
Peggy Reynolds Hulse, whose father died this 
fall. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, ]\Iass. 
Members of the Class who attended the 
recent Alumnae Council meetings in Boston 
were: Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 
Florance Waterbury, Rosamond Danielson, 
Marcia Bready Jacobs, Margaret Thayer 
Sulloway and Eleanor Little Aldrich. 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Hauhgwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 
It is a pleasant thing to record that we have 
not only a pedigreed class baby, but a proper 
class dog, as well. His name is Jeff. He is a 
(usually) white bull terrier, given as a wedding 
present by Jessie Thomas to Molly Walcott. 
Jeff Keyes, the Class greets you! 



(33) 



BRYN xMAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The Council meeting in Boston was a great 
success. Elizabeth Torbert and Eleanor Aldrich 
gave large and interesting luncheons, much to 
the delectation of the foregatherers. 

Beth and Mary lunched with Marion Coffin 
Canaday and her husband, who were in Boston 
for the Harvard-Yale game. Marion's daughter, 
Doreen, gave up coming on for the occasion 
because of an untimely quiz imposed by 
Bryn Mawr, where she is a Sophomore. She is, 
incidentally. President of her class. 



1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa, 

The Council meeting in Boston afforded an 
opportunity for a small reunion of 1907 and 
contemporaries. Eunice Schenck and Alice 
Hawkins were attending in official capacities, 
and had the great good fortune to be staying 
with Elizabeth Townsend Torbert, 1906, who 
fed them gossip and breakfast in bed, and so 
renewed their youth that they found it impossi- 
ble to waste any time sleeping for fear they 
might miss something. The meetings and en- 
tertainments were all run off in fine style by 
such old friends as Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905, 
Mary Richardson Walcott and Beth Harrington 
Brooks, of 1906. At odd moments they were 
able to foregather with Esther Williams Apthorp, 
Margaret Augur and Margaret Blodgett. Tea 
at Miggy's bookbindery and bookshop (The 
Margaret Blodgett Corporation, 31A Mount 
Vernon Place), with all its fascinating wares 
was a delightful interlude, and a 1907 luncheon, 
at the lovely house of the Women's City Club 
after the Council was over, proved to be a most 
hilarious occasion. 1 doubt if any of the five 
had heard so many frank comments on her 
clothes or table manners or her opinions in 
general, for the last quarter of a century. 
Throughout the crowded days of the Council, 
we never lost an opportunity to urge every 
one to read Peggy Barnes' new book, Within 
This Present, which Tink Meigs has reviewed 
on page 29. It was a beautiful sight to see Eunice 
and Alice board the train and establish them- 
selves, without previous collaboration, each with 
a copy of the book in its gay yellow jacket. 

Barbara Cary, daughter of Margaret Reeve, 
has been elected Vice-President and Treasurer 
of the Sophomore Class. 

The Class extends its affectionate sympathy 
to Blanche Hecht, whose mother died last 
August. Blanche is still doing volunteer work 
at the Polyclinic Hospital and Neurological 
Clinic in New York, as well as taking some 
work at the New School for Social Research 
and keeping up her music. 



1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

1909 

Class Editor: Helen B. Crane 
70 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

A recent letter from Lacy Van Wagenen is 
full of her work and travels. She spent the 
summer in Norway with her cousin, Kathrina 
Van Wagenen Bugge (1904), between a month 
in the Dolomites and a visit with friends in the 
Hague. Then she studied in Switzerland and at 
the moment of writing was in Paris; en route 
she heard Hitler over the radio and has tried 
"to pry into the complex German emotions." 
She is now on her way back to Rome for her 
fourth season of work, but her address is still 
c/o Morgan & Cie, Paris. "My locks of youth 
are untinged, but the weight of years is heavy 
and my back is bent with something ... I 
imagine that some day I shall have to leave my 
comfortable physical level and mount higher, 
perhaps to mental exercise!" 

1909 points with pride to William Rose 
Benet's Fifty Poets, sub-titled an "auto- 
anthology" because it is made up of the favorite 
poems of the contributors. "H. D." (Hilda 
Doolittle) chose The Islands, and Marianne 
Moore A Grave. Both are interesting and 
characteristic of the writer's moods and forms. 

Gene Miltenberger Ustick has just had a 
fine trip to San Francisco, Carmel, Asilomar 
and other lovely spots. Back in Pasadena now, 
she is going in vigorously for gardening, "which 
I find I adore. They say it is a middle-aged 
pursuit; well, in spite of having such a good 
time, I do feel very middle-aged." 

Sally Jacobs was married last summer to 
Howard Holmes Barton, a graduate of Harvard. 
They are living at present at 13 Rue Franklin, 
Paris, XVI. 



1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City 

Ruth Tanner Vellis has become so enthusi- 
astic about Greece that she and her husband 
plan to stay there another year. Their address 
until further notice is 31 Banc Populaire, Athens. 

Harriet Couch Coombs, besides teaching her 
youngest boy at home, has classes in the visual 



(34) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



arts at the Art Guild in New York, Inci- 
dentally, all the pet snakes are hibernating in 
the cellar. Harriet gives a good deal of time 
to Girl Scout work, and with Margaret Dulles 
Edwards finished the captain's training course 
last spring. The latter has a son in the Fresh- 
man class at Princeton this year. 

Willa Alexander Browning's children won 
several prizes in fancy diving exhibitions this 
summer, Willa continues to knit most intricate 
and effective dresses, to the envy and despair 
of her friends. 

Isobel Rogers Kruesi has written us volun- 
tarily to give her new address, which is 1804 
West Division Street, Grand Island, Nebraska. 
She describes the town as a "kindly, friendly 
place, right out on the prairie," conveniently 
reached by the Lincoln Highway, Union Pacific 
Railway and the United Airways, and hopes 
to see any traveling 191L 

Dottie Coffin Greeley and Margaret Copeland 
Blatchford, 1908, motored from Chicago in two 
days to see the Yale-Harvard game. Their sons 
are room-mates at Harvard. 

Kate Chambers Seelye made a flying trip to 
New York to speak at the Y. W. C. A. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Sante Fe, N. M. 



1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

From Ruth Coe Manchester, in Lucknow, 
India, a letter to Katherine Page, too late for 
Reunion: 

"May I, through you, convey my greetings to 
1913? I am sorry I cannot be present for the 
Reunion. Though this letter is headed Lucknow, 
I'm actually at Lashio in Upper Burma. Soon 
a bus will come to take me fifty- miles further 
inland to Kutkai, where I shall visit a former 
student whose husband is in the Geological 
Survey Department. I must confess I never felt 
quite so far removed from everywhere. Lucknow 
seems the hub of the' universe in comparison 
with this. 

"These years have been full of interests of 
all sorts, I'm quite surfeited with weddings of 
present and former students. There were of all 
lengths from that of the Hindu student which 
began at nine a. m. on one day and ended at 
noon the next, to the Muslim one which lasted 
for less than two minutes. But it has been a 
joy to see the happy comradeship of these 
young couples — Hindu and Muslim, as well as 
Christian." 



From Lucile Shadburn Yow, in Haverford: 
The year 1933 is almost over and since its 
significance to me is somewhat comprehensive, 
based on events economic, academic, romantic 
and domestic, I am tempted to mention them 
briefly for the Bulletin. (I do not know how 
I have the courage to break the long silence 
of 1913.) 

The first six months of the year passed very 
much as the months of the preceding five years 
for I was still on the Executive Staff of The 
Harcum School in Bryn Mawr, but when Com- 
mencement was over I resigned — a daring step 
when the world seemed at its lowest economic 
level. However, I had worked pretty much the 
year 'round, so I consoled myself with virtue's 
doubtful reward and with gay spirits hurried 
off to see my Katharine graduate at Smith — an 
honor student, winner of the music prize offered 
to the most outstanding music student in the 
college, soloist with the College Symphony, 
leader of the Glee and Madrigal Clubs and 
wholly satisfactory to her mother, who fairly tip- 
toed about for fear of upsetting her own pride 
and appreciation. That happy experience soon 
passed, and as Katharine was music director 
at a Y. W. C. A. camp in New York and as 
my two sons had automatically disappeared to 
Georgia for their vacations and, as my new 
leisure did not fit in with the methodical work- 
ing hours of my husband, I agreed to travel 
alone in a Ford over Pennsylvania and New 
York seeking students for a near-by college. 
Of course, I became absorbed and vitally inter- 
ested and did very well for myself and the 
college, but in the background stalked 
Romance. Katharine wished to marry — and in 
September! 1 clucked and fluttered like that 
same foolish old hen, but my arguments against 
marrying so soon fell like tenpins. Romance 
took the center of the stage and still commands 
it! The young married couple live in 
Magnolia, Mass., and I am gradually growing 
accustomed to having a married daughter. This 
I have ample time for, as domestic burdens sit 
lightly on my shoulders. Two sons — 14 and 16 
— in Senior High School daily test my knowl- 
edge of Latin and French, but I will have none 
of their Physics and Geometry. 



1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, M; 



1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave. 
Avondale, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

This month we have the third and almost the 
last installment of notes contributed by those 
lucky members of the Class who were near 
enough or opulent enough to attend reunion. 

Gail, Nannie — looked handsome. Reported 
four children and a husband out of a job, but 
said they were happy anyway. The Class baby 
is fifteen. 

Garfield, Lucretia — her husband teaches at 
Williamstown. Has one son. 

Goodnow, Lois — Ad Werner visited her and 
told of her charming house furnished com- 
pletely in Chinese style. There are three 
children, the oldest a daughter almost ready for 
Bryn Mawr. 

Greenewald, Jeanette — lives in New York 
City with same husband and children. 

Heydemann, Clara — teaches in California. 

Hill, Eleanor— left Greece last spring as pre- 
viously reported. 

Hitchcock, Florence — Investment business 
with occasional trips to Europe to visit her 
brother in Paris. 

Holliday, Elizabeth — Has two children. Is 
busy with Junior League and Bryn Mawr work 
in Indianapolis. 

Jaggard, Anne — Has six children, according 
to Chase. 

Kellen, Constance — Has two very charming 
daughters. Her husband is very much inter- 
ested in town affairs and Boy Scouts. Con is a 
Girl Scout captain and is busy helping at the 
school where her girls go. 

Kellogg, Fredrika — Sent a letter to the Class 
on the back of pictures from Hankow, China. 
They showed her, her son and her new house. 
Her husband is connected with aviation work 
there and they are to stay for three years. 

Kirk, Buckner — Nannie sees her and told of 
rather recently acquired house in Connecticut 
with charming low ceilings that keep you 
stooping, surrounded by birches and command- 
ing a marvelous view. 

Klein, Larie — Neither Ad nor Chase felt they 
could do Larie justice. 

Kleps, Marion — Teaches math at the Holme- 
quist School at New Hope, Pa. 

Polly Branson, now Sister Augustine, has 
been made Sub-Prioress of her order, and is 
now living at the Carmelite Convent, Oak Lane, 
Penna. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

Dr. Louise Wagner Szulaski and her husband 
are both practicing physicians in Pasadena, 



Cal. She is a prominent nose and throat 
specialist. 

Caroline Stevens Rogers and her family spent 
the summer at North Chatham at a place which 
they bought on Pleasant Bay. It is called 
"Far End," and there is wonderful sailing and 
swimming, with a grand sandy beach. There 
they would be glad to welcome any '17ers who 
chance that way next summer. 

Gladys Bryant is very much interested in the 
work of the Vital Interests. In fact, she can 
probably be found at the Vital Foods Restau- 
rant in New York this winter. Last summer 
she was doing a great deal of the cooking and 
preparing of food for the Child and Dragon 
Tea Room, which they ran in South Kent, 
Connecticut. The house way up on the hill in 
which the workers lived and where tea was 
served, in addition to a tea house down below 
on the level of the main road, was a perfectly 
charming place with a fascinating view of those 
lovely Connecticut hills. Giddle looked very 
well and seemed to be enjoying herself despite 
difficulties connected with cooking over oil 
stoves. The food, incidentally, was excellent! 

Your Class Editor took an extremely interest- 
ing vacation in October, with a day and a half 
at the Century of Progress. The next move was 
flying to the coast, leaving Chicago at 9 p. m. 
and arriving at Los Angeles at noon the next 
day. Two weeks later I flew back to New York, 
stopping at Omaha over night on the way. 

While in California I went out to Scripps 
College to see the Dean, Isabel Smith, '15. 
She took m6 all over the place, which I found 
most charming. The architecture is interesting, 
the grounds delightful, and the interiors of the 
buildings with their furnishings beautiful. We 
had lunch in the little dining room in Padua 
Hills and saw the studio Virginia Litchfield 
Clark had before her marriage. There is at the 
college an extremely interesting exhibition of 
the various types of work which she did. I 
shall quote from an October issue of the 
Scripture, the student publication of the college: 

"As a permanent memorial to a former and 
much loved member of the Scripps art faculty, 
Mrs. Virginia Litchfield Clark, examples of her 
most beautiful work are now hanging in the 
Common Rooms. The exhibit was contributed 
by her family, and presented to the college 
during the commencement memorial hour last 
spring. The mountings were arranged for by 
her many friends at Scripps. 

"In selecting the pieces for this memorial, 
an effort was made to obtain an illustration of 
each of the many types of art work in which 
Mrs. Clark was proficient. As a result, the 
college now has a vivid and living inspiration 
of this very human artist to serve as incentive 
both for the students who worked with her and 
for those who will study art here in the future. 



(36) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



"Among the pictures which will illustrate the 
remarkable versatility of the artist are copies 
of the Madonna by Duccio, executed on tooled 
gold leaf, and of another picture, done in 
black and gold lacquer on wood. Two water 
colors of the Grand Canyon (one of which 
particularly impressed me) and a country 
scene, a wood engraving to illustrate Paid in 
Full, by Bret Harte, block prints of Mount 
Whitney and an English scene, a pencil draw- 
ing of the Grand Canyon country, and an 
enamel interpretation on wood of the Tower 
of London complete the exhibit. 

"But it is not for her reputation as an artist 
alone that Mrs. Clark is remembered. She was 
a jolly, unaffected good sport, who often ac- 
companied students on camping trips and out- 
door excursions. Her love of beauty and eye 
for design were reproduced in all her life work. 

"Mrs. Clark was an instructor in Applied 
Design for two years at Scripps until June, 
1932, when she left the college to marry Owen 
Clark, a hydraulic engineer in the Grand 
Canyon. She died the following November." 

Eleanor Dulles has just published a short 
book, meant for tKe elucidation of the general 
public, entitled The Dollar, the Franc, and 
Inflation. This is a remarkable feat, as she did 
not decide to write it until October 25th, and 
then did not get started immediately. The 
manuscript was accepted by Macmillan and the 
contract signed on the morning of November 
27th; it was set up in type that same day. 
Dooles sat up all night to correct the proof, 
and the book was bound and ready for distri- 
bution on December 6th. All this was done 
while she is doing full-time work at the 
Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, 
as well as giving one course for some of her 
old Bryn Mawr students, who were not willing 
to give her up. Incidentally, she runs two 
housekeeping apartments, one in Philadelphia, 
and another, for herself and her husband, in 
Baltimore, where she spends week-ends. She 
is a wonderful woman and there probably is 
truth in the rumor that President Roosevelt is 
planning to send for her to ask her why she 
is against inflation. 



I9I8 

67a55 Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 
3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. 0., Phila. 



1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. P. E. Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. I., N. Y. 



1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 E. 57th St., New York City 

Josephine Herrick — "I have just returned 
from Cleveland, where I spent the summer, and 
this year am living at the Mayfair House, 610 
Park Avenue, New York. We are just starting 
our sixth year of our studio, de Braganga and 
Herrick, at 25 East 63rd Street, where we do 
Portrait Photography." 

Madelaine Brown — "We are full of good in- 
tentions as far as our 1920 luncheons go this 
year, and I think the Bostonese will meet as 
usual. I just returned from visiting friends at 
a camp in Northern Wisconsin and spending 
a few days with Virginia Anderton Lee, '18, 
at her farm in Central Wisconsin. Wish I 
could send you a scoop, but the only tangible 
evidence of my last year's work is an article 
in the American Journal of Medical Sciences 
last November and one in the American Journal 
of Physiology in August. 

Dorothy Griggs Murray — "I haven't any 
startling news for you, but will at least send 
your card with what I have — am teaching every 
morning at a small private school here — ^history, 
geography and spelling in the fourth and fifth 
grades (and an occasional sideline of arith- 
metic in grade three!). My children number 
three and are Mary Lin aged 11, Carol aged 
9I/2 and Douglas aged 5^/2 . All thriving in 
health and average in intelligence." 

Doris Pitkin Buck — "We have a new address 
— 2627 Adams Street, Columbus, Ohio. Abso- 
lutely no other news except that babies are a 
lot of work." 

Evelyn Wight Dickson — "No news. Married 
life agrees with me and so does work, I'm 
still on the job, though Carroll doesn't approve. 
Also keeping occupied on the outside with the 
business of being the part owner and manager 
of our house, which we have made over into 
apartments. I am up to the teeth in plumbing, 
decorating and the general mess that goes with 
it." 

Elizabeth Williams Sikes — "Was away in the 
back woods when this came, then mislaid it. 
Have two daughters, eight and eleven years old. 
Am nothing but a housewife with a few outside 
activities. Working on the Scholarship Fund 
and Women's Club, etc." 

Jule Conklin — "Absolutely nothing happens 
in my life. I'm still Society Editor of Town 
and Country, and live at 10 Park Avenue. I 
went to Havana this vacation and stayed with 
some Cubans who were mixed up in the Revo- 
lution, but I didn't get shot at." 

Mary Hardy attended the Alumnae Council in 
Boston, as an alternate for District III.'s Council- 
lor, Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922, who is abroad. 



(37) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Jule Cochran Buck — "The news of other 
people always sounds so dramatic that I am 
aiiashed to report myself the regulation matron 
of thirty-five, with two big boys and a medium- 
sized girl. We are distinctly modern in regi- 
men. In addition to their school routine, all 
the children are having their teeth straight- 
ened, all go to dancing classes (three different! ) 
and all belong to a Saturday morning ice- 
skating club in the winter. The picture of 
them is completed by a sprinkling of ear- 
aches, sprained ankles and warts on the bottom 
of the feet. Not content with getting the chil- 
dren there and back, I fill in my time with all 
the drives and campaigns in the city and do 
a good deal of work with the Girl Scouts. This 
year I am also taking piano lessons. My 
patient husband gets what is left of me. 

Katherine Cauldwell Scott — "I really haven't 
any news, but I do like to go down as one of 
those who oblige, so here goes. A few tennis 
tournaments, some won, some not, a little golf, 
a lot of swimming and two gorgeous weeks in 
the wilds .of Nova Scotia constitute our sum- 
mer. We got- a couple of canoes, a couple of 
guides and a little food, and went back to 
nature in the raw. All over the inland lakes 
of Nova Scotia we paddled, fished, swam, shot 
rapids, portaged, and stalked deer and moose." 

Helene Zinsser Loening has just been visit- 
ing her father in New York. She and her two 
children — Helen, aged four or so, and Jurgen, 
aged about three — and their nurse came over 
in a small German boat which went through 
a hurricane. However, the latter made slight 
impression on the youngest, for when coming 
down the gangplank in New York he asked 
where was the boat he was going to America 
on, as he thought he had been in a hotel for 
the past ten days. Zin promises us an account 
of her life in Bremen, which, judging from 
her conversation about skiing in the Tyrol and 
week-ending in Heligoland, will be of interest. 

Helen Humphreys — "Am still teaching Span- 
ish in a large high school here (Cleveland). 
Spent the summer of 1932 in Spain at the 
University of Madrid and that of Granada. 
Life, except for the simple pleasures of driving 
and seeing friends, isn't very eventful." 



1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelley Erdman 
(Mrs. C. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

Jean Spurney Jory, known on the stage as 
Jean Inness, is living at 1309 N, Michigan 
Avenue, Pasadena. Though I saw her in the 
lead in a very good play at the Pasadena 
Community Playhouse last spring, she writes: 
"I play very little nowadays, as I have a regu- 



lar job at the Playhouse this season answering 
to the high-sounding title of Supervising Di- 
rector of the Workshop, and we put on plays 
every two weeks. It is the truly 'community' 
part of the Playhouse, open to one and all, 
experienced or amateur. I am crazy about it 
and enjoy the directing end of the theatre 
almost as well as I ever did the acting." Her 
husband, Victor Jory, just took time out from 
his movie contract to do the lead in "The 
Spider" at the local theatre, because "all the 
movie people who came from the speaking 
stage love to get behind the footlights again. 
His next picture to be released is Smoky, Will 
James' cowboy horse story, and he starts at 
once on one called Disillusion, with John Boles 
and a new Fox discovery, Rosemary Ames. It's 
the first time he's ever had a part written for 
him — that of a bold, not-too-sincere anarchist." 
The Jorys have one daughter, about four years 
old. They have not yet looked for any his- 
trionic ability in her, but hope she'll want to 
act — as they have had such fun in the business. 

Dorothy Walter Baruch has the most awe- 
inspiring record of accomplishments— all I can 
do is list them. She is Director of the Nursery 
School, and Assistant Professor of Education, 
Broadoaks School of Education, Whittier 
College. Mother of Bert (Herbert M. Baruch, 
Jr.), age 12; Nancy, age 9. She is also 
Director and Supervisor of the two nursery 
school groups at Broadoaks (about thirty- five 
children between the ages of twenty months to 
almost five years). Also Supervisor of the 
Alhambra Parents' Cooperative Nursery School 
and the Whittier Extension Unit of Broadoaks 
Nursery School. In addition she is professor 
of such courses as Parental Education, Child 
Psychology, Children'-s Literature, Creative 
Writing for Children, and Nursery Education. 

Author of the following books: 

A Day With Betty Anne (1927), Harper & 
Brothers. 

In and Out With Betty Anne (1928), Harper 
& Brothers. 

Big Fellow (1929), Harper & Brothers. 

Big Fellow at Work (1930), Harper & 
Brothers. 

Blimps and Such (1932), Harper & Brothers. 

/ Like Animals (1933), Harper & Brothers. 

/ Like Machinery (1933), Harper & Brothers, 

The Two Bobbies (1930), John Day. 

/ Like Automobiles (1931), John Day. 

Author also of any number of magazine 
articles. 



1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York City. 



(38) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York City 

The class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Marion Lawrence, whose mother died during 
the summer. 

Helen Hoyt Stookey has a third son, Byron 
Stookey, Junior, born last July. 

An editorial blessing upon Nancy Fitzgerald 
for the following letter: "I won't say that 
I haven't been doing anything interesting, but 
I am afraid there is very little new since my 
last. I spent the Fourth of July with Lucy 
Kate Blanchard and played baseball with the 
twins. 

"Dorothy Burr was at home for a few weeks 
this summer and spent a couple of days with 
me. She has now gone back to Greece for 
another two years. She sailed from New York 
but touched at Boston, so I saw her off and 
had a line from Gibraltar saying they had had 
a good trip thus far. While Dorothy was stay- 
ing with me we drove down to Ipswich for a 
picnic and stopped to see Ann Fraser Brewer, 
but she was away, so we did water colors of 
the landscape instead. 

"Delphine Fitz Darby and her husband turned 
up in Boston about August. They are now in 
a junior college in Greenwich, Conn., where 
they are both teaching this winter. 

"I am still working at the Brookline Public 
Library and see Margaret Hussey occasionally. 
At present the Girl Scouts, of which she is 
head, are rehearsing a play in our basement. 
My other principal activity is being Secretary 
of the American Miniature Schnauzer Club. 
... I write breed notes for three dog papers, 
a weekly and two monthlies. We have just 
staged our first specialty show at Chicago in 
connection with the Century of Progress. In 
connection with Dog Week this month we had 
a special display of books, for which I made 
a poster. The Children's Room also had a 
show of toy dogs, for which they had 110 
entries, and I was asked to judge." 



1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 
(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 
8102 Ardmore Ave., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 
The opening of the Deanery was a gala event 
for everyone. Felice Begg, Mary Woodworth, 
Betty Howe, Bess Pearson Horrocks and I were 
on hand to represent '24. Soon after that 
occasion Martha Cooke Steadman, looking as 
beautiful as ever, arrived with her husband 
and spent one night with us before going on 
to New York. There she was feted by Jean 
Palmer and many others. 



The exodus from New York is tremendous. 
Estelle and Cyprian Bridges have already left 
for England, and Kitty and Bob Holt may 
follow to spend the winter. Kay Elston Ruggles 
is moving to the West Coast, first for a visit 
with her mother in Mexico, then to live in 
Oregon or perhaps in Honolulu. 

Bee Constant Dorsey has an apartment in 
New York at 37 East 66th Street. 

Bryn Mawr is well represented at Wheaton 
College. Kay Neilson, as Instructor in Art, is 
teaching a beginners' course in Cave Paintings 
and Romanesque Cathedrals, also two advanced 
courses — one in Spanish Art and the other in 
Post-Renaissance Sculpture and Architecture 
Mitzie Faries is Director of Physical Education, 
and Henrietta Jennings, '22, is head of the 
Economics and Sociology Department. 

Although she now has three daughters, 
Bobby Murray Fansler is still connected with 
the Instructors' Department of the Metropolitan 
Museum, and also finds time for important 
work with the Carnegie Corporation. 

Ruth Allen has had a job at Harvard for 
five years. 

Mary Lou White has a new apartment in 
Boston, where she is being indispensable to the 
Atlantic Monthly. 

According to a letter from Betty Hale 
Laidlaw, a second son, David, was born to 
Margaret Dunham Edsall on September 30th. 
Betty is going in for portrait painting, tropical 
fish and bulbs. 

Congratulations are also in order for Pamela 
Coyne Taylor — her son was born November 
18th. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 
57 Christopher St., New York City 

Apologies are inserted here for the omission 
in the December Bulletin of Maud Hupfel 
Flexner's name as a member of the Democratic 
Committee for West Bryn Mawr. She and her 
husband contributed a splendid ham to the sup- 
per, and were both zealous workers. 



(39) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Cay Field Cherry's daughter Joanna was born 
on November 7th, a great bouncing lass, so we 
hear. Our scouts promise us news of other 
arrivals soon. 

Frances Bethel Rowan writes that Germany 
has been very exciting this year, but that she 
is at a loss as to what to report on it for two 
reasons: "I am quite confused myself, and, 
censorship. One thing seems clear, however, 
and that is that Hitler is showing signs of 
growing with the job and profiting by early 
mistakes. . . . To summarize in as few words 
as possible — I would say that I am pro-Nazi 
because I think it is Germany's only hope of 
keeping Germany intact for the Germans and 
of preventing racial strangulation by the Jews. 
The bad points are the individual cases, such 
as Bruno Walter and Daniel Prenn, and, of 
course, the outside world makes a lot of these 
things." Frances took two trips this summer: 
one by train and boat to Sweden and Denmark, 
where they found Stockholm and Copenhagen 
and the surrounding country fascinating. 
"Those countries are certainly restful and 
peaceful as compared to Central Europe!" The 
second trip was by motor through East Prussia, 
Poland, and Czechoslovakia. "Danzig is a fas- 
cinating old Hansa town, and Gydnia, the new 
Polish port just ten miles west, is also very 
interesting. Although it is small as yet, every- 
thing is very new and it appears to be flourish- 
ing; but it is all very futile because Germany 
is sure to get the Corridor back, and since 
there is not enough trade for both Gydnia and 
Danzig, Gydnia will probably be ruined. In 
Poland we stayed in both Warsaw and Cracow, 
and found Cracow very nice because of the 
interesting old buildings — but Warsaw was dis- 
appointing, to say the least. No romantic old 
Russian atmosphere, as I had expected, but 
just a big, flat, gray middle-western town. . . . 
The Carpathian Mountains between Poland and 
Czechoslovakia include some of the loveliest 
scenery I have seen in Europe, and Czecho- 
slovakia, on the whole, certainly seemed to be 
a flourishing and industrious country after 
Poland. The people in Prague are pretty 
mongrel, however, and in the last analysis, I 
suppose, a country must be judged by its 
people." 

Evelyn Brooks has taken an apartment at 
183 East 64th Street with her brother, and has 
had a temporary job with the Conde Nast 
publishing house. She reveals that Puggie 
Moore is working at William B. Nichols, a 
brokerage house on Wall Street. Eleanor Jones 
is at present the associate of Mr. E. E. Furlong, 
landscape architect, at 15 Washington Street, 
Newark, N. J. 

Margaret Coss Flower has continued her 
research and reviewing, and has just edited 
Shakespeare's sonnets, published this autumn 



by Cassells. Maud Hupfel Flexner has taken 
over the task of running the bookshop at 
College. 

Elizabeth Chesnut writes: "The past five 
years have been full of good times, not to 
mention a little work. I studied at Johns 
Hopkins for three years in the Romance Lan- 
guages Department, concentrating on Italian, 
and at the Peabody taking vocal, History of 
Music, and taking part in the shows put on 
by the operetta class. I've been serving on 
the Girl Reserve Committee at the Y. W., too,, 
teaching Sunday School, keeping house, etc. 
This summer I've been reading law books, for 
I've signed up to start work at the University 
of Maryland Law School this fall, with the hope 
some day of being somebody's legal secretary."' 

Station Cosy Chit Chat Hour signing off^. 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 

Mary Gessner Park has a son, Howard 
Franklin Park, III, born July 6th. She and 
her husband have moved back to Philadelphia 
from the Oranges; her address is now 8 Over- 
brook Parkway, Overbrook Hills, Pennsylvania. 

Grace DeRoo Sterne's husband has a fellow- 
ship this winter working at the Harvard 
Observatory. 

Ruth Rosenberg Ehrlich graduated from the 
University of Pennsylvania after leaving 
Bryn Mawr. She married Mr. Ehrlich soon 
after graduation, and aside from a little teach- 
ing and tutoring has been busy housekeeping. 
She has one son, Paul Ralph, now aged seven- 
teen months. 

Sally Bradley Schwab has a second child, a 
daughter named Edith, born this summer. She 
and her husband are still living in Asheville, 
N. C, but have moved to 14 Ridgefield Place. 

Frances Hand was married last month to 
Robert Munro Ferguson, of Williams, Arizona. 

Bobs Mercer is now in New Haven as a 
first-year medical student and is living at 17 
Howe Street. She spent last summer going 
across the continent: to Denver by car, then to 
British Columbia by rail, south to San Fran- 
cisco by car, and by rail back to Denver, 
where she picked up her car and drove home, 
taking in the World's Fair at Chicago. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa-. 

1931 

Class Editor: Evelyn Waples Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 



(40) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1932 

Class Editor: Josephine Graton 

182 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Hat Moore, since leaving the Institute of 
Pacific Relations Conference in Banff, has been 
staying at home in Winnetka, brushing up on 
her German and tackling Russian in prepara- 
tion for a couple years' study abroad. At pres- 
ent her plans are to study at the London School 
of Economics from January until summer, and 
then go to Germany, studying at the university 
which has the professors she most wants. 

Kate Mitchell has taken over Hat's position 
with the Institute of Pacific Relations. Dolly 
Tyler is specializing on Basic English. Dolly 
is living in an apartment with Amelie Alex- 
ander, Polly Huger, and Winnie McCully, all 
of whom are teaching at the Brearley School. 

Lucy Sanborn is teaching English in the 
high school in Haverhill, Mass. A card from 
Jane Oppenheimer says ;that Ruth Milliken's 
address in Oxford, where she is studying 
Philosophy, is 17 Banbury Road, and that she 
would love to hear from her classmates ; but 
Jane modestly neglected to mention what she 
herself is doing. 

K. Kranz was married on the 7th of October 
to Carl Louis Breithaupt, She and her hus- 
band have moved to Cambridge, Mass. 

Molly Atmore married Edward H. Ten Broeck 
on the 4th of November and is living in 
Berwyn, Pennsylvania. 

We wish to congratulate Mr. and Mrs, F. 
Murray Forbes, Jr. (Elizabeth Livermore) on 
the birth of their second daughter in October. 



1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

After our first effort as Alumnae Editor, we 
were chagrined to receive sundry communica- 
tions informing us that after all we didn't know 
so much about our classmates' activities. Alice 
Brues, accused by us of graduate work in 
Philosophy, writes that her time is divided be- 
tween Classical Archaeology, Psychology, and 
Anthropology. Instead of holding it against 
us, however, she included in her protest lots 
more information about other members of the 
class. ' 

Lots more people seem to be doing graduate 
work at Bryn Mawr. Mabel Meehan is doing 
more Latin and combining Education, and Sue 
Savage, also a Latin major, is taking a minor 
in Classical Archaeology. Jeanette LeSaulnier 
is acting as secretary for Miss Swindler and 
also working, as we said, in Archaeology. Boots 
Grassi is doing graduate work, and our guess 
is History, and Anne Funkhouser, who is also 



back, is probably working in French. VAtanor 
Yeakel is living at Bryn Mawr Gables, and 
doing graduate work in Biology and Chemistry. 
The other graduate student from the ranks of 
1933 for whose school we have been sleuthing 
all fall is Jane Crumrine, and the school is 
Columbia. 

Next to graduate work, teaching stands high 
as 1933's most popular occupation. We said 
last time that Carolyn Lloyd-Jones was teaching 
at Baldwin and nobody contradicted us. Bunty 
Robert is also teaching there, in the Math 
Department. Louise Esterley is teaching 
French at a school in Wayne, and Eileen 
Mullen at Springside School in Chestnut Hill. 
Margaret Carson, who deserves something or 
other for a purely spontaneous letter full of 
news, is tutoring some Penn students in 
German and living at home. 

Maizie-Louise Cohen, who also contributed 
her share of news, is working for the head of 
the Neuro-Psychiatric Clinic of the Philadel- 
phia Municipal Courts, and finds it very inter- 
esting. It ought to be. Jane Bradley is work- 
ing in the psychiatric clinic of a Buffalo hos- 
pital. Amd Ruth Prugh, who should have 
gone in the paragraph before, is teaching music 
at the Rye Country Day School. 

Fritzie Oldach is working for an insurance 
company and had just taken (and passed, we 
hope) her examination on the day of the Dean- 
ery tea. Jo Bronson has joined the growing 
Bryn Mawr colony in Macy's. Elizabeth Sixt 
is doing social work in Cleveland. 

Fay deVaron is doing some translating — 
Spanish, we take it. And down here on this 
page of our notes come two more graduate 
students and another teacher. Anne Burnett 
is teaching at Shady Hill, a progressive school 
in Cambridge, and taking care of two children 
and a dog in her spare moments. The dog is 
reported to have a mania for garbage, and 
especially the Graton's garbage, so perhaps this 
is 1932 news. Beth Busser is studying in 
Munich and living at the Studentenheim on 
Kaulbachstrasse, all of which proves that any 
Bryn Mawr girl who can pass her German oral 
need not be afraid of the big bad wolf, and 
can live in safety under any roof no matter 
how terrifying its name. Eleanor Chalfant is 
working at the School of Occupational Therapy 
in Philadelphia, studying, we take it, although 
she may be teaching. You never can tell. 

The only marital news we have is that Sylvia 
Cornish's marriage to Mr. Robert Allen was 
announced this summer and took place some 
time last fall. Ruth Crossett, now Mrs. Edward 
French, is the mother of a boy, but he's almost 
a year old now and it is hardly news. 

The class wishes to extend its deepest svm- 
pathy to Martha Tipton, who lost her father a 
short while ago. 



(41) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



^ 
k 



^ SCHOOL DIEECTQRY 



Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. General 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
small classes. Ample grounds 
near Orange Mountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. Established 
1894. Write for booklet. 

LUCIE C. BEARD 

Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. ROWLAND 
ELEANOR O. BROWNELL 



Principals 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
Wynnewood, Pennsylvania 

College Preparatory 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 

Head Miatrea* 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. \ Head 
Mary E. Lowndes, M. A., Litt.D. J Mistresses 
Katherine P. Debevoise, Assistant to the Heads 



TOW-HEYWOOn 

I V On theSound^At Shippm Point \ / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

Ont hour from Ntw York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, ffeadmi.tre.a 

Box Y, Stamford. Conn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Maw^r, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school established 
1899. Preparation for leading women's 
colleges. Four-year high school course ; 
intensive review courses for College 
Board examinations throughout year 
or during second semester; general 
courses. Resident enrollment limited 
to twenty-five. Individual attention in 
small classes. Informal home life. 
Outdoor sports. 

MARY B, THOMPSON. Principal 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Z SCHOOL DIKECTORY 



I 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art, and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges' requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming' Pool — Riding-. 



For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 



LAKE FOREST 



ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on reaueest. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A. B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharme Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 



SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School, St. Martinis 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Bryn Mawr 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



KATHARINE GiBBS 

A school of unusual character with a distinctive 
purpose for educated women 
SECRETARIAL EXECUTIVE 

ACADEMIC 
Special Course for College 
Women. Selected subjects 
preparing for executive posi- 
tions. Special schedule. 
Special Instruction. 
Two-year Course for pre- 
paratory and high school grad- 
uates. First year Includes six 
colleg:atesub]ect8. Second year. 
Intensive secretarial training. 
One-year Course Includes 
technical and broad business 
training, preparing for posi- 
tions of a preferred character 
Write for catalogue 



NEW YORK 

247 Park Ave. 
Resident and Day 

BOSTON 

90 Marlboro St. 
Resident and Day 

PROVIDENCE 

155 Angell St. 



LowTHORPE School 

of Landscape Architecture 
GROTON, MASS. 

Courses in Landscape Architecture, in' 
eluding Horticulture and Garden Design, 
given to a limited number of students 
in residence. Anne Baker, Director. 

Spring Term Starts April 2, 1934 
Write for Catalogue 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c ■ $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. IM. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge, Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on the Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

IWISS SARA DAVIS. IWanager 

Telephone: Bryn IWawr 386 



The Pennsylvama Company 

For Insurance on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD. President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 




896 



934 



BACK LOG CAMP 

In the Adirondack Mountains 

SABAEL P. O.. INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 




Back Log Camp is a large tent camp (there are two cabins) in an inaccessible 
part of the Adirondack Mountains, in the State Preserve. On all sides lie unbroken 
stretches of forest. There is no other camp near it. Whether you choose an inactive 
holiday resting in the main camp for the most part, or an active vacation with fishing, 
hiking, over-night camping, and trail making. Back Log Camp has much to offer you. 
Good food, good company (men and women from many different colleges), complete 
freedom from the usual summer resort attractions, these attributes the Camp has kept 
through its long history. It is better to come in pairs, perhaps, but many ladies come 
alone and soon find congenial friends. 



Write for our illustrated hoo\let to 
MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT : 272 PARK AVENUE. TAKOMA PARK. D. C. 



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R 



eady now for delivery 



A 



SERIES of twelve Staffordshire 
dinner plates hy Wedgwood . . . 



^^' Prpn iWabr plates; 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please reserve for me sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $15 per set. 

I enclose $5 deposit on each set and will pay balance when notified that the plates 
are ready for shipment. 

Color ghoice [^ Blue |^ Rose [^ Green Q] Mulberry 

Signed 

Address 

Ma\e chec\s payable and address all iyiquhies to Alumnae Association of Bryn Maivr College 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



100 & 1 CELEBRATED HANDS 



By MILTON C. WORK 

Pres., U. S. Bridge Assn. 
and 

OLIVE A. PETERSON 

Certified Teacher of the Sims, 

Culbertson, and Official Systems 

Holder of Women's National Championships 



o 
O 



73 

A book for isvery Contract player. Nothing sinnilar has ever been J^ 

published before. Contains one hundred and one famous hands ^^ 

(no freaks) played in leading tournaments. Each hand is bid ^^i 
according to the three popular systems. Then the actual play of 

the cards is given. Finally the play is explained and analyzed. CO 

Invaluable to players and teachers. The hands ^^ ^\/\ ^n 

also offer an ideal selection for Duplicate play. 'H' | ^^J^J ^^ 

THE JOHN 0. WINSTON COMPANY O 

WINSTON BUILDING PHILADELPHIA, PA. ^\ 



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Hf:. ^ 



n^n 



-fw^ 






^ 




...to me thet/re MILDER 
. to me they TASTE BETTER 




© 1934, Liggett & M^'frs Tobacco Co. 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




CAMPUS NEWS 



February, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 2 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phtla., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1933 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920 

T^- „* - „4. T - „ /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

Directors at Large \alice Sachs Plaut, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Marguerite Mellen Dewey, 1913 

District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 

District IV Adeline Werner Vorts, 1916 

District V Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI Erna Rice, 1930 

District VII JeriS Bensberg Johnson, 1924 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

Virginia McKenney Claiborne, 1908 Florance Waterbury, 1905 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen Faulkner, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maguire, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 






Jform of pequesit 

m 



I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OP Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, *12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Maay Crawford Dudley, '96 Elinor Amram Nahm, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '06 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrouoh Wrench, '21 Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV FEBRUARY, 1934 No. 2 



More and more the Class Notes have come into their own. They are read and 
discussed long after more significant things have been read and forgotten. The 
College announces a change in policy that we think is going to be a bomb-shell 
in the midst of the alumnae, and in a bare month or so every one is taking the 
change for granted. The Undergraduate Editor, who is extraordinarily good this 
year, gives a picture of the ever-changing pageant of the campus, and tries to bring 
to us some comprehension of the discussions pro and con that shake the under- 
graduate body to its foundations; again all of this is quickly taken for granted. 
The one thing, it seems to me, that the alumnae never take for granted is them- 
selves. They want to have the Bulletin keep them in touch as closely as possible 
with the College — there is no question about that, although some one is always 
turning up to ask why we do not have an article about such and such a thing that 
was dealt with, exhaustively, six months earlier; but what they demand with rising 
excitement is that the Bulletin shall keep them in touch with each other. Were 
the question of doing away with the Class Notes brought up now as it has been 
once or twice in the past, there would not be any discussion; there would be a riot. 
Certainly they seem to me to grow more interesting and significant. The Editorial 
Board has tried to formulate a rather definite policy about life, death, and casual 
contacts, but the real credit must go to the Class Editors, who more and more choose 
what is significant. If the Class Notes are considered in conjunction with the 
special articles that appear from time to time, the variety and scope of activities 
on the part of the alumnae are extraordinary. They dig gold in Sierre Leone, they 
paint miniatures, they write best sellers, or put on plays, they are movie stars or 
magazine editors, they manage their own communities or run important Federal 
departments, they climb mountains or make significant archaeological finds, or go 
in for medicine and research, they are decorated with the White Lion of Czecho- 
slovakia, or start to sail around the Horn. There is almost no profession in which 
they are not represented, and then they end up by marrying all of the eminent men. 
It is really an amazing record for a group that is as small as is our alumnae group. 



URYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE DEANERY COMMITTEE 

(Presented to the Council by the Chairman, Caroline McCormick Blade, 1896) 

At the meeting of the Alumnae Association held at Bryn Mawr in February, 
1933, Mrs. Clark, President of the Association, announced to the Alumnae 
Miss Thomas's proposed gift to make possible the use of the Deanery as an 
Alumnae Center on the Bryn Mawr Campus. To understand what this gift means, 
we must recall the position the Deanery holds in the history of Bryn Mawr. 

The young M. Carey Thomas, just back from her years of study in Europe, 
where she had been the first woman to win a Ph.D., summa cum laude, at Zurich, 
was called by the Trustees of Bryn Mawr in 1884 to help plan the new College 
about to be opened. The Trustees had chosen Dr. James E. Rhoads as President 
of the College, and Miss Thomas was invited to outline its educational policy, to 
nominate to the President the members of the faculty, and to plan the entrance 
requirements and the curriculum for the students who were to come. The position 
was one of such great responsibility that the Trustees were at a loss to give it a 
name, and Miss Thomas, with the approval of President Oilman, of Johns Hopkins 
University, proposed that she be called Dean — an academic title up to that time 
unknown in this country. Now that the many Deans in our educational system play 
such an important part, it is of particular interest for us to remember that 
Miss Thomas was the first Dean to take her place in any American college or 
university. 

Three little wooden cottages were on the college grounds, and one of these 
which she made her home she christened "The Deanery." In 1896 the Deanery 
was enlarged by the Trustees, and in 1907 Miss Mary Garrett, her life-long friend, 
came from Baltimore to live with her, and at that time rebuilt the Deanery, adding 
the great room that we know and the beautiful garden. The furnishings and equip- 
ment of the Deanery were Miss Garrett's special care and delight. Through the 
years that followed. Miss Thomas and Miss Garrett traveled widely, and always 
brought back treasures of beauty for the Deanery and the Deanery garden. 

The house is, of course, with every other building on the Campus, the property 
of the College, but Miss Thomas has the right to keep it for her lifetime upon 
payment of an annual maintenance charge. It had long been Miss Thomas's inten- 
tion to leave in her will a request to the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College that the 
house be used as an Alumnae Center, on the same terms on which she held it, and 
a bequest of all of the wonderful contents of the house and garden and an endow- 
ment for its support. Miss Thomas's decision, last January, to make this gift 
immediate, came to us all as a great surprise, with which was joined a keen sense 
of loss because she intended no longer to use the Deanery as her home. 

Her first proposal was to make the gift to the Alumnae Association, and, in 
announcing it, Mrs. Clark appointed a Ways and Means Committee to consider how 
the Association could accept this most generous gift and assume the responsibility 
for its management. This committee consisted of Elizabeth Bent Clark, President 

(2) 



BllYN MAW It ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



of the Alumnae Association^ ex-officio ; with two other members from the Executi\c 
Board of the Alumnae Association: Caroline Chadwick-Collins^ Director-at-large 
and also Chairman of Publicity of the College; and Lois Kellogg Jessup^ Chairman 
of its Finance Committee ; Martha G. Thomas^ for many years Warden of Pembrok(' 
^nd formerly member of tlie Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College; and from 
the present Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College: Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 
formerly President of the Alumnae Association ; Millicent Carey Mcintosh ; Frances 
Fincke Hand; and Caroline McCormick Slade, who was also appointed Chairman. 
After a careful study of the situation, the committee decided that a guarantee fund 
of $20,000 should be in hand before the Deanery could be opened. While they 
were considering how such a fund could be raised in these difficult times, Miss 
Thomas added to her very generous gift the $20,000 required. 

The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association had, from the beginning, 
impressed upon the committee that the finances of the Alumnae Association could 
not be drawn upon to meet deficits and that the Association must not assume any 
responsibility for future development in the Deanery that might cripple its contri- 
bution to the essential work of the College. The Ways and Means Committee were 
called to meet with them to consider how this could be assured. This meeting was 
held on May 5th, 1933, when the Ways and Means Committee reported their con- 
clusion that the only way to meet the situation was to ask Miss Thomas to make 
her gift to Bryn Mawr College, to be held in trust for the alumnae, rather than 
to the Alumnae Association, and they also suggested that a Deanery Committee, 
consisting of the alumnae members of the Board of Directors of the College and the 
President of the Alumnae Association, be appointed with full responsibility for its 
management. The Executive Board of the Alumnae Association were unanimous in 
their acceptance of this suggestion, and voted to adopt it and to propose it to 
Miss Thomas as the most effective way of accomplishing the purposes she had in 
mind. Miss Thomas received the plan with unqualified approval. She believed that 
the way had been found to accomplish her purpose and that, logically, the furnish- 
ings of the Deanery should belong with the building itself, making a unit to be held 
by the College for the benefit of the alumnae, and, at the same time, giving the 
management to a continuing group of alumnae chosen in large part by the Alumnae 
Association. 

This plan was submitted to the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College at 
their regular meeting on May 18th, 1933, and, to quote from their Minutes: "The 
report was favorably received and it was voted that a special committee be appointed 
to draft the agreement of gift in consultation with Miss Thomas, and that the said 
agreement and plan of management be then submitted for approval to the Executive 
Committee, which was given power to act. As the special committee to draft the 
agreement of gift, Mr. Jones appointed Mr. White, Mr. Scattergood, INIr. Emlen, 
and Mrs. Slade.** Meantime, the Deanery Committee was appointed by Dr. Rufus 
M. Jones, President of the Board of Trustees and of the Board of Directors of 
Bryn Mawr College, and empowered to proceed. 

The alumnae members of the board at present are the President of the College, 
one Trustee, three members-at-large elected by the Trustees of Bryn Mawr College, 
and the five Alumnae Directors elected by the Alumnae Association, one of these 
going out every year and a new one taking her place. 

(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The Deanery Committee for 1933-34 consists of the following members: 
President Marion -Edwards Park, Millicent Carey Mcintosh, Frances Fincke Hand, 
Susan Follansbee Hibbard, Caroline McCormick Slade, Elizabeth Lewis Otey (until 
D-ecember), Virginia Kneeland Frantz, Virginia McKenney Claiborne, Florance 
Waterbury, Louise Fleischmann Maclay, Gertrude Dietrich Smith (after December), 
and Elizabeth Bent Clark, President of the Alumnae Association. The five Alumnae 
Directors^ with the President of the Alumnae Association, make six members elected 
by the Alumnae Association, which means that, out of the Board of eleven, six are 
elected by and directly responsible to the Alumnae Association. 

The Deanery Committee held a preliminary meeting to prepare for the opening 
of the Deanery as an Alumnae Center in the autumn and Caroline McCormick Slade 
was made Temporary Chairman, and, in accordance with instructions then given, 
appointed Millicent Carey Mcintosh, Acting Vice-Chairman; Elizabeth Bent Clark, 
Acting Treasurer ; Louise Fleischmann Maclay, Acting Secretary ; Alice G. Rowland, 
Chairman of the House Committee; and Caroline Chadwick-Collins, Chairman of 
the Entertainment Committee. The first regular meeting of the Deanery Committee 
was held at the Deanery on October 19th, 1933, and it was voted that their meet- 
ings should coincide with the meetings of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr 
College, in October, December, March, and May, that the annual meeting and the 
election of officers be held in May, and that the fiscal year be that of the College, 
July 1st to June 30th. The temporary officers were elected to hold office until 
July 1st, 1934, and the chairmen of the House Committee and the Entertainment 
Committee were reappointed. 

The Deanery Committee realize that their work, to the limit of their resources, 
must be to make the Deanery of the greatest possible value to the Alumnae and to 
provide a center for college entertaining, in cooperation with the President of the 
College, the Board of Trustees, the Board of Directors, and the Faculty of the 
College, as well as with the Alumnae Association. This first year is necessarily 
experimental and the committee feel that they must take time to find out how these 
ends can best be accomplished. To give the faculty immediate facilities for the use 
of the house, the committee have sent guest cards, with full privileges for 1933-34, 
to the non-alumnae women members of the faculty, and have offered the privileges 
of the Deanery for entertaining to the men of the faculty. 

Through the spring and summer. Miss Thomas worked untiringly to put her 
house in order, so that the accumulations of a lifetime could be adequately disposed 
of. The furniture and furnishings she had given to the Deanery, and she herself 
superintended the laying of every rug and the placing of every piece of furniture. 
Alice G. Howland, Chairman of the House Committee, with Elizabeth Bent Clark, 
Caroline Chadwick-Collins, and Constance Cameron Ludington, have borne the 
labor and heat of the day, and no words are adequate to express the gratitude due 
them for the magnificent way in which they made it possible to have the Deanery 
ready for use on the 1st of October. Caroline Chadwick-Collins, Chairman of the 
Entertainment Committee, undertook single-handed to bring out the Deanery 
pamphlet (which is appended to this report), and there is no higher praise than to 
say it is worthy of her best efforts. The other members of this committee are: 
Elizabeth Bent Clark and Alice G. Howland, ex-officio; Lysbeth Boyd Boric, 
Mary Hopkinson Gibbon, Virginia Newbold Gibbon, Dorothy Lee Haslam, Sophie 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Yarnall Jacobs, Anne Linn, Ellenor Morris, Martha G. Thomas, and Emily 
Kimbrough Wrench. Their plans for the year began when the Deanery was 
formally opened with a reception in honor of Miss Thomas on October 2Lst. It is 
not too much to say that Miss Thomas rejoiced in this opportunity to greet and be 
greeted by her own Alumnae, and those of the years since her retirement, and the 
undergraduates. 

The Entertainment Committee are now planning to open the house for interest- 
ing meetings throughout the college year. There are many ways in wliich the 
Deanery can be effectively used. Already a meeting of the Garden Club has been 
held there, on October 19th, by invitation of Sophie Yarnall Jacobs, when 
Gertrude Ely told the story of the garden as it was told to her by Miss Thomas. 
On October 27th and 28th, President Park held there the annual meeting of the 
Five College Conference of Presidents, Deans, and faculty representatives of Bryn 
Mawr, Mount Holyoke, Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley. The Anna Howard Shaw 
lectures are now being given at Bryn Mawr, from October 30th to December 5th, 
and the lecturers are the guests of the College, living at the Deanery and holding 
student conferences there. President Park has invited the Board of Trustees and 
the Board of Directors of the College to hold their December meeting at the 
Deanery and to be her guests at dinner. The Bryn Mawr representative of the 
Seven Women's Colleges Committee is asking President Park to invite the Presidents 
of these colleges and the college representatives to meet at the Deanery during the 
spring. Bryn Mawr looks forward to the Flexner lectures, which will be held again 
next year, when the Deanery will provide hospitality for the Flexner lecturer. 
These distinguished lectures have added notably to Bryn Mawr's prestige, and it is 
a great pleasure to know that the Deanery can offer them comfortable quarters and 
a suitable place in which to meet with the students. With President Park's approval, 
Dr. Tennent has invited the National Academy of Sciences to meet at Bryn Mawr 
next year, and the Deanery has made this possible. If this invitation is accepted. 
the Deanery will be headquarters for a meeting of the most distinguished scientists 
in this country, including such an eminent former Bryn Mawr faculty member as 
Dr. Morgan, this year's winner of the Nobel Prize. 

The Deanery Committee look forward eagerly to the time when the Council 
of the Alumnae Association will meet in Philadelphia and make their home at the 
Deanery. May it be in 1934 ! 



ANNUAL MEETING 

The Annual Meeting of the Alumnae Association will be held in the 
Deanery on Saturday, February 3rd, 1934, at 9.45 a. m. At half past one 
o'clock the meeting will adjourn for luncheon in Pembroke Hall, wliere the 
alumnae will be the guests of President Park, who will speak on college affairs 
of current interest. 

There will be an informal buffet supper for $1.00 in the Deanery on 
Friday, February 2nd, 1934, at 7 p. m. The Deanery Committee invites the 
Alumnae to meet the Faculty at the Deanery at 8.30 p. m. 
Mr. Horace Alwyne will plav 

(5) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE UNDERGRADUATE POINT OF VIEW 

{Reports presented at the Council by the present President of the Undergraduate Association 
and by the President of the Class of 1933) 

A very good friend of mine, of the older generation, always approaches me 
with the statement that it takes at least ten years to get over a Bryn Mawr educa- 
tion. I wish he were here this morning to defend himself, because I hope to dispel 
every illusion on which the remark is based. The undergraduate point of view 
today is practical at all costs, and although we may have lost something in casting 
aside the role of the carefree collegian, it is certainly more in keeping with the 
times that we should be serious-minded. Speaking this way is taking the attitude 
of the senior class especially, because we are the ones who are looking back on the 
greater part of our four-year plan, and, like the Soviets, realizing our mistakes or 
gleaning encouragement for the much longer plan of action that we shall start 
next June. 

Freshman year we all started as rugged individualists, thinking that if we had 
passed those college boards with a Bryn Mawr average we must have something 
that very few other people were fortunate enough to possess. Consequently we got 
into a lot of trouble neglecting traditions to which we were then conscientious 
objectors, but for which we would fight now, tooth and nail. For instance, on 
Lantern Night, marching out of the Cloisters we burst into a snake dance, which 
may have expressed our own mood, but which was decidedly incompatible with that 
of the other three classes. Today, as Seniors, we are more inclined to understand 
their righteous indignation, and, I think, realize that there is no golden mean and 
it is better to be a little sentimental than too hard boiled and callous. 

At the beginning of sophomore year feeling ran high when Latin was given as an 
alternative on the list of required subjects and a large number of us had struggled 
through it the year before. Then when Bryn Mawr started accepting girls on 
New Plan College Board examinations and encouraging the progressive schools, the 
Sophomores murmured that they were letting down the bars and it was all over. 
This year we applaud those policies of the administration because they externalize 
our own feeling that a college career should not be made merely a difficult feat 
entirely removed from the slipshod remainder of life, but should complete and 
crystallize an education and training that we can use later. I don't mean to say that 
the modern practical undergraduate meets every issue saying, "No, it's depression 
time, I can't buy a sandwich," or "Why should I go to the movies, that won't help 
me after college.^", but as a whole we are genuinely more enthusiastic about Mrs. 
Dean's lectures than the latest movie star, and after the first poignant moment, 
ten cents in the pocket is more satisfactory than the tomato-and-lettuce sandwich. 

Junior year, however, we showed tliat we are not quite all conscientiousness 
when we voted unanimously in favor of the absolute success of big May Day the 
year before and advised our successors to continue it without question. Also, last 
spring we gave a dance in the gymnasium and there were enough tickets sold to 
provide for a special undergraduate scholarship over and above our expensesi 

As Seniors we are too busy to spend time developing the philosophy of our 
behavior, and still, this year, the general trend of extra-curricular activities has 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



been toward creating our own diversions rather than purchasing those that Hollywood 
or the tea rooms sell ready made. The members of choir practice at least twice a 
week, and sing at morning and Sunday evening chapel. They are planning to sing 
Beethoven's Ninth Symphony with Mr. Stokowski next spring, and on December 
10th they gave a concert in the Deanery. The Players' Club has adopted a policy of 
producing a one-act play each month. Anyone is allowed to produce any play, and it 
is hoped that there will be some original ones offered soon as a result of the Play- 
writing class. The Varsity Dramatics Association produced The Knight of the 
Burning Pestle on December 9th, followed by another undergraduate association 
dance in the gymnasium. I think it is particularly interesting that the Varsity 
Dramat of its own accord gave the play without the Haverford or Princeton men 
whose aid they have enlisted for the last four years. 

The Bryn Mawr Lantern still prints the best literary efforts of the campus 
and the College News invites letters of indignation. The business board of the 
News has organized several fashion shows given by Best, Wanamaker, and Saks 
Fifth Avenue, in connection with their advertising. This introduction of fashion to 
the campus and the excellent examples of dress set to us by the Freshmen are 
driving out the traditional sloppy haberdashery of the last few college generations. 

Although I am still a little afraid of encroaching on the premises of the 
Dean's office, I would like to express a feeling of satisfaction with the advanced 
courses. The majors in almost every department are enthusiastic about their work, 
and there are twenty-six of us — out of a class of eighty-eight — taking honors. The 
administration has been very broad-minded in one case especially that I think of, 
where three Economics Major students wanted a course not in the catalogue, by a 
professor not on the faculty. For a short period they went to the University of 
Pennsylvania for the lectures, and then Miss Dulles was reelected to the faculty, 
and now she comes out to Bryn Mawr. This, to me, shows a great advancement in 
Bryn Mawr's academic attitude. The undergraduates know what they want, and 
the administration makes it possible for them to get it without lowering the high 
standards that we are all proud of. 

I have really given you more of undergraduate activity than of our point of 
view, but under it all is the increasing consciousness that college is not four years 
of marking time, but rather a strong boost toward whatever goal we are seeking. 
In details the undergraduate point of view may change from year to year, but on 
the whole we still think we have an unusually superior undergraduate body, as it 
was when we entered and undoubtedly always has been since Miss Thomas gave 
the first examinations for matriculation. 

Mary B. Nichols, 1934. 

RELIGION AT BRYN MAWR 

One phase of the undergraduates' point of view is seen in the interest taken in 
the activities of the Bryn Mawr League. This organization took the place of the 
Christian Association five years ago and provides an opportunity for religions 
expression and social service work. 

One so often hears that there is no religion at Bryn Mawr — -that most of the 
students are agnostics or even atheists. I believe that this statement is not true. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



There are at Bryn Mawr, as there are in other colleges, as well as in the younger 
generation as a whole, those to whom religion apparently means very little. Per- 
haps religion means more to them than they are willing to admit, or perhaps they 
find that the usual forms of expressing religion do not meet their needs. However, 
there are also at College those who are interested in religion and who show this 
interest by attending the Sunday Evening Services. 

The services this year have been very well attended. I think one of the reasons 
for this is that outstanding speakers have come to College. Another reason is that 
for the first time the subjects of their talks have been announced before the services. 
These talks have been on such problems as "India," "The Oxford Movement,*' 
"The Problems of the Church in Facing the Attitude of the Modern Generation," 
and "Psychiatry and Religion." These topics appeal because they are tangible, 
practical and helpful in their application to the bewildering situations that sur- 
round us all. A service devoted entirely to music is held about once a month and is 
most popular. 

An important part of the social service work of the League is the work of 
running Bates House, a seashore home for children. The undergraduates not only 
go to Bates House during the summer to take care of these children, but they have 
the full responsibility of raising the money and managing the whole undertaking. 
They would appreciate any suggestions from alumnae about a house at the sea- 
shore which could be used for this purpose. 

Although Bates House is one of the major interests of the League, it is by 
no means the only one. Classes are arranged by the League for Americanization of 
foreigners at the Bryn Mawr Community Center, and instruction in handicrafts, 
gymnasium, dancing, singing, cooking, sewing, etc., is given at the Haverford 
Community Center. Every evening during the week two or three students go to 
the Blind School at Overbrook to read to the boys and girls who, in spite of their 
great handicap, are trying to go to college. 

The League is also interested in arranging educational and social activities for 
the college maids. Undergraduates tutor the maids in any subject they may want 
to study. This often proves to be anything or everything, from Physics and French 
to Arithmetic and Spelling, or even, as this year. Bridge! This year the activities 
of the Summer School Committee and the Industrial Group have been combined. 

Speakers prominent in some field of social work were invited to come to 
Bryn Mawr to tell about their work. Mrs. Mary Breckenridge spoke on the 
"Frontier Nursing Service in Kentucky," and Antoinette Cannon, 1907, spoke of the 
"Training Necessary for Social Work." Visits were made to a settlement house, a 
recreation center, and a prison. These talks and field trips, I think, make the 
college work in sociology more vivid because it brings the subject down to imme- 
diate present-day problems. 

The Bryn Mawr League carries on such a variety of projects that it is able to 
interest a large number of the undergraduates in at least one of its activities. The 
League not only gives the students an opportunity for religious thought and dis- 
cussion and for social work, but it also gives them at least some idea what is going 
on outside of College in these fields. 

Ellinor H. Collins, 1933. 



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BHYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MEMBERS OF THE FACULTY AT MEETINGS 
OF LEARNED SOCIETIES 

Reprinted from the College News 

At the Boston meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science^ Miss Gardiner read a paper entitled "The Origin and Nature of the 
Nucleolus/' and Dr. Blanchard read one on "The Relation of Adrenal Cortical 
Function to Certain Aspects of Resistance." Dr. Tennent also attended. 

Dr. Wheeler and Dr. Noether were present at the meetings of the mathematics 
division. Illness prevented Dr. Flexner from reading his study of "The Intersection 
of Chains on a Topological Manifold." Dr. Richtmyer attended the biannual 
Organic Symposium at Cornell, and Dr. MacKinnon was one of a group of Gestalt 
psychologists who conferred at Northampton. 

The Geological Society of America, meeting in Chicago, heard Dr. Watson 
read a paper on "Differentiation in Teschenite Sills at El Mulato, Mexico." 
Dr. Dryden read an article on "Statistical Correlation of Heavy Mineral Suites." 

At the Amherst gathering of the American Philosophic Association, Mrs. 
de Laguna read a paper on "Appearance and Orientation." Dr. Weiss and Dr. 
Nahm also attended. Dr. Weiss has recently been appointed to the advisory board 
of the new quarterly magazine. Philosophy of Science, which is interested in the 
"unification and clarification of the program, methods, and results of the disciplines 
of philosophy and of science." The magazine is in the library periodical room. 

The chief address at the joint dinner of the Archeological Association of 
America and the American Philological Association, which both convened in 
Washington during the holidays, was delivered by Dr. Carpenter. He discussed 
"Homer and the Archeologists." Dr. Muller read a paper before the former 
organization, on "The Beginnings of Monumental Greek Sculpture," and Miss 
Swindler presided at one of the sessions. Mrs. Holland read a paper before the 
Philological Association, entitled "Virgil's Three Maps of Italy." Miss Taylor 
also attended as a member of the Executive Committee of that Association. 

Although unable to attend the sessions of the Modern Language Association in 
St. Louis, Dr. Lograsso was elected councilor of the affiliated organization, the 
American Association of Teachers of Italian, for the year 1934. Two articles by 
Dr. Lograsso have appeared recently in the A. A. T. I. publication, Italica. 

Dr. Max Diez read a paper before the M. L. A. entitled "The Principle of the 
Dominant Metaphor in Goethe's Werther." Mr. Canu read one on "Arnaud 
Dandieu (1897-1933) et VOrdre Nouveau." The secretary of the Spanish Language 
and Medieval Literature Section of the M. L. A. is Miss Florence Whyte. Mrs. 
Frank is head of the Old French Division. Miss Kohler also attended the convention. 

At the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association, held this 
year in Philadelphia, Dr. Wells conducted a round table on comparative govern- 
ment. Other organizations interested in the social sciences convened at the same 
time, and their sessions were attended by members of the Bryn Mawr faculty, 
including Dr. Miller, who is on the Executive Committee of the American Sociolog- 
ical Society, Dr. Kingsbury, Miss Fairchild, Dr. and Mrs. Smith, and Miss Dulles. 

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BRVN MAWU ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENTS PAGE 

As the members of the Alumnae Council know_, but as other alumnae may not 
know, I see and hear only the social sessions of the Council. My foot stays at the 
threshold of all discussions of college business. Consequently it is only with the 
coming of the January Alumnae Bulletin and the full reports of the councilors 
that I know how often the talk in Boston turned on ways and means toward a closer 
connection between Bryn Mawr and its graduates. The alumna and the official in me 
devoutly wish this consummation not because Myself, the Official, plans to crystallize 
and use for base purposes the sentiment or sentimentality of Myself, the Alumna, 
but because on one hand I think Bryn Mawr needs more eyes, ears and brains in 
its affairs; and oil the other, because the questions of policy and of principle which 
harass us here, are so like the questions of policy and principle in every kind of 
education, that they are worth the objective attention of the alumna who is Living 
in Eeal Life, as she would probably say. I am ready to give to this concern of the 
Alumnae Council enthusiasm, hard work, and what Mr. Laski calls the distasteful 
process of thought. 

I shall venture to put down for all the alumnae my half of an Imaginary 
Conversation on the subject. The closer connection which we wish must rest, I 
agree, on flesh and blood. Moving pictures need more than their captions, and 
pages and print leave the writer warm from exertion but the reader cold. Either 
the College or the alumnae must travel. 

The first obvious device is that Mahomet come to the mountain! I am 
convinced that the College must encourage alumna-visiting in every way, and, short 
of clogging the wheels of the college machinery, be keen to try any plans proposed. 
But Mahomet should realize (1) that brief and unannounced visits are intellectual 
potluck; our dinner of yesterday or tomorrow may be better or worse; (2) that if 
a sample lecture or a sample day is arranged by the College it ceases to be a sample. 
In neither case can an average be struck in the appraisal of a year course, by one, 
two, or even three hours of observation. I have seen two pairs of disorganized 
pyjamas wipe out the impression of a hundred trim skirts. 

Suppose the eight directors who are alumnae carry out their proposal of 
spending twenty- four hours or more at the College on the occasion of each meeting, 
and as time goes on will both formally and informally discuss their impressions with 
each other and with us, the natives. A pool of information and criticism can be 
started. It will be information and not gossip. To such a pool other alumnae can 
add either formally or informally their impressions. I think an observation service, 
immensely valuable to the College, can be built up. 

The second obvious device sends the mountain to Mahomet! Mahomet in his 
own home rightly makes a varied demand on a spokesman for his alma mater. He 
wants facts — how about the Japanese cherries, the new microscopes, the freshman 
class; inside information on the college policies behind the facts; admission and 
curriculum information of a detailed and exact kind for local schools or scholarship 
committees, and propaganda for hesitating parents or girls; more majestic orches- 
tration based on the Bryn Mawr theme: women's colleges, liberal arts colleges, 
progressive and old-line schools, women in politics. The modest individuals who 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



b 



have some (no one has all) of this knowledge have usually got it by hard work in 
Bryn Mawr offices^ whither they must^ alas ! soon and precipitately return, for with 
the present staff absences can not be long. On the other hand the traveler can not 
be hurried; school visits, teas and speeches must fit into the schedules of schools 
and of hostesses, and slie licrsclf must be fresh and quick-witted, for disaster lies 
in the path of fatigue. 

And difficult as the practical arrangements of official traveling are, it is 
repaying to the official traveler. Those ticklish problems of the College which are 
and stay far from the campus, she sees from nearby. She realizes genuine dissatis- 
faction, false starts which the College is taking, its misunderstanding or apparent 
disregard of students' needs. Visits to Mahomet in his own home are as valuable 
to Bryn Mawr as his visits to the campus. 

To sum up my half of this conversation: there must be, I think, genuine 
meetings of interested parties — College and alumna — and in the domain of each. 
The information which . each gets must be recorded, corrected, enlarged, used. 
Council meetings, alumnae meetings, will serve admirably to tie up such discussion 
and to spread such information, and slowly to build up a united college policy on it. 

It remains for the committee appointed at the council meeting to work out 
the plan. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Wednesday. February 7th — 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hali 

Lecture on "The Conquest of Everest," with movies, by 
Air-Commodore P. F. M. Fellowes, leader of the British expedition. 
Reserved seats, $1.65; Balcony unreserved, $1.10, 
Auspices of the Cosmopolitan Club of Philadelphia. 

Sunday, February I Ith — 5 p. m., The Deanery. Fourth of the Series* 

Mr. Barton Currie, editor, author, and book collector, will talk on "Collecting the Jolly Old 
Classics" and will show valuable old manuscripts and early editions of really beloved books. 

Tuesday, February 13th — 2.30 p. nn., The Deanery 

Bridge for the benefit of the Eastern Pennsylvania, Delaware and Southern New Jersey 
Regional Scholarship Fund. Tables, $4.00, including tea and prize, may be purchased from 
Mrs. W. C. Byers, Villanova. 

Saturday, February 17th — 10.30 a. m. and 3 p. nn., The Deanery 

Red Gate Shadow Puppets. Auspices of the Chinese Scholarship Committee. 
Adults, $1.00; Children under 12 years, $.65. 

Saturday, February 17th — 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Concert by the Princeton Glee Club. Tickets, $1.00. 

Thursday, February 22nd — 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Concert by the Vienna Choir Boys. Auspices of the Bryn Mawr War Memorial and Community 
hlouse Association. Reserved seats, $1.50 and $1.25; Balcony unreserved, $1.10. 

Saturday, February 24th — 8,20 p. m,, Goodhart Hall 

Freshman Show. Tickets, $1.00, 
Sunday, February 25th — 5 p. m., The Deanery. Fifth of the Series* 

Lecture, "The Artist in the World Today," by Mr, Edward M. M, Warburg, 

of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, 

*Tea and cookies will be served informally without charge at 4.30. 

An informal hujfet supper will be served every Sunday evening at 7 o'cloc\, price 75 cents. 
Reservations should he made in advance if possible to the Manager of the Deanery. 

Alumnae may bring guests to the Deanery parties, 
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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAK BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. Elizabeth Hannan, 1934 



There has probably been more traffic in and out Goodhart and the Deanery 
during the past month than at any time in the history of either place. The week 
after Thanksgiving was filled with rehearsals and presentations of the Varsity Play; 
Alexander Woollcott swept in on the following Tuesday to give The Dying Confes- 
sions of a Newspaperman; and Edna St. Vincent Millay dragged us away from 
our books on the Monday after that. 

The Varsity Dramat play, the first event after Thanksgiving, was a Jacobean 
farce, The Knight of the Burning Pestle, by Beaumont and Fletcher. Although 
director and cast expressed some doubt beforehand as to its success, the play received 
unqualified praise from its audiences. To quote Dr. Enid Glen's review in the News: 
"Some of the audience was heard to say that it was the finest production Bryn 
Mawr had done for years; others could not remember anything so good." And 
more of the same from an enthusiastic letter written by Dr. Leslie Hotson, Profes- 
sor of English at Haverford and well known Shakespearean scholar: *'Its thumping 
success marks an undeniable step forward in undergraduate producing at college." 

On the strength of these paeans of praise, I think we may say that the first 
round goes to the "literary" group in Varsity Dramat. They have been waiting 
more or less patiently for a long time to put across their point — that Bryn Mawr 
is better fitted to give period plays than modern productions, which require profes- 
sional acting from everyone in the cast; and now they seem to have proved it. 
Although the experience acquired in such a production would scarcely be classified 
as useful for anyone aiming at the professional stage, it has a very definite value 
for the people who take part in the staging, costuming, and acting. To put on 
The Knight of the Burning Pestle and keep it faithful to the traditions of the 
period, everyone concerned had to know something of the Jacobean world. Most 
of the cast projected themselves quite successfully, both in gesture and tone, back 
to Jacobean times. Although the audiences were too small to give The Knight 
the financial success it deserved, the recent triumph will probably weigh heavily 
in future choice of plays. The rather scant attendance may seem a reflection on 
the Bryn Mawr undergraduate, but we hasten to say that the forbidding title of the 
play and unfavourable publicity probably repelled many who had guests down for 
the dance Saturday night. No doubt Philadelphia seemed to offer more light and 
gaiety than a Beaumont and Fletcher revival. We think that next time, with a 
little encouraging publicity and the aura of success lent by this play, Varsity 
Dramat will achieve financial security as well as a succes d^estime. 

It was demonstrated to our unbelieving eyes on the following Tuesday by none 
other than Mr. Alexander Woollcott that the great spaces of Goodhart can be 
packed almost to the last seat. Rapid calculation of the number of people in the 
audience forced us to the conclusion that every Main Line homestead and school 
must have been drained to the last man to hear the witty columnist. None of them 
regretted coming if one can judge from the almost continuous laughter and frequent 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



bursts of applause. Mr. Woollcott not only supplied his hearers with a number 
of good stories — both amusing and sentimental — but he also left behind him a few 
constructive hints for the uncertain undergraduate. His chief advice to the job- 
hunters-to-be was not to model their ambitions on the achievements of some glitter- 
ing success of the generation before^ but to look around with eager eye to discover 
the new fields being opened up. We don't think his advice will be hard to follow ; 
next year will undoubtedly find ninety-nine percent of the Senior Class inventing 
new occupations that no one has ever heard of before^ just to preserve an appear- 
ance of activity. 

Our second celebrity of the month was Edna St. Vincent Millay who again 
convinced us that no one can read poetry with half the charm and lucidity that 
the person can who wrote it. The practice of inviting poets to Bryn Mawr to 
deliver their poetry at first hand has brought to Goodhart in the last few years 
such authors as W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, James Stephens, James Weldon 
Johnson. We feel that it must be a great inspiration to the poets of Bryn Mawr 
to get their poet-lore from the purest source, and also to be able to grill the visitor 
at the reception usually held afterwards. Miss Millay, brought to bay at this 
function, answered the stock request for a definition of poetry with a sentence she 
had once used on a Vassar examination paper: "Poetry is something reverently 
written by great men and blasphemously defined by undergraduates in female 
institutions." No doubt this succinct definition will relieve poets speaking here in 
the future of the thankless job of defining poetry to a hypercritical Bryn Mawr 
audience. A satisfying exception to the rule that poetry should be read by its 
author, if possible, was a reading by Mrs. Hope Woods Hunt at the Deanery the 
Thursday before Miss Millay came. She selected verse by modern poets, but 
omitted Miss Millay's because she was scheduled to speak so soon afterwards. 
Although this careful omission prevents comparison of the two, Mrs. Hunt's tech- 
nique would probably not have suffered by it. 

The prevalent interest on campus in the muse of poetry may be bearing a sort 
of mushroom fruit underground but as yet none of the poetry group has published 
in any form except The Lantern, and there not very profusely. Miss G. G. King, 
in her review of the fall issue of The Lantern, practically accused the undergraduate 
body as a whole of having little energy and fewer ideas than any generation to 
date. This judgment is correct, if one can draw sweeping conclusions from a 
survey of campus publications and not from a thorough canvass of each student — 
body and soul; yet we still think that there is a modicum of creative power hidden 
behind our indifferent masks. Our theory is that the present generation is neither 
so generous as former ones, nor so anxious to see its brain-children in print in a 
college paper. Some day we intend to offer a large premium for all contributions 
just to find out whether the literary light has failed or is merely being hoarded 
for the royalties of after-life. 

When our famous visitors and Varsity Play are both forgotten, the month of 
December, 1933, will be remembered by every undergraduate as the month when 
the plan for a comprehensive system first emerged from a faculty committee into 
the hot glare of publicity in the News columns. Although the plan of having com- 
prehensive examinations for the whole Senior Class in the major subject has not 
been finally adopted, it has been thoroughly discussed and reported upon by the 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Faculty Curriculum Committee. In the December 20th issue of the News, Dean 
Manning explained the system, presenting a clear analysis of what its adoption 
would mean to the students. It if works out as the report indicates that it will/ 
it should result in giving every student a more mature view of what she has been 
concentrating on for three or four years. 

The objection will probably be made that comprehensives will make for too 
much emphasis on one course and that this over-specialization will be harmful. 
That objection can, I think, be disproved by people who take honours and the 
comprehensive under the present system. Intensive work — ''specialization" — para- 
doxically enough, forces one to broaden one's view of a course and to apply infor- 
mation gleaned from other branches of learning as well as the major. To quote 
from Dean Manning's article: *'The examinations, to be successful, must test the 
power of the students to use and apply the information which they have gathered 
from courses and reading. A wider familiarity with what has been written from 
different points of view on the subject matter of the major courses might be one 
essential part of the preparation." Under the present system, or lack of system, 
different departments have widely differing requirements for the comprehensives; 
the English Department, for example, requires every student to take Junior and 
Senior comprehensives, a requirement which warns off the wary and the timid from 
majoring in English. All that will be changed under the new plan, which, when 
and if adopted, will enforce uniformity in every department. The question of com- 
prehensives will probably start a small uproar pro and con when College reassembles 
after the holidays, so we promise to continue the story in next month's issue. 



PROPOSED NEW POLICY OF COMPREHENSIVE 
EXAMINATIONS 

(Reprinted from the article written for the College News by Dean Manning) 

A plan for an important change in the curriculum is at present under discussion 
by the Faculty Curriculum Committee and the various major departments. This 
plan, of which copies have been given to all members of the Undergraduate Curricu- 
lum Committee, would introduce an examination on certain general fields of the 
major subjects to be taken by all candidates for the A.B. degree in the final 
examination period of their senior year. The examination would probably consist 
of three papers of approximately three hours each, to be scheduled in the first week 
of the examination period. Seniors not passing it would not receive the degree in 
that year, but would be permitted to attempt the examination again in the fall or 
later. 

The plan for the Comprehensive Examination, which might perhaps better be 
called the final examination in the major subject, has been prepared with the object 
of strengthening and unifying the work of the senior year and, to a lesser degree, 
the work of the other three years by giving to the major work a more definite final 
objective. The examinations to be successful must test the power of the students to 
use and apply the information which they have gathered from courses and reading. 
A wider familiarity with what has been written from different points of view on 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



the subject matter of the major courses might be one essential part of the 
preparation. 

The plan makes allowance for a considerable amount of time in the senior 
year to be devoted to such reading or to other reading on special topics. A Senior 
would carry only three unit courses and she would have, moreover, two full weeks 
during the mid-year examination period for intensive reading and study and probably 
a certain amount of extra time in May for a general review. It is also to be hoped 
that many students will find it possible to do a good deal of general reading in the 
summer before the senior year. 

Every effort has been made in the plan to minimize such interruptions as would 
be caused by course examinations, but there is no intention of encouraging students 
to concentrate entirely on their major subject in the senior year. It is the hope 
of the Curriculum Committee that Seniors would feel well able to carry at least 
one elective course, whether it be in a subject totally unrelated to the major or in 
one in which interest has been aroused through the study of some branch of the 
major. In the majority' of cases students would probably also be carrying work 
in a closely allied subject. 

It is taken for granted that in those courses which are not tested by the Com- 
prehensive, Seniors would cover the same ground and do approximately the same 
amount of work as the other students, but special schedules would be arranged in 
order that the review periods and the written tests would not conflict with the periods 
of intensive work for the Comprehensive. 

The junior year would, generally speaking, be the period in which students 
would complete Second Year work in the major and would carry essential allied 
work and one or two elective courses. At the end of the junior year departments 
would hold conferences with all their major students to ensure that the plan of 
reading for the Comprehensive Examination was fully understood and that students 
had every opportunity to read sucli books as especially appealed to them during the 
summer. 

There seems no reason at all to suppose that the change of the major subject 
would be any more difficult under the plan proposed than it is at present. On the 
contrary, since there would be more deliberate effort to concentrate most of the work 
of the major subject into the last two years, the possibility of making a change 
in the middle or at the end of the junior year would be increased rather than 
otherwise. Undoubtedly, a student who tried to change at the begiiming of her 
senior year would be somewhat handicapped unless she chose a subject in which 
she had already done a great deal of work. But that is true at present. 

For the first two years the effort would be to make students diversify their 
courses rather more than they do under our present requirements. It would be very 
important for students to complete their required work early and also be prepared 
to pass their language examinations at the beginning of their junior year. In many 
cases, of course, tlie German could be passed at the beginning of the sophomore 
year or even at tlie end of tlie freslnnan year. Students would on the whole be 
discouraged from taking Second Year work in tlie sophomore year when they 
wished to spend their junior year abroatl. The accunuilation of credits towards the 
degree would not be possible in the same sense tliat it is at present, and every one 
would be expected to carry full work for the last two years. Exceptions might 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



possibly be made for students who lost time through illness in the junior or senior 
year, if they had completed an unusual amount of work by the end of the sophomore 
year, but some procedure on this point would have to be worked out on the basis 
of experience. 

The passing mark for the Comprehensive would be sixty, and, since the students 
attempting it would in all cases have completed two years of work in the major 
subject with marks of seventy or above, there seems no reason at all to suppose 
that the examination would be a more difficult test than the course examinations. 
That it ought to be a different kind of test is sufficiently obvious, and unless exami- 
nations are set which call for a broad view of the subject and for the power to 
reason about the facts and not merely to memorize them, the whole experiment 
will be a failure. 

It seems to many members of the faculty worth while to make a change which 
holds promise of greater unity and meaning for the college course as a whole, 
especially since it would introduce a type of work in the senior year of which the 
majority of undergraduates at present have but little experience and which has 
been found in other colleges to develop maturity and independence. 

THE ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 

Peddler's Pack, hy Mary Owen Lewis. David McKay Co,, Philadelphia. $1.60. 
Peddler's Pack is the third slim book of verse that Miss Lewis has brought out. 
The Phantom Bow and Tower Window being her two earlier ones. It shows a 
growing maturity in her art^ although it follows the same lines of interest, for the 
most part, that were indicated in the other two volumes. She writes of birds and 
flowers, of the changing seasons, of storms, of the sea, of the places and pictures 
she has seen on her wanderings through France and Germany. In one of the poems 
she says that she "glories in the freedom of maturity." That is the undercurrent 
that one feels in all of the poems, especially in those that are specific social 
comment. The meters with which she experiments, while they, for the most part, 
follow old patterns, with the exception of the septet, which is an original form with 
her, show this same sense of pleasure in variety, in release from constraint. One 
feels in all the poems, even when it is not stated as explicitly as in the following 
quotation, that life itself is her preoccupation: 

"Art is the drop and life the river flowing. 

Who puts the cistern high above the stream.'' 
. Or slakes a thirst with art, in scorn of knowing 

That life is water fresh with sunlight's gleam.?" 

Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912. 

Tourist Third, hy Ruth Wright (Kauffman). Penn Publishing Co., 1933. $2.00. 
Of Mrs. Kauffman's two novels presented to the Alumnae Bookshelf, Dancing 
Dollars and Tourist Third, the latter is the most recent and should prove refresh- 
ing reading to those who revolt against the relentless realism of the day and long 
for Victorian romances when heroines were beautiful, heroes faithful, and coinci- 
dence befriended both. 

(16) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Jacqueline Olmsted meets her hero on a deserted island in Maine when she 
had sought solitude there to consider another man's offer of marriage. Even the 
tides are kind and prevent the landing of a rescue boat until the mysterious Alike 
(who has been camping here with his great Dane for reasons known only to them 
both) has found and feasted his lady. One likes to imagine that this scene inspired 
the book, for it possesses an atmosphere worthy of a summer night in Maine, and 
the light humor of the dialogue would make a charming scene on the stage. 

The reader cannot help hoping during the following pages which seem, perhaps 
because of his impatience, rather too long, that Jacqueline will decide to keep her 
assignation with Mike and book passage on the same ship. It is a little hard to 
understand how a modern American girl, portrayed as the belle of a sophisticated 
society, could be so much under the influence of her mother and so reverent to the 
conventions that she would need any encouragement from her stepfather to embark 
upon such an adventure. 

Up to this point, the author has chosen a savory and not too familiar recipe 
for romance to which her touches of humor give a certain flavor. But from now on 
there is a disappointing drop as if she had seen no farther than the meeting on 
the ship, and had been abandoned there by her imagination high and dry. One feels 
the mistake whereby Jacqueline reads Mike's telegram merely hauled in to prolong 
the tale, and knows beforehand that the suspicious female name will soon be 
ingeniously explained away. The explanation, however, is almost too ingenious. 

Pamela Burr, 1928. 

To Paris with Aunt Prue, hy Ruth (Wright) Kauffman. Penn Publishing Co., 

$2.00. 

In To Paris with Aunt Prue Mrs. Kauffman has given us a guide book in disguise 
as a child's story which should prove equally entertaining to children and helpful 
to parents unfortunate enough to find themselves stranded in Paris with the very 
young. This book happily fills in a blank in Guide Book literature which so far 
offered little reading palatable to a child. The adventures of the twins in Paris 
(though it takes, perhaps, a shade too long to get them there) have been prepared 
with care, knowledge, and common sense, most indispensable quality of all from 
the traveller's point of" view. The chapters, with their slight thread of story, should 
give a child a clear picture of the city and just enough information to clarify rather 
than confuse. The suggestions at the end of each chapter should answer the ques- 
tions of even the most curious child who is ignorant of how to telephone, count 
money or eat breakfast in French, at the same time that they solve the problems 
of his mother who does not know where to take him when the sun shines or where 
to leave him when it rains. Pamela Burr, 1928. 

Among other recent alumnae publications are: 

The Dollar, The Franc, and Inflation, hi/ Eleanor Lansing Dulles. The 
Macmillan Company. $1.25. 

British Colonial Government After the American Revolution, hy Helen 
Taft Manning. Yale University Press. $4.00. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

Those who knew Anna Weusthoff Mosher 
(Mrs. J. A. Mosher) will regret exceedingly 
to hear that she passed away last September. 
Mrs. Mosher was a graduate student in 1906-07 
and 1909-12, and was the Ottendorfer 
Memorial Research Fellow in Teutonic Phil- 
ology from 1907 to 1909. For the last few 
years she has been on the faculty of Hunter 
College, New York City, where she not only 
did very fine work in her classes, but also won 
a high place in the regard and affection of 
her fellow-teachers and her pupils. Her hus- 
band. Professor J. A. Mosher, of City College, 
New York, and her mother, Mrs, H. S. 
Weusthoff, survive her. 

1889 
No Editor Appointed. 

1890 
No Editor Appointed. 
In the exhibition of the National Association 
of Women Painters and Sculptors on view now 
at the American Fine Arts Building in New 
York, are what the New York Times character- 
ized as "interesting, sometimes really arresting" 
pictures by Marian Macintosh. It reproduced, 
giving it the most important place on the page, 
her "imaginative study in contrast," The Lute 
Player. 

1891 

No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., New York. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 
Evangeline Walker Andrews has given me a 
retrospect of her career in recent years to 
"bring us up to date." In 1926-27 she and 
Dr. Andrews made a trip around the world, 
frequently getting off the beaten paths. Their 
most interesting experience was crossing the 
desert from Damascus to Bagdhad. Here, there, 
and everywhere, they ran into revolutions of 



sorts; in Syria, Damascus, Indo-China, and 
China. Letters of introduction offered unusual 
opportunities for visiting the interior of 
Sumatra, Java, and Bali, with a day in the 
Sultan's palace at Djokjakarta, witnessing the 
routine life and the dancing. Then a three-day 
trip to the Dieng Plateau, rarely visited, where 
are the oldest Buddhist remains in Java. Let- 
ters to people in Kandy, Ceylon, enabled them 
to see some of the native dancing, life in the 
Temple of the Tooth, the elephants at work, 
and the ruined cities of the North. Another 
high-water mark was a 350-mile drive to 
Angkor from Saigon. In Japan they were, 
inter alia, entertained in a Buddhist monastery 
and saw the pearl fishing as well as cormorant 
fishing, and pushed into some quiet, unspoiled 
back country. 

Since their return. Dr. Andrews — ^honorary 
member of '93 — ^has retired and is devoting 
himself to his Magnum Opus, a six- volume 
History of the American Colonies. Evangeline 
has completed a four-year term as President of 
the Connecticut Society of Colonial Dames. 
During her term of office great stress was laid 
on collecting Colonial manuscripts, and sav- 
ing, recording, and restoring Colonial houses. 
The restoration and opening of an old tavern, 
Marlborough Tavern, on the main highway 
from Hartford to New London at the intersec- 
tion of the Willimantic-Middletown road, will 
be of interest to motoring members of '93, 
who will see there a fine old ball-room and 
tap-room. 

And now the Andrews family has "gone 
rural"; they have bought a farm at East Dover, 
Vermont, and made over the barn into a de- 
lightful "home and workshop," where they 
expect to write, rest, and play for six months 
of the year. John Andrews has temporarily 
given up his law work to try out writing. He, 
too, has a little house at East Dover, and, 
though Evangeline states that his chief interests 
are law, aviation, and literature, I know that 
last spring he was energetically selling most 
excellent maple syrup. Ethel Andrews Harlan 
has a charming daughter, Evangeline, now 
nearly 2 years old, described as a "grand" baby 
in more ways than one. 

Jane Brownell did not get to Hancock Point 
last summer. Her sister Harriet had pneu- 
monia, and their departure from Hartford was 
so long delayed that it was finally given up 
entirely. 

Helen Thomas Flexner spent the summer at 
Chocorua, N. H., where your Editor almost saw 



(18) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her and did see her attractive son, who is, I 
believe, also trying his hand at writing. 

Lucy Donnelly was with Helen at Chocorua 
for a time. This I know, not from any news 
sent by Lucy, but from my daughter Susan, 
who spent the summer nearby as chauffeur and 
errand boy for Professor and Mrs. George 
Baker, erstwhile of Workshop 47 and of Yale, 
and kept an eye on "mother's friends." Lucy 
please note and send her own news next time. 

Bertha Putnam is in London working on her 
book on Early Proceedings Before Justices of 
the Peace, crouched over a gas-log and nearly 
freezing in this unexpected weather. She had 
planned to join Corinna and her husband in 
Egypt for part of the winter, but gave it up 
on account of the dropping exchange. With 
the thermometer also dropping, she may well 
be regretting her decision. 

Gertrude Taylor Slaughter was asked a year 
ago to select, arrange and edit some of Nan 
Emery Allinson's essays for the volume that has 
recently been published by Harcourt, Brace 
and Co., and is entitled Selected Essays. When 
the material was accepted by the publishers 
they asked Gertrude to write the biographical 
introduction, which she did, thus adding much 
to the interest of the volume of which she 
writes, "I think the collection (of essays) on 
many different subjects will represent Nan and 
make her personality felt." Gertrude continues 
to spend her winters in Madison, Wis., where 
she has many interests, and goes for the sum- 
mer to her lovely home at Hancock Point, Me., 
with Jane Brownell as a near neighbor. 

Susan Walker FitzGerald married off her 
daughter Rebecca, Bryn Mawr '26, in late 
June and spent several days in Lebanon, N. H., 
unpacking and settling the aforesaid daugh- 
ter's possessions in "The Parsonage" before 
her arrival. Daughter Susan, Bryn Mawr '29, 
is in Munich as "Adviser to the Junior Year 
Students" under the direction of the Univer- 
sity of Delaware. She is herself taking three 
courses at the university, and hopes some day 
to count them in towards an M.A. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 
c/o The Brearley School 
610 East 83rd St., New York City. 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 



1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

The Class Editor regrets exceedingly her slip 
— one hundred city blocks — in writing down 
Mary Fay's New York address for the Decem- 
ber Bulletin. The correct address is 520 West 
114th Street. She regrets also that her per- 
sonal New Year's Greeting which she meant to 
have in the January issue, was edited out, 
probably because the notes came in so late 
that there wasn't room for everything. She is 
especially sorry because the greeting had, con- 
cealed among its evergreen sentiments, an 
S. 0. S. call for news items that she hoped 
would come pouring in for this issue. How- 
ever, there are Christmas cards to fall back 
upon, though it is surprising to find on them 
so little that is "fit to print." 

Anne Lawther is always a comfort. In a 
clear, bold hand she writes, on the back of the 
Jungfrau, I think it is, of the glorious July 
days in Switzerland and of delightful walks 
around Miirren. She adds, "Since I came back 
early in September, I have been away two or 
more days each week on Board of Education 
work and it keeps piling up." Thank you. 
Miss Lawther. 

Sue Blake spent the holidays with her mother 
and sister in Merion and went out to 
Bryn Mawr for tea in the Deanery and dinner 
in Low Buildings. She had intended going to 
Boston for the Science Meetings at Cambridge, 
but the zero weather made her decide not to 
go farther north. She writes with enthusiasm 
of her life at Hollins College, Virginia. 

Emma Cadbury's greeting card was from 
Vienna I, Singerstrasse 16. (If she had written 
on the card all that we should like to know 
about conditions in Austria it might never 
have come through.) 

1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 
(Mrs. Warren Tliorpe) 
15 East 64th St., New York City. 



(19) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike D. Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

May Yeatts Howson (on demand by the 
Editor), neatly penned the following skeleton- 
ized account of her family: 

Charles, Jr. — Yale, '30, Senior in Law School. 
Married June, '33. 

John Y.— Princeton, '3L Medical Student. 
Engaged. 

Elizabeth — Two years Bryn Mawr. Gradu- 
ated Drexel, '3L 

James — Williams, '32. Law Student. 

George — In Drexel & Co. (Philadelphia J. P. 
Morgan Office). 

Walter — University of Pennsylvania, '37. 

May — Baldwin '33. Boston-Bouve Freshman. 

Margaret — Baldwin '34. Headed for Bryn 
Mawr next fall. 

She added a brief note to say she feared her 
data was like that of other classmates, and we 
needn't use it if we didn't want to — and that 
for herself (besides these maternal responsi- 
bilities — the parenthesis, the Editor's) she is 
interested in the usual clubs, garden and music, 
President of the local library and a Trustee of 
the Mothers' Assistance Fund of Delaware 
County (appointed by the Governor). "But 
these are the things everyone is doing" . . . 
Read this, ye mothers of one child or none, 
who don't even write to your Editor when she 
sends a stamp for the reply! 

May Brown has been teaching at the Mt. 
Vernon School in Washington for several years. 

Nan Shearer Lafore is President of her 
Garden Club and doing welfare work. Her 
oldest son, John, Jr., was married in October. 
Her daughter Helen is M. F. H. of the Gladwyn 
Hunt, the youngest master in the U. S. A. 
Robert is in business with his father and does 
a great deal of flying. Lawrence goes to 
Princeton next year. 

Jane Cragin Kay dropped out of the unknown 
into Boston in October with a very pretty 
daughter in tow. She says they live in London, 
but are never there — that they own a house 
somewhere else but don't stay there either, 
and that on the whole the Guaranty Trust 
Company, Brussels, Belgium, is as likely to 
reach her as any other address, but she thinks 
she'll spend next winter in Boston. By these 
bits of quotation, her classmates will note Jane 
is still hitting high spots, and your Editor is 
prepared to state that she is prettier and livelier 
than ever, and that we should do well to lure 
her back to America. 

Elinor Dodge Miller is again at No. 2540 
Massachusetts Avenue, Washington, D. C, for 
the winter, after a summer vacation in Ontario. 

After a summer abroad looking after an ill 



sister, Eleanor Wood Whitehead is back in 
New York for the winter. 

Elizabeth Lyon Belknap is spending the fall 
and early winter in her new and beautiful 
country place at Island Creek, Massachusetts. 
Her second son, Robert, Jr., is a Sophomore at 
Yale rowing on the Crew; her second daughter, 
Rhoda, a first year student at Shipley. 

Maude Sperry Turner is working with the 
Delineator as Celia Caroline Cole. She has 
published several short stories in the magazine, 
and has written a play which has been bought 
by Jane Cowl. 

Elizabeth Bodine teaches in the Trenton High 
School. She spent last summer in Munich and 
the Bavarian Alps. 

Elizabeth Plunkett Paddock's son is a first- 
year student in the Harvard Medical School; 
her daughter is at home this winter. 

Frances Adams Johnson has one son at the 
Yale Medical School and another a Freshman 
at Brown. Her daughter graduated from 
Mt. Holyoke last June and is now attending 
the New York School of Social Work. Her 
distinguished husband, who was Chairman of 
the Traveling Commission to investigate traffic 
in women and children for the League of 
Nations, has returned after two years in the 
Near and Far East. Frances herself has some 
dignified entitlements, such as Secretary of the 
Pleasantville Woman's Club, but what she really 
does is play golf. 

Violet Foster has been with the United States 
Tariff Commission in Washington ever since it 
was organized in 1917. She is Foreign Tariffs 
Expert in the Division of International Rela- 
tions. She is a motor enthusiast, and when not 
in her office is out in her car — an expert on 
roads as well as on tariffs. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 
320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Alice Boring sent me a delightful Christmas 
letter from Yenching: 

"It is fun to be part of a going concern, 
and Yenching is a thrilling place to work in. 
We are always on the brink of some kind of 
a precipice — if it is not the Japanese it is 
Depression. 

"Last summer Mary James and I had a little 
reunion all of our own. I visited her in her 
summer camp at a beautiful mountain resort 
in Central China, and we hiked everywhere. 

"My living arrangements are as romantic as 
ever, since I still live in the Prince's Garden— 



(20) 



BIIYN MAWK ALUMNAK BULLETIN 



the Prince, by the way, being the uncle of 
Pu Yi, the present factotum in Manchokuo. 
My old housemate, Grace Boynton, a Wellesley 
woman who teaches English at Yenching, has 
returned to me again after two years in 
America. It is, of course, delightful to have 
her with me again. The Prince, by the way, 
is coming tomorrow for tea. Grace has been 
making a study of Chinese gardens, and wants 
to ask him more about the history of ours." 

Christmas Greetings came from one of our 
busiest classmates. Dr. Mary James, who is 
carrying on most successfully with her hospital 
work. 

Alice Schiedt Clark's daughter Eunice is a 
Senior at Radcliffe; Arnold is a Freshman at 
Swarthmore; and Rebecca is a Freshman at 
Wisconsin. 

Hope Woods Hunt gave a delightful reading 
at the Deanery on December 14th. 

Marjorie Sellers has been elected Vice-Presi- 
dent of the School Board of Lower Merion. 

Clara Wade visited in Philadelphia during 
the Christmas holidays. 

Eleanor Bliss Knopf attended the meetings 
of the Economic Geologists' Society, held at 
Princeton last July. She went as a leader on 
the excursion of the International Geological 
Congress, guiding about thirty people of differ- 
ent nationalities. Her daughter Tess is at 
Wellesley; her son George is studying for his 
Doctor's degree at Yale. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

After the Bulletin was on the press word 
was received of the death of Helen Kempton. 

The Class extends sympathy to Clara Porter 
Yarnelle and Gladys Seligman Heukolom, 
whose respective fathers died recently. 

Louise Marshall Mallery's stepson, Otto Tod 
Mallery, Jr., was married in New York City, 
on December 20th to Elizabeth Stuart Barstow, 
and Florence Craig Whitney's son Craig was 
married in New Haven on January 6th to 
Anne Van Duzer Ward. 

Anne Greene Bates writes from 1105 North 
Fremont Avenue, Tucson, Arizona: "Betsey had 
sinus trouble, missed a year of college because 
of an operation, and is now out here recover- 
ing on the desert. She is studying at the 
University of Arizona and hopes to go back to 
Bryn Mawr. We have met some delightful 
people and are enjoying the country. I found 
Ruth Jones Huddleston, who has her entire 
family here and is working for the Red Cross." 

Esther Lowenthal has been in New Haven 
recently, where she lectured on The Gold 
Standard before the Smith College Club. Those 



who were at the meeting said it was the clear- 
est exposition of the subject they had heard. 

Margaret Fulton Spencer writes from 10 rue 
Oudinot, Paris VII, France: "We had a mar- 
velous year, living in Paris and then motoring 
through Switzerland, Germany, and France, and 
at the seashore in Brittany. Now we have this 
apartment for the winter and expect to put 
the car into dead storage. What a pest money 
matters are! My younger daughter is in board- 
ing-school outside of Paris, acquiring French, 
and the older, who is 19, is studying piano and 
voice here. I have been doing some archi- 
tectural work in collaboration with a French 
architect — one thing, a residence club of thirty- 
eight apartments, and another, a scheme for 
sixty houses and a club and two apartments 
at St. Cloud. Whether they will be built de- 
pends upon the financial situation, which un- 
fortunately is none too good here, though, 
compared to America, France is flourishing. At 
any rate, it is intensely interesting work and I 
have met all sorts of persons and had a vast 
amount of practice in speaking French, as I 
am on a committee with seven French persons 
who are active in these developments. I have 
been painting, also, and exhibiting here and in 
Holland, so that I find life very full and very 
thrilling." 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Haughwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 



1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

For years we have been hearing about Ruth 
Hammitt Kauffman's literary achievements, but 
somehow our letters to her, addressed usually 
to Geneva, had a way of returning unopened. 
We had been told also that she and her hus- 
band knew everyone interesting in Europe, and 
we mean to pursue that rumor further, now 
that we have actually run her to earth in 
Sebasco, Maine, and she has obligingly given 
us three of her books for the Alumnae Book 
Shelves. (See pages 16-17.) Not satisfied with 
that, we asked for more, to which she politely 
replied : 

"You are not greedy, but Stars for Sale, my 
publishers write me, is out of print. There 
was a reprint by another firm, but I have even 
forgotten their name. If I ever run across a 
second-hand copy, I will see that it comes to 
you. 

"Several years ago we bought an acre or so 
of shore frontage, rocks and woodland here on 
Casco Bay, half a dozen miles west of its 
northern point. I had great fun designing a 



(21) 



BllYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



cottage — unassiuning except for an interior 
balcony — and went so far as to have the four 
outer walls of clapboard built, with a beautiful 
chimney to hold them solidly on their rock. 
Thirty windows were inserted to keep pic- 
nickers away, and then we were obliged to 
restrain operations. This summer, practically 
driven back from Switzerland because of our 
dollar, we installed ourselves in our camp, 
much to the horror and amusement of the 
summer-folk. But with the aid of occasional 
workmen and, more, with our own hands, we 
managed beautifully — building paper for floors 
and partitions, and ruffled crepe paper for 
window-curtains. With winter, it was sug- 
gested — and insisted — that I inhabit a stolidly 
built farmhouse, empty until spring. Just now, 
for a few weeks, I am alone, with a lovely 
view across the snow-covered golf links to the 
sea on the one hand, and, on the other, dotted 
summer cottages that do not twinkle at night. 
But I am glad for the temporary solitude, 
which is giving me a chance to finish a little 
book on narcotics — not a novel! — that I am 
writing. 

"From the length of this, it looks as if this 
solitude had driven me to considerable self- 
expression! I have just counted: it must be 
seventeen years since I visited the campus!" 

Rene Christy is still working with her 
brother. Earl Christy, and sometimes writes 
articles for the movie magazines, especially 
Photoplay, to accompany his portraits of reign- 
ing stars. 

Elizabeth Pope Behr is planning to bring 
her daughter Elizabeth, aged 14, on a visit to 
the campus in the spring. Why not collect all 
the 1907 daughters some week-end? We hear 
(not from Popie) that each one of her three 
children (Edward is 15 and John 7) is at the 
head of his or her class. Not that this will 
startle anyone. 



ness and light in order to be near her school. 
On the first day of her arrival here, however, 
she struck up an acquaintance with a little 
Italian and a little coolie with whom, I have 
since discovered, all the nice children of the 
neighborhood are not allowed to play. May 
the friendship thrive! As for myself, just two 
years ago I published what I regarded as my 
Magnum Opus up to that time in two con- 
secutive numbers of the scientific journal, and 
it has apparently turned out to be, bacterio- 
logically speaking, my last will and testament." 

Terry Helburn was in Washington for the 
opening of the Theatre Guild Play, Mary of 
Scotland, which she personally directed. 

Margaret Copeland writes: "While Fan 
Passmore was in Chicago last fall, visiting the 
Century of Progress, she had an experience 
with one of Chicago's criminals. Fan, staying 
at the Blackstone Hotel, was awakened one 
morning at 10 o'clock by sounds in her room. 
Thinking her husband had come for break- 
fast, she raised her head and said, 'Hullo, 
dear!' at which a burglar, who had been 
rummaging in her bureau drawers, beat a 
hurried retreat. In spite of this. Fan saw the 
fair thoroughly! I drove East just before 
Thanksgiving with Dorothy Coffin. We planned 
to spend a night at the Deanery, but missed 
our way by one hundred miles, and ended up 
in New York. Louise Carey Rosett is writing 
a book and articles on some very deep subject 
of French Philosophy. Her husband is also 
about to publish a book. Adelaide Case is 
very busy running Teachers College and lec- 
turing all over Philadelphia and New York." 

Josephine Proudfit's son Andrew was mar- 
ried to Julia Filers Bobbins on December 27th 
in Austin, Texas. 

Helen Greeley's son won the junior singles 
championship in Canada last summer. Louise 
Foley's son is at the University of Virginia. 



1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

The opening of the Deanery brought several 
1908 back to Bryn Mawr. Virginia McKenney, 
as Alumnae Director, received. I found 
Margaret Franklin reclining on the Mme. 
Recamier sofa on the third-floor landing. She 
tells me her country house is being used by 
Margaret Bontecou for a progressive school for 
little girls. Louise Roberts, Eleanor Rambo 
and Elizabeth Crawford were there. Rumors 
came to me of Rosie Marsh. I did not see 
Rose, and, what is more, neither did I hear 
her, so the rumor was probably false. 

Agnes Goldman writes from Cambridge: 
"Having sworn lustily that I would not bring 
up my daughter in a university town, I have 
promptly transferred her to this haven of sweet- 



1909 

Class Editor: Helen B. Crane 
70 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

Christmas time fortunately brings news 
flashes from various points of the compass. 
Caroline Kamm McKinnon had a brief vaca- 
tion this fall in California. "I tried to see 
Gene Ustick, but found they were in 
San Francisco the one week-end that I was in 
Pasadena; isn't that too disgusting? . . . We 
took a plane home; it was Jim's first ride and 
my first long one; fortunately it was perfect 
flying weather, with only a few bumps, little 
ones. The mountains were very lovely. . . . 
one river valley was a mass of billowy white 
clouds, like a lake, with the surrounding hills 
standing out above it. The airport here in 
Portland is on an island, and as we started 
for the landing it was covered with fog; we 



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BltYN MAWK ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



I 



held our breath, but. did land safely. ... It 
would have taken us twenty-three hours to get 
home by train, and it was three and a half by 
plane» We think now we would not mind 
flying, but we want to know what the weather 
is going to be before we start; no blind flying 
for me!" 

Marnette "Wood Chesnutt is still working 
hard for the Fellowship Committee of the 
A. A. U. W. and attending the national meeting 
in Minneapolis last spring. After a bad illness 
in June she is now well and busy with her 
usual tasks: "I have had an interesting time 
recently serving as the consumer member of 
our county's N. R. A. Compliance Board and 
helping plan C. W. A. projects for women. 
. . . My town has learned more about the 
importance of planned social work recently 
than in all the years of effort on the part of 
some of us who might be considered as at 
least partially trained social workers." 
Marnette's son Jimmy is a Senior at Lawrence- 
ville this year. Dorothy North is still enjoying 
her menage at Deerfield, 111., and urges us to 
improve our summer by a visit to the fair. 
"Last year I helped make an exhibit of 
Creative Arts of Childhood (again from" 
Vienna) in the Hall of Science, along with 
many a worth-while organization." 

Margaret Ames Wright acknowledges the 
Saturday Evening Post production which we 
mentioned some time ago: "It was just a 
fluke — not enough to go to my head. . . . My 
husband has been writing for the last seven 
or eight years and has had short stories in 
several magazines. It is uphill work, but he 
enjoys it, after years of being in business. It 
gives us a wonderful excuse for traveling, but 
since a year abroad some time ago we haven't 
done much of it; as the children grow older 
it is more difficult to break up the school 
regime. I saw Mary Herr in September, when 
I took the three children to the fair; she seems 
to love Chicago, and vice versa." 

1910 

Chss Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Jane Smith: "I have been appointed under 
the Federal Emergency Relief Administration 
as 'Supervisor of Work Relief in the Field of 
Education.' The title at present (November) 
is about all I know of the possibilities of this 
new job, as I have been in Washington only a 
month. The new funds are to be used to give 
work relief to unemployed teachers in five 
fields of education: (1) rural elementary 
schools; (2) vocational education; (3) teach- 
ing adults to read and write English; (4) edu- 
cation of the physically handicapped; (5) gen- 



eral education of adults with little previous 
schooling. Under number 5 it would be pos- 
sible for our program of workers' education to 
come in, if there is enough local demand, and 
if teachers who are qualified by experience in 
this kind of teaching can be found. 

"There are many difficult problems to be 
faced: how to build up a program of adult 
education on the work relief basis, using many 
teachers whose experience has been in differ- 
ent fields; how to train some of these teachers 
for a new type of teaching, closely related to 
the daily lives of the students in their classes; 
how to supervise such a program throughout 
the country. If a demonstration can be made 
during this emergency period, it is possible 
that a permanent program may be established 
by some states later. For the present, the best 
that can be done is probably to select a few 
cities where conditions are favorable and work 
with the school authorities in making such 
experiments. I have asked for a leave of 
absence from the Affiliated Schools for Workers 
for the present." 

Constance Deming Lewis: "My family con- 
sists of a son of 18 who is a Junior at 
Harvard, a daughter in her Senior year at the 
Madeira School, where she is hovering between 
Bryn Mawr and Vassar, and a small boy of 10, 
still at home. My husband is Vice-President 
of a large waste and bagging mill, and, like 
all mill officials, of late months has been 'com- 
muting' to Washington. My days are kept 
very full, as I spend every morning in writing 
and have had increasing success in placing my 
verse. In addition, I am editing Shards, a 
small poetry quarterly, which is a surprisingly 
arduous but most intensely interesting occu- 
pation because of its delightful contacts with 
writers, established and would-be. Mayonne 
Lewis, '08, has been a frequent contributor. 

"My summer was starred by a very happy 
morning spent at St. Mary's Episcopal Convent 
in Peekskill, New York, with Elizabeth Tappan, 
now Sister Mary Bede, and as happy and as 
full of droll humor as in her college days." 

Dorothy Nearing Van Dyne: "The most in- 
teresting thing that I have done lately was to 
visit the World's Fair, which I enjoyed very 
much. Edward, my son, and I drove out and 
stayed there a week, taking in all the sights. 
Then Edward, who seems to have a wandering 
foot, went on to San Francisco and took ship 
for a trip around the world. He would like 
to work his way as far as possible, so if any 
of you meet him, I hope you will help him 
out. Mary is at Miss Madeira's School, and 
at last accounts was signed up for Bryn Mawr." 

Gertrude Kingsbacher Sunstein: "My oldest 
child, Ann, is 18 years old and is a Sophomore 
at Cornell. My two boys are in various stages 
of preparing for college at country day schools, 
and my youngest daughter is still in grade 



(28) 



BRYN MAWK ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



school. Her main interest is in dancing, for writer this time, there is no more news about 



which she seems to liave some talent. For the 
past three years I have been the Chairman of 
the Pittsburgh Committee of the Affiliated 
Schools for Workers, a job into which Jane 
Smith inveigled me." 

Marion Wildman McLaughlin: "At the pres- 
ent time I am kept busy with three daughters 
of school age. Betty, aged 16, is a Senior at 
Baldwin's, and Janet, aged 10, is in the sixth 
grade there. Nancy Lee, 7, goes to school here 
at home. I am sure that you knew that I lost 
my husband year before last. Since then re- 
sponsibilities have come to me heavier than 
ever. I am trying to be father and mother 
both to my children, and find it at times pretty 
hard. 

"This fall I had a pleasant trip down to 
Virginia with Henrietta Sharp. She is kept 
pretty busy with committees, etc., besides keep- 
ing house for her father." 

Peggy James Porter: "We have just returned 
from a year in Europe. Five of us, our girls 
and boy and a 19-year-old nephew, packed into 
a Chevrolet with our luggage, and, with the 
exception of a three-months stay in Rome and 
two weeks in Paris, we traveled joyously the 
rest of the time. We saw Italy and Sicily 
rather thoroughly and admire greatly the sys- 
tem and order that Mussolini is achieving with 
his people. It was interesting to be in France 
afterwards and feel the greater independence. 
After that we visited England and Scotland, 
and then came home. The changed conditions 
have finally reached California, and everybody 
is trying to help where they can, and trying to 
understand what is happening and where we 
are going." 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 

Margaret Corwin has just been appointed 
Dean of the New Jersey College for Women. 
She will begin her job in February, with the 
opening of the second semester. And that is 
all we know from a newspaper clipping. 

Maysie Morgan Lee and her family spent 
the Christmas vacation at Oneonta, and in 
spite of, or because of, the zero weather, 
Maysie wrote enthusiastically of snowshoeing 
up mountains. 

The Editor and her husband motored to 
Chicago for the Christmas holidays, but be- 
cause the column is being done by a ghost- 



that. Chicago is the Editor's scoop. 

Helen Barber Matteson, Jean Stirling Gregory 
and Carmelita Chase Hinton were the only 
members of 1912 to foregather at the Council. 
The poor ghost can't tell anything about them 
except two meager fashion notes; Jean wore 
rose satin and Carmelita a flowered print. 

Why don't the members of 1912 rush into 
print and tell about sons in college and daugh- 
ters in Bryn Mawr, new houses or good works, 
or, in fact, anything that can be put on a 
postcard? 

1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

I am sure that any member of 1913 who has 
not fainted at the sight of so many class notes 
will join me in thanking all those whose return 
postcards are responsible for the following 
items: 

Lydia Stetson Stone — ^^"I had every intention 
of going to Reunion, but somehow got switched 
on to the Harvard- Yale race instead. My life 
is very unexciting. I have four children, two 
in the Ethel Walker School, one in the Provi- 
dence Country Day, and one in the Mary C. 
Wheeler School here in Providence. One of 
them will be a debutante next winter." 

Mary Sheldon McArthur — "Just so you won't 
be too discouraged and because I love reading 
other people's letters, here goes: I haven't been 
doing anything interesting at all — living on a 
farm with my husband and children and cows 
and ducks and dogs and chickens — stewing in 
a vat of domesticity. In the winter I live 
(really live) in a Mexican house in Cuerna- 
vaca, which is about forty miles from Mexico 
City, and life there is perfect and so simple. 
I wish we could stay there all the time. Love 
to 1913." 

Marguerite Bartlett Hamer — "Assistant Pro- 
fessor of History, University of Tennessee. 
Summer of 1933 — toured in Caribbean and 
South America. December, 1933, spent a won- 
derful week in Bermuda, cycling about and 
swimming." 

Dorothea Baldwin McCollester: "Your ener- 
gy and executive ability demand an answer, 
even if I have nothing of the least interest to 
report. (Will those who have not returned 
their postcard please note. — H. E. L.) A dull 
— to others — domestic routine largely occupies 
my days. My two boys — Roger, 10 years old, 
and Duncan, 8 years old — are at school all day, 
and even my youngest, Ann, although only 4^/4, 
is already a Brearley School girl in the morn- 
ings. But someone always seems to have a 
cold or to have been exposed to whooping- 
cough or something or other, and the days 



(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



i 



when the house is deserted are very few. We 
spend most week-ends at our little place at 
Southport, Connecticut. My husband and I 
still play string quartets a lot and go to many 
concerts." 

Agnes O'Conner Rossell — "My husband be- 
ing on the faculty of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tute of Technology, I find myself involved in 
the wives' activities to the extent of being the 
production manager for all the plays presented 
by the Drama Club of Technology. I'm read- 
ing plays by the hundreds and trying to give 
an occasional book review on anything but 
plays. A continuous excitement is finding my 
classmates' children at dances or school with 
my two boys." 

Agathe Deming — "For two years I have been 
half owner of the '7 Ranch' in New Mexico, 
a real cattle ranch which my partner and I 
hope some day will be worth something, if the 
cattle man ceases to be the forgotten man. I 
spend about eight months of the year there, 
gardening, riding, reading, not forgetting the 
canning of my garden produce, about 300 
quarts this year. On the side I write some 
poetry. In the winter I am with my mother 
in New York City. I belong to the Poetry 
Society of America, the Craftsman Group of 
Poets, and the Women Poets, all of which 
groups are interesting and stimulating." 

Zelma Corning Brandt — "Have traveled a lot 
in the past years. At present can only report 
that I am doing nothing but enjoying myself." 

Martha Warren Branham — "Doing: Raising 
five children, four of them girls. Reading: 
Anything which doesn't demand too much of 
my enfeebled mind. Interested: In almost any 
form of human activity except puzzles, bridge 
and the children's so-called home work. What 
I intend: Some day to rest, and faith, I shall 
need it." 

Maud Holmes Young — "My plan of retiring 
to the country for a quiet life worked for 
about a year. Then I got restless, so now I 
have a job with the Federal Relief. Social 
work in the Ozarks is anything but monoton- 
ous and cannot be carried out in the conven- 
tional manner. Transportation is a problem. 
My technique at 'packing the ruts' is improv- 
ing, but wading is still my most reliable means 
of traveling creek roads, where the creek is 
literally the road." 

Katherine Schmidt Eisenhart — "My husband 
is the Dean of the Graduate College and we 
shall be delighted to see any 1913's who come 
to Princeton. In the summer we go to 
Greensboro, Vermont. We have three children, 
a Senior in Princeton, and two girls, 14 and 12. 
I am very much interested in studying Russian 
and have done a little translating for some 
men here, though I know very little as yet." 

Yvonne Stoddard Hayes — "Life and Works 
of Y. S. H. Work — Plain: Part-time unpaid 



chambermaid and nursemaid. Works — Good: 
Treasurer, N. Y. State League of Women 
Voters. Member at Large, Municipal Affairs 
Committee, N. Y. City League of Women 
Voters. Works of Art (?): Painting two 
afternoons a week, with Camilo Egas, New 
School for Social Research, portraits of 
pumpkins, radishes, limes, lanterns, bottles, 
etc., etc.; very lovely. Works of Supereroga- 
tion: 1st Alto, Adesti Chorus (and it is work 
to conceal the fact that one has never had a 
singing lesson). Work — Physical. Exercise 
class with Dorothea McCollester, calculated 
not only to increase beauty, but to make us 
strong enough to take in each other's washing 
when the New Deal deals us that card." 

(To be continued. Have ten more postcards 
in hand. Will the other ninety-nine please 
return theirs if they have enjoyed Install- 
ment I?) 

1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

We are nearing the end of Larie's Reunion 
notes. Only the T's and the W's are left. 
Who has some more news? 

Lautz, Ruth — Ad saw her in Chicago looking 
the same as ever and very happy. She has an 
adopted daughter (a niece) who is a Freshman 
at Bryn Mawr. She wrote urging us all to 
come to the fair. 

Lee, Anna — Teaches English at Frankford 
High School in Philadelphia, and as an extra 
job, just for the love of it, does tutoring in 
English for College Entrance Board examina- 
tions. She keeps house for her father and has 
a garden. 

Loudon, Margaret — A letter from her re- 
vealed that she is now married to the man 
with whom she hopes to spend the rest of her 
life. "Live first and learn afterwards" is her 
amusing philosophy, or that is her philosophy 
and she is perpetually amusing people and 
much amused at herself. 

Mabon, Margaret — Her husband is head of 
the Psychiatric Department of n large hospital 
in Glasgow, Scotland. 



(25) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Maxwell, Helen — Is doing social work. 

Moses, Georgette — Has two children. Eleanor 
Hill saw her in Austria and Helen Robertson 
in London. Each year she and her husband 
publish an account of their experiences in 
Europe. 

Packard, Dorothy — Ad sees her once a year. 
She has two very attractive daughters. 

Porter, Elizabeth — Is head of social work in 
New Orleans. 

Riegel, Helen — Lives in an attractive old 
house on the Hudson. (We have heard that 
she is spending the winter in town at the 
Park Lane.) 

Robertson, Helen — Has charge of a church 
school. Recently took a year off to garden. 

Russell, Margaret — Lives in Plymouth by the 
sea all winter and goes to her New Hampshire 
farm in the summer. Has three children. 

Sandison, Lois — Is married to Harold 
Howland, living in New York and teaching at 
Miss Spence's School. 

Savage, Willie — Has a nice, big family. 

Sears, Anna — Is active in Junior League 
work. Has two sons and looks very young. 

Sippel, Dorothy — Is teaching. Has one boy. 

Smith, Agnes — Has been teaching for eleven 
years at St. Timothy's, Catonsville, Md. Is 
College Board reader in algebra. 

Stokley, Dorothy — Moved west for her health. 

Strauss, Emilie — Is social worker in 
New York and teacher in social work school. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

1918 

Class Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 
3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. 0., Phila. 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. P. E. Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. I., N. Y. 

1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 East 57th St., New York City 

Monica Healea — "I am now an instructor in 
Physics at Vassar College." 

Martha Chase — "I have just returned from 
a summer of motoring in Germany, Austria, 
and Czecho-Slovakia, with my family. Then I 
had two weeks alone in London, where I 
studied at the British Museum and the Victoria 
and Albert on my special subjects— old silver 
and glass and porcelain. For two years I have 
lectured on these subjects at Miss Sacker's 
School of Interior Decoration and Design in 



Boston — and I shall do so this coming winter. 
I am also booked for five lectures before clubs 
and hope for more." 

Isabel Arnold Blodgett — "I have two little 
girls, Margaret, who is 4^/2, and Katharine, 
who is 1 — and no outside activities that you 
can count as such! Can you believe it?" 

Margaret Kinard — 'T gave up my job in 
Jackson Heights and am going to be at home 
in Lancaster this winter." 

Margaret Ballon Hitchcock — "I spent seven 
weeks at Sunapee, New Hampshire, with my 
family in a small cottage with a glorious view. 
We bathed and climbed mountains and had a 
wonderful summer. Now I am back at 
New Haven getting ready to teach again. Both 
children are in school. As for committee work, 
I am Chairman of the B, M. Summer School 
Committee." 

Beatrice Bromell Hersey, whose address is 
now 26 Grove Street, Madison, New Jersey. — 
"We and the four bratlings (all boys) have 
just returned from a 3,700-mile jaunt." 

Marjorie Canby Taylor, re. our Class Baby — 
'There is nothing very exciting to report about 
Edie except that she was 12 years old on the 
18th of September and is 5 ft. 4 in. tall. She 
starts seventh grade and has done very good 
work so far, usually rates in the upper quar- 
ter of the class. She is very fond of swimming 
and won a Culver 'C for a 350-yard swim this 
summer at Culver Military Academy, where we 
visited for six weeks with my cousins. We 
motored out and went to the fair several times. 
Had lunch with Nat Gookin, who was just 
planning a trip to Estes Park, then a tea party 
at Belinda's, when she displayed her two-weeks- 
old daughter and brand-new house. Her older 
daughter, Isabel, is a most beautiful child. 
Virginia Park was there, looking younger and 
prettier than ever, with her three-year-old son. 
My other two daughters are flourishing in 
public school." 

Cornelia Keeble Ewing — "There really is 
very little news about me. I am just a plain 
housekeeper, no children, still Junior Leaguing 
to a certain extent, one of the Business Man- 
agers this season for the Children's Plays. 
Have held a paid position for the last two 
summers (and will this summer). Platform 
Manager for the Monteagle Chautauqua, Mont- 
eagle, Tennessee (a summer resort)." 

Alice Harrison Scott and family are return- 
ing from Japan in March for a vacation. Alice 
intends to sail straight from Japan to New York 
by way of the Canal. 

Dot Rogers Lyman writes: "Sandy (Alex- 
ander Victor Lyman, Jr.) was born March 11, 
1930. He is the darlingest little tow-headed 
hoy, with enormous brown eyes." Dot recently 
enquired about enrolling her daughter Sally, 
now in Class B of the Brearley School, for the 
Class of 1948, Bryn Mawr. 



(26) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelley Erdman 
(Mrs. C. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

While her husband was in California teach- 
ing at summer school, Ellen Jay Garrison 
motored with her 10-year-old Clarinda from 
Madison, Wis., to Black Point, Conn. Clarinda 
read the maps and Ellen did the driving, but 
they arrived safely any way, in time to meet 
the other two children and the nurse at the 
train. 

Clarinda Garrison Binger, in spite of a recent 
siege in the hospital, is carrying on her job 
and is in charge of all the admissions at the 
Dalton School. 

Jimmy James Rogers took her family to the 
Cape this summer and then went on various 
boating trips to Georgian Bay, in between 
which she seems to have taken in the Chicago 
Fair and seen all the Lake Forest classmates. 
She reports that Mary Gushing Howard Niles 
appeared in Toronto last winter and again this 
fall. She is married to Henry Niles, of 
Baltimore, and they are in business together 
as Business Consultants. They move to one 
city after another about every three months, 
working chiefly with insurance companies. 
They have two girls, 7 and 3 years old. 

Chick Parson Storms is a designer of Charles 
Walnut knitted suits, located in Philadelphia 
in the winter and on Cape Cod in the summer. 

Kat Walker Bradford finally carried out her 
threat and paid her first visit to Little Rock. 
She motored down with Luz Taylor the 1st of 
November, forgot her husband and three chil- 
dren, and went flying and hunting and had a 
grand time. Luz is the Secretary of the 
Junior League of America, Inc., which seems 
to involve a good deal of traveling. She was 
in New York for a meeting 'in October, goes 
to Oklahoma City in January and back to 
New York the 1st of February. The Director 
job she had last year has now been divided 
into three jobs, which speaks well for her 
ability, or maybe it's the N. R. A. 

Mag Taylor Macintosh has a son, Charles 
Archibald, born August 15th. 

Lydia Beckwith Lee motored East before 
Christmas, primarily on a shopping trip for 
her shop in Lake Forest, but she managed to 
get in a good deal of visiting en route. 

An item from the New York Times gives the 
following exciting information: The Rose Mary 
Crawshay Prize of the Britisli Academy for a 
historical or critical work in Englisli literature 
by a woman of any nationality was awarded 
for 1933 to Eleanore Boswell Murrie for The 
Restoration Court and Stage, published by the 
Harvard University Press in 1932. 

Helen Bennett was married in Oci()h<'r to 
Mr. King R. H. Nelson, of Pittsburgh. 



1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York City. 

1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York City 

Frances S. Childs has been awarded a Schiff 
Fellowship at Columbia University and has 
been given a leave of absence from Brooklyn 
College. The subject of the dissertation on 
which she is working is "The French Emigre 
Group of the Eastern Seaboard in the late 
Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Centuries." 

1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 
(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 
8102 Ardmore Ave., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Nancy Hough Smith and her husband sail 
on February 6th. Baldwin has half a year's 
sabbatical leave from Princeton. He and Nan 
have rented their house and are feeling very 
festive as they start off on a long trip. We 
know they are going to Egypt, and hope for 
more details next month. 

Dorry Fiske has had a broken leg and is 
spending the greater part of January at home, 
on leave from Harper's, receiving friends 
gladly. 

Doro Shipley and Betty Smith Thompson are 
fine, upstanding girls, excellent models for the 
whole class. We are indebted to them for all 
the rest of this column: 

Betty Smith Thompson writes: 

"Marian Bradley Holbrook arrived November 
18th, and is said to have dark hair and skin 
like a rose — that was long ago, though. She 
may be well sun-tanned by now. 

"Allegra Woodworth reports that she can be 
found at the Shipley School 'in Room G, sur- 
rounded by piles of history report?.' 

"Mathilde Hansen Smith (Mrs. William W. 
Smith) is now living at 65 Humboldt Avenue, 
Providence. When I heard from her just be- 
fore Christmas she was about to help run a 
new shop at the Providence-Biltniore, carrying 
'all of Fortnum and Mason groceries and all 
kinds of trick new glasses and trays, shakers, 
etc. My children are fine.' 

"A grand, newsy letter from Doro Shipley: 
'Of course, I am keeping on with History of 



(27) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Art, and am finding greater joy in the work 
all the time. I usually land up in Spain some 
time during the summers — last summer was an 
exception. Not the most superlative adjectives 
or the purplest passages can convey one atom 
of the hold that country takes upon one. I 
must tell you what fun I have had with my 
dissertation. In Santiago de Compostila there 
is a certain portal which is covered with in- 
numerable bas-reliefs. They are Romanesque 
and strangely beautiful. Well, I am attempt- 
ing to place them, according to school and 
date. To do this I simply had to have many 
and excellent photographs, so a scaffolding 
was erected, and the photographer and I spent 
two blissful but hectic weeks upon it. Never 
shall I have such notoriety again. A lady, from 
America, doing all that to study those busted 
old things, and climbing the ladder, too! Now, 
I am doing some reading and a little teaching 
at Bryn Mawr, It is great fun, but my sculp- 
tures don't progress very fast just now. 

" 'Bryn Mawr is always the same, and al- 
ways different. Taylor bell hasn't missed a 
stroke, the grass continues to get green in the 
spring — in most places — and the library still 
rings to the hectic hush of pre-exam workers. 

*' 'My real news is that I have grown hope- 
lessly domestic. I have an apartment with 
Dorothy Wyckoff, Bryn Mawr '21, and it is 
lots and lots of fun.' 

"Also a grand and welcome letter from Helen 
Potts Clarke (Mrs. Eugene Vincent Clarke), 
who is living at 604 Drexel Avenue, Glencoe, 
Illinois. It's hard to realize that it must be 
at least ten years since she left us, so news of 
her is all the more interesting. 'I married 
five years ago (a lawyer, Yale, now here in 
business with Dad), after taking some English 
at Oxford. Our first baby, Suzanne Borden 
Clarke, arrived March 22nd, is the most jovial 
and sociable child, and so bright the pediatri- 
cian is worried about her. She has pep enough 
for six. I've given up most of my outside 
interests except some church work with the 
Cradle Roll Department and the Old People's 
Home — two extremes — and being Program 
Chairman and on the Board of the Woman's 
Club. I believe that this gives a picture of my 
life since we've had to give up our annual treks 
to Florida and New York these past two years.' 

"I've been very remiss in reporting a lengthy 
telephone conversation with Mary Mutch 
Knowlton last spring, when she was here for 
her brother's installation as minister of the 
First Presbyterian Church. Mutchie's husband 
has a church in Bristol, Pennsylvania. Her 
voice and enthusiasm haven't changed at all." 

And from Doro we hear: 

"H. D. Potts had a very lovely wedding and 
her husband is terribly nice. Her account of 
her engagement would, I suppose, have been 



in poor taste had she written a eulogy, but I 
should like to do so." 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

This column has been non-existent for so 
many months that we think everyone must have 
decided to hibernate for an indefinite period. 
All that we can say in our defense is no news, 
no notes, and very definitely we have had no 
news. 

E. Norton Potter is still in the Art Depart- 
ment under Miss King, and she and her hus- 
band have a charming apartment in the Mer- 
mont, Bryn Mawr's most fashionable apartment 
house. 

Val Hill DuBose is state chairman for North 
Carolina under the District III. Councilor of 
the Alumnae Association. We hear she is build- 
ing one of the finer houses in the South in a 
lovely situation outside Durham. 

Your Editor is having one of her busier 
winters. She is City Editor for the Junior 
League Magazine, a member of the Players 
Committee which is this month very busy put- 
ting on a children's play, and has various other 
minor activities, mostly as a committee member 
for this and that. We might also mention that 
we are on the Entertainment Committee for the 
Deanery, and that in spare moments we still 
pursue the fox and dash about the country 
with the merry beaglers. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 
57 Christopher St., New York City 

The Class wishes to extend its sympathy to 
Peggy Hess de Graaff and Eleanor Hess 
Kurzman, '26, whose father died last month. 
Dr. Hess has made many valuable contribu- 
tions to medical science, and his sudden and 
untimely death has deprived not only his fam- 
ily, but all those with whom he had come in 
contact in his busy life, of a good and helpful 
friend. At the time of her father's death, 
Peggy was abroad with her husband on their 
annual trip. She had left her son with his 
grandmother and planned to spend several 
months visiting her husband's family in The 
Hague, and motoring to Italy, with a stop for 
some winter sports in Switzerland. 

Betty Brown Field is another who has de- 
serted these shores, this time for a winter in 
London, where she planned to study anthro- 
pology. This summer, Betty attended the 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Institute of Pacific Relations meeting in Banff, 
and the rest of the time was at her charming 
home in New Hartford, Conn. (To date, this 
is the only address we have for her.) 

Barby Loines Dreier is at Black Mountain 
College, Black Mountain, N, C, which some 
of you may know is an experimental college 
which grew out of Rollins. Barby writes: "We 
have several educational ideas which we hope 
can be worked out with the most congenial 
group, which now totals seventy-five people. 
Besides the standard curriculum subjects, there 
will be special emphasis on the arts; dramatics 
and music and dancing will be produced by 
the group as a whole, including faculty wives 
and children. . . . We want more students. If 
you have any pioneering young friends who 
might be interested in building up something 
like this, we can offer them good company and 
lots of responsibility, beside room, board and 
tuition for $1,000. ... All Dreiers thrive in 
the midst of these glorious mountains." 

Elizabeth Bethel is secretary to Professor 
Whitbridge, Master of Calhoun College, Yale 
University, and is living once more at 100 
Howe Street, New Haven. Peggy Perry 
Bruton is in Durham, N. C, where her address 
is R. D, 4, Box 171 A. From the time of 
graduation until her marriage, Peggy con- 
tinued to lead an academic life, having been a 
graduate student at Newnham College, Cam- 
bridge University, from 1928-29, at Yale, 
1930-31, and having taught History at Choate 
School, Brookline, 1930-31. 

Lenore Hollander has sent us a long account 
of her activities, which in summary have been: 
Scholar at University of Illinois, 1928-9; de- 
gree of M.S., 1929. Assistant in Chemistry, 
1929-30; degree of Ph.D., 1931. Since 1931 
she has been research associate in Biochem- 
istry, at the Cancer Research . Laboratories of 
the Graduate School of Medicine of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, doing independent 
work on the properties of amylases (to relieve 
our bewilderment she kindly explains that these 
are the physiological compounds which digest 
starch in plants and animals). Also, she did 
a study under Professor Ernst Waldschmidt- 
Leitz, o£ Prague, of the liver amylase system 
designed to prepare for a study on cancer 
tissue. In October she went abroad to continue 
her work in Prague. Her address will be: 
Institut fiir Biochemie der Deutschen Tech- 
nischen Hochschule, Prague, Cz. Lenny sup- 
plied us with the subjects of her theses, which 
sound highly esoteric to us. 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 

Barbara Humphreys Richardson has another 
daughter, bom in August. 



Ella Poe Cotton spent the summer in Spain 
with her husband. 

Nancy Woodward says she is still raising 
minks and what is more remarkable, she still 
likes them. She has moved into Old Lyme 
(Conn.) for the winter. 

Jane Barth Sloss has no news of her own, 
so she writes, but wishes to remind us that 
she has two daughters: Janet, now aged seven 
months, and Harriet, who is three. She says 
that our two other classmates in San Francisco, 
Kit Collins Hayes and Eccleston Moran, are 
running the Bryn Mawr Club and dancing in 
the Opera Ballet, respectively. 

Lysbet Lefferts was married on June 24th to 
Philip Golden Bartlett, of New York, Yale '27, 
and the New York Architectural School. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The class will be grieved and shocked by the 
news of the sudden death of Elizabeth Bigelow, 
on January 14th at Lincoln, Mass. She was 
examining a colt which suddenly swung its 
head and struck her on the head in such a 
way that cerebral hemorrhage resulted. 

The Class extends its deepest sympathy to 
Charlotte Farquhar Wing on the death of her 
brother. 

We take great pleasure in announcing the 
engagement of Hazel Seligman to Dr. Carl 
Goldmark, Jr., of New York. He graduated 
in 1929 from Cornell, took his medical degree 
at Long Island Medical College, and is now 
in New York at the Lenox Hill Hospital. 

Stanley Gordon Edwards has a second daugh- 
ter, Elizabeth, born on December 1st. 

Erna Rice was married on January 7th to 
Mr. William N. Eisendrath, Jr., and expects to 
live in Chicago. 

1931 

Class Editor: Janet Waples Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 

1932 

Class Editor: Josephine Graton 

182 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Denise Gallaudet was married to Carleton 
Shurtleff Francis, Jr., on January 20th in the 
Dwight Memorial Chapel in New Haven. Her 
address will be 423 S. Carlisle Street, 
Philadelphia. 

1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



4 






Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. General 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
small classes. Ample grounds 
near Orange Mountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. Established 
1 894. Write for booklet. 

LUCIE C. BEARD 

Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. ROWLAND 






ELEANOR O. BROWNELLj 



Principals 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 

• 

COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Miatreea 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DA VIES, Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. \ Head 
Mary E. Lowndes, M. A., Litt.D. j Mistresses 
Katherine P. DebeToise, Assistant to the Heads 



TOW-HEYWOOn 

1 y On theSound'^AtShippm Point \ / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 
Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

OfU h«ur from Ntw York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, HeadrntstreMs 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school established 
1899. Preparation for leading women's 
colleges. Four-year high school course ; 
intensive review courses for College 
Board examinations throughout year 
or during second semester; general 
courses. Resident enrollment limited 
to twenty-five. Individual attention in 
small classes. Informal home life. 
Outdoor sports. 

MARY B. THOMPSON, Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnak Buli.eti» 



BRYN MAWll ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



^ 



I 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art, and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming: Pool — Riding:. 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on requeest. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe. Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD. A. B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Collies. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hod^ey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharme Branson School 

ROSS. CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Heads 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 



SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School, St. Martin's 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Bryn Mawr 



Kindly mention Bryh Mawk Alumnax Buiuctin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



^ABBOT^ 

ACADEMY FOR GIRLS 



105th year. Modern in equip- 
ment and methods; strong fac- 
ulty ; delightfully located. Gen- 
eral and preparatory courses 
prepare for responsibility and 
leadership. In past five years 
97% of students taking C.E.B. 
examinations were successful. 
Writes president of Br.\n Mawr: 
"Every college would like more 
students of the kind Abbot 
Academy has sent us." Art, 
music, dramatics, household 
science. Art gallery. Observ- 
atory. All sports — skating, ski- 
ing, riding. 23 miles from 
iFrite for catalog. 
Bertha Bailey, Principal 
Box P, Andover, Mass. 




Abbot Hall 



*^* *^> " ig* ^gJ- "^^ 



LowTHORPE School 

of Landscape Architecture 
GROTON, MASS. 

Courses in Landscape Architecture, in' 
eluding Horticuhure and Garden Design, 
given to a Hmited number of students 
in residence. Anne Baker, Director. 

Spring Term Starts April 2, 1934 
Write for Catalogue 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $L25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge. Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on the Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Manager 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 386 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurance on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD. President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 




1896 



1934 




BACK LOG CAMP 

A Summer Camp for Adults and Families 

THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 
INDIAN LAKE, NEW YORK 

For the Less Strenuous 

By no means are all of our campers strenuous hikers, swimmers, fishermen, or canoeists. 
There is always a certain amount of a stationary or infrequently moving element, made up 
of several sorts of people. First of all are the men and women, with or without relatives, 
who, while in no sense invalids, are yet beyond the age of vigorous activity. Though these 
do not take in all the trips, they greatly enjoy the food, the society, and the open air 
life which Back Log Camp affords. Again there are men and women in active health who 
find the Camp a highly desirable place to write or to carry out a course of reading. 
Finally there are those who, exhausted by the winter's work or by recent illness, find at 
Back Log just the combination of good food, good air, good sleep, and good company 
which sets them on their feet again in a remarkably short time. 

Some of our campers go on all the trips; some go on many of them; some go infre- 
quently; and some never go. This more stationary group forms a sort of Greek chorus 
of Athenian elders, always ready with sympathetic appreciation of the tragedies and 
comedies of the energetic populace. 

Letters of inquiry should he addressed to 
MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT : 272 PARK AVENUE. TAKOMA PARK. D. C. 



Kindly mention Bryn Maws Alumnae Bulletin 



R 



eady now for delivery , 



A 



SERIES of twelve Staffordshire 
dinner phtes hy V/edgwood . . . 



^^' prpn ilatpr ^lateg 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please reserve for me sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $15 per set. 

I enclose $5 deposit on each set and will pay balance when notified that the plates 
are ready for shipment. 

Color choice [J Blue Q Rose Q Green Q Mulberry 

Signed .._ „ _ _ 

Address „ 

MaXe checks payable and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



100 & 1 CELEBRATED HANDS 



By MILTON C. WORK 

fres., U. S. Bridge Assn. 
and 

OLIVE A. PETERSON 

Certified Teacher of the Sims, 

Culbertson, and Official Systems 

Holder of Women's National Championships 



o 
O 



7D 

A book for every Contract player. Nothing similar has ever been J^ 

published before. Contains one hundred and one famous hands ^^ 

(no freaks) played in leading tournaments. Each hand is bid ^i 
according to the three popular systems. Then the actual play of 

the cards is given. Finally the play is explained and analyzed. QQ 

Invaluable to players and teachers. The hands ^^ ^\^\ TTl 

also offer an ideal selection for Duplicate play, m' | .^/^/ ^^ 

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY O 

WINSTON BUILDING PHILADELPHIA, PA. ^\ 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 










^Si^/ 




THE CIGARETTE THAT'S ^yliadet 

THE CIGARETTE THAT '-/^t£&'^e^ 



19J4 
ticcETT & Myers 
ToaAC<-.o Cr> 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




W^^^<>' 



ANNUAL MEETING 



March, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 3 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 1933 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Virginia Atmore, 1928 

_,. ^ ^ , /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

Directors at Large ^ ^lice Sachs Plaut, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Mary C. Parker, 1926 

District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 

District IV .Elizabeth Smith Russell, 1915 

District V .- Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI 

District VII - Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Elizabeth Lewis Otet, 1901 Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

Virginia McKbnnet Claiborne, 1908 Florance Waterburt, 1905 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 

Virginia Atmore, 1928 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen Faulkner, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maquire, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Niblds Bancroft, 1898 



jTotm at Request 

m 



I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OP Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 

Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, ^96 Elinor Amram Nahm, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 > Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-oficio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV MARCH, 1934 No. 3 

At this time of the year no new enterprise seems particularly appealing^ but 
there are various and unmistakable signs scattered through this number of the 
Bulletin, that with the coming of spring we shall have to consider once more plans 
for the Crusade in which every alumna of every woman's college finds herself a 
part. The general situation is really given in a nut-shell in the letter from 
Miss Thomas, which Mrs. Frantz quotes in her Report. Miss Thomas was writing 
not to the alumnae, but to Mr. Scattergood, and discussing the benefit that she 
felt an Alumnae Centre would be to the College itself. "I want to say in closing 
that I am convinced that privately supported colleges like Bryn Mawr must depend 
for the future on the generous support of their alumnae and not on large gifts from 
rich men and women and rich foundations." On President Park's Page is given 
in full the letter from the General Education Board, making clear that we cannot. 
in view of their revised program, count on them for help. In the Condensed 
Minutes of the Annual Meeting is a motion that a special meeting of the Association 
be held during Commencement Week, 1934, to consider recommendations to be 
presented by the Committee on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the College. What the 

k recommendations will be, naturally, is entirely in the hands of the committee, but 
these three items placed together are very significant. We like to think that women 
need no longer wage campaigns as women, but merely as human beings, but that 
time is not yet. They still have to depend on themselves for the things that they 
want, that lie outside of the traditional things that they have always been given. 
The fight for an opportunity for an education is over, but the fight to maintain 
the separate liberal arts colleges that they feel have something more to give a 
certain type of girl than have the great universities, is in a sense only just begin- 
ning, and no one but women themselves, the alumnae of a woman's college, take the 
situation really seriously. The great danger, because woman after all is a practical 
creature, is lest in her zeal to give buildings and grounds she lose sight of those 
spiritual values that were part of the early conception of woman's education and 
themselves are the reason she feels the necessity once more, but certainly not for 
the last time, of again taking up the battle. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 
OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 1934 

(There is on file in the Alumnae Ojflce a full stenographic report of the Annual Meeting. 
The following minutes are much condensed.) 

The meeting was called to order in the Deanery at 10.10 a. m., with Elizabeth 
Bent Clark^ 1895, President of the Association, presiding. Although at first the 
necessary quorum of fifty was lacking, about one hundred members attended the 
meeting, and more than a hundred others were present at President Park's luncheon 
in Pembroke. 

It was voted to omit the reading of the minutes of the previous meeting and 
to proceed immediately to the reading of the reports of Association activities during 
the past year. The reports of the Executive Board, of the Treasurer including the 
presentation of the budget, and of the Chairman of the Finance Committee and of 
the Alumnae Fund were presented and approved, and are printed in full in this 
issue (pages 7 to 15), together with charts showing the receipts and disbursements 
of the Association for the fiscal year. The Association accepted formally the recom- 
mendations offered. 

M. S. C. that the Alumnae Association pledge to the College for 1934 « 9^ft 
of $7,000 for academic needs. 

M. S. C. that the Treasurer of the Association he authorized to pay over to the 
College the amount of $7,000 raised during 1983 for the academic needs of the 
College. 

It was also 

M. S. C. that the budget for 1934 he accepted as a whole. 

Miss Ehlers had previously explained that the budget (see page 12) had been 
drawn up to include the $7,000 pledge, and that for clarity the budget had 
been divided in two parts, one of $14,465, which includes all the regular business 
expenses of the Association, and one of $8,500, which is made up entirely of sums 
pledged to the College, a total of $22,965. 

M. S. C. that a vote of thanks he given to the retiring Chairman of the 
Finance Committee and of the Alumnae Fund. 

Following the reports on the Association finances, Ellen Faulkner, 1913, 
Chairman of the Academic Committee, spoke briefly, referring to the article pre- 
pared last year on the work of Bryn Mawr graduates in science and published in 
the Alumnae Bulletin for April, 1933, and telling of the present project, a 
similar study of the careers of alumnae working in the fields of Art and of Classical 
Archaeology. Miss Faulkner said that her committee hopes to publish an article 
in one of the spring issues of the Bulletin, and she added later in the meeting 
that, if it could possibly be arranged, it would be very desirable also to publish the 
material in some other magazine with a wider general circulation. Miss Faulkner 
took this opportunity to thank the Class Editors for their assistance in giving her 
committee information about individual members of their classes who are working 
in the field now being studied, and asked for further cooperation of this sort. 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



In Dr. Knauth's absence^ her report for the Committee on Health and Physical 
Education was read by Josephine Young Case, 1928, Secretary of the Association. 
(See page 16.) Marjorie Thompson, 1912, Editor of the Alumnae Bulletin, next 
gave a short report, expressing the satisfaction of the Bulletin Board on the 
increasing significance of the Class Notes, and asking for criticisms and suggestions 
from the Association. 

Miss Thompson was followed by Serena Hand Savage, 1922, Vice-President 
of the Association, who gave a spirited account of her impressions of the Council in 
Boston in November. Mrs. Savage asked to be allowed "to describe the proceed- 
ings from the point of view of a novice to whom it was a maiden experience. It 
was a fine adventure, for there is a certain arrogance in leaving home alone; to be 
for a few days neither somebody's wife nor mother; not the head of a school nor 
the partner in a business, but a complete and independent entity once more. By a 
quick metamorphosis I became an irresponsible egocentric undergraduate again, who 
attended the sessions of the Alumnae Council very much as I had attended class 
meetings, self-government meetings and Undergraduate Association meetings in the 
days of my youth." After giving a resume of all the Council activities, which have 
been fully reported in earlier Bulletins, Mrs. Savage concluded: 

"As I sat through these sessions I could not help wondering what made them 
so absorbing; why people came again and again to listen to statistics and reports 
about matters with which they had no real or vital concern. " Had we all come to 
Boston because most of us would go anywhere when our traveling expenses are 
paid? Were all these people busying themselves on behalf of Bryn Mawr merely 
because it seems the choice of the modern female to involve herself in as many 
causes outside of home and family as is feasible or reasonable? 

"My several conclusions to these questions are perhaps sentimental, and I shall 
no doubt be accused of a certain resemblance to that execrable creature known as 
the Professional Alumna. Nevertheless, I believe this to be a fairly accurate and 
rationalized statement of the case. 

"In the first place, we come to a Council frankly to enjo}^ seeing old friends and 
to renew long-neglected friendships with them. We indulge in happy reminiscences 
of experiences shared, and meditate together on our hopes and fears for the future. 
All this which may appear a slightly frivolous evaluation is in reality of no 
inconsequential importance because the focus of it all is Bryn Mawr. It is a most 
effective method of publicity, for we all return to our respective cities alert to the 
problems and thrilled by the record of the College today. 

"In the second place, it is very evident that the eager workers in this service 
are giving of their time and ability, whether it be for scholarships, fiftieth anni- 
versaries, or what you will, because they believe that the training which the}^ 
received cannot be overestimated in its significance in their lives. For this reason 
it is an education worth giving to the children of a new generation — an institution 
worth assisting to the best of one's powers because of its essential value in a world 
sadly in need of wisdom which can only come forth from the halls of true learning. 

"I should like to conclude with a definition in the words of a progressive school 
^headmistress, who asked a five-year-old boy to come and join a group that she was 
[going to organize, during the Christmas vacation. 'I wish to teach the children,' 
'she said, *a respect for effort in purposeful play.* Although these terms seemed 

(3) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



extravagant for the case in pointy they nevertheless are most appropriate for the 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae Council. Its meetings are certainly 'purposeful play/ where 
we learn 'a respect for effort' which is so convincing that we are all persuaded to 
go and do likewise." 

With the report on behalf of the Alumnae Directors^ presented by the Senior 
Director^ Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 (page 17), and that for the Nominating 
Committee, given by the Chairman, Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898, the regular 
scheduled business was completed. Mrs. Bancroft referred to the ballot for officers 
of the Association, which had been printed in the November Bulletin, and since 
mailed to all the members with the notices of the Annual Meeting. She said that 
she wished to thank the Councillors for cooperating in the plan to secure in a 
more systematic manner suggestions for Alumnae Director, adding that through 
their efforts the Nominating Committee now had before them forty names from 
whom they might make their choice to present this spring to the Association as 
candidates for Alumnae Director. She reminded the Association that the ballot for 
this might contain one or more names; that the single ballot is not mandatory upon 
the Nominating Committee. 

Following Mrs. Frantz's report, Mrs. Clark asked Alice Rowland, 1905, 
Chairman of the House Committee of the Deanery, and Caroline Morrow Chadwick- 
Collins, 1905, Chairman of the Entertainment Committee, to tell the Association 
something of the actual happenings in the Deanery since its opening in October. 
Miss Rowland gave a brief report, telling of the necessary expenditures which had 
been made in order to adapt the Deanery more nearly to the purposes for which it 
is being used — a new bathroom has been added, and certain household supplies had 
to be supplemented, etc., in spite of the generous stores Miss Thomas left. She 
then read some very interesting figures for these first few months that the Deanery 
has been open, showing how surprisingly much it has been used, but stressed the 
fact that more people coming and staying for longer periods would be very helpful 
to the treasury. In closing she said that she would be very glad if people would 
volunteer to assist in some of the routine tasks which are always necessary. 

Mrs. Collins gave an interesting account of the many entertainments held 
already, and told something of those planned for the future. She explained that 
it had been necessary to experiment in order to find out whether it is more desirable 
and practical to have parties on weekdays or Sundays, and whether refreshments 
should be served to every one free or only when ordered. She said that alumnae 
are urged to bring their husbands to these parties, and may also bring guests. The 
present plan is to serve a very simple tea free of charge before the entertainments 
begin, and that on Sunday evenings a buffet supper will be served for $.75. A 
rising vote of thanks was offered to Miss Rowland and Mrs. Collins for their 
indefatigable efforts in making the Deanery a useful and delightful Alumnae Rouse. 

Under New Business, Mrs. Clark asked Relen Lewis Evans, 1913, who has 
consented to act as Chairman of the committee requested by the Council to consider 
means of establishing closer contact between the College and the alumnae, to tell 
something of her plans. Mrs. Lewis said that the committee had not yet started its 
work, but that she had already made some inquiries about what is done at some of 
the other colleges, and had been especially interested in the plans at Vassar and 
Smith, where elected representatives from classes and from clubs attend meetings 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



of their alumnae councils which are held on the campus while college is in session, 
and at the time of certain undergraduate activities. The expenses of these delegates 
are paid either by the Association or by the classes, and the delegates are required 
to report in writing within a week to their "constituencies." 

Professor Mary Hamilton Swindler was then asked to speak about tlie joint 
project of the Archaeological Institute of America and the Bryn Mawr Department 
of Classical Archaeology. (See page 22.) 

The meeting closed with a discussion of the advisability of changing the date 
of the Annual Meeting. The objections have been raised that the weather is apt to 
be disagreeable and that the deserted atmosphere of the campus then makes the 
time of the midsemester recess undesirable. Some arguments were advanced in 
favor of holding the meeting at a time when College is actually in session, when 
the alumnae might visit classes, but it was pointed out that if the students are all 
in residence it is impossible for many alumnae to be accommodated on the campus. 
It was in the end agreed that a larger and more varied group of alumnae could be 
counted on to be present if it is held during Commencement Week, when the^ 
reuning classes can attend the meeting. Although it was the sense of the meeting 
that the largest attendance could be secured if the meeting is held on Sunday, it 
was felt that the establishment -of this as a regular practice might give offense to 
some people. No final decision about the day was made, but it was 

M. S. C. that the Annual Meeting of the Association should he held during 
Commencement Week. 

Mrs. Slade raised the question of the celebration of the Fiftieth Anniversary 
of the Founding of the College, and said that Mrs. Maclay, who had been obliged 
to leave the meeting early, had urged that a meeting be held this spring to talk 
over plans. 

M. S. C. that a special meeting of the Association be held during Commence- 
ment Week, 1934, to consider recommendations to he presented hy the Committee 
on the Fiftieth Anniversary of the College. 

Before the close of the meeting, Mrs. Clark asked Mrs. Case, as Secretary, 
to read the result of the elections, as follows: 

OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS OF THE ASSOCIATION, 1931-36 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Director-at-Large Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

Director-at-Large Alice Sachs Plant, 1908 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS, 1934-37 

Councillor for District I. Mary C. Parker, 1926 

Councillor for District IV. Elizabeth Smith Wilson, 1915 
Councillor for District VII. Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 



(«) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MAKING HISTORY 



This year is the first time that the alumnae have met in their own Alumnae 
House^ but it had been made so welcoming and gay with open fires and flowers and 
lights that we all felt, as we looked about us, that it would seem strange ever again 
to meet anywhere else. One of the delightful touches was that Miss Thomas had 
sent word that she wished the Whistler etchings in the blue study to hang again 
in their accustomed places to do us honour. Upstairs the House Committee had 
arranged some of the brocades, which are like stuffs out of the Arabian Nights, so 
that they could be seen more easily than in the cupboards where they have been 
stored. There seemed to be more people than usual for the supper, but there was 
no sense of crowding with the various groups that formed instinctively. 

It was a very happy idea of the Deanery Committee to ask the faculty to come 
to hear Mr. Alwyne play in the evening. It was rather on the principle of having 
outside people at a family party. It makes the party. There was a stir and 
gaiety that was delightful before we settled in enchanted silence to listen to an 
unusual and interestingly chosen program. 

The meeting next morning was held in the great room, which proved surpris- 
ingly easy to speak in. Yet in spite of the fact that one could make one's self heard 
without effort, there was very little general discussion, and the business moved swiftly 
and smoothly, as you will read in the condensed minutes. Perhaps the most inter- 
esting single announcement was that made by Miss Swindler of the proposed 
Bryn Mawr Expedition in connection with the American Institute of Archaeology. 
It is the first time that a group of women have been invited to undertake anything 
of the kind, and we all feel a vicarious pride that it is the Bryn Mawr group of 
women archaeologists that have been chosen. 

President Park's luncheon took place, as usual, in Pembroke, and, as usual, 
was crowded. Everyone is always eager to hear what President Park has to say 
to us as a group. The specific announcements she is making again on the President's 
Page, so that the alumna half across the world is kept as closely in touch with her 
hopes and fears for the College as is the alumna who is able to come each year to 
hear her speak and to enjoy her hospitality. In her formal address, President Park 
tried to make us see the College dispassionately and with fresh eyes. She reviewed 
the history of the College and stated what its aims had been in those early days, 
when it was the real experimental college, as no college has been before or since. 
In the light of this, she went on to discuss the place that Bryn Mawr will and 
ought to take in the future, and expressed the" hope that its alumnae can add some- 
thing to the economic balance of life in America. 

The last event of the day took place with the Deanery again as the setting. 
Mr. Willoughby showed the moving pictures which he had made of the College and 
of student activities, to be used for college publicity. As we wandered, talking, 
out on the snowy campus afterwards, we all agreed that it had been a very pleasant 
week-end, and there was no one, I think, who failed to express her appreciation of 
the part that the Deanery had played in making it so. We were at home on the 
campus as we had not been since undergraduate days. 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE EXECUTIVE BOARD 



Another year has passed in the history of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association 
and we have come together again for our Annual Meeting — always an occasion not 
only of great interest to all, but also of happiness in the renewing of old friendships 
and in the making of new ones. It is interesting and stimulating at such a time to 
review the achievements of the past year and^ at the same time, to discuss the 
future plans and policies of the Association. 

As so often happens towards the end of the fiscal year in the autumn, your 
Executive Board began to wonder whether it would be possible to meet the financial 
obligations of the Association; and yet, realizing the difficulty of raising money for 
any purpose whatsoever, it hesitated to make a special appeal to the ever loyal and 
generous members of the Association. However, in great part due to one particularly 
generous contribution of $1,000 from- an alumna and to the profit from the sale of 
Bryn Mawr plates, we finished the year 1933 with the great satisfaction of having 
met all the budgeted expenses and of having made the usual gifts: our share of the 
Rhoads Scholarships Fund, $1,000 to the President of the College, and $7,000 to 
the College for academic purposes. To the very able Treasurer of the Association, 
and to the equally able Chairman and members of the Finance Committee are due 
our sincere appreciation and thanks for their indefatigable efforts which have 
brought about this happy result. 

Never before have there been more numerous demands upon the Scholarships 
and Loan Fund than during the year that has passed. Whereas several years ago 
one student in seven received financial help, for the past few years it has been one 
in three. Had it not been that the Scholarships Committee had worked unceasingly 
on the problem, even to the extent of cooperating with Dean Manning in raising a 
special fund to supplement the resources of the committee, the result would have 
been that many a brilliant and valuable student would have been deprived of the 
education which was preparing lier for her means of livelihood. 

The Committee on Health and Physical Education, ever ready to give the 
benefit of their valuable advice, is to meet at the College in the early spring to 
confer with the President iand the Dean in regard to matters pertaining to the 
physical education and training of the students. 

Last year the Academic Committee made a most interesting and exhaustive 
survey and analysis of the accomplishment and discoveries of Bryn Mawr women 
in the world of science. To the great edification of the alumnae, the results of this 
study were incorporated in two articles published in the Bulletin. This year the 
committee is doing the same thing in the departments of Art and Archaeology. With 
a committee composed of women so distinguished in the academic world, we may 
well anticipate the pleasure that these articles will afford. 

Of the actual results of the faithful and unremitting work of the Nominating 
Committee the Chairman will later give a detailed report. However, it should be 
mentioned that the scheme for securing suggestions for Alumnae Directors from 
organized groups of alumnae throughout the country has worked surprisingly well 
and that the District Councillors have acted promptly and enthusiastically, so that 

(7) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



they have greatly facilitated the work of the Nominating Committee. In accord- 
ance with the amendment to the by-laws passed at the last Annual Meeting — which 
states that the Alumnae Directors shall be elected at a separate election to be held 
in the spring instead of being elected at the Annual Meeting in February — no 
nominations for Alumnae Directors will be published until the April issue of the 
Bulletin. 

Our Association now numbers 2^788^ of whom 488 are life members. There 
have been only 20 resignations^ a matter^ I think^ in view of present conditions, of 
congratulation. 100 were dropped for non-payment of dues, 10 members have 
died, and 134 new members were added to our list. Of these new members, 78 are 
from the Class of 1933, 6 were graduate students, 13 former members of the Class 
of 1933, 12 members of two other classes who received their degrees in 1933, 18 
who have resumed their membership in the Association, and 7 from older classes 
who had never before been members. 

I shall now read the list of changes during the year in the officers and members 
of the various committees: 

CHANGES IN OFFICERS AND COMMITTEE MEMBERS 

ISlew Succeeding 

Alumnae Director 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith, 1903 Elizabeth Lewis Otey, 1901 

Councillors 

Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 (District II.) Jeanne Kerr Fleischmann, 1910 

Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 (District V.) Anna Dunham* Reilly, 1908 

Appointment to he made (District VI.) Erna Rice Eisendrath, 1930 

Finance Committee (resigned) 

Virginia Atmore, 1928, Chairman Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920 

Ida Lauer Darrow, 1921 Lilian Davis Philip, 1920 

Appointment to he made Josephine Stetson, 1928 

Academic Committee 

Ellen Faulkner, 1913, Chairman, reappointed 

Elizabeth Mallett Conger, 1925 Pauline Goldmark, 1896 

Edna Shearer, 1904 Helen Sandison, 1906 

Scholarships and Loan Fund Comjnittee 

Edith Rice, 1907 Margaret Reeve Cary, 1907 

Esther Willits Thomas, 1898 Anne Todd, 1902 

Committee on Health and Physical Education 

Katharine Townsend, 1920 Gertrude Emery, 1916 

Dr. M. Elizabeth Howe, 1924 Mary Hardy, 1920 

Nominating Committee 

Evelyn Holt Lowry, 1909 Eleanor Little Aldrich, 1905 

Olga Kelly, 1913 Nathalie Swift, 1913 

Bulletin Board 

Denise Gallaudet Francis, 1932 Ellenor Morris, 1927 

(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The Commemoration of the Founding of the College is less than two years 
distant. A committee of five is to be appointed to make special recommendation as 
to the form of the proposed gift to the College in honour of its Fiftieth Anniversary, 
and to make plans for the celebration of this event. A report with these recom- 
mendations will be presented at the next Council Meeting. The committee asks the 
cooperation of every member of the Alumnae Association in offering suggestions. 

In striking contrast to the zero weather without during the three days of our 
Council Meeting in Boston in November was the warm welcome within, and the 
unbounded hospitality extended by the wonderfully efficient Boston Committee. 
One of the important results of the Council this year was the forming of a special 
committee. This developed from the great interest aroused by the report of 
Helen Evans Lewis, 1913, Councillor-at-Large, who especially stressed the need 
for closer contact between the College and the alumnae, and in so doing seemed 
to strike a responsive chord in every one present, for a motion was immediately 
made and carried that the Executive Board should appoint a committee to bring 
about means of establishing closer contact between the College and the alumnae, 
and that this committee should report at the Annual, Meeting, if possible, or at the 
next Council Meeting. We are happy to report that Mrs. Lewis has accepted the 
chairmanship of this committee of five, but the committee is not able to report at 
the present meeting, as it has not as yet had time to develop its plans. 

Undoubtedly nothing could possibly bring about this happy contact of the 
alumnae with the College as perfectly as Miss Thomas's wonderful gift of the 
furnishings and contents of the Deanery to the Trustees in trust for the alumnae, 
in addition to a $20,000 fund to be used during the first years of its establishment. 
To all the alumnae these beautiful surroundings offer a meeting place pervaded by 
happy memories of the past and by the inspiration of Miss Thomas's distinguished, 
sympathetic and brilliant personality. At the same time it is a practical alumnae 
house which can be of constant service to the College for its many entertainments, 
and yet always a dignified and delightful home to the alumnae from far and near. 
Again we wish to offer to the Deanery Committee, under the chairmanship of 
Caroline McCormick Slade, our heartfelt thanks for their untiring work. 

To all officers of the Association, to the Chairman and members of all com- 
mittees, to the Alumnae Secretary, to the District Councillors, and to the many 
individual alumnae throughout the country, who consistently and faithfully develop 
and carry on the work of the Association, we cannot sufficiently express our thanks 
for the assistance so cheerfully given at all times. 

I shall now ask you to rise and remain standing while I read the names of 
those members of the Alumnae Association who have died during the year. 

Margaret Dudley Walker, 1893 Alberta Warner Aiken, 1905 

Leonie Gilmour, 1895 Helen Kempton, 1905 

Etta Davis, 1899 Alice Baird Roesler, 1907 

Edith Crane Lanham, 1900 Anna Pratt Abbott, 1924 

Edith McCarthy, 1901 Elizabeth Bigelow, 1930 



Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895, President. 



(9) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



933 RECEIPTS 

S 43.00 




D CURRENT INCOME 
PERMANENT TRUST FUNDS 
ALUMN/E FUND Undesignated 



KX^ ALUMN/E FUND Designated 



♦INCLUDES $500 PROFIT FROM BRYN MAWR PLATES 



(10) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1933 DISBURSEMENTS 

141,954 



-^^v^^ 






<s 



^\ 



'-FUND $»,240 



TO BRYN MAWR 
COLLEGE FOR 

ACADEMIC 

PURPOSES 






S:o^^ 



K"^- 
^j?.^ 



V 



M 15 c. ?>^A^ob 

•J 2,860 ' ^Ji 



nmn 



• • •: •'• • 






•••-• 



K^ 



CURRENT INCOME- DUES.ETC 
PERMANENT TRUST FUNDS 
ALUMN/t FUND Undesignated 
ALUMN£ FUND Designated 



(11) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



FINANCIAL COMPARISONS 



Income 

Budget 



Dues $6,000.00 

Bulletin 1,000.00 

Income, Life Membership Fund Invest 900.00 

Income, Rhoads Scholarships Invest 50.00 

Bank Interest 400.00 



$8,350.00 



Appropriation Undesignated C A 6,345.00 

Alumnae Fund { B 8,500.00 

TOTAL $23,195.00 

Disbursements 

(A) 

Salaries , $6,950.00 

Pensions 325.00 

Operation 

Postage $400.00 $482.66 

Printing and 500.00| 330.30 

Supplies 125.00) 189.66 

Telephone and Telegraph 75.00 48.35 

Auditors 200.00 185.00 

Office Equipment 150.00 102.50 

Miscellaneous 75.00 89.61 

$1,525.00 

Bulletin 

Salary of Editor 

($600 included above). 

Printing $2,500.00 $2,328.25 

Mailing and Miscellaneous 500.00 477.79 

$3,000.00 

Other Expenditures 

Executives and Committees 600.00 325.82 

Council 600.00 805.69 

Alumnae Festivities 100.00 79.19 

Dues in other Associations 95.00 95.00 

Questionnaire 300.00 127.00 

Alumnae Register 700.0D 196.83 

Emergency Fund 500.00 

■ $2,895.00 — — 

$14,695.00 

(B) 

Rhoads Scholarships $500.00 $250.00 

President's Fund 1,000.00 1,000.00 

Pledge to College for 

Academic Purposes 7,000.00 7,000.00 

8,500.00 

TOTAL $23,195.00 

(12) 



Actual 
for 

1933 


Proposed 
Budget, 

1934 


$5,994.80 

1,524.26 

861.86 

24.50 


$6,000.00 

1,000.00 

900.00 


325.82 
Appro. Bal. 
Office Equip. ... 79.66 

Prof. Plates 500.00 

Ad. Book 25.50 


300.00 


$9,336.40 

A 3,794.75 
B 8,250.00 


$8,200.00 

A 6,265.00 
B 8,500.00 


$21,381.15 


$22,965.00 



),950.00 
317.50 



$7,070.00 
325.00 



$1,428.08 



$2,806.04 



$500.00 

600.00 

75.00 

100.00 
100.00 



$2,300.00 
500.00 



500.00 
700.00 
100.00 
95.00 
300.00 
700.00 
500.00 



,375.00 



52,800.00 



$1,629.53 
$13,131.15 



8,250.00 
$21,381.15 



$2,895.00 
$14,465.00 



$500.00 
1,000.00 

7,000.00 



8,500.00 



$22,965.00 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 



Madam President, Members of the Alumnae Association: 

With your approval I should like again to submit today — in place of the 
detailed financial statement for the year 1933 — two charts which^ while they omit 
the technical intricacies of the audited report, still include in summarized form 
every portion of our financial operations. These charts are .accurately made to 
show the relationship and the comparative size of our various classes of receipts 
and disbursements. 

The details of our income and expense account will be further itemized today 
in the printed budget which we have to present to you, and in which we have listed 
1933's budget and actual results, as well as the estimated figures for 1934. 

The complete audited report of the Treasurer will be be filed in the Alumnae 
Office, where it may be seen by any member of the Association who so wishes. In 
accordance with the recommendation of the Finance Committee and the approval 
of the Executive Board, the report for 1933 has been audited not by the usual 
public accountants, but by an Auditing Committee appointed by the Executive 
Board. This procedure is one frequently followed by organizations like our own, 
and it was adopted for the year 1933 as a means of reducing by about $200 our 
budget for 1934. The committee consisted of Louise Congdon Francis, 1900; 
Marguerite Lehr, Ph.D. 1925, now Associate in Mathematics at Bryn Mawr College, 
and Virginia Atmore, 1928. The committee verified all checks, bills, and vouchers, 
cash on hand and at the various banks; examined securities in the custody of the 
Pennsylvania Company; checked and verified the accounts and balance sheets of 
the Association. 

In presenting these diagrams, I wish to explain that the apparent discrepancy 
between total income and total disbursements is due to the fact that some balances 
belonging to special funds may be carried over from one fiscal year to another^ — as 
illustrated in the Loan Fund account, in which approximately $1,000 more was 
received than was disbursed during the year — the balance being correspondingly 
greater at the end of 1933 than at the end of 1932. 

Our money, as we have tried to indicate in these diagrams, falls into four — or 
we might say three — classes, for certain annual gifts to the College have become 
so essential to Bryn Mawr that they have become as fundamental a part of our 
activity as the maintenance of our organization, and are submitted to you in our 
budget, together with operation items. We have, then: first — our permanent trust 
funds — the Loan Fund and the Life Membership Fund ; second — the General Fund, 
whose income comes from two sources — dues, the investment income. Bulletin 
advertising and miscellaneous income, which pays about 72 per cent of the operation 
or maintenance of our organization and its activities — including the sending of the 
Bulletin to 2,800 members; and the other source, that very vital and moving 
testimony of the devotion of Bryn Mawr Alumnae, the undesignated Alumnae Fund, 
with its proud record of $12,096 in that trying year 1932, and of $12,044 in this 
still more trying year, 1933. It is this achievement which not only supplies the 
remaining 28 per cent of our operation expenses, but makes it possible for us to 

(13) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



complete annually the Rhoads Scholarships, to give President Park the much- 
cherished annual President's Fund of $1,000, and to pay to Bryn Mawr College our 
pledge of $7,000 for academic purposes. And thirdly, our finances include this 
very substantial segment — over $20,000 in 1932, but even in this lean year about 
$14,500 — the Designated Alumnae Fund — primarily Regional and Special Scholar- 
ships — but including also other gifts for special designated purposes. These funds 
are in most cases transferred practically at once to the College. 

In presenting the budget for your approval today we have included not only 
the expense account of the Association and the two regular annual gifts — the $500 
for Rhoads Scholarships and the $1,000 for the President's Fund — which it has 
been our practice to include in previous years, but also the $7,000 gift to Bryn Mawr 
for Academic purposes which has been recommended to you by the Finance Com- 
mittee and the Executive Board. We have made this change in the form of the 
budget because we believe that it gives a much clearer picture of our undertaking. 

The statement before you shows an estimate of 1934 expenses somewhat below 
the estimate for 1933, though somewhat above the actual disbursements for 1933. 
It is important to note that, aside from the economies which reduced most of the 
items in the Expense Account below the estimate or approved budget, two reduc- 
tions in 1933's record must not be counted on in 1934. The appropriation of $196.83 
instead of $700 to the Register Sinking Fund was necessitated because we had not 
sufficient balance at the end of the fiscal year to set aside the entire $700 provided 
by the budget. The other substantial reduction, i. e., the payment of $250 instead 
of $500 for the Rhoads Scholarship was due to a fortunate gift which provided the 
money for one Rhoads Scholarship and so relieved us of half of our obligation in 
this item. For both these items the figure of the 1933 budget must be assumed for 
the 1934 budget. 

Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909, Treasurer. 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 

A year ago, at our Annual Meeting in Goodhart Hall, your Finance Committee 
was able to announce with great relief that we had managed to complete, without 
any special, last-minute appeal, the collection of our $7,000 pledge to the College. 
This was with the help, you will remember, of a handsome thousand-dollar nest-egg 
bequeathed to us from the preceding year. At that time, without a dissenting voice 
you voted to pledge yourselves to raise $7,000 again during the year 1933. 

Like the three little pigs, we cried, "Who's afraid?" But it remained to be 
seen whether or not our kouse was to be built of straw ! 

From many sides came rumors of wolves at the door, and there were those 
who wondered if our house would stand. This year we had no nest-egg, or, lest 
we mix our metaphors, let us say we had no thousand-dollar foundation to our house. 

In my story it was the pig builders who did the huffing and puffing ; the ever- 
faitliful Class Collectors made a special effort to reach every member of their class 
with a personal appeal. And, to make a long story short, on the last of December, 
when the books were closed for the year, they had collected, again without any 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



special appeal, enough money to complete all our running expenses and to give to 
the College $1,000 for the President's Fund, $250 toward the Rhoads Scholarship, 
and our $7,000 pledge toward the academic needs of the College. 

Our house proved not to be built of straw, but of good, firm masonry — the best 
of which a house could boast: rocks of loyalty, cemented with generosity. 

Actually, in round figures, the alumnae contributed this year to the Undesig- 
nated Fund $52 less than in 1932. But tlie Undesignated Fund was not called 
upon in as large a measure as it was the year before to complete the running 
expenses of the Association : a larger percentage of our contributions could there- 
fore be applied directly to the alumnae gifts to the College. 

In analyzing the year's results, there seem to me to be one or two very 
encouraging aspects: 

Twenty out of .the 47 classes (and in "classes" I include the ever-generous 
Ph.D.'s, M.A.'s and Graduate Students) increased the total amounts of their gifts 
this year to the Undesignated Fund. 

Twenty-one classes increased their number of contributors. Indeed, the most 
heartening thing to me about the whole year's work is that during this difficult 
financial year 1,007 alumnae contributed to the Alumnae Fund, as against 948 
last year. 

Another gratifying fact is that of the 20 classes which increased their gifts this 
year, only 8 were classes holding reunions last spring. 

Does this mean that there was a more strenuous huffing and puffing by our 
faithful pig-builders? Or does it perhaps mean that the very bricks and mortar of 
our alumnae structure rose by common consent and fitted themselves into place .'^ 

Wherever the credit lies for having brought the year's task to a successful end, 
it is with renewed hope for the future of the Alumnae Fund that I bring you. 
Madam President, this recommendation from the Finance Committee, which has 
been approved by the Executive Board, namely: that the Alumnae Association 
pledge to the College for 193^ a gift of $7,000 for academic needs. 

Since last year's pledge of $7,000 to the College was not incorporated in the 
budget for 1933, I believe it is in order to move that the Treasurer of the Associa- 
tion he authorized to pay over to the Treasurer of the College the amount of $7,000 
raised during 1933 for the academic needs of the College. I so move, Madam 
President. 

Lois Kellogg Jessup, 1920, Chairman. 



ALUMNAE COMMITTEE OF SEVEN COLLEGES 

The committee wishes to call the attention of all alumnae to the article in the 
magazine section of the New York Times for February 4th — Dean Gildersleeve's 
Portrait of the College Girl. 



(15) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH 
AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

There have been several changes in the organization of the Health Department 
this year. In the past the first responsibility for medical care of the students has 
rested with the Physician-in-Chief. The College Physician has worked under his 
supervision. The new arrangement involves calling on consultants by the physician, 
a general consultant in the neighborhood for the more serious cases, and a long list- 
of special consultants in Philadelphia. This gives the College Physician more direct 
responsibility and at the same time provides for a wider range of consulting spe- 
cialists when necessary, which should be satisfactory to both patient and physician. 

An Associate College Physician and Consultant Cardiologist has been appointed 
to help carry the increased load which has fallen on the College Physician. 

Dr. Marjorie Jeffries Wagoner is College Physician for the ninth consecutive 
year. 

Dr. Frederick Sharpless is the present General Consultant. 

Dr. Mary Easby is the new Associate Physician and Cardiologist. 

The past year brought a number of difficult medical problems. Four cases of 
clinical scarlet fever with a number of immune carriers lasted nearly three months. 
The infantile paralysis scare in the fall necessitated quarantine and a late opening. 
A short grippe epidemic occurred after Christmas. 

. This year for reasons of economy there is no night nurse. 

The Hygiene course has been reduced to Apphid Anatomy and Physiology, and 
according to Dr. Wagoner is going much better as such. 

Dr. Wagoner writes that they are "trying constantly to improve the spirit and 
atmosphere of the Infirmary. Books, magazines and periodicals would be most 
welcome. The sole subscription is to the Nezv York Times." The committee would 
like to respond. One subscription has been received, for the National Geographic. 
Would anyone who would like to add to this communicate with the Chairman or 
Miss Hawkins? 

The Department of Physical Education has completed five years under a 
system which is different from that of the other colleges. There is no formal 
gymnastic work and in its place is a course known as Body Mechanics, which gives 
the theory of good movement, together with a very large amount of demonstration 
and practice. For further correction in movement and posture there is instruction 
swimming, dancing, and the various sports, with a certain amount of individual 
correction work. 

Miss Josephine Petts, Director of Physical Education for the past five years, 
says in the Alumnae Bulletin of June, 1933: "Our problem is to teach everyone 
in College to move well, to walk with the minimum of fatigue being held more 
important than to run with the maximum of speed." She asks us to "think of 
dancing as the most austere of discipline, strict and simple, but capable of awaken- 
ing from the human being a power and energy which have slept for centuries." 

Dean Manning has asked this committee to study the working of this system 
and to comment upon it. We plan to begin our investigation in February. The 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



committee would welcome questions, suggestions and comments from alumnae, stu- 
dents and parents, addressed to the Chairman or Miss Hawkins. 

And finally, it is a pleasure to quote from an article in the August Good House- 
keeping by Henrietta Sperry Ripperger on "When You Choose Your Daughter's 
College." "I shall first of all inspect the conditions under which my daughter 
would live," she begins, "with special reference to the liousing and the food." And 
having done so, the author reports: "Let me give some examples of successful 
handling of food. The first is the University of Michigan . . . the second is 
Bryn Mawr." After explaining the planning and control of food at Bryn Mawr, 
she concludes: "The food is excellent, plentiful, and is passed twice, which, strange 
as it may seem, is not the common practice at many institutions of learning." 

Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918, Chairman. 



REPORT ON BEHALF OF THE ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 

It is with some diffidence that I come before this meeting to report for the 
Alumnae Directors. The reason is that I have always felt that the alumnae wlio 
attend this mid-year meeting are those who, because of vicinity or interest, are in 
extremely close touch with the College and that there is little I can tell you that 
you do not perhaps already know better than I. For those of you, however, who are 
not intimately connected with the business of the College, and for the pages of the 
Alumnae Bulletin in which this report may find a place, I would like first to 
outline very briefly the work of the Board of Directors as a whole, and then to 
tell you what the activities of an Alumna Director can be. 

Boards of Directors are at best unwieldy organizations and, except for final 
decisions on controversial points, the board as a whole only ratifies the decisions 
which have been made by the standing committees. These are, as you know, the 
Executive Committee, the Finance Committee, the Buildings and Grounds Com- 
mittee, the Library Committee, and the Religious Life Committee. The membership 
of these committees is an indication of how active a part the alumnae take in the 
affairs of the College. 

It is an enormous privilege and pleasure to me to have been on the Executive 
Committee since I have been in office. Academic problems are, of course, first 
handled by the faculty and the President, and much of the work of the Executive 
Committee is to hear and approve their plans for appointments and curriculum. 
These plans are always full of interest for the members of the committee, but they 
come to us rather mature. 

Another large part of the work is the administrative side of the College, and 
even the Executive Committee is too large an organization to manage mucli of this 
in meetings. The President and the Chairman of tlie committee work together con- 
stantly during the year, and the rest of us applaud their labors. I imagine that 
the work of the other committees is done in much tlie same way: by small sub- 
committees and by constant collaboration between the President and the Chairman 
of the committee. 

There are only four Board iNIeetings a year and an indefinite number of 
committee meetings preceding the Board Meetings. I have felt that the practice of 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



having the Executive Committee meetings immediately precede the Board Meetings 
has had its disadvantages from the standpoint of the work of the Executive Com- 
mittee. Matters often come up which require longer discussion than is possible in 
the time allotted, and upon which some action might be taken before they were 
presented to the Board of Directors. It is, of course, a great saving in time, 
especially to the out-of-town members of the committee, to have two meetings in 
immediate succession, but it means more work for the Chairman of the committee 
and less for the members. 

These, then, are our duties as members of the Board: attendance at the meet- 
ings and the meetings of those committees to which we belong. This should be an 
easy task and is a delightful one, but it seems to. me hardly a useful service. An 
opinion given after a few moments of thought on a subject of which one has heard 
no discussion beforehand can hardly be valuable to the College. The members of 
the Board who really contribute to the work of the College are those who are 
constantly in touch with the affairs of the College and of the Alumnae Association. 
This is made possible in several ways: first by the invitation extended to the 
Alumnae Directors to attend the Council Meetings of the Alumnae Association. 
Another opportunity is the delightful lunch which Miss Park holds before the 
Directors' meeting for the alumnae members of the Board. A third opportunity, 
of which I greatly regret I have not been able to avail myself, is the very wise 
decision of the Alumnae Association to make the Alumnae Directors act with the 
President of the Association as the Alumnae Committee of the Deanery. This very 
dramatic task has probably colored the year for all of us, and, while it will be 
reported in greater detail at another time in this meeting, I feel sure that the 
practice of having the committee meet after the Board Meeting and spend the night 
at the Deanery has brought us all in much closer touch with the College. I would 
like to quote from a letter of Miss Thomas's which she wrote to Mr. Scattergood 
in July of last year: 

''I want to say in closing that I am convinced that privately supported 
colleges like Bryn Mawr must depend for the future on the generous sup- 
port of their alumnae and not on large gifts from rich men and women 
and rich foundations, and that I believe that a beautiful and unique 
Alumnae Centre like the Deanery can not fail to strengthen and inspire 
the love and loyalty to it by 4,000 or more alumnae. Even if the College 
had to contribute to its maintenance, I am confident that any expenditure 
made by the College for this purpose would be returned financially a 
thousand-fold — quite apart from the added loyalty and devotion such an 
Alumnae Centre will foster and, I hope, create." 

Certainly the Deanery Committee, under the able direction of Mrs. Slade, is 
carrying out Miss Thomas's hopeful prophecy. 

But I feel that these opportunities are not enough and that, if one is really 
qualified to be an Alumnae Director, one should be able to spend time at the 
College and also to have contact with people who are interested in Bryn Mawr, 
the alumnae, and friends of the College. Two members of the Board of Directors 
who do this outstandingly, so outstandingly that there can be no invidiousness in 
comparison, are Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Hand. Their long familiarity with the affairs 
of the College, their enormous interest, and their indefatigability make them abso- 
lutely invaluable members of the Board. I feel that the Alumnae Association 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



should look forward long into the future and groom now two new members who, 
many years hence, can carry on the race which these two have so nobly begun. 
I feel also that in choosing candidates for Alumnae Directors the Association should 
take pains to select those who can give the time and the interest to the work 
which it needs. 

I cannot close without a word about the actual accomplishments of the College 
during the past year, though most of these are already known to you, especially 
through the Alumnae Bulletin. An outstanding feature, it seems to me, is that 
a year ago it was necessary to cut salaries in the administrative force of the College 
because we feared a deficit at the close of the year. Through the extraordinarily 
able work of the various executives whose salaries had been cut, such a deficit did 
not occur. There was, in fact, a surplus, and it was a great happiness on the part 
of the President of the College, the Executive Committee, and the Board of 
Directors, to be able to refund to these loyal members of the college staff the salary 
cuts which they had so gallantly accepted. 

It has been a very great pleasure to hold this office for the last five years, and 
I want now to thank the Alumnae Association for having given me the privilege. 

Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918, 

Senior Alumnae Director. 

COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Sunday, March 4th — 7.30 p. m., Music Room of Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by the Reverend John W. Suter, Jr., D.D., Rector of the Church of the 
Epiphany, New York. 

Monday, March 5th — 5 p. nn., The Deanery 

Sixth of the Series.* 

Mr. Reginald Pole, graduate and prize-man of Cambridge University, founder with 

Rupert Brooke of the Marlowe Dramatic Society of Cambridge University; poet, composer, 

dramatist, actor; producer and director, will talk on "The Theatre of the Future; and the 

Signposts of Today." 

Monday, March 5th — 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Pianoforte Recital by Horace Alwyne, 

Sunday, March I Ith — 7.30 p. m., Music Room of Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by the Reverend Malcolm E. Peabody, D.D., Rector of St. Paul's Church, 
Chestnut Hill. Pa. 

Tuesday, March 13th — 4 p. m., The Deanery (Tea at 5 p. m.) 

Seventh of the Series. 

An afternoon of poetry with some Bryn Mawr poets, Hortense Flexner King, 1907, Lysbeth 

Boyd Borle, 1925, and members of the undergraduate poetry group. 

Saturday, March 17th— 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

"Le Barbler de Seville," by Beaumarchais, presented by the French Club. 
Reserved seats 85 cents, special price to students and teachers 50 cents. 

Sunday, March 1 8th — 5 p. m., The Deanery 

Eighth of the Series.* Violin Recital by Abe Berg 
through the courtesy of Sophia Yarnall Jacobs, 1923. 

*Tea and cookies will be served informally without charge at half pastfour o'clock. 
An informal buffet supper at seventy-five cents will be served at seven o'clock every Sunday 
evening. Reservations should be made in advance. If possible, to the Manager of the Deanery. 

Alumnae may bring guests to the Deanery parties. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 



Most of the events of the college winter are important only to those of us who 
help bring them about, attempt to counteract them, or merely record them, but in 
the past weeks there have been two which I should like to broadcast to every 
graduate of the College. 

1. When in March, 1932, the budget for the winter of 1932-33 was made up 
by the Board of Directors, the general financial condition looked so uncertain that 
the Finance Committee advised expenditures be lopped to meet a probable large 
decrease in income. After the insertion in the list of all possible economies, it seemed 
necessary to the regretful President and Board to make a 10 per cent cut in all 
non-teaching salaries of over $2,500 a year, and a 5 per cent cut in lower salaries 
of the same kind. This was announced and carried out. 

At the end of the fiscal year, July, 1933, caution was rewarded. It proved, on 
the one hand, that the decrease in the college income was less than our March guess, 
and, on the other, that our difficult economies had been carried out faithfully in 
every department. There was neither the deficit we had feared, nor an even break — 
the best we had hoped — but a small surplus. The Directors of the College con- 
sequently voted, at their meeting in December last, to return to each member of the 
staff affected by the cut of 1932-33, the amount deducted from the salary of 
that year. As the alumnae have been informed, cuts in both teaching and non- 
teaching salaries are in force this year. 

2. The alumnae will remember that in accordance with The Plan for the 
Academic and Financial Future of the College worked out by a joint committee of 
the Directors of the College and of the alumnae during the spring of 1931, a letter 
was sent to the General Education Board, in April of that year, describing the plan 
and asking that the Board take under consideration the gift of a sum of money, 
sufficient to construct and equip a new science building to be used for the Depart- 
ments of Chemistry and Physics. A communication was received from the officers 
of the Board a month later, notifying us that the Board was unable at the moment to 
go further than an expression of general interest in the plan. The President of 
the College and several members of the committee later met and talked with mem- 
bers of the staff of the General Education Board, and, acting on the advice of several 
friends of the College who were themselves interested not only in Bryn Mawr but 
in the possibilities of scientific work for women, sent a' second letter to the General 
Education Board in December of the same year. This second statement included a 
plan proposed by the science departments to increase their advanced undergraduate 
work and their graduate work by doubling the number of scholarships and fellow- 
ships now offered, and by adding a research fund available both for faculty and 
students. It enlarged on the advantage of such opportunities, offered in a college 
for women, to science work in America, and it was accompanied by a striking 
statement of the scientific work carried on in Dalton Hall and published in scien- 
tific journals, and a list of the professional positions of Bryn Mawr women, grad- 
uate and undergraduate students, who had gone into pure or applied science. At 
the same time, Dr. Simon Flexner, Dr. William H. Welch, Professor Robert 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Millikan, President Karl Compton^ Dr. E. P. Kohler and Dr. Edmund Wilson 
wrote to the Board a series of remarkable recommendations of the scientific work 
done by the College and of approval iji general of its request. An answer was duly 
received from the Board;, saying that;, though no change was to be made in the 
present routine under which the Board intended to make a general study of educa- 
tional needs during the year 1932^ the material presented by Bryn Mawr would be 
given careful study. A number of conversations with men connected with the 
General Education Board have been held following this last letter. 

In early December of 1933^ however^ a letter from Mr. Brierley^ Secretary of 
the Board;, was received, containing the following statement: 

Action on your request for a contribution for the construction of a 
building for the Departments of Chemistry and Physics, submitted by you 
on April 13, 1931, was deferred pending completion of the educational 
survey being made by the officers for use by the Board. I am writing you 
at this time to inform you of the disposition of your request. 

The findings of the survey were presented to the Board at a recent 
meeting, and as a result a revised program was adopted which does not 
provide for assistance to colleges and universities for general purposes. I 
regret, therefore, to inform you that your request falls outside the revised 
program. 

I do not need to enlarge on that urgent need of a new building for Chemistry 
and Physics and a rebuilt Dalton for Biology and Geology. Science at Bryn Mawr, 
one of the fields of instruction of which we have been most proud, is not only ter- 
ribly overcrowded in its present quarters, but is using a fast deteriorating building 
and old apparatus and equipment. Whether from the point of view of the present 
gallant struggle against odds in this work which is being waged by all the science 
faculty and students, or from the angle of the future development of science as a 
field at Bryn Mawr and for women in general, a development in which useful and 
far-reaching plans are crying for a chance to be put into action — from either point 
of view, new quarters for its science department are without question the need of 
the College which must first be met. 



AN ALUMNA VISITS THE DEANERY 

It was a genuine homecoming to find myself once more in those spacious, 
hospitable rooms with glowing fireplaces and mellow lights; rooms filled witli 
Whistler etchings, Venetian glass and small bronzes, and with daffodils in vases. 

Here was a house lived in, so pervaded by the personality of its former owner 
that momentarily one expected to see Miss Thomas appearing around a corner, or 
advancing down the hallway, mistress of her realm. Memories, associations came 
to mind through all the lower rooms. One felt pride of possession, of coming, through 
no merit of one's own, into a rich heritage. No alumnae liouse has been like this. 

For this benefit to myself and to other alumnae, for this opportunity given 
Bryn Mawr to entertain her friends in fitting manner, may we all honor Miss 
Thomas, who proves again how much she has our good at heart. 

Gladys Jones Markle, 1912. 
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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE JOINT EXPEDITION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 
AND THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE 
OF AMERICA 

The long-cherished plan for a Bryn Mawr Excavation is apparently shortly 
to be fulfilled. At the invitation of the Archaeological Institute of America, Bryn 
Mawr will cooperate in an excavation in Cilicia on the southeastern coast of Asia 
Minor. The Director of the Excavation will be Hetty Goldman, Bryn Mawr 1903, 
Field Director of the Fogg Museum in Cambridge. Miss Goldman has excavated 
for the Fogg Museum at Halae and Eutresis in Boeotia and also at Colophon, near 
Smyrna. She has published monographs and books embodying the results of her 
work, which have been received with enthusiastic commendation by scholars. Bryn 
Mawr is fortunate in having an excavator who is highly acceptable to the Institute 
as the Director of this Expedition, and who will conduct a scientific excavation 
which will bring credit to the College. 

We are hoping to excavate the ancient Hittite city of Puranda which has been 
located by Dr. Emil Forrer, Visiting Professor at Johns Hopkins, who will accom- 
pany the expedition as adviser and will read Hittite texts that may be found. 
We expect to find a Hittite, a Mycenaean and an early Greek city on this site. We 
shall also test out some Mycenaean sites in Northern Syria and hope to arrange for 
future excavating in Turkey and Northern Syria. If our plans are successful, we 
anticipate no difficulty in future financing. 

Recent discoveries have shown that there are important Mycenaean remains 
in Cilicia and in Northern Syria. The British under Sir Arthur Evans have just 
chosen a site near Tarsus for excavation. The Swedes have written of their dis- 
coveries of Mycenaean pottery in Cilicia. Bryn Mawr may well have the opportunity 
to assist in writing a new historical chapter on the Mycenaean Empire on the coast 
of Asia Minor. We believe that this expedition is an important step for the College 
and one that may bring discoveries of significance for Bryn Mawr and for American 
scholarship. 

The sum of $7,500 is needed as Bryn Mawr's share for the financing of the 
expedition. $3,625 has been raised and the remainder must be obtained quickly if 
the expedition is to go out this spring. It is important for future financing of the 
work that a beginning be made this year. Neither the opportunity nor the honor 
which has come to the College should be disregarded. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, 
Professor of Classical Archaeology. 



For the rest of this year the Deanery may be used by the families of 
alumnae. Alumnae may also introduce guests, but must give any guest a personal 
letter of introduction, and in addition must notify the manager of the Deanery 
that such a letter has been given. Families of undergraduates may also avail 
themselves of the use of the Deanery but such arrangements must be made by 
the undergraduate personally through the Chairman of the Entertaining Com- 
mittee. An additional charge of fifteen per cent will be made to non-alumnae. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 



As usual during the period from Christmas to midyears, not to speak of tlie 
midyear weeks, there was a dearth of activity on campus. This was made up for 
by the few but excellent attractions in Goodhart and the Deanery. Two Bryn Mawr 
alumnae, Mrs. E. B. White (Katharine Sergeant, '14) and Frederica de Laguna, '27, 
returned to give us interesting talks about their work; Dr. Fritz M. Marx (husband 
of Barbara Spackman, '27), an exile from Hitler-land, and Dorothy Sands, the 
well-known monologuist, completed the calendar of events. 

Mrs. White, who spoke at a vocational tea as editor of the New YorJxer, 
dispensed, along with a list of the openings for those who want writing jobs, a good 
deal of encouragement as to the prospects of actually getting a position on a 
magazine. Her constructive advice was refreshing to an audience accustomed to the 
old story that there is really not much a college graduate can do, a story that 
leaves the ambitious undergraduate feeling like one against a very cold world. 
Although we don't wish to harbour any delusions about the value of an A.B. degree, 
we think it would be nice for Mrs. White to blow through Bryn Mawr once a year, 
letting light and sunshine into the post-college outlook. 

Our other alumna-speaker, Miss de Laguna, told us about The Eskimos of 
Prince William Sound, a subject not quite so near home, but equally fascinating in 
its own way. These people had never been studied before by anthropologists, so 
the Burket-Smith expedition, of which Miss de Laguna was a member, made a 
survey in an entirely new field. Besides telling us about the life and history of this 
tribe of primitive Eskimos, she brought a reminder that unexplored fields still lie 
about us — only waiting to be discovered by the hardy daughters of Bryn ]\Liwr. 

Our other speaker during January, Regierungsrat Dr. Fritz M. INIarx, formerly 
a professor at the University of Hamburg and an expert on political problems. 
surprised many of his audience out of their preconceived notions about the Brown 
Shirts by his unexpected attitude on Hitlerism. When he was announced as an 
exile from Germany, everyone at once leaped to the conclusion that the talk would 
be a virulent expose of Nazi policies. Instead, his audience was treated to a well- 
reasoned lecture on Hitler's desire for peace and disarmament; and, by the way, to 
a denial of most of the atrocity stories circulated about the Nazi Revolution. We 
must admit that not everyone was willing to believe that Hitler wants only peace 
and security, even from a declared opponent of his national policies ; yet the interest 
of the audience was proved by the fact that Dr. Marx was kept answering questions 
in the Common Room long after 11 o'clock and our curfew. It is impossible to say 
how many converts he made, but at least certain seeds of doubt were spread in our 
minds as to whether all that is printed in the newspapers is to be trusted. That, 
probably, is enough for any one lecturer to accomplish. 

Our drama for the month of January was supplied by Dorothy Sands, who 
gave a program called Our Stage and Stars under the auspices of the Cosmopolitan 
Club of Philadelphia. She dealt very faithfully and intelligently with American 
styles in acting from 1787 to Mae West, and succeeded in instructing and amusing 
her audience at one and the same time. Although we compared her unfa>'ourably 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



with Euth Draper and Cornelia Otis Skinner^ the fact remained that she did know 
a great deal about the technique of the theatre^ and more than that about its history. 
The usual drama-bitten group attended the reception and listened with all ears to 
Miss Sands's gossip of the theatre world. We have a premonition that Bryn Mawr 
may be in the process of producing another Theresa Helburn or Katherine Hepburn, 
and if it isn't, it should be; the campus has overpassed the number of dilettantes 
required to produce one genius, and we look for one soon — be she actress, play- 
wright, producer or whatnot. 

One of our less noisy groups, the Bryn Mawr League, has been doing things 
lately in its quiet, determined manner, and now it has an innovation to make public. 
Bates House, the summer camp for poor children which the League has been run- 
ning with some help from another charity organization, has been given a new lease 
on life and henceforth is to be a strictly Bryn Mawr institution, called the 
Bryn Mawr Camp. A great many practical details will have to be arranged before 
the camp can become the thriving establishment that its backers hope to make it; 
a long list of household equipment — cot-beds, sheets, towels, kitchen china, etc. — is 
needed for the new house, and the Bryn Mawr Camp Committee is planning to 
make its drive for these necessaries in February. Later on in the spring they will 
give a Puppet Show in the Deanery Garden to swell the Bryn Mawr Camp Fund, 
and wish it to be known that the alumnae around Philadelphia will be thrice 
welcome. 

In the last issue of the Bulletin we promised to report the undergraduate 
reaction to the new plan for comprehensives ; it has been rather negative so far, 
probably becatise of midyears, and there has been little discussion. The News will 
offer the best agency for raising and answering questions about the proposed 
change, and it has, as yet, had no editorials or letters on the subject. Dean 
Manning, following up her article in the News on comprehensives, gave a talk in 
chapel explaining the plan in further detail, but the campus has yet to answer the 
administration. We renew our promise to let you know when and if it does — and 
whether the mob reaction has any effect on the plan. 



NEW YORK BRYN MAWR CLUB ENTERTAINS 
PRESIDENT PARK 

The club dinner for President Park was given at the Park Lane on January 
16th. Helen Riegel Oliver, 1916, President of the club, was toastmaster. Serena 
Hand Savage, 1922, spoke about the Council; Beatrice Sorchan Binger, 1919, 
outlined the work of the New York Scholarship Committee, and Hetty Goldman, 
1903, discussed the plan for the Bryn Mawr Excavation. President Park, the guest 
of honour, brought news of the College. She told of the large enrollment, discussed 
the ever-present problem of the Science building, and told of the great things in 
prospect for next year in the Department of Mathematics. In closing she praised 
warmly the present student attitude, with its more mature point of view and 
widening interests. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE ALUMNAE BOOK-SHELF 

DiNA Ferri's Notebook of Nothing^ The Lyrical Diary of a Sienese Shepherdess, 
Translated from the Italian by Helen J. Robins and Harriet Reid. Published 
by Bruce Hopkins^ Inc. Boston. Price $2.00. 

Any piece of writing, especially poetry, is changed in translation; one wonders 
how much of the charm of Dina Ferri's delicate little Notebook of Nothing is owing 
to the kindly skill of Miss Robins and Miss Reid, who put it into English. For 
charm, unquestionably, the notebook has. Love of the changing year, of the birds 
and flowers and fragrant vineyards that gladden Tuscany, of the country folk whom 
the gentle shepherdess must daily have seen, of the religion that formed so great 
and expanding a part of her few years, fill the poems. 

Two fragments, one composed early in her literary life, one written in the 
Siena Hospital, where she died in May, 1930, give a slight idea of a work whicli 
must be read through if it is to be properly savoured. 

Si Avvicina Primavera 
(Spring Is Coming) 

O Queen so fair 

From Winter's Lair 

girdled with flowers 

of many Imed bowers, 

thou comest delaying, 

lingering, staying, 

Scattering showers 

of song and sweet air. 
*■ 

All thou awakest to fresh-springing green, 

all thou trans formest, O gentle Queen ! 

Hospital of Siena, May 6, 1930. 

In the abyss of heaven there shone one luminous star. It made one tliink of a 
dew drop quivering on the petal of a flower, or the piteous tear of a tired angel 
astray in azure paths . . . The little star . . . trembled as if terrified by its loneliness, 
and as it trembled it seemed to put out its own light and light it again. 

These and other passages are so fragrant that they make one regret there are 
to be no more of them. 

Beatrice INIcGeorge, 1901. 



The College has two sets of the moving-picture reels shown at the close 
of the Annual Meeting. They are available, free of charge, to any alumnae 
group for publicity purposes, and may be obtained by applying to 
Mrs. Chadwick-Collins, Oflice of Publications, Taylor Hall. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



HELEN KEMPTON: AN APPRECIATION 

Helen Kempton came to the New York School of Social Work in 1924, pre- 
pared for teaching by long experience which included training in the Boston Asso- 
ciated Charities, four years as District Secretary in the same organization, four 
years as General Secretary of the New Bedford Family Welfare Society, and five 
years as an Associate Director of the American Association for Organizing Family 
Social Work, now called the Family Welfare Association of America. 

The teaching of social work was, and still is, more or less on the frontiers of 
knowledge. One might say that its task is to take the raw experience of the social 
worker and make it yield material for thought. By classroom discussion the teacher 
must try to add to the young worker's capacity to understand social life and to be 
useful in this troubled world. Helen Kempton's temperament was suited to such 
an endeavor. It challenged her interest in social philosophy as well as her academic 
conscience, and she threw herself into the work with all that almost panther-like 
force and concentration which always characterized her in study, in conversation^ 
and in athletics. I think that those who knew her best in college must remember this 
driving energy of hers and the intensity with which she focussed upon her objective. 

She taught first the courses in technical social case work. After a time she 
became interested in developing and teaching another course, which she called 
"Some Ethical Considerations in Social Case Work." She described this as "a round- 
table discussion course focusing on some of the ethical implications of the social case 
worker's professional relationships. Responsibilities involved in the attempt to 
influence personality. Apparently conflicting loyalties. Group responsibilities. Spir- 
itual values in relation to ethical concepts." This was the first and only course of 
its kind to be given at the New York School of Social Work. Helen Kempton made 
a great success of it and many students found in this course an opportunity to bring 
up and work through some of their own conflicts, getting help from the way the 
discussion was conducted and, I am sure, often getting inspiration from her own 
intense appreciation of spiritual values. 

After she had been teaching for some time she began writing the series of 
articles called "The Class Teaches Itself," which were published in The Family 
from time to time and which have been helpful not only to teachers, but also to 
social case workers in general. In these and her other short papers her own phil- 
osophy of life and her attitude to life were as apparent as in her actual teaching. 

Besides these scattered articles Helen Kempton contributed to the literature 
of social case work teaching a chapter of the School's recent book, "Social Case 
Work, An Outline for Teaching." In this chapter her course on "The Content of 
Social Case Work" is described in full with illustrative material which she used 
and a discussion of her method. She was one of the committee of teachers which, 
through several years, worked to assemble the material for this book and to construct 
the framework of thought in which it is presented. At one time she was for several 
months Associate Editor of The Family. 

It is needless to say that so marked a personality as hers is greatly missed 
and cannot be replaced. Her life was the strongest possible demonstration of the 
power of that individuality about which her own philosophy and belief centered. 

Antoinette Cannon, 1907. 
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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandaha, Missouri. 

Emma Dietz, Ph.D., 1929, has just been 
awarded by the American Association of 
University Women the Sarah Berliner Research 
Fellowship of $1,200 for research only, or a 
docentship of $1,500 if the holder arranges to 
continue research and give one or more lectures 
at the university at which she will reside. At 
present she is engaged in chemical research on 
the structure of chlorophyll at Harvard Uni- 
versity. Miss Dietz will spend the fellowship 
year at the University of Munich, working in 
the laboratory of Professor H. Wieland on the 
use of porphyrin-iron complexes as catalysts in 
oxidation processes in connection with the gen- 
eral problem of the function of catalysts in the 
animal body. 

Appointed as alternate to the Margaret E. 
Maltby Fellowship of $1,500, also offered by 
the A. A. U. W., Agnes Katharine Hannay, of 
Washington, D. C, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 
1930. Research fellow. Smith College. Her 
project lies in the field of economic history 
in the Southern states in the determination of 
factors of location of southern manufacturies. 

1889 

No Editor Appointed. 

Ella Riegel, who went as a delegate to the 
Pan-American Conference at Montevideo, writes: 

"Indeed, I have not forgotten my promise to 
send you notes on the work of the Inter- 
American Commission of Women at the Pan- 
American Conference. 

"The Inter-American Commission of Women 
submitted to the conference two conventions. 
The first, guaranteeing equal rights in nation- 
ality to men and women, was passed unani- 
mously and was signed by all twenty-one re- 
publics; the second, guaranteeing equal civil 
and political rights to men and women, was 
converted by the committee that reported on 
them into a recommendation that the nations 
grant equal civil and political rights to them 
as soon as possible, which recommendation 
was passed unanimously. Four progressive re- 
publics — Cuba, Ecuador, Paraguay, and Uru- 
guay — however, signed an Equal Rights Con- 
vention, which precious document is safely 
signed, sealed and deposited in the archives of 
Uruguay, later to be sent to the Pan-American 



Union in Washington. The conference also 
voted unanimously to continue the work of the 
Inter-American Commission of Women. These 
three points were not achieved without hard 
work on our part, the greatest opposition com- 
ing from the United States delegation. 

"It was a pleasant surprise to find that the 
wife of the United States Minister to Uruguay, 
Mr. J. Butler Wright, is Harriet Southerland, 
Bryn Mawr, 1904. Mr. Wright has been here 
for three years helping to prepare for the 
Pan-American Conference. 

"I am about to start on a tour through the 
Straits of Magellan, the fjords of Chile, 
Robinson Crusoe's Island, and the Panama 
Canal on my way home." 

1890 

No Editor Appointed. 

1891 

No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., N. Y. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, IVIass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 
c/o Brearley School 
610 East 83rd St., New York City. 

Julia Langdon Loomis' second daughter. 
Virginia (B. M. 1930), is engaged to be 
married to Bayard Schieffelin. And Elizabeth 
Bent Clark's daughter Elizabeth was married 
in January to Arthur Brock Sinkler. The wed- 
ding took place in the Deanery. 

Starling Hoffman, Mary James HoffniaTi's 
only child, received his A.B. degree in June, 
1933, at the Pennsylvania State College, spe- 
cializing in English, Avith Journalism and 
Mathematics. He lives in Carmel, New York. 

The Class will be grieved to learn of the 
death of Leonie Gilmour in New York on 
December 31st. 



(27) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 

Elsa Bowman has adopted a little girl of 
11 years and is staying with her this winter 
at New London, New Hampshire. 

On January 20th Charlotte McLean gave a 
tea for '96 in her home on South 4th Street, 
Philadelphia. Though only twelve guests were 
able to come, they thoroughly enjoyed seeing 
one another and were delightfully entertained 
by Charlotte and her sister. Those present 
were: Lydia Boring, Tirzah Nichols, Mary 
Mendinhall Mullin, Emma Linburg Tobin, 
Lucy Baird, Elizabeth Cadbury Jones, Helen 
Haines Greening, Anna Scattergood Hoag, 
Clara Farr, Elizabeth Kirkbride (on her way 
back from the Conference on the Cause and 
Cure of War, in Washington), Hilda Justice 
(who left at home Laura Heermance, who had 
come from New Haven for the tea, but became 
ill and was not able to go), and Helen 
Saunders Holmes, who came from Yonkers 
especially to be with '96 that afternoon. 
Elizabeth Kirkbride and Charlotte's sister 
Sarah (who was the only outsider)' poured tea 
and coffee. 

Charlotte writes that her guests were "ex- 
uberantly glad to see each other. ... I had 
some evergreen in a vase in the parlor and 
also on the dining room table. But the one or 
two that I spoke to about it seemed never to 
have heard of our symbol or motto or class 
ring." The editor is proud to be able to 
respond to the implied challenge by giving 
our emblem — the evergreen tree — our motto — 
Ora e sempre (the motto of Young Italy) — 
and saying that our class ring is' a dark green 
jade seal engraved with the emblem and motto, 
and set in a greenish gold design of pine 
cones and needles. 

Anna Hoag writes of the tea: "It was in the 
house in which Charlotte was born, and where 
she, a sister and a brother still live. The front 
lower room is a lawyer's office, but the rest of 
the handsome, spacious -house is theirs. Lovely 
old furniture and no end of fine old steel 
engravings. Elizabeth Kirkbride and I felt at 
home, for its plan was just like all the old 
Philadelphia houses. My grandmother lived 
till she died in 1895 just around the corner on 
Spruce Street, so I know, or knew, the neigh- 
borhood well. We had a rather unusual and 
a very pleasant gathering." 

From the notes of regret could be gleaned a 
few items about the Class. Mary Gleim, from 
California, pleads not only distance, but two 
sick sisters, who are requiring her attention at 
present. May Jewett wrote from Pleasantville, 
New York, that she is very busy "trying to sell 
property to the numerous people who seem to 



have money to invest in land, but are very 
fussy about getting a lot for their cash." Clara 
Colton Worthington wrote: "1 am to be in 
Washington from Tuesday to Friday of next 
week as a delegate to the National Birth Con- 
trol Conference, and it may be more than I 
should undertake, for I still must take great 
care not to overdo. It seems as if a miracle 
had happened to my eyes, as they are better 
than in years, but if I get over-tired they and 
my nerves go back on me and 1 am out of the 
picture for a few days." 

The Class extends its sympathy to Edith' 
Wyatt, whose mother died on January 29th, 
after a short illness. 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Seymour Angel (Mrs. John Angel, 
468 Riverside Drive) is most generous to give 
us this intimate glimpse of her own life and 
incidentally a glimpse into the studio and the 
work of a famous sculptor: "I reply at once. 
My importance is entirely vicarious, but all 
the more interesting to me from having three 
centres instead of only one. 

"You asked about John's work at present. 
He has finished, all but two small panels, the 
sculpture for the North Tower portal of the 
Cathedral here — St. John the Divine. This 
means a group, with smaller figures above and 
below, thirty-two angels around the archivolt, 
eight sibyls with other angels between them, 
and nine martyr saints. It has all been a 
tremendously interesting piece of work, and 
hunting up stories to giv^ clues to the various 
personalities, whether of saints or sibyls, takes 
one into a surprising variety of paths. Sibyls 
connect with ancient times; one refers to 
Pausanias and Vergil and legends about the 
Ara Coeli in Rome. Saints carry one to many 
countries of Europe, for the group includes 
St. Peter, on the trumeau of the doorway; 
St. Stephen, the first martyr of the church; 
St. Alban, the first English martyr; St. Denis 
of France (connecting curiously though mis- 
takenly with a legend of St. Paul in Athens) ; 
St. Vincent of Spain. John has a fondness 
for character, expressed in face and figure and 
pose, and has enjoyed the problem of bringing 
this out for others to see, while keeping to 
the Gothic severity which the architect de- 
mands. Bases under each large mirtyr saint 
have given him a chance to model events in 
the life of each saint — from three to four in 
each case. They become the books of the 
words, to illustrate the saint above — but one 
must know a little how to read the language 
in order to enjoy them. There are four scenes 
under Joan of Arc — Joan in the fields seeing 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her vision, leading the soldiers, Joan before 
the crowned Dauphin, and Joan being burned. 
Others have more chance for humor — the little 
demons trying to get the soul of the bishop, 
under St. Lawrence, the various knights at- 
tacking Thomas Becket; one of them is nearly 
the White Knight. If you could be in 
New York now, you would see what I think is 
the finest thing John has ever done — a 'Last 
Supper' panel for the Mellons' church in 
East Liberty, Pa. He has always hoped he 
might some time have a chance to model this 
subject. He was recognized as fit to do it 
from a panel he did a few years ago of the 
young Christ in the Temple, among the doc- 
tors, for St. Paul's School, and also by his 
studies of character in the Four and Twenty 
Elders in the great Tympanum of the Princeton 
University Chapel. But the opportunity in this 
new panel is the greatest, for the heads are 
not of imaginary characters, as were most in 
the other reliefs, but are of men of whose 
story we know more or less, and about whom 
every one has fairly definite conceptions. Each 
figure has been a thrilling problem to him; he 
has steeped himself in legend as well as the 
New Testament story, and tries to show in 
each face the character that would fit it. 
St. Thomas is not only the doubter, but the 
thinker; St. Philip is more of an aristocrat 
than the others, not a shepherd or fisherman. 
And so on. He has never used a model for 
one of these heads — or, indeed, for any head 
at all. The composition has a balance and 
swing that delights one. I wish you could see 
it. If you are in New York, ever, do let me 
know, and I will take you over to the studio. 
But this will be finished by Easter, he hopes, 
and then away — as always with his work. 

"Our boys are well and busy; the elder a 
Sophomore at Harvard — scorning all family 
tradition. He won 'high distinction' for his 
work last year, is on the Harvard Advocate, 
the J. V. wrestling team, and the Glee Club, 
and goes to too many dances — so he is fairly 
well rounded. The happiest hours I had dur- 
ing Christmas vacation were reading Theocritus 
with him for a comparison he is making for 
his tutor, comparing Theocritus and Vergil and 
the English poets, I read Greek fairly regu- 
larly and with intense pleasure to myself, with 
intenser pleasure when the boys come to me 
for help in it. The younger boy, a Fifth 
Former at Choate, now just 15, teases me 
about it and delights in trying to trip me up, 
but has some pride in it, nevertheless — his 
mother's one accomplishment. 

"We have acquired in the last eighteen 
months an old house, 1785, with sixty-two 
acres of farm land and woods, between Barre 
and Petersham, Mass., and look forward to 
having it. as a permanent home, as a New York 



apartment can not be. I am delightfully in 
touch with Bryn Mawr there through Becky 
Chickering, who is in Petersham in the sum- 
mer, and Mrs. Higginson and Ruth Furness 
Porter's aunts. We see Bessie once or twice 
a summer at least, and sometimes Ruth or one 
of her sons. That kind of country life means 
hard work for the housekeeper, with no one 
to deliver even the milk at our doors, and my 
skill in driving is so lately acquired that it is 
wearing. But it is real living, and we had a 
most happy summer there, last year. John and 
I drove up this last week-end and explored 
through the snow over a new trail we have 
cut, almost half a mile, through woods and 
scrubby fields. It will be a summer job to 
keep down the undergrowth and make it com- 
fortable walking, 

"I do nothing in New York worthy of men- 
tion, but do enjoy life there immensely. The 
only office I hold is the chairmanship of the 
'Ladies' Board' (a name descending from the 
foundation seventy-five years ago) of 'Shelter- 
ing Arms,' a home for homeless children not 
far from our apartment, so that I can easily 
walk there. My original interest in it came 
through a little Greek boy, now just 8, whom 
we much enjoy having at our house some- 
times or taking to the zoo, museums or movies. 
Then, through this, I am on the Board of the 
Federation of Protestant Welfare — simply to 
represent 'The Sheltering Arms.' 

"■I am so glad you like John's statue for 
Edith Lawrence. I love it. He has the orig- 
inal in the studio and I always enjoy it." 

Frances Arnold, although snowed in up at 
Cornish, New Hampshire, writes that she feels 
all warmed up by the nice letters that come 
to her in reply to her letters asking for con- 
tributions to the Class fund. Class collecting 
is a mean job, and I move and second a vote 
of sincere thanks to F, A. It takes a very 
real spark of genius to write a letter that will 
strike fire and bring forth a heartwarming 
response while asking for cold cash I 

1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 

What '99ers would do without Emma Guffey 
Miller we are sure we can't fathom. Your 
Editor has fallen down completely on the job, 
with the same worn-thin excuse, "so busy try- 
ing to keep her head above the waters of 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



depression." Thanks to Guffey and the ac- 
tivities of the New Deal, this month a few 
items will take the place of that too pathetic 
blankness below our classification. 

First — and by far the most vital news— is 
that we can look forward to a Reunion in 
June. For a few hours we can revisit the 
scenes which the years have made all the 
dearer and indulge in talk fests with class- 
mates who, unfortunately, live for most of us 
in memories rather than in the companionship 
we had anticipated. We know we are sound- 
ing Guffey's sentiments when we implore every 
'99er to begin this very minute and make her 
plans to be in Pembroke West on June 4th 
and 5th. Wouldn't it be just too glorious to 
have a 100 per cent Reunion? Let's make k 
one. 

The baccalaureate sermon is on the 3rd of 
June and Commencement on the 6th. While 
we shall be welcome to stay throughout the 
week, the '99 festivities will be confined to 
Monday the 4th and Tuesday the 5th. So 
red circle these dates. 

Guffey is living in Washington, her husband, 
Carroll Miller, having been appointed by 
President Roosevelt to an important post with 
the Department of Commerce. We who know 
Guffey know that she is making the most of 
every minute and getting lots of fun out of it. 

Mollie Thurber Dennison is also spending 
much of her time in the Nation's capital, for 
her husband, Harry Dennison, is actively in- 
terested in the C. W. A. 

Anne Boyer is spending the winter in 
Florida. Lucky Anne. 

Elsie Andrews severed her connection with 
Miss Wright's School last fall and is now 
doing private tutoring. 

The star performer at the Birth Control 
hearings before the Judiciary Committee in 
Washington was — of course, you will say — 
Kate Houghton Hepburn. And her far-famed 
Katherine has nothing on her mother when it 
comes to holding successfully the center of 
the stage. 

We were amused to note that Katherine 
Hepburn in a newspaper interview expressed 
her appreciation of the kind and encouraging 
comments of John Mason Brown, the Dramatic 
Editor of the New York Post, on her per- 
formance as the star of The Lake, adding "and 
I don't know him." But we know that he is 
the husband of Dorothy Fronheiser Meredith's 
Catherine. 

Your Editor hopes that every '99er who 
visits the Bryn Mawr Club in the Park Lane 
in New York will give the Publicity Depart- 
ment of the hotel a buzz, because her organi- 
zation is doing the publicity, and while she is 
not always there they can reach her, and Oh! 
how she would love to see you. 



1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 
(Mrs. Warren Thorpe) 
15 East 64th St., New York City. 

Grace Mitchell writes: 

"Last summer I went again to California, 
going both ways by boat, and stopping at 
South America, Panama, most of the Central 
American countries, and Mexico. We were 
three weeks going, about the same time in 
California, and three weeks returning. We 
arrived in Havana just after Machado had 
left, and De Cespedes had just been made the 
new President. We walked about Havana, as 
no taxis were allowed to operate, saw stores, 
etc., that had been broken into and looted. 
All spare room on our boat was filled with 
families of friends of Machado leaving Cuba 
for the United States. 

"Since my return all my spare time has 
been given to my work as Treasurer of the 
Bellefonte Chapter, D. A. R., as the chapter, 
which is an old one, is quite large." 

Fanny Sinclair Woods writes: 

"My children are scattered to far distant 
places, the twins doing graduate work at 
Radcliffe, and my youngest son a Junior at 
Yale. We have comforted ourselves by having 
Buffy's daughter, Mary Hill, live with us while 
she is doing graduate work at the University 
of Iowa." 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rot an Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

The Class extends its most sincere sympathy 
to Elizabeth Corson Gallagher, who lost her 
husband, Percival Gallagher, in January. 

Edith Orlady spends her winters in Phila- 
delphia and her summers in Huntingdon, Pa. 
She is much occupied in both places with 
public education, welfare work and gardening. 

Elizabeth Chandlee Forman says her news 
is her family, and sends these details. Her 
son Henry, who was the first child born to a 
member of 1902, but rejected as class baby 
because he wasn't a girl (and don't we know 
he's glad he isn't class baby in a woman's 
college ! ) , Bachelor of Arts, Princeton 1926, 
Master of Architecture, U. of P. 1931, had his 
first job on Goodhart Hall, He is married 
and has one child, Elizabeth Chandlee Forman, 
2nd. Her daughter Elizabeth goes in for music, 



(30) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and skiing, hockey and kindred sports. She 
and her mother — our Elizabeth — spent last win- 
ter at the Lake Placid Club and wound up at 
the unique skiing school at Pecketts-on-Sugar 
Hill, where they took medals. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

Constance Leupp Todd writes: 
Dear 1903: 

Someone — probably somebody young — has 
said that middle age is best, it being the only 
time in one's life with both a past and a 
future. And, indeed, as we part reluctantly 
with our teeth and watch our hair grow daily 
whiter, there is at least a solace in watching 
the children of our generation, now grown to 
years of achievement. 

Thus in the summer of 1932, as the bonus 
army marched on Washington, and the Hoover 
administration shook with terror, while citizens 
who believe in the right of petitioners to be 
met with something other than tear gas shook 
with indignation, 1 began to hear of a young 
couple from St. Louis active among the peti- 
tioners' sympathizers; and when, one evening, 
a tall, fair young man walked in with his 
slight, pretty brunette wife, and I heard the 
name was Gellhorn — reader, you have guessed 
it — it proved to be the son and daughter-in- 
law of Edna Fischel. 

Then one day last summer, at Woods Hole, 
someone brought young Christine Gibbons to 
tea with me; and in this competent young 
woman with a brand-new and reasonable 
theory of how to teach French to young chil- 
dren, I discovered the daughter of Helen 
Brown, of 1906. 

As for our own class baby, Nancy Wilson 
Nathan, anyone who has never heard her play 
the cello should do so at the earliest possible 
moment. She had a recital at Woods Hole 
shortly after her return from studying in Spain 
with Casals. And even to an uneducated 
musical ear, her unusual combination of native 
ability and superb training are apparent. Nor, 
in this review of two generations, should one 
miss Nannie, her copper-colored hair still un- 
touched with gray, her figure still that of a 
16-year-old girl, appearing as mother-in-law on 
the beach in a boy's striped bathing suit. Nor, 
since the Kidders are a gifted race and mark- 
edly prone to marry intellectual distinction, 
need one be surprised to learn that the fresh- 
man play at Bryn Mawr last year was written 
by Margy Kidder, Nannie's niece, who also 
demonstrated the family ability to act. 

Cruising around Cape Cod last summer, whom 
should I discover in a cosy little house among 



the pines outside of Orleans (a house equipped 
for winter living, which she wants to sell, be 
it noted), but our own Margaret Field. Here 
her husband, Charles Buck, writes adventure 
novels; and my son, browsing in the book- 
cases, was awed indeed when he came upon 
one of them translated in Czech. Margaret's 
son, Jack deMotte, lives with them when he is 
not off somewhere as camp counsellor; and 
Margaret remains the same spirited person in 
spite of vicissitudes. 

Probably the most interesting study of 
mother and child that we present as a college 
is that of the two Katharine Hepburns. First 
young Kate spell-bound us here in Washington 
in The Lake, of which the Bryn Mawr Club 
bought the first night, thus earning a goodly 
sum for the Scholarship Fund. Then, a few 
weeks later, came the Birth Control Confer- 
ence, at which Kate senior was a star per- 
former as Chairman of the Legislative Com- 
mittee, ably handling the two days of con- 
gressional hearings following the conference. 

And then last fall along came Helen Amy 
Macan as the new principal of St. Agnes' 
School, across the Potomac from Washington. 
Anything so refreshingly unhidebound in 
the way of a school head has seldom been 
seen. Her way of handling the petty vices of 
the young, such as the make-up habit, is orig- 
inal but effective. Nevertheless, be it recorded 
that when she and her pretty daughter Lynette 
came to dinner, my boys the next day found 
a lipstick which Lynette joyously retrieved. 

So much for the two generations. 

For contemporaries, 1 had a glimpse of 
Helen Robinson after many years when she 
came to Woods Hole to hold a sale of attrac- 
tive French colonial textiles. She is the same 
distinguished-looking Helen. And Anne Sher- 
win reports that she has embarked upon a 
summer tea-room venture in the White Moun- 
tains, where she serves very good meals. 

Among our latest political acquisitions here 
in Washington are Madeleine Palmer Bakewell 
(Mrs. Charles Bakewell), whose husband was 
elected to Congress from Ne-\\" Haven on tlie 
Republican ticket. 

Emma Guffey Miller (Mrs. Carroll Miller) 
is also a recent Washington acquisition, her 
husband being a new memlier of tlie Federal 
Trade Commission. And of ihc younger gen- 
eration there is Nina Perera, of 1928, who 
has recently married Charles Collier (son of 
the Commissioner of Indian Affairs). 

For myself, I have chosen this inausiticious 
moment when the dollar is ^vorlh sixty cents 
in Europe to begin to gather the material for 
an information service for American parents 
on European schools. When the dollar rights 
itself relatively there should be once more 
a demand for such information. 



(31) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Marjorie Sellers' son, James Townsend 
Sellers, was married on January 13th to 
Gertrude Ethelwyn 31igh, of New York City. 
They will be in their new home, 2491 North 
50th Street, Philadelphia, after February 15th. 

Hope Woods Hunt has been very successful 
in her poetry readings and returned in Feb- 
ruary to Bryn Mawr to read at Rosemont 
College and also at the Baldwin School. 

Marguerite Gribi Kreutzberg is spending her 
second winter on her "claim" in Tucson, 
Arizona. She is doing a great deal of painting. 

Hilda Vauclain has been having Beatrice 
McGeorge's series of art lectures at her house 
every Tuesday morning. 

Clara Woodruff Hull visited her sister Lelia 
in Germantown in early February, and attended 
the Annual Alumnae Meeting and luncheon. 
Leda White, Rebecca Ball, Emma Fries, Amy 
Clapp, Gertrude Buffum Barrows, Hilda Canan 
Vauclain and your Editor all enjoyed the day 
together. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Release from a long illness came to Helen 
Payson Kempton in a Boston hospital on Jan- 
uary 10th, and thus was brought to its close 
a life of real importance and value to the out- 
side world, as well as to the Bryn Mawr 
circles where she was a well-known and loved 
member. She had lived with all the energy 
and enthusiasm which those who knew her in 
undergraduate days were prepared to expect. 
Long after her health had begun to suffer, she 
insisted upon "carrying on"; and when her 
resignation became inevitable, she regarded her 
retirement as purely a temporary one. Even 
from her sick-bed she continued her writing 
under great difficulties and handicaps. We 
who remember her fighting spirit on the hockey 
and basketball field, can get some idea of the 
wholehearted fight which she put up to win 
back her health. 

A keen sense of humor was one of her out- 
standing characteristics, and all through her 
illness, doctors, nurses and visitors were amazed 
and cheered by her quick tongue and ready 
laugh. It really seemed as if anyone who 
wrote such humorous letters as she wrote to 
her friends up to the very end must be grow- 
ing better. It was not fear of death, but 
desire to live and work, which made Helen 
fight with such grit and courage. Her life 
was very rich spiritually, and she had a faith 
that knew no doubt nor wavering. 



On behalf of the Class of 1905 we herewith 
record our appreciation of all Helen Kempton 
will mean to us always, and our sorrow that 
we can no more see her among us. We wish 
her family to know of our pride in her and 
our love for her, and we extend to them our 
heart-felt sympathy. 

The Class extends sympathy to Alice Day 
McLaren, whose mother died very suddenly in 
Santa Barbara the day before Christmas. Alice 
and her husband are once more spending the 
winter there. 

Hope Allen writes from the University of 
Michigan: "Here I am since October, beginning 
'a new life,' which is so far interesting and 
pleasant. The depression meant a storm in ♦ 
my world at home (now fortunately abating), 
and I was lucky in being able to take refuge 
in my research as a profession, so to speak. 
In March, 1932, I had a grant for that from 
the American Council of Learned Societies, 
with which I spent six months in England that 
year and three, last summer. Now I am an 
assistant editor on the Early Modern English 
Dictionary, done with surplus material left after 
the Oxford Dictionary was finished — and other 
similar sources—for the period 1475-1700. I 
work only a half day for the academic year 
and thus have much time for my research in 
the library here, and elsewhere in vacations. 
I am just back from Chicago. I now study 
the history and influence of the Ancren Riwle 
— a delightful work for very devout women. 
To do it I do so much work on court circles 
I feel as if preparing for an historical novel." 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Haughwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 

Members of 1906 will learn with sorrow of 
the death of Mrs. Francis B. Harrington, 
mother of Beth Brooks. The Class extends 
deepest sympathy to Beth. 

1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The Alumnae Meeting on February 3rd was 
the occasion for an informal reunion. Elsa 
Norton Ashbrook, Athalia Crawford Jamieson, 
Katharine Harley, Edith Rice, Lelia Woodruff 
Stokes, Dorothy Forster Miller, Mabel 
O'Sullivan, Tink Meigs, Eunice Schenck, and 
Alice Hawkins, all foregathered at some time 
during the day and exchanged gossip. 

Dorothy is now a full-fledged real estate 
broker — she actually has a license won by 
taking an examination. She manages the 
apartment house where she lives (680 Madison 
Avenue, near 62nd Street), and has a full and 



(32) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



contented house, and is now ready to extend 
her sphere of. influence, and will be glad to 
find any friend just the right place to live. 
She plans to bring her daughter down to the 
campus at the time of the Glee Club in May, 
and hopes other 1907 mothers will join her. 

The State of Maine is evidently the favorite 
hiding place for lost 1907, who, unlike the 
bears, seem to be galvanized into action by 
really cold weather. Last month we discovered 
Ruth Hammitt Kauffman for you, now Laura 
Pollock Bushnell writes us from Whitefield, 
Maine: "Since New Year's we have been snowed 
in for a week at a time, with the thermometer 
40° below zero, and it is colder in the village 
than here on our hill. It gives us confidence 
to have snowshoes — so it is rather fun." 

1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

1909 

Class Editor: Helen B. Crane 

70 Willett St., Albany, N. Y. 

The Editor's only news is that she has spent 
a month in a hospital and cordially invites 
anyone in the Class to take over the job. 

1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 

71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Josephine Ross Miller: "If you hadn't chal- 
lenged my honesty with the stamped envelope, 
I doubt if you would have gotten an answer! 
I have no professional status and no imme- 
diate past or present activities that would 
interest the class, but I have an excellent 
domestic status and an enchanting family: viz., 
the same husband that I have had for twenty- 
one years; a 20-year-old son, a Junior at 
Haverford College; an 18-year-old daughter, a 
Freshman at Wellesley; a 16-year-old daughter, 
a Junior at Baldwin; a 9-year-old daughter and 
a 6-year-old son, both at school at home." 

Millicent Pond: "I have been with the 
Scovill Manufacturing Company, in Waterbury, 
Conn., for ten years now, having gone there 
in the first instance to do some research in 
psychological tests for hiring and transfer of 
employees. In 1928 I was put in charge of 
the employment office and have continued the 
research work as well. Last summer I was 
asked by the United States Employment Serv- 
ice to take the temporary task of State Re- 
employment Director for Connecticut and was 
given a leave of absence from the Scovill 
Manufacturing Company for this purpose. 

"In the research work with the Scovill 
Company I have had a very interesting time, 



though the work has not yielded as many short 
cuts for the selection of employees as may 
have been expected. The present work is very 
stimulating, but very difficult on account of 
political tension and all the problems that 
arise under the administration of the new fed- 
eral policies with regard to selection of workers 
and hours of work. When stated without re- 
gard to these factors, the problem seems simple 
enough, namely, that of establishing active pub- 
lic employment offices in the towns and counties 
of the state which are not covered by the state 
employment offices. 

"Outside of my work, I have always until 
this summer been a good deal of a gadabout, 
am active in the Business and Professional 
Women's Club, and in both personnel organi- 
zations and psychological groups, and am in- 
terested in various social service movements, 
although not much of a participator in them. 
I do the psychological testing for the 
Connecticut Industrial School for Girls, and 
until the past year have done a good deal of 
the same kind of work for the Child Welfare 
Bureau of the State." 

Julie Thompson Turner: "A suburban life 
with three children, two in the country day 
school and the youngest at home, because I 
believe in putting off socialization as long as 
possible, gives almost all the needed informa- 
tion about me. I belong to the Woman's Club, 
etc., but they seem always to meet on the days 
when I paint. I have a studio in the barn, 
where I work and have a couple of classes." 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

The Class extends its deep sympathy to 
Beulah Mitchell Hailey on the recent death of 
her mother. 

Elsie Funkhouser is taking a course in 
"Social Adjustment," and Norvelle Browne is 
studying "Roman Archaeology" at Columbia. 

Mary Case Pevear recently gave a most de- 
lightful supper in New York for Kate Seelyp. 
who was making a speaking trip in New "^ork 
and Philadelphia. Among those present were 
Willa Browning, Elsie Funkhouser, Louise 
Russell, Norvelle Brown, Helen Parkhurst. and 
Betty Russell. Helen reported progress on her 
hook, and Kate's account of the ease with 
which housekeeping may be done in Syria 
made us decide to go there as soon as we 
can raise the fare. 

Marion Scott Soames is spending the winter 
in Arizona. Her address is 125 West Franklin 
Street, Tucson. 

Margaret Prussing LeVino's 10-year-old son 
Ted flew alone from Los Angeles to Washing- 



(33) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ton, D, C, this fall. Pruss also reports a 
merry time behind the scenes of Little Women 
last summer. 

Marion Carroll's oldest boy is at Phillips 
Exeter Academy this year and is enjoying his 
first contact with an American school since 
he was a small boy. 

Ruth Wells was in New York at Thanksgiv- 
ing and finds her job as engrossing as ever. 

Catherine Delano Grant writes that getting 
her children settled in foreign schools was 
quite a job, but now that is accomplished she 
has time to be enthusiastic about Mussolini 
and all he has done in Italy. 

Margery Smith Goodnow has a picture in 
the annual exhibition of the National Asso- 
ciation of Women Painters and Sculptors. 

Betty Russell is helping to direct the forth- 
coming production of the New York Junior 
League Players. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaten Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 

After years of silence, Lucie Kenison 
Bornefeld writes: 'T am just a plain old mar- 
ried woman with two children — Barbara, 15, 
and Herman, Junior, 14, and a husband in 
the foreign shipping business. Barbara is five 
feet 1^2 inches and blond, and the boy tall 
and slender and dark. Since I left Bryn Mawr 
I haven't had the pleasure of seeing many of 
our Class friends. . . . One of my favorite 
pastimes lately is studying Latin. I help many 
of my children's friends and struggle along 
with it. Also, I have been trying to make 
dresses, and have lots of fun sewing for 
Barbara. I have been considering sending 
Barbara to a college of industrial arts. Herman, 
Junior, seems mechanical, but hasn't decided 
what he will do so far. ... In 1926 I passed 
through Philadelphia on our way to Norway, 
where we had a grand time. . . . But what 
did thrill me was the spaciousness and breadth 
of our own country and the quantity and 
richness of the crops. ... If you ever happen 
to come this far southwest, don't fail to let 
me know." 

Dorothy Dale Chase writes that her little 
girl continues to improve. "She is full of 
good spirits and fun, and you could not tell 
from her appearance that she was other than 
perfectly normal." 

A Christmas card from Edgerton Grant 
labeled "My Second Year" with six illustra- 
tions suggests that his mother has gone largely 
domestic, though she doesn't say so herself. 
Incidentally, Edgerton looks worth knowing. 

Florence Leopold Wolf's new address in 
New York is 161 East 79th Street. 



She writes: "Would you and 1912 like to 
know a few facts about me and mine? We 
moved here October 1st, and I think it is 
permanent. Dick is a Junior at Harvard, 
pre-medical. Jim is a Freshman at Columbia, 
planning to take Engineering. Tom, the son 
of my old age (he's 10), is at school here. 
No daughters for B. M., alas! 

"Van Weems, Margaret Thackray's husband, 
was here last week. He's retired and they are 
back in Annapolis." 

The Class Editor's budget of news, gleaned 
in Chicago, is as follows. Maysie Morgan 
Lee ' said she and Isabel Vincent meet every 
Friday and take in new art exhibits. This 
item has appeared before, but it is still re- 
garded as news. Mary Brown, Jean Gregory, 
and Gertrude Stone have a French class once 
a week. 

Isabel Vincent Harper is now in Florida 
visiting her mother. 

Mary Lane wrote at Christmas that her 
husband had been ill this fall. I understand 
from people who live in Phoenix that he is 
more and more taking a great place in the 
life of Phoenix, and has a remarkable spir- 
itual influence. 

For my own part, Chicago seemed just as 
wonderful to me as ever, in spite of terrible 
weather, but it was nice to see the sun in 
Santa Fe again. My husband expects to prac- 
tice law here very soon. He is going slowly 
yet, but looks so well. 

Carmelita Chase Hinton sent the following 
characteristic communication: 

"Well, Christmas has come and gone, and 
we've gone to the North Pole and back. 
Eighteen of us finally got together for a ski- 
ing holiday at Lac Nasson, near Ste. Mar- 
guerite, in Canada, and what a time we had! 
We really over-exercised, because we skiied 
every day for ten days from morning until 
night, once even making a twenty-two-mile run 
with the thermometer 36° below. 

"Do you know how cold it got? 54° degrees 
below zero. When anyone opened the door, 
the cold air rushed in in a mist blanket. It 
was frightening to see. But it really wasn't 
so cold out-of-doors — that is, for one's comfort. 
Only — we were always having some part of 
our anatomy frost-bitten. I had my nostrils 
and under my chin quite mischievously nipped. 
The results did not improve my appearance, 
but it is all wearing off now. We drove up 
and down, and it was adventurous work, in 
blizzards, over ice roads, in roads of snow 
unbroken by anyone else. 

"My sister-in-law drove all the way from 
Philadelphia with her three children to join 
us. Wasn't that sporting? The snow there 
was almost three feet deep and not one day 
of rain. Here it does nothing but rain," 



(34) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Gladys Jones, looking very handsome in 
black velvet, came down to stay at the Deanery 
at the time of the Annual Meeting. She, 
Louise Watson, also looking very, very hand- 
some and full of pleasant spice, Mary Peirce, 
and Marjorie Thompson, Anne Catharine 
Arthurs and Beatie Howson all had supper 
together by the fire in Miss Thomas' blue 
study on the Friday evening before. Gertrude 
Elcock t ame out for Miss Park's luncheon on 
Saturday. 

1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn, 

Thirty-seven welcome return postcards have 
come back. Sixty-seven have not. Verbum 
sapienti. We are still hopeful. 

From Eleanor Bontecou; "Most of your 
questions are unanswerable. Learning to 
weave and to transcend the limitations of space 
seem my principal occupations. I was deeply 
moved by The Testament of Youth. It's the 
best of the war books yet, I think, and I am 
glad that Ernest Hemingway is not to have 
the last word about our generation. Ludwig 
Lewisohn's Expression in America I think very 
fine but uneven. I resent the theory that only 
the cruel things of life are its realities, but I 
find it the first significant piece of writing on 
American literature that I've encountered. It 
is a good antidote to Clive Bell's Civilization, 
which I've just read and found intensely irri- 
tating, but challenging." 

From Clara Crocker: "Opened Y. W. C. A. 
to men, for which feat in Boston I should not, 
though probably shall, remain unhonored and 
unsung. Take a certain mournful pleasure in 
watching the deterioration of America. Whether 
in increased leisure I have more time to be 
appreciative or whether they really are more 
vital, I am not sure, but I have read more 
stirring books in the past year than ever be- 
fore — not Anthony Adverse, but Poor Splendid 
Wings, Peter Abelard, The Fountain, etc., etc. 
Have great faith in the future of the movies, 
which seem in many cases to be a real form 
of artistic expression." Jane Crocker is at the 
University of Chicago. 

From Cecile Goldsmith Simsohn: "I was 
present at Reunion only for Class Supper be- 
cause of the serious illness of my mother, who 
passed away last July. Late in the summer 
I went to Bermuda with my father and also 
visited my two daughters at their camp in the 
Adirondacks. My time at home is fully occu- 
pied with running a large house, superintend- 
ing the lives and lessons of three children, 
two of whom are in senior high school, and 
acting as President, since 1931, of the sister- 
hood of Temple Keneseth Israel." 



From Emma Bell Ewing: "I have been very 
much at home for the last three years nursing 
my husband, who has been ill, but who has 
been much, much better since Thanksgiving, 
I am reading Middleton Murray's Keats and 
Shakespeare, along with the plays, and am 
very much interested in that and in poetry 
for children. Has everybody seen The Open 
Door to Poetry, by Anne Stokes? I mean to 
do those things 1 have left undone so long. 

From Gertrude Hinrichs King: "At present 
I'm working in the public library. It's fun 
and it's interesting (and tiring), but leaves 
very little time to see one's children. Now 
that real estate is getting healthy again, I'll 
give my main attention to that. The library 
job is temporary. Losing my partner because 
her husband has a new job in Washington is 
a blow. If anyone wants to rent, buy or sell 
a house in the vicinity of Glen Ridge or 
Montclair, don't fail to get in touch with me, 
I'll work my head off to see they are perfectly 
suited, and it's an especially nice vicinity to 
live in. I have fun in between jobs, but no 
time to loaf, so I'm a poor prospect for the 
devil. Hope you all write juicier histories than 
this, but, juicy or not, I like reading them all," 

From Katherine Stout Armstrong: "Young 
Katherine, age 17, is at Mt, Vernon Seminary 
in Washington, D. C; young Julian, age 15, 
is at Culver Military Academy; Andrew (14) 
and Priscilla (12) are at the local Bell School, 
I expect to take K. over to Mile, Boissier's, at 
Neuilly, in the fall. Four very vigorous chil- 
dren, a garden, and a sailing husband account 
for my time. Have one more trip to Monmouth 
Cave, one more to Yellowstone, etc, to take, 
but, on the whole, am pretty well up to sched- 
ule on 'See America First' for the young. Read 
Anthony Adverse and seed catalogues," 

From Helen Barrett Speers: "'I have spent 
a very concentrated fall on family ailments, a 
part of it in Baltimore, where my husband 
had an operation. All of them are well now. 
(We presume she refers to her children, too.) 
I ran on to Grace Turner in New York and 
asked for her address, which is The Carroll 
Club, 120 Madison Avenue. New York, 
Gertrude King is the lady with news. She 
has added being a librarian to her other jobs," 

1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs, Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass, 

A cheerful Christmas card from Lib Br^^ant 
discloses the fact that she is spending the 
winter in Vienna being psychoanal>'zed. 

Mad Fleisher Ellinger has a son in the 
freshman class at Princeton. Her new address 
is 180 East 79th Street, New York City. 



(35) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Mary Shipley Allinson's daughter is a Fresh- 
man at Bryn Mawr. 

Lib Inches has just returned from Jamaica, 
which she considers a most beautiful and inter- 
esting place. She is disappointed not to find 
some news, but hopes for some very soon. 

1915 * • 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Anna Brown sailed for Spain on January 
23rd, to be gone for six weeks, part of which 
will be spent with Catherine Simpson Andrews. 

Mildred Jacobs Coward and her family are 
living in Haverford this winter. 

Our deep sympathy is extended to Cleora 
Sutch, whose mother died unexpectedly on 
January 7. Cleora herself had not been well 
this fall, and secured leave of absence from 
the Scarsdale High School for the first semes- 
ter. She took a short Mediterranean cruise 
and was on the way back when her mother, at 
home, was stricken with a heart attack. 

Kitty McCollin Arnett has a part-time job 
with the Women's International League for 
Peace and Freedom. 

Frances Boyer is going to study at Columbia 
for her Ph.D. this term, beginning February 
7th, and will live in one of the graduate halls 
on the campus. 

Peggy Free Stone lost her aunt, Mrs. John 
Scott Craig, in January. This was the aunt 
with whom Peggy had made her home in 
Pittsburgh. 

The results of the class elections, which 
were carried out by mail, are as follows: 

President — Adrienne Kenyon Franklin, 

1st Vice-President — Elizabeth Smith Wilson. 

2nd Vice-President — Florence Hatton Kelton. 

Secretary — Katherine McCollin Arnett. 

Treasurer — Dorothea May Moore. 

Florence Hatton Kelton writes: "I have 
again joined the Bryn Mawr Club of Washing- 
ton and am living at 3905 Morrison Street, 
N. W., Chevy Chase, Washington, D. C. Edwin 
is attending the Army War College, all three 
children are happily established in school, 
while 1, after five years of teaching in a pro- 
gressive school in Memphis, am once more a 
lady of leisure and enjoying it fully. Our 
family circle has been increased by the addi- 
tion of one small and lively coal-black Cocker 
Spaniel with the proud name of Lady Penelope 
of Debonair, whom we hope to rear success- 
fully to render a service to her race and to 
our exchequer. Meanwhile, to hear our fatu- 
ous prattle, you would think that we had a 
new baby at the fireside. 

"We love it here in Washington as always, 
but have no idea whether or not we shall be 



here after June, when the course at the War 
College, and consequently this detail, end. My 
mother has been very ill for months, so I 
spent November in Columbus and may return 
in February. While there 1 saw Harriet 
Sheldon at her school and talked to Adeline 
Werner Vorys, who had returned from the 
East just as I was leaving. 

""I feel honored to hear from Jake (Mildred 
Jacobs Coward) that I am 2nd Vice-President 
of 1915 — fancy achieving class office at last, 
after all these years ! and I am only sorry that 1 
cannot help represent the class at the Alumnae 
Meeting this time. I hope that if you or any- 
one else in 1915 ever find a moment of leisure, 
you will come out to see me. . . ." 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

This brings to an end the Reunion notes. 
Who knows something about the many not 
mentioned therein? And who has some recent 
news about those included? Much can happen 
between June and February. Isn't that really 
the time during which one's status quo is 
most likely to undergo a change? 

Thompson, Frances — Has five children. One, 
a 10-year-old girl, was with her at Reunion. 

Thomson, Annis — Is bacteriologist in Depart- 
ment of Health, New York City. 

Tinker, Elizabeth — Eleanor Hill has seen her. 
She has two children. 

Wagner, Emilie — Is teaching at Miss Wilson's 
School and is very busy socially. Ask Flo 
Hitchcock who waited until three to be taken 
home from Reunion. 

Washburn, Betty — Was on the way to Paris 
at Christmas (1932). Has been to Dr. Gren- 
fell's the second time. 

Werner, Adeline — Is living in a new house. 
(Editor's query: What's the address?) Has 
three children — two boys, 131/2 and 10, and a 
little girl of 4. She is Alumnae Councillor, 
which she thinks a great job because it takes 
her traveling. (Term expired February, 1934.) 

Westheimer, Charlotte — Is the same as ever 
and looking marvelous, according to Ad. 

Wilson, Edith — Is now Class Collector. Has 
one son. Her husband is teaching at New York 
University. They have a delightful triplex 
apartment on the Hudson opposite the Pali- 
sades. Lois Sandison, Anna Lee and Edith 
had a private reunion at Edith's last spring. 

Wolff, Helene — Flo Hitchcock sees her occa- 
sionally. 

Worthington, Lilla — Nannie Gail saw her in 
New York some time ago. She's as thin as a 
rail. 



(36) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. 1. 

Constance Hall Proctor's husband is now at 
Muscle Shoals. Con spent Christmas there, 
returning to Baltimore in January for their 
car. In February she is going back to "the 
tiny ^ouse we have rented in Rogersville, 
Alabama — thirty miles from any railroad." 

Margaret Scattergood has resigned as Class 
Collector and Martha Willett has agreed to 
serve. 

A delightful Christmas card came to your 
Class Editor from Ryu Oyaizu in Tokyo. She 
sent love and greetings from Japan to all the 
members of 1917. 

Anna Wildman was married recently to 
A. Murray Dyer, and is now living at 
27 Federal Street, Springfield, Mass. 

1918 

Class Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 
3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. 0., Phila. 

NOTICE 

I have had a number of replies to the 
circular letter which 1 sent out last December 
to all the members of the Class, and my 
hearty thanks go out to those who replied so 
promptly. 

The Honor Roll is as follows: 

Those who fully expect to attend the Re- 
union are: Marjorie Strauss Knauth, Mary 
Safford Mumford Hoogewerff, Henrietta Huff, 
Lucy Evans Chew, Helen C. Schwartz, 
Margaret Bacon Carey, Marjorie Jeffries 
Wagoner, Ruth Cheney Streeter, Louise Hodges 
Crenshaw, Elsbeth Merck Henry, Rebecca 
Rhoads, Margaret Timpson. Others who are 
uncertain about their plans, but still hope- 
ful are: Alice Newlin, Helen Whitcomb Barss, 
Virginia Kneeland Frantz, Marjorie Mackenzie 
King, Charlotte Dodge, Katherine Holliday 
Daniels. 

Jessie Mebane and Gladys Barnett don't ex- 
pect to get to Reunion, but were good enough 
to answer my letter and send me some news 
of themselves. A total of $211 has been prom- 
ised toward our Reunion Gift by the people 
who have already replied. 

I hope that all of you who have not yet 
sent word to me will read this notice and at 
once take your pens in hand and send me 
word. The truth of the matter is that every- 
body is so over-worked these days that I doubt 
if any of us can devote as much time as they 
would like to give to preparations for Reunion. 
I, myself, expect to be busily engaged in a 
primary campaign until the middle of May, 
not that I am running for office for myself, 
but merely working for those who are. 



It will not be difficult to make arrangements 
for Reunion, for everyone in the Class will do 
her share promptly by replying to the various 
communications which are sent to her, but it 
makes our work much more difficult if we 
have to send out five or six letters before get- 
ting word from you. I know that Marjorie 
Strauss feels even more strongly than I do 
about this, because it is a long and fussy job 
to edit a Class Book, and she can't even begin 
on it until you have all sent her your lives. 
It is very good of her to take on this job, and 
I hope you will all help us as much as possible 
by sending a description of your doings as 
soon as possible to Mrs. Victor W. Knauth, 
37 Washington Square, New York City. 

Looking forward to seeing you all this spring. 
Cordially yours, 

Ruth Cheney Streeter. 

The following interesting letter has been 
received from Virginia Anderton Lee: "You 
asked for news of me for the Class Notes, and 
because I do so miss the good old bits that 
once did appear in the Bulletin (the Editor 
refuses to see the implied sarcasm) I modestly 
blush and recount to you my past. In 1931 
my husband became one of the jobless, and 
still is, for that matter. We had a chance 
to rent our house in Connecticut, and early in 
1932 I came out here to Milwaukee, where a 
friend had given me the opportunity to repre- 
sent her in behalf of her summer camp for 
girls. That summer I went to the camp as a 
member of the" staff, in charge of the more- 
or-less domestic side of the organization, and 
Jane (now aged 10) went as a camper. It 
was a marvelous thing for me, for it took me 
back to the kind of life I love best, in the 
beloved woods which were the favorite stamp- 
ing grounds of my very early youth. That 
summer my father was very ill, and the follow- 
ing winter and spring, while he was in the 
South, I took care of his office and learned a 
lot about the farm-land business, which I sup- 
pose I should have picked up all through my 
life. There is no market for farm lands now, 
so our activities are confined to operating 
about half a dozen farms with tenant farmers 
on a percentage basis, and to wondering where 
the next taxes are going to come from. In the 
winter months that can be done in an office 
in the city, and so Jane can go to the excel- 
lent schools in this village where my father 
and mother still keep the old home. In the 
spring and autumn I spend some time at the 
home-farm, and in the summer I am at camp. 
(The Joy Camps, Hazelhurst, Wisconsin; 
owned and directed by Barbara E. Joy, of 
Bar Harbor, ISIaine.) My future seems des- 
tined to follow along the same schedule in- 
definitely, unless I am lucky enough to find 
another job — any kind — for which I am con- 



(37) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



stantly on the lookout. At my present rate 
of income, Jane will never get to Bryn Mawr, 
and sadly enough she is no more of the 
student than her fond mama, so she 'will 
never win herself any scholarships, so I must 
earn the filthy lucre! During the first week 
of September I had a jolly surprise in the 
form of a good visit with Mad Brown (1920). 
She is a friend of both the girls who run the 
camp. While she was there we had for a 
visit Josephine Proudfit Montgomery (1908) — 
and the three of us had one grand round of 
B. M. songs in front of the camp-fire, much 
to the amusement of our post-season group — 
all adults and from half a dozen other insti- 
tutions of learning. B. M. certainly held its 
own on that occasion!" 

The Editor has stopped soliciting news from 
the Class — partly because it seems to be a 
fairly useless proceeding, and partly so that 
there will be no competition with Marjorie 
Strauss' requests for the Reunion booklet. Any 
items received will, of course, be received joy- 
fully and handed on promptly for publication. 
If you want news in the Bulletin, it's up 
to you! 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Remington Twitchell) 
Setauket, N. Y. 

Is everyone making plans to return to the 
Grand Fifteenth in June? Can't you feel 
that irresistible longing calling you back to 
campus in the spring? There is nothing can 
take the place of old friends in old scenes. 

Marguerite Krantz Iwerson has moved from 
Scarsdale, N. Y., to 119 Longvue Terrace, 
Tuckahoe, N. J. 

A little bird has whispered that Mary Ewen 
Simpson has taken her family, bag and bag- 
gage, to Washington, D. C, to live. 

Augusta Blue Randolph is living in 
Charlottesville, Va., now. 

Hazel Collins Hainsworth writes that they 
have moved to Swan Island, Crosse lie, Mich. 
"We are at the southwestern end of the island, 
where we can look out on Lake Erie, as well 
as the Detroit River. We have an ideal loca- 
tion." 

Edith Howes is teaching school in Rochester, 
N. Y., this winter. The museum handbook on 
which she has been working in collaboration 
with the Metropolitan Museum in New York 
for three summers, is now completed. 

Peggy Rhoads has gone South for the win- 
ter, having resigned her position as Secretary 
of the Mission Board after more than nine 
years' service. 

The Editor had a most delightful luncheon 
recently with Winifred Kaufmann Whitehead, 
Catherine Everett Noyes, and Harriet Hobbs 



Haines, 1918. Having not seen Catherine for 
thirteen years, I was thrilled to find her look- 
ing just as she did in College — such a dis- 
covery is so comforting, especially when look- 
ing forward to a Fifteenth Reunion. Cath- 
erine's 9-year-old boy already shows artistic 
interests. Her husband has been ill for a 
long time. 

Henry Stambaugh Richner is always the 
same. She is a good cook and a weekly 
attendant at the matinee. 

The Editor has completed her three-year 
term as First Reader in church; she is looking 
forward also to completing her five-year term 
as Editor for 1919 in June. So be thinking 
of whom to have as her successor! 

1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 East 57th St., New York City 

Millicent Carey Mcintosh has twin sons, 
born on Sunday, February 4th. James Henry 
Mcintosh weighed 4 lbs. 11 oz., and Rustin 
Carey Mcintosh, 5 lbs. 2 oz. 

1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelly Erdman 
(Mrs. C. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

The Class extends its sincere sympathy to 
Maimie Southall Hall, who lost her mother 
last summer after a long illness. Maimie is 
back in Hoosick Falls in her old job of relief 
worker with the Red Cross, and has even 
gotten involved to the point of attending con- 
ferences, which, however, she asserts are very 
business-like and not at all like women's club 
meetings. 

Jimmy James Rogers sailed the middle of 
January for Montego Bay, Jamaica. She saw 
Kat Bradford before she sailed. 

Henrietta Baldwin Sperry has a son, 
Pierrepont Sperry, Jr., born August 20th. 

A nice long letter from Marion Fette pro- 
poses a crusade for bigger and better letters 
to Class Editors. (May it have many fol- 
lowers ! ) She suggests that "maybe some of 
the unwilling classmates would write in much 
more readily if they realized how eagerly some 
of their isolated 'sistern' scan the columns for 
news of them." She started as a teacher of 
English and Arithmetic in the junior high 
school in Hannibal, Mo., then she went on to 
senior high school, where she taught English 
and Spanish. Last summer she obtained her 
M.A. in Spanish from the University of 
Chicago, and she is now back in Hannibal as 
the whole Romance department, teaching 
French and Spanish. In November she was a 



(38) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



delegate at the convention of the Missouri 
State Teachers' Association in St. Louis, and 
she is Chairman of many committees in her 
local association. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York City. 

1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York City 

By January everyone has her activities well 
in hand and can just relax and abandon her- 
self to colds and other seasonable ailments and 
not bother to make any news. But bits of 
information about what you were doing drift 
in, and here are four, two first-hand and two 
hearsay. 

Ruth Beardsley Hufif way back last Novem- 
ber was in the midst of a hectic political cam- 
paign. "We are just in the eleventh hour," 
she writes, "and if you have ever experienced 
a real campaign in headquarters you know it 
is no 'pink tea.' I have charge of the wom- 
en's division, which, as you know, is the back- 
bone of any campaign. The men talk and 
the women do the work. The Citizens' League, 
which is sponsoring this campaign and for 
which 1 am organizer, is made up of the 
leading public-spirited citizens of Pittsburgh. 
Our Pittsburgh Bryn Mawr Club is a centre 
of political discussion. The Citizens' League 
is a permanent organization for better govern- 
ment, and I have a great deal of satisfaction 
in feeling that the work is really constructive." 
In addition to her outside interest Ruth has 
a husband and son. 

Lois Bennett, so we hear, gave up her 
apartment in New York and went abroad for 
about a year, where she spent her time visiting 
and traveling. In December she was back in 
America, spending the winter in Brewster, 
New York. 

Virginia Corse von Eckstadt works in the 
mornings in the American Consulate in Port 
au Prince. And her small son is thriving, we 
are also told. 

Katherine Shumway Freas' letter left West 
Africa in November and arrived to wish us a 
Merry Christmas. After an absence of four 
years she and her husband plan to return 
home in May. They have had an unusually 
busy year, having been left with the entire 
responsibility of their station, in addition to 
all the medical work. They hope to have 
performed, before leaving, the first operation 
in part of their new hospital at the new 
station. Reviewing the year, Katherine writes: 



"In May we had an adventurous trip in our 
Ford truck to Leopoldville, where our first 
mission conference in three years was held. 
Following our return we have spent almost the 
entire summer itinerating in the villages. In- 
stead of making hurried trips, we planned to 
spend one night at least in each of the thirty- 
six villages for the semi-annual examination, 
for which we are responsible to the govern- 
ment. In each of the villages my husband 
examined the people and checked up on the 
hygienic conditions. I would confer with the 
village teacher-preacher in regard to the school 
work." On the following morning Katherine 
helped the teacher, while her husband dis- 
pensed medicine and explained better care of 
the children. "Then our seventeen carriers 
would pick up their loads, consisting of all 
our household and medical equipment, and oflF 
we would start for the next village." 

Katherine ends with a postscript, "When 
do we have Reunion?" which is something 
we'd like to know ourself. 

The Private Schools Committee in New York 
invited Helen Dunbar to talk to the members 
of the Junior League and their friends about 
the factors in health and disease, based on 
observations made at Lourdes, at a meeting 
held on Tuesday evening, February 6th. 

1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 
(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 
8102 Ardmore Ave., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

4fter visiting Portland, Kay Elston Ruggles 
has arrived at her mother's ranch in Mexico, 
where she will stay indefinitely. 

Doris Hawkins Baldwin is tasting the joys 
of country life at East Rochester, New York. 
After several years in the hotel business, Doris 
and her husband are delighted to be settled 
in a home. 

Instead of visiting England, Kitty Gallwey 
Holt has taken a house in Morristown, N. J. 
Her daughters, most attractive young ladies, 
are becoming experts at ice skating. 

Betzie Crowell Kalthenthaler has just 
emerged from quarantine for scarlet fever. 
Fortunately her child had a light case — and 
she is eager to resume her many activities, 
such as gym, rhythmic dancing, presiding over 
a large Sunday School class, and ha\dng a 
good time with her children. 

A letter from Plum Fountain says she is 
not engaged, rumor to the contrary, but still 
working, in New York, with the architectural 
firm of Rossiter and Muller. She writes that 
Betty Hale Laidlaw is working part time at the 
Medical Center, and that Connie Lewis Gibson 
will be home from the Philippines the end 
of next summer. 



(39) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



In response to a plea, Pam (Coyne Taylor) 
sent the following information: Ailing Arm- 
strong Arnold returned from California in 
November and is living in Cambridge. Her 
daughter Mary is being brought up according 
to the most scientific methods. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

On the eve of sailing for Egypt and the 
Near East for our husband's sabbatical leave, 
we are pinch-hitting for the Editor. 

We are overcome by the activities of Rachel 
Foster Manierre, who is doing ten different 
things every other Tuesday and every second 
Friday, including presiding at meetings of the 
League of Women Voters and singing, besides 
the more ordinary activities like bridge and 
taxi-ing children to nursery school. 

Crit Coney (Mrs. Edward F. D'Arms) is 
now at 124 Fulton Avenue, Poughkeepsie. 
Write this in pencil, as we are late and she 
may move again. 

Peggy Pierce (Mrs. Frederick Milholland) 
is now living at 3 Greenholm Extension, 
Princeton, N. J. Her husband commutes to 
Philadelphia and decorates the interiors of 
Princeton in his spare time. 

Peggy Stewardson Blake and her husband 
have left Washington for a two-months' trip to 
Ohio. Peggy made us literally gnash our 
teeth by announcing that she had rented her 
house and moved out of it in 23 hours. We 
have done the same in 23 days. 

Helen Chisolm Tomkinsi is at the New York 
Hospital, having a sudden appendicitis opera- 
tion, but is getting on very well. 

The Editor will be back next month, so 
cheer up! 

Nancy Hough Smith. 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

Anne Tierney Anderson writes a charming 
letter from her husband's present station, 37 
Bungalow, Abbottabad, N. W. F. P., India. 
She tells of travels and gardens and views, 
and of her small daughter, Sara Elizabeth, 
born last June at Dalhousie, 6,000 feet above 
sea-level. Now they are living at a mere 4,000, 
surrounded by English roses and American 
zinnias, and Anne, who claims to have been 
a mute, sings Bryn Mawr songs to her child 
to wake her when she falls asleep over her 
meals. 

Sophie Sturm Brown is living at Glendale 
Road, Park Ridge, N. J. She got a Columbia 
M.A. degree last June in French. 



Grove Hanschka has a new address — 680 
Parker Street, Newark — and a comparatively 
new, at least to these columns, child. His 
name is Mark, and he was born last July 7th. 

Ibby Bostock Bennett's children are grow- 
ing up; Edgar is almost 2, and Jane Elizabeth 
about four months. From Ibby, indirectly, we 
hear that Esther Silveus is a full-fledged 
M.D., and in December was looking for a 
place to hang out her shingle. 

Marjorie Falk Maulbourguet has eluded 
these pages for some time. She lives in Paris, 
but comes to this country every summer. Last 
summer she was at Lake Placid with her 
little boy. 

Molly Parker has left her job at the Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts (her decision, unneces- 
sary to say) and is at present a lady of 
leisure, keeping her apartment in Boston. 

Folly von Erffa has gone abroad for the 
rest of the winter. At present she is living 
with a German family in Munich, and very 
soon we may expect some views on Hitlerism, 
which interests her particularly. Her husband, 
meanwhile, is pursuing his studies of Islamic 
art in Cairo, and Folly will later join him. 

Charis Denison, our great Radcliffe anthro- 
pologist, has been elected to Phi Beta Kappa; 
but these laurels are no couch to her, appar- 
ently, for still her work goes on. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellen or Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 
57 Christopher St., New York City 

This is the time for all good classmates to 
come to the aid of their editor. What we 
mean to say is that our lines of communication 
seem to have broken down and we have not a 
single bit of gossip to retail. We therefore 
seize the opportunity to present some of the 
vital statistics of our class, as our records 
show them. 

We have on our lis^ 114 names of those 
who entered with the Class of 1928. Of this 
number, so far as we know, 54 are married, 
and their children number 35, 18 girls and 17 
boys. Seven families have more than one 
child, and one has three. During our steward- 
ship of these notes, all but six of the people 
on our list have received one or more mention 
and report of their doings. Remember that, 
if you like to read about others, they may 
like to hear about you, and the best and most 
accurate source of information about you is 
yourself. Let's have lots of news next month. 

P. S. The response to our plea was prac- 
tically instantaneous! The next mail brought 
us news for which we have been waiting. We 



(40) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



take pleasure in announcing the arrival on 
January 31 of Ailing Christian Brown, son of 
Bertha Ailing and Charles Brown, weighing 
seven pounds. We now have 18 girls and 18 
boys; who is going to break the deadlock? 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 

We should be very glad if any one could 
send us the addresses of the following: 
Catherine Rea, Mary Grace Menaker, Candis 
Hall, Elsie Bryant Jack, Elvira de la Vega. 

In spite of not knowing her address we 
have heard that Mary Grace Menaker is work- 
ing on the staff of Fortune. 

Elizabeth Ufford has returned to Bryn Mawr 
this winter where she is studying for a Ph.D. 
in biology. 

Susan FitzGerald is in Munich, Germany, 
chaperoning the students of the Delaware 
Group. 

Bips Linn Allen writes: "I am sorry I have 
nothing very exciting to report. My baby 
daughter, whose birth on March 15th was duly 
announced in the Bulletin has become, in the 
ordinary course of things, eleven months old, 
a beautiful blue-eyed, brown-haired babe, with 
a cheery disposition, a ravishing smile and no 
talents except the ability to sit up, roll all the 
way over, and pull grandpa's glasses, usual in 
such infants. The Century of Progress brought 
fewer familiar faces than I had hoped, but 
Pussy Lambert was here for a few days chap- 
eroning a young sister, and announcing the 
acquisition of a grand new job as field worker 
for the Welfare Division of the Junior League. 
There are only three or four of these workers 
in all, and Pussy has the responsibility of put- 
ting the screws on all the Junior Leagues in 
the West and Middle West, so the job is a big 
one and will require a lot of travelling about. 
I am able to report that the Chicago Junior 
League, at least, breathes her name with awe, 
and all difficult problems are referred to the 
time when 'Miss Lambert will be here.' As far 
as I can remember, that is the only sight of a 
member of '29 for which I have to thank the 
Fair, though friends from other classes, Benjy 
Linn, Elinor Amram Nahm (who lunched with 
my husband while I was out of town) did turn 
up. Betty Fry tantalized me all summer with a 
prospective visit, but first an appendix, and 
then one thing and another kept her away. 
After studying at Columbia Summer School in 
the summer, she is back now at a school in 
Pittsburgh, teaching history to the 4th, 5th, 6th 
and 7th grades in, I firmly believe, a very stim- 
ulating manner. To give the Century of Prog- 
ress its due, I also have it to thank for a sec- 
retarial job which takes from two to three 



hours a day, can be done at home, and pays 
a living wage." 

Ella Poe Cotton informs us that the name of 
Barbara Humphreys Richardson's second daugh- 
ter is Jennifer, that Peggy Patterson spent the 
summer in England, and that Dole Purcell was 
at Virginia Beach during that terrific storm on 
the coast and in which her brand new car was 
washed out of the garage into the sea. As for 
herself Ella says that she and her husband 
returned from a long trip abroad in October; 
they spent a good deal of the summer in Spain, 
going to bullfights, and two months in Northern 
Africa and Turkey and Asia Minor. They will 
be in Washington (D. C.) this winter because 
her husband is in the NRA. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

The general dearth of 1930 notes in recent 
months had two good results in the form of 
two unsolicited letters from members of the 
class. Some of their items have already ap- 
peared in these pages but many were fresh news 
for us. 

Betsie Baker Smith writes: ". . . since acquir- 
ing a Ph.D. from Yale last June and passing 
unscathed through two major motor smashes, I 
am putting in a fourth winter in New Haven, 
this time working in general physiology, with 
the title of Research Fellow in Physiology. 
That means I have laboratory space and re- 
search materials furnished me, but there is no 
salary attached so I eat or not as I can borrow 
the money. My husband will get his Ph.D. in 
June; then we will be faced with the alterna- 
tives of finding jobs or joining one of the better 
bread lines." She also informs us that Louise 
Littlehale has reached her third year at Yale 
Law School, and that Lorine Sears Stein and 
Charlotte Farquhar Wing's husband are both 
working in the Yale library. We congratulate 
Betsie on being the first member of the class 
to get her Ph.D. If anyone else has one hidden 
away she will please correct us. 

Connie Cole writes that she and another 
person conducted a group of thirty high school 
girls and boys through France and Germany 
last summer. Next summer they intend to in- 
clude Czecho-Slovakia, Switzerland and Austria. 
They guarantee lots of fun for a low cost. This 
winter, Connie says, she is teaching IMath. at 
a high school in Niagara Falls and studying 
German. 

Nancy Nicholson is studying physics at the 
University of Virginia. 

1931 

Class Editor: Evelyn Waples Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 



(41) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1932 

Class Editor: Josephine Graton 

182 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Priscilla Rawson is studying music at the 
Brearley School in New York. Betty Young 
is also in New York; she has a part in a play 
which will open on Broadway soon. Dodo 
Brown is studying at Katherine Gibbs Secre- 
tarial School; Betty Knapp is also studying 
there. Tuger (Grace) Holden has a steno- 
graphic position with a law firm in New York. 
Lee Bernheimer has moved her silvercraft 
studio from Philadelphia to 241 West 108th 
St., New York. 

Yvonne Cameron is soon to take two young 
children abroad, teaching them French on the 
way. 

Emma Paxson writes: "I have changed my 
plans considerably since I saw you. 1 have 
just finished my first term at business college. 
I shine some in all but typing, where I have 
more or less consistently kept at the end of 
the class. My address from now on will be 
40 Highgate Road, Berkeley, Calif. I'll be glad 
to see any classmates and friends." 

Mary Maccoun has announced her engage- 
ment to James Francis Graves from Atlanta, 
Georgia. He is a graduate of Georgia Tech, 
and works for Lanborn and Company, sugar 
brokers. 

Lucille Shuttleworth has announced her en- 
gagement to Theodore Moss, a medical student 
in Virginia. 

Greta Swenson was married in New York on 
December thirtieth to Mr. Kimberly Cheney. 
They are living in New Haven. Greta, Dolly 
Tyler and Alice Bemis attended Denise 
Gallaudet's wedding to Carleton Shurlett 
Francis, Jr. 

Josephine Gratan has announced her engage- 
ment to Philip Chase, and expects to be mar- 
ried in April. 

Up to date no details are available about the 
bridegroom-to-be. He is said to be living in 
Texas, and it is known that last summer, when 
on that famous Western motor trip, Jo left the 
party for some days to go to Texas, ostensibly 
for archeological purposes. 

By the way, there is supposed to be a 
Reunion this year. 



1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

This is a little late for our most important 

piece of news, but last month we just missed. 

Martha Tipton has announced her engagement 

to Joseph Lemuel Johnson, of Nashville, Ten- 



nessee. Mr. Johnson is a senior at West Point 
and he and Tippy plan to be married June 13 
under crossed swords in the West Point Chapel. 
We're not quite clear about the swords. Per- 
haps that comes after the ceremony, but it all 
sounds pretty martial and romantic. Tippy will 
give up a magnificent job with Pictorial Pat- 
terns to start training herself for the life of 
domesticity sometime in March. 

We had a Christmas card from Kag Berg, 
who says she is not recuperating at home, but 
living a life of ennui and irritation in a 
"beastly sanitarium," in which she has been 
incarcerated since August. Maybe she's out 
now, but from the sound of her note, if she 
ever escapes it will be only through her own 
ingenuity. 

Being definitely short of news this month, 
we take advantage of our exalted office, and 
pad your notes with an account of what goes 
on in Chicago. Writing for a magazine isn't 
really enough to keep one busy except in 
spurts, and about New Year's the habit of four 
years won out over a life of ease and sloth, 
and the first day of the year found us signing 
our soul away in exchange for a few courses 
at the University of Chicago. Rose Hatfield 
and Anna Martin Findlay turned up here too. 
Rose and I (we) live in International House 
and are bandied about from communism to 
stout republicanism, alternately filled with in- 
ternational amity and race prejudice. (This 
is really not our province, but Rose is doing 
work in Education.) We (I) are trying to 
learn how to write plays. 

Mary Chase is being flighty about a course 
in stenography, and relief work, and French 
lessons. She doesn't seem to take naturally to 
short-hand and typing, and all she knows about 
her classmates is that Anne Funkhouser is not 
doing her graduate work in French. It's 
German. 

We have saved this for the last because it 
represents a pretty amazing bit of sleuthing 
on our part. One day a few weeks ago, a 
Chicago newspaper carried a story about the 
ten best-dressed women in America, selected 
by Orry-Kelly, a Hollywood dress designer. 
Kay Francis and Bette Davis and the former 
Irene Castle had their pictures all over the 
place, and we read the story to find out the 
whys of it all. Down toward the middle of the 
list was the name Betty Edwards, Dallas, Texas. 
We haven't confirmed this scandal by writing 
Betty because it's too good to spoil. We prefer 
to go on the assumption that there is only one 
Betty Edwards in Dallas and that at last Bryn 
Mawr has graduated from the blue stocking 
class. We go around telling people we knew 
one of the ten best-dressed women in America 
when she wore overalls backstage. It's better 
than Kate Hepburn. 



(42) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The Bryn Mawr 
College Bookshop 

WILL BE GLAD TO 
FILL MAIL ORDERS 

All Profits Go Toward Scholarships 



LowTHORPE School 

of Landscape Architecture 
GROTON, MASS. 

Courses in Landscape Architecture, in' 
eluding Horticulture and Garden Design, 
given to a limited number of students 
in residence. Anne Baker, Director. 

Spring Term Starts April 2, 1934 
Write for Catalogue 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge. Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on the Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS, Manager 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 386 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD. President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 




1896 - 1934 




BACK LOG CAMP 

(A CAMP FOR ADULTS AND FAMILIES) 

SABAEL, P. O.. NEW YORK 

On Indian Lake, in the Adirondack Mountains 



T) ACK LOG CAMP offers none of the usual "attractions'' of a summer resort, such 
^-^ as golf, motor boating, arranged programs, dancing, and visiting celebrities. It is a 
large tent camp, inaccessible to automobiles, but easy to get to, situated far from all 
other camps in a very wild part of the Adirondack Preserve. A fleet of fine canoes and 
rowboats always at the service of the guests without extra charge, and innumerable 
trails, many of our own making, enable Back Loggers to penetrate to isolated parts of 
the woods seldom visited by the usual run of summer visitors. That's what Back Log 
does: it runs the woods. 

What strikes most newcomers is the personal, friendly atmosphere of the Camp. It 
is owned and run by a large family of brother? and sisters and' their children, college 
graduates (Harvard, Haverford, Heidelberg, Bryn Mawr, Wellesley, etc.) and Phila' 
delphia Quakers, and the note of the Camp is a cheerful sobriety that marks that 
religious body. We have reduced our rates. 

Send for a fully illustrated hoo\let to 

MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT, 272 PARK AVENUE, TAKOMA PARK, D. C. 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



^ 
^ 



SCHOOL DIMECTOMY 



Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. General 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
small classes. Ample grounds 
near OrangeMountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. Established 
1 8 94. Write for booklet. 

LUCIE C. BEARD 

Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. ROWLAND 






ELEANOR O. BROWNELLJ 



Principals 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head MigtresM 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryii Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 

A COUNTRY SCHOOL 
FOR GIRLS 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 
Prepares for Bryn Mawr and Other Colleges 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



Head 
Mistresses 
Katherine P. Debevoise« Assistant to the Heads 



Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. 1 
Mary E. Lowndes, M. A., Litt.D. J 



TOWHEYWOOn 

I J On theSound'^At Shippan Point \ / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

Oru hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmiatrema 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school established 
1899. Preparation for leading women's 
colleges. Four-year high school course; 
intensive review courses for College 
Board examinations throughout year 
or during second semester; general 
courses. Resident enrollment limited 
to twenty-five. Individual attention in 
small classes. Informal home life. 
Outdoor sports. 

MARY B, THOMPSON, Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BKYN xMAWIl ALUMxNAE BULLETIN 



fi SCHOOL DIMECTQMY |^ 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art, and Dramatics. 

Preparalory Oeparlinent: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on I^ake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming: Pool — Riding-. 



Fnr catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 



l-AKE FOREST 



ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on reciuest. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD. A. B., Bryn Mawr. 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girl* 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 



SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School, St. Martinis 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Brvn Mawr 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 




esteriieid 



the cigarette thats MILDER ♦ the cigarette that TASTES BETTER 

© 1934, Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co. 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND 



ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 



April, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 4 



Entered as xecond-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 1933 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATIOIN 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Virginia Atmore, 1928 

T^. . i. T - « /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins. 1905 

Directors at Large •••• \ Alice Sachs Plaut, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorib L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Mary C. Parker, 1926 

District II '. Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 

District IV .Elizabeth Smith Russell, 1915 

District V Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI 

District VII Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Virginia McKennet Claiborne, 1908 Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918 

Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 Florance Waterbury, 1905 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith, 1903 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Virginia Atmore, 1928 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen FAUiiSNEB, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maguibe, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorib Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 



Jfarm ot iBeqneit 

m 



I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OF Brtn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr» Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 



OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNA ASSOCIATION 

Marjokie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, ^96 Elinor Amram Nahim, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnge Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV APRIL, 1934 No. 4 



The Scholarships Report, which appears in this issue, is always one of the 
most interesting of the reports that is presented to the Association. It gives, 
expressed in terms of individuals, a graphic picture of what is, perhaps, the most 
valuable contribution that we or any other alumnae group can make to a college. 
But gifts can sometimes present problems and be a burden. One of the great safe- 
guards against embarrassing the College with our generosity is the Loan Fund. 
Twenty years ago the majority of the students hardly knew of its existence, and 
the alumnae as a whole certainly felt no sense of responsibility about it. With the 
development of the scheme of Regional Scholarships, however, the whole situation 
has changed. We have come to realize that when it is necessary to lend as much as 
$5,561, as the Fund did in 1931, and that many of the applicants are recommended 
by the Dean's office, we have as genuine a responsibility toward the Fund as toward 
the sending of new scholars to the College each year. In these past years of 
financial strain, a fund for emergencies has had to be raised with which the Dean 
could help students not of scholarship grade. As Miss Maguire points out in her 
report, college and endowed and Regional Scholarships can take care of only the 
highest third of the applicants, and yet 140 students now in College are being 
helped in some way. Grants and remissions and special scholarships all play their 
part. It may not be possible this next year to have as large an emergency fund 
as usual, and students, instead of receiving grants, may ratlier have to take out 
loans. The Loan Fund is the only thing within the College to which they can turn 
to do that. There is no question but that it must be made adequate to meet the calls 
upon it. Every alumna should take seriously the request for suggestions how to 
augment the Fund; and the financial report submitted by the Committee, if read 
understandingly, makes a case that needs no words to strengthen it. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE ON SCHOLARSHIPS 
AND LOAN FUND 

In making the report of the activities of the Committee on Scholarships and 
Loan Fund it has generally been the custom for the Chairman to speak first of 
Scholarships and secondly of the Loan Fund. This year I want to reverse the 
procedure, and change the emphasis, for though the Scholarships situation is as 
satisfactory as usual, the Loan Fund has come to a sort of crisis in its existence. 
I know that most of the alumnae are definitely and warmly interested in Scholar- 
ships; may I commend to your attention the condition of the Loan Fund, which is, 
after all, almost as important as Scholarships in our plan for the financial aid of 
the students of Bryn Mawr? 

As you may remember, the Loan Fund had been lending about $3,000 a year 
in 1926, 1927, 1928, and 1929. In 1930, the first year of depression, it increased 
its loans to $5,443, and in 1931 to $5,561. In 1932 it lent $4,150, and in 1933 it 
has lent $4,110. The repayments in the years between 1926 and 1932 brought in 
approximately $2,000 a year. The remainder which was lent in those years was 
made up of gifts, of loans to the Loan Fund from alumnae, and of a gift of $1,000 
annually from the Parents' Fund. In this way the Loan Fund was just able to take 
care of the people who applied, though there was practically no margin, and the 
Committee always was haunted by the thought of unexpected demands which could 
not be met. However, the Loan Fund did function satisfactorily enough during 
those years. We felt that students were repaying their loans with encouraging 
promptness, and congratulated ourselves on the fact that very few people were 
behind with their repayments. Of course, there was always a small group of people 
who owed money, and who apparently had no intention of paying it back, but that 
group was the exception and not the rule. This year we must report that the 
situation has changed for the worse. Instead of the $2,000 we had expected in 
repayments, we had, by the middle of November, only $958 — less than half as much 
as usual. Of the 100 people with whom we were doing business at that time, 27 
were still in college, and tbere were 17 more whose interest and principal were not 
yet due; but there were only 15 people who had kept up on their payments, or who 
liad paid in advance, and there were 41 who were behind in payment of both prin- 
cipal and interest. Some of these people, we know, are not to blame for their remiss- 
ness; tliere are those whose salaries are so small that they need every penny for 
their own living expenses, and there are those who are earning nothing. We feel 
sure that many of them will make an honest effort to pay their debts when it is 
possible for them to do so. But we also know that there are some people who are 
earning good salaries who prefer to spend their money in other ways, and therefore 
cannot repay their Loan Fund obligations. There is due at this moment $5,674 of 
principal and $1,184 of interest, of which perhaps $3,300 may be considered hope- 
less of collection and $3,500 should be collectable. 

At the Council meeting in November the whole question of collecting these 
debts was discussed, and it was suggested that the Councillors or other interested 
alumnae might find out what they could about the circumstances of the Loan Fund 
delinquents in their Districts, and, if it seemed indicated, might by letters, telephone 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



calls, or interviews urge them to continue their payments. We felt that this personal 
appeal might carry more weight than the letters sent out with the bills from the 
Alumnae Office. This has proved to be the case. The Councillors went at their 
rather difficult task with a will, and so successful have they been that since 
November more than $800 has been sent in to the fund. There have been several 
payments in full of debts which seemed hopeless of collection, and there have been 
small payments from people who have promised to continue them. We are extremely 
grateful to the Councillors and to the other alumnae who have helped and are 
helping the Loan Fund in this way. 

This year the Committee decided that it would be of interest to the alumnae to 
mimeograph and to distribute at this meeting the Financial Report of the Loan 
Fund. You will notice that the report is for the calendar year 1933, and that the 
item called Donations is rather remarkably large. The explanation for this is that 
the gifts from the Helen Lovell Million Fund, $433.38, and from the Mary Helen 
Ritchie Fund, $1,284.09, which were promised in 1932, were actually not turned 
over to the Loan Fund until January, 1933. The other donations were from indi- 
viduals, $625; from the Class of 1933, $400; from the Undergraduate Association, 
$58.80; and from the Parents' Fund, $1,000. 

I should like to report that since January 1st, 1934, we have made loans 
totaling $205 to three students, and that repayments and interest to the sum of 
$613.43 have come in. Therefore today there is a balance on hand in the Loan Fund 
of $1,733.14. There are two loans from alumnae which must be repaid during 1934, 
and the needs for this year may easily total $4,500, and probably more. We do our 
utmost to check up on the requests for loans ; many of them are recommended by the 
Dean's office, and no loan is made when there is doubt in any of our minds as to 
the student's real financial need. 

As you can see, however, in spite of the efforts of all of us, the discrepancy is 
still great between what has been repaid to the Loan Fund and what is still owed. 
This discrepancy must be made up somehow, by continued stimulation of repay- 
ments, by loans to the Loan Fund, and, if possible, by gifts. Suggestions on all 
three of these points will be received gladly by the Committee, especially suggestions 
of names of alumnae who might be interested in loaning money to tlie Loan Fund 
for two years. 

If the first part of this report is discouraging, the other side of the picture is 
the part having to do with scholarships. In spite of all difficulties, and in the face 
of a completely uncertain financial situation, we feel that scholarships are in an 
extremely satisfactory state. As you will see in the scholarships statement, the 
College has awarded Endowed, Budget, and Special Scholarships, Grants, and 
Remissions, for the year 1933-34, to the amount of $41,855. Regional Scholarships 
to the amount of $11,555 have been awarded. The grand total of scholarship help 
for 1933-34 is, therefore, $53,410. 120 students were given this help. In addition 
there are 18 other students who have been given the $100 rooms usually reserved for 
scholarship students, and 2 who have been given loans but who are not on tlie 
scholarship list. Thus, 140 students out of the 385 undergraduates now in College 
are being helped in some way. 

Last spring we went through the usual procedure with the 96 applications for 
college scholarships for the three upper classes, and again it was evident tliat 

(3) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



college and Endowed and Regional scholarships could take care of only approxi- 
mately the highest third of the applicants. It was felt that something must be done 
not only to supplement regular scholarships^ but also to help the less brilliant but 
nevertheless perfectly worthy students who needed some financial aid. Dean 
Manning set out, as she did last year, to engineer the raising of an Emergency Fund. 
This she succeeded so admirably in doing that the sum of $9,450 was raised, $2,000 
more than the year before. This money was given by the parents of students, by 
the undergraduates themselves, by faculty, by alumnae, and by friends of the 
College and of the students in question. The emergency was met once more, and 
it is again our proud boast that no really worthy student had to leave College 
because of lack of financial help. 

The question which will need careful thought this spring is whether or not 
there will be the necessity for such a large Emergency Fund to be raised in 
addition to the college budget for 1934-35. Probably there must always be a fund 
upon which the Dean may draw for help for students not of scholarship grade, or 
to supplement scholarships; and generous parents and friends will always be given 
the opportunity to contribute to that fund if they like. There was no doubt of the 
necessity for helping non-scholarship students to pay college fees in 1932 and 1933, 
from the standpoint of the College as well as for the sake of the students. No one 
can tell as yet what 1934 will bring in the way of prosperity, but we hope, 
earnestly, that by this spring conditions will have improved to such an extent that 
there will be less need for financial help to families which have been hard hit for 
the last two years. 

One heartening sign pointing to less financial strain even now is that only 25 
of this year's Freshmen are on scholarships, and 8 more are given $100 rooms, out 
of a class of 124, while of last year's Freshman Class 30 were on scholarships, and 
10 were given $100 rooms, out of a class of 111. It would seem that this year's 
class is going to need 10% less help on its way through College. 

It is my own personal belief that if it were known that a large Emergency 
Fund is not going to be raised for 1934-35, many students who have hitherto 
depended on such help would make an effort to find the money for their own college 
fees, instead of leaving Bryn Mawr. In that case the Loan Fund would probably 
be called on more heavily than ever — another argument for having a strong Loan 
Fund. It is less pleasant and less easy for students to take out loans than to 
receive grants from the College, but perhaps it might serve to inculcate a sense of 
responsibility. Another point is that students might try to find money in some 
other way when they understand that the choice is between borrowing and going 
without. 

Let me make it perfectly clear that it is only the large Emergency Fund about 
which there is the slightest doubt. Of course, scholarships themselves are an integral 
part of the college financial plan. If this needs justification, one glance at the 
record of the present Senior Class would reassure us. Of the first 10 of the 
Class of 1934, 9 are on scholarships, and numbers 11 to 14 are also scholarship 
students. It is staggering to think of what the Senior Class would be if these 
distinguished students had not been helped to stay in College. 

Of all scholarships those most interesting to the alumnae are their own 
Regionals. Approximately $12,000 has been awarded this year, a splendid total, in 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



spite of the fact that it is somewhat less than last year's amount ($15,050). It 
was not surprising to find that in nearly every District the committees felt that 
they were unable to raise the amount of money usually awarded. Southern California 
and District VI. for the first time in some years are sending no scholars, District V. 
is sending 2 instead of 4, District IV. 2 instead of S, Western Pennsylvania is 
sending 1 instead of last year's S, Eastern Pennsylvania is being responsible for 4 
instead of 5, and even New York and New Jersey have had to cut down somewhat 
on their scholarships both in number and amount. Baltimore, on the other hand, 
deserves praise for being responsible for one more scholar than last year, and 
New England is giving $3,505, only $200 less than the splendid sum it raised last 
year. 

There is no need for me to go into details about the Regional Scholars them- 
selves, except to say that there are 36 this year. Most of them are as usual doing 
excellent work, and many are taking their parts in the various extra-curricular 
activities which interest them, such as the News Board, Players' Club, or Varsity 
Hockey. There are 12 Freshman Regional Scholars this year, some extremely bril- 
liant, and 7 of them in the first 20 of the class. We have high hopes that they will 
add more distinction than ever to the Regional group. 

A contribution which the College itself is making to the community during 
these difficult times is the awarding of several Tuition Scholarships to girls living 
in the neighborhood, who could not come to College even as non-residents without 
some financial help. Four $500 scholarships of this kind were given from the college 
budget, and several (5) of $250 and $200. The Directors themselves also gave a 
$500 scholarship. In making these awards Bryn Mawr is taking its place with 
many other colleges which have adopted a like policy. 

To students of the college catalogue it may be of interest to know that the 
Mary E. Stevens Scholarship, which used to be of the value of $160 yearly, is now 
to be a Tuition Scholarship. A friend of Miss Stevens inherited her estate; the 
friend died last year, and the estate now comes to the College, and should bring in 
an income of $500 a year. There is a new named scholarship, the Professor James 
H. Leuba, raised last year for the first time by the faculty and administration in 
honor of Dr. Leuba upon his retirement. This scholarship is not yet completely 
funded, but it is hoped to raise enough money to make it a Tuition Scholarship 
yearly. The Faculty Show, that high point of college entertainment, was given last 
spring for the benefit of this scholarship. It is pleasant to see that year by year a 
few more scholarships are being added to the number already existing. 

Elizabeth Yarnall Maguire, 1913, 

Chairman. 



As this number of the Bulletin goes to press, the Scholarships Committee is 
engaged in considering the applications for assistance for the year 1934-35. It is 
encouraging to note that whereas at this time last year 36.79% of the Freshman 
class were among the list of applicants, only 25% of this year's Freshman class 
are now asking for financial help. 



(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



LOAN FUND REPORT 

Balance, January 1, 1933 : $279.97 

Receipts for year 1933: 

Repayments of loans by students $1,227.97 

Interest on loans 319.39 

Interest on bank balances 6.87 

Donations 3,801.27 

Loans to the Loan Fund 600.00 5,955.50 

$6,235.47 
Disbursements for year 1933: 

Loans to students $4,110.00 

Repayments of loans to Loan Fund 800.00 

Tax on cheques .76 4,910.76 

Balance December 31, 1933 $1,324.71 



LOANS TO STUDENTS 

Year Repayments on loans 

1930 $5,443.50 (loaned to 30 students) $2,466.58 

1931 5,561.08 (loaned to 30 students) 2,204.97 

1932 4,150.00 (loaned to 29 students) 2,501.89 

1933 4,110.00 (loaned to 30 students) 1,227.97 



AMOUNTS GIVEN IN SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS 

1926-27 1927-28 1932-33 1933-34 
Undergraduate Scholarships. 

Regional $6,500 $7,300 $15,050 $11,555 

Endowed 6,130 6,695 8,865 10,785 

Given by College 

From budget 7,085 7,160 9,380 11,720 

From special donations 7,165 8,257 12,480 12,950 

Special Grants 3,395 4,200 

Remission of $100 of tuition fee 3,100 700 4,900 2,200 



$29,980 $30,112 $54,070 $53,410 

NUMBER OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
RECEIVING SCHOLARSHIPS OR GRANTS 

as Compared with Total Number of Undergraduates 

1926-27 1927-28 1932-33 1933-34 

Number of undergraduates receiving scholar- 
ships or grants or remission of fees 64 65 124 120* 

Total number of undergraduate students in 

College 381 387 375 385 



*In addition to this figure of 120 there are two students receiving; loans who are not on 
the scholarship list and 18 additional students have been given the special $100 room rate 
which is usually reserved for scholarship students. 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A STUDY OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF ART AND 
ARCHAEOLOGY AT BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 

WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE CAREERS OF WOMEN STUDENTS 

Courses in art were first organized at Bryn Mawr College thirty-eight 5^ears ago, 
although a few lectures on art were given by non-resident Lecturers in the opening- 
years of the College. The first courses^ dealing with Greek art and Italian painting, 
were established by Professor Richard Norton^, who was later in charge of the 
American excavations at Cyrene and Director of the American School of Classical 
Studies at Athens. 

From these original courses have grown the two independent but closely related 
departments of the History of Art and of Classical Archaeology. The work begun 
by a single professor is now carried on by three full professors, two associate pro- 
fessorS; one instructor, one reader, and one demonstrator. The College Calendar 
for 1933 lists twenty-two courses for undergraduates and six graduate seminaries. 
These courses include not only Classical, Mediaeval, Renaissance and Modern art, 
but also introduce the student to the art of the Far East, of Egypt and Mesopotamia. 
For some years American Archaeology was also included. The Art Club, a student 
organization carried on under the auspices of the Department of the History of Art, 
ofi'ers an extra-curricular course in drawing and painting and for some time 
Architectural Drawing was offered as an extra-curricular course by the Department 
of Archaeology. 

The roster of the professors who have given courses in these departments 
has included: 

^Joseph Clark Hoppin, author of A Handbook of Attic Red-Figured Vases; 
Euthymides; A Handbook of Black-Figured Vases, etc. 

Caroline Ransom Williams, formerly Associate Curator of the Egyptian Depart- 
ment of the Metropolitan Museum, and Honorary Curator of the Egyptian Collection 
of the New York Historical Society; author of The Decoration of the Tomb of 
Perneb, Studies in Ancient Furniture and a Catalogue of Egyptian Antiquities in 
the New York Historical Society ; ^Corresponding Member of the German Archaeo- 
logical Institute in Berlin. 

C. Leonard Woolley, Excavator at Carchemish and Ur, Director of the Joint 
Expedition to Mesopotamia of the British Museum and University of Pennsylvania 
Museum, and author of books on Ur and Sumerian Antiquities. 

Lily Ross Taylor, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1912, Professor of Latin at 
Bryn Mawr College and Acting Professor in Charge of the School of Classical 
Studies at the American Academy in Rome for the year 1931-35, Fellow at the 
American Academy in Rome (1917-18; 1919-20); author of The Cults of Ostiaj 
Local Cults in Etruria; and The Divinity of the Roman Emperor. 

Prentice Duell, of the Oriental Institute in Chicago, author of the Tomba del 
Triclinio (Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome). 



t Deceased. 

* Only four American women have been awarded this honor and three of these have been 
connected with Bryn Mawr College. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Charles H. Morgan, II., of Amherst College^ Annual Professor of the American 
School of Classical Studies at Athens (1933-1934). 

David M. Robinson, Vickers Professor of Archaeology, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity^ Excavator at Pisidian Antioch and Olynthos; author of volumes on Olynthos, 
on Greek Vases, Inscriptions and Sculpture. 

William B. Dinsmoor, Professor of Classical Archaeology at Columbia Univer- 
sity and Head of the Department of Art; author of the Archons of Athens, and 
various books on Architecture. 

Helen Huss Parkhurst, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1911; A.M., 1913; Ph.D., 1917; 
Lecturer in Art, Bryn Mawr College, 1916-17 ;' Associate Professor of Philosophy, 
Barnard College, Columbia University; John Simon Guggenheim Fellow, 1931-32; 
author of Beauty: An Interpretation of Art and the Imaginative Life, New York, 
1930. 

Helen Fernald, Curator of Far Eastern Art, University of Pennsylvania 
Museum, author of many articles on Far Eastern Art, and reviews in Easterfi Art, 
Asia, The Illustrated London News, Art and Archaeology, The Journal of the 
American Oriental Society, The Museum Journal, etc. 

The present members of the department include: 

Georgiana Goddard King, Head of the Department of the History of Art since 
1912 when it was organized independently, pioneer in the field of Spanish Art; 
author of Pre-Romanesque Churches in Spain, Sardinian Painting, The Way of 
St. James, Mudejar, and many other works; a Member of the Hispanic Society and 
Chairman of the Managing Committee on Mediaeval and Renaissance Studies of the 
Archaeological Institute of America. 

Ernst Diez, Associate Professor in the Department of the History of Art, 
formerly Assistant in the Department of Mohammedan Art, Kaiser Friedrich 
Museum, Berlin, Professor of Oriental Art in the University of Vienna, and author 
of Byzantine Mosaics in Greece, Die Kunst der islamischen Volker, Die Kunst 
Indiens, Churasanische Baudenhmdler, and other books. 

Rhys Carpenter, Head of the Department of Archaeology, Annual Professor at 
the American Academy at Rome in 1926-1927 and from 1927 to 1932 Director of 
the American School of Classical Studies at Athens; author of The Aesthetic Basis 
of Greek Art, The Greeks in Spain, The Sculpture of the Nike Parapet, and the 
Humanistic Value of Archaeology ; best known for having discoved "U," one of 
the figures of the Eastern Pediment of the Parthenon (Hesperia, II, 1933), also dis- 
coverer of the signature of Apollonios, son of Nestor, on the Bronze Boxer, National 
Museum of Rome, published in the Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome; 
Martin Classical Lecturer at Oberlin College, 1933, and Charles Eliot Norton 
Lecturer of the Archaeological Institute of America, 1933-34, an Honorary Member 
of the Greek Archaeological Society, a Member of the German Archaeological 
Institute, and Corresponding Member of the Hispanic Society of America. 

Mary H. Swindler, member of the Department of Classical Archaeology since 
1912, Acting Head of the Department from 1926-1932; author of Ancient Painting, 
Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology, Corresponding Member 
of the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin, Organizer of the Joint Expedition 
of Bryn Mawr College and the Archaeological Institute of America to Cilicia in 1934. 

(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Valentin Mueller, Associate Professor of Classical Archaeology, formerly 
Extraordinary Professor in the Department of Archaeology in the University of 
Berlin, and in 1921-1923 Fellow Traveller of the German Archaeological Institute 
at Rome. His best known book is Fruhgriechische Plastik in Griechenland und 
Vorderasien. He is a frequent contributor to the Jahrhuch, Athenische Mitteilungen, 
Gnomon and the American Journal of Archaeology. 

When we turn from the faculty to the careers of former students, we find 
their achievements convincing evidence of the effective and stimulating teaching 
in these departments. The data^ obtained, though incomplete, give us information 
on 196 former students who since leaving Bryn Mawr have been actively engaged 
in some work allied with art or archaeology. They have become staff members of 
museums, professors and teachers of art, excavators, research students, art critics, 
architects, painters, sculptors, commercial artists and workers in arts and crafts. 
Twenty-six have held positions in colleges or universities. Of these nine were 
students at Bryn Mawr within the last ten years. Among them were: 
9 full professors (4 in Classical Departments). 
2 assistant professors (1 in Classical Department). 
11 authors of monographs or articles in journals such as The Classical 
Journal, Classical Philology, The Art Bulletin, Art Studies, etc. 
1 Editor-in-Chief of the American Journal of Archaeology. 

1 Associate Editor of Latin Notes. 

Nineteen are teaching in schools or private classes. Of these seven were students 
at Bryn Mawr within the last ten years. 

Twenty-five Bryn Mawr women have been connected with important Museums 
such as: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, University of Pennsylvania Museum; 
Boston Museum of Fine Arts; Fogg Art Museum in Cambridge; Brooklyn 
Museum of Art ; Lyman- Allyn Museum at New London ; Mesa Verde National Park 
Museum in Colorado. 

In this museum group fifteen studied at Bryn Mawr within the last ten years. 
Among their interesting activities might be mentioned: 
Excavation. 
Publication of articles in Museum Journals, Art Magazines, and 

popular magazines. 
Serving as a Contributing Editor of Parnassus, and winning second 
prize of the Intercollegiate Contest of the College Art Association. 
Serving as Art Advisor of the Carnegie Corporation. 
Nineteen are or have been Excavators. Of these ten were students at Bryn 
Mawr within the last ten years. Among them have been: 

9 Fellows at the American School of Classical Studies at Atliens.^ 
4 Fellows at the American Academy in Rome ^ (Latin Majors). 
4 Holders of Carnegie Scholarships.^ 

2 Holders of John Simon Guggenheim Fellowships.^ 

1 Fellow and 3 Assistants at the Agora excavations at Athens.^ 

4 Authors of Articles in Hesperia, and the American Journal of 
Archaeology. 

5 Doctors of Philosophy. 

8 Research workers studying for the Ph.D., all students at 
Bryn Mawr within the last 10 years. 

1 The information was obtained from the College files, the files of the Alumnae Office, 
the Class Editors, and from questionnaires sent to former students in the Department of the 
History of Art and the Department of Classical Archaeology. 

2 These competitive fellowships and scholarships are open to both men and women. 



(9) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Two Bryn Mawr students have become librarians of art photographs and 
three have been on the staffs of art magazines: The International Studio and The 
Arts. 

To convey a more vivid impression of the standing of some of these women 
we append below a few individual records and quote extracts from authoritative 
sources. Space permits us to give this evidence of achievement for a few only^ 
but it should be indicative of the recognition which Bryn Mawr women have won 
in these fields. 

Georgiana Goddard King, A.B. Bryn Mawr 1896, A.M. 1897. Extract of 
review of her book, Sardinian Painting, Vol. I, The Painters of the Gold Back- 
grounds: 

"She was one of the first Americans to turn to Spain and to study the art of 
the country when it was no easy task to travel to search out the monuments in 
their remote hiding places. She was also one of those who blazed the trail among 
the artistic discoveries of the Way of St. James. And now she leads us from 
Catalonia across the sea to a new province of aesthetic study and delight, Sardinia. 
Surely none was better prepared to be our guide. Thoroughly conversant not only 
with Spanish but also with Italian Painting (by a constant intercourse of twelve 
and twenty-four years respectively, as she tells us in her preface), she possessed 
just the proper qualifications of erudition for examining and describing the art 
of an island that looked for its inspiration to both countries. . . . The value of 
the work is further enhanced by that linking of the artistic development with the 
political and cultural history which must today be demanded of any serious study 
of painting, sculpture, or architecture." — Chandler R. Post (The Art Bulletin, 
June, 1924). 

Extract from review of her book Mudejar: 

"Those who are familiar with the earlier work of Miss King — which is to say 
all students of the history of art — will find in the present volume those same admir- 
able qualities which have distinguished its predecessors. In the present book, the 
reader will find Miss King at her best — her knowledge of her loved Spain, which 
no one knows so well, even broader and mellower, her intellectual curiosity stimu- 
latingly omnivorous, and her style showing a marked gain in clarity and force." — 
Arthur Kingsley Porter, Saturday Review of Literature, September 29, 1933. 

Mary Hamilton Swindler, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr, 1912. Extracts of reviews of 
her book. Ancient Painting: 

"The work as it stands, is an admirable performance with little to parallel it 
in the way of scope and comprehensiveness elsewhere in the publications of American 
classical scholars." — (Parnassus, February, 1930.) 

"It is impossible to offer anything but the highest praise to the author who 
has written and the University that has published, this admirable volume. It is a 
veritable treasury of the highest artistic, aesthetic and historical value, and the wide 
range of its subject matter will assure for it an honorable place in the libraries 
of scholars and institutions whose activities are concerned with the history of art, 
of culture and of the specific civilizations with which it deals." — (Journal of 
Egyptian Archaeology, Vol. CVI, November, 1930, London.) 

"Her book is a marvel both of evocation and of exposition, a highroad into 
knowledge." — (Illustrated London News, May 3, 1930.) 

In Scrihner's, May, 1930, her book is listed as one of the achievements of 
the decade. 

(10) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Edith Hall Dohan, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1908, Agnes Hoppin Memorial 
Fellow, American School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1903-05, Excavator in 
Eastern Crete, and Assistant Curator in the Classical Department of the University 
of Pennsylvania Museum; Lecturer, Bryn Mawr College, 1923-24; 1926-27; Sem. 
II, 1929-30; author of Sphoimgaros, of Vrokastro, and other works on Aegean 
Archaeology; Corresponding Member of the German Archaeological Institute in 
Berlin. For review of Vrokastro, see Journal of Hellenic Studies, 37, 1917, pp. 
130-131; cf. 54, 1934— (article by Miss Lorimer). 

Louise Adams Holland, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College, 1920; Lecturer in Latin, 
Bryn Mawr College, Sem. II, 1928-30, 1931-32, and 1933-34, Fellow at the 
American Academy in Rome, 1922-23; author of The Faliscans in Prehistoric 
Times (Papers and monographs of The American Academy in Rome, Vol. V) ; 
A Study of the Commerce of Latium^ from the Early Iron Age through the Sixth 
Century B.C. Cf. Berliner Philol. Woch. 1925, pp. 1229-32; 1926, pp. 928-32; 
A. J. P. 1924. 

Marion Lawrence, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1923, Ph.D. Radcliffe, 1932, Fellow of the 
Carnegie Institute, 1926-1927, Instructor in Fine Arts, Barnard College, 1929 to 
date, author of articles in the Art Bulletin, American Journal of Archaeology, and 
Art Studies. Dr. Gerhart Rodenwaldt, in his study "Der Klinensarkophag von 
S. Lorenzo" in Jahrbuch des Deutschen Archdologischen Instituts, Vol. 45, 1930, 
pp. 116 if., refers to several of Dr. Lawrence's articles on sarcophagi, and com- 
mends the value and quality of her work by basing part of his discussion upon 
her conclusions. Translation of excerpts from the review by George Stuhlfauth in 
Repertorium fur Kunstwissenschaft, Vol. 52, 1931, pp. 165-166, of "Maria Regina," 
in Art Bulletin, Vol. VIII, No. 4, 1925, pp. 149-161: 

"... a short article, but as charming as it is exhaustive. ... It is an excellent 
contribution to the Early Christian and Mediaeval iconography of the Virgin Mary. 
Although further examples (of this type of Virgin) will inevitably turn up, the 
author may rest assured that they will not alter anything of significance in her 
conclusions." 

Other reviews may be found by: 

Weigand, in Byzantinische Zeitschrift, 28, 1928, p. 467, on "City-Gate 
Sarcophagi." 

Deshoulieres, in Bulletin Monumental, 89, 1930, p. 392, on "The Mantua 
Sarcophagus." 

Helen Burwell Chapin, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1915, Assistant in the Department 
of Chinese and Japanese Art in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1917-1924, now 
Assistant in the Japanese Collection, Columbia University Library, author of sev- 
eral articles published in The Art Bulletin, Ostasiatische Zeitschrift, Journal of 
the American Oriental Society and the American Magazine of Art; she spent 
several years of study in the Orient, traveling extensively in China, Japan and 
Korea. On her return she was able to decipher characters at the British ^luseum 
and to identify divinities not previously recognized. Mr. Waley, of the British 
Museum, in his catalogue of Paintings Recovered from Tun-huang by Sir Aurel 
Stein, K. C. I. E., has acknowledged her help. 

Agnes Mongan, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1927, A. M. Smith College, 1929, Research 
Assistant to Professor Paul J. Sachs at the Fogg Art Museum since 1928 and in 

(11) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



charge of the drawing collection; author of articles published in Fogg Art Museum 
Bulletins^ in old Master Drawings and the American Magazine of Art, now assist- 
ing Professor Sachs in preparing a Catalogue Raisonne of Old Master Drawings 
at Harvard. Professor Sachs has written of her: 

"Agnes Mongan is by far the ablest graduate student with whom I have ever 
come in contact. She combines a wealth of factual information with powers of 
discrimination that are rare^ indeed. I am quite satisfied that she knows more 
about Old Master Drawings than anyone else in this country, and I predict for 
her a brilliant career as a scholar. 

■\Lida Shaw King, g. 1899-1900; co-author of Corinth, Vol. I, Pt. 1, Decorated 
Architectural Terracottas, 1929. 

Dorothy Cox, u. Bryn Mawr, 1910-1913, Assistant to the Curator of the Numis- 
matic Museum, New York, author of the studies. The Caparelli Hoard and The 
Tripolis Hoard of French Seignorial and Crusader's Coins, published as Monographs 
of the American Numismatic Society, 1933; architect of the following excavations: 
at the Argive Heraeum, three years ; at Eutresis in Boeotia, three years ; at Colophon, 
near Smyrna, one year; at Cyprus, one year; at Troy, one year. 

Agnes Newhall Stillwell, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1927, Fellow of the Carnegie 
Corporation, 1927-28; Fellow, American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 
1928-29; writer on her excavations in the Kerameikos at Corinth in the American 
Journal of Archaeology, now preparing to publish a volume on Corinthian pottery. 
Her work is widely recognized and quoted by both European and American scholars. 

Dorothy Burr, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1923, Fellow of the American School of 
Classical Studies at Athens, 1924-25; Agora Fellow, 1931-34; author of "A Geo- 
metric House and a Proto- Attic Votive Deposit," Hesperia, II, 1933, and of other 
articles in Hesperia and the American Journal of Archaeology. Credited by Swedish 
archaeologists with the discovery of the Tombs at Dendra, A. Persson, The Royal 
Tombs at Dendra near Midea, 1931, p. 8. 

Lucy T. Shoe, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1927, A.M., 1928, Special Fellow of the 
American School of Classical Studies at Athens, 1930; author of A Box of Antiqui- 
ties from Corinth, Hesperia, I, pp. 56 ff; studying in Greece from 1929 to 1934 
on Greek Mouldings. 

Mary Zelia Pease, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1927; Ph.D., 1933, Fellow of the 
Archaeological Institute of America, 1928-29; Martin Kellogg Fellow in Classics, 
Yale University, 1929-30, Research Fellow, American School of Classical Studies, 
Athens, 1932-33, has prepared for publication, Greek Vases in the Collection of 
Albert Gallatin, New York City. 

Agnes Kirsopp Lake, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1930, Fellow of the American Academy 
in Rome, 1931-33, Excavated at Minturnae, Spring, 1933. 

In the realm of creative and applied art, the College can take no credit for 
direct training, but who can tell how much inspiration may have come from the 
Bryn Mawr class rooms? In any case the information on Bryn Mawr women 
engaged in creative art or in handicraft is interesting to Bryn Mawr Alumnae. 

In commercial arts and handicraft our range of talent is wide. There are ten 
professional photographers, twelve landscape gardeners, seven interior decorators, 
one shop-window dresser, one designer of model doll houses, two stage costume 
designers, one designer of textiles, one of fancy paper, one designer of Christmas 



t Deceased. 

(12) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



cards, one maker of jewelry, one silversmith, one maker of furniture, and three 
who restore antiques. 

There are thirty-three painters, several of real eminence, who have held one- 
man shows and have won prizes at general exhibitions, five teachers of painting, 
eight architects, six students of architecture, six sculptors, two etchers, and two 
illustrators. 

Well known among these artists are: 

Dorothy Ochtman, painter, A.B. Smith College, 1914; graduate student Bryn 
Mawr College, 1916-18; Guggenheim Fellow, European study, 1927-28; awarded 
Julia A. Shaw prize, Nat. Acad, of Design, 1921; 3rd Hallgarten prize, Nat. 
Acad. Design, 1924, 1st prize, Expn. Women's Arts and Industries, 1927; 3rd prize 
Greenwich Soc. of Artists, 1930; A. N. A. 1929; member Nat. Ass'n Women 
Painters and Sculptors, Allied Artists America, Grand Central Art Galleries, New 
York Soc. Painters, Greenwich Soc. Artists. 

Rhys Ca'parn, u. Bryn Mawr, 1927-1929, studied in Paris under Edouard 
Navellier and later at the Ecole d'Art in New York. She had a torso on exhibit 
last summer at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and last November had a one-man 
exhibit at the Delphic Studios in New York. A. Archipenko has written of her 
work as follows: 

"The idealism of Rhys Caparn and her love for the spiritual permit her to 
create a new form in sculpture, without losing her ability to sculp in naturalistic 
form when she so desires. 

**She passed through careful and profound academical studies, but her inventive 
mind guides her to a new conception of sculpture. . . . 

"Rhys Caparn is the first woman in America who had enough courage to use 
the new combinations of form and line for self-expression. And in this combination 
it is easy to recognize the feeling which we often find in the music of Chopin." 

In order that a more comprehensive view may be gained of what Bryn Mawr 
women have accomplished in Art, Archaeology, and related subjects, the following 
women who did not study in the Departments of Art and Archaeology but who 
have gained distinction in their own fields, are cited. 
In the field of Creative Art: 

Florance Waterhury, A.B. Bryn Mawr College, 1905; student of painting 
with Charles Hawthorne in New York City, 1911-12, and in Paris, 1913-14; student 
of drawing with the late Georges Noel in Rome, 1913; student of portrait painting 
with Cecilia Beaux, 1919-20; student of the Chinese method of painting with the 
late Kung Pah King in Peking, 1922-23; has held exhibitions in New York City, 
1922, 1924, 1928, 1929, 1930, and 1932, in Peking, 1923; Bryn Mawr, 1924; 
Denver and Terre Haute, 1930; Princeton, 1932; many summer exhibitions at 
Provincetown. 

Isabel Cooper Mahaffie, u. Bryn Mawr, 1909-10, sometime artist of the Beebe 
Expeditions, illustrator of Galapagos. 

Marian Macintosh, A.B. 1890, paintings exhibited by such organizations as 
the Chicago Art Institute, the New York Academy of Design, the Cincinnati 
Museum, and the Pennsylvania Academy. 

(13) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Edith Longstreth Wood, A.B. Bryn Mawi*^ 1905, studied at the Academy of 
Fine Arts, Philadelphia, at the Breckenridge School, Gloucester, Massachusetts; 
in 1927 held a Cresson Travelling Scholarship in Europe; in 1928 studied at the 
Academie Scandinave in Paris; worked with Hans Hoffman of Munich; exhibited 
oils, watercolors, lithographs and other black and white media at the Philadelphia 
Academy, the National Academy in New York, the Corcoran Gallery in Washington 
and the La Jolla Gallery and San Diego Art Museum in California, the North 
Shore Exhibition at Gloucester and various Philadelphia art clubs; received a silver 
medal for oils, an honorable mention for oils and a silver medal for watercolors 
at the Plastic Club. 

In the field of Anthropology: 

Mrs. Carl Aheley {Mary L. Johe) g. 1901-03, Explorer, Advisor, Akeley 
African Hall, American Museum of Natural History, New York City; author of 
Lions, Gorillas and Their Neighbors and Carl Akeley' s Africa. 

Frederica de Laguna, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1927; Ph.D. Columbia, 1933; 
Excavator, Assistant in the American Department of the University Museum of 
Pennsylvania; one of the Directors of the Joint Danish National Museum and 
University Museum expedition to Alaska, 1933, and Leader of expeditions to 
Alaska in 1930, 1931 and 1932 for the University Museum; author of articles in 
the Illustrated London News, Museum Journal, American Journal of Archaeology, 
American Anthropologist and on Eskimo Cave-Paintings in the Journal de la 
Societe des Americanistes. 

In the field of Archaeological Excavation: 

Hetty Goldman, Director of Bryn Mawr's first excavation which begins work 
this spring, under the joint auspices of Bryn Mawr College and the Archaeological 
Institute of America, A.B. Bryn Mawr, 1903, Ph.D. Radcliffe, 1916, Holder of the 
Charles Eliot Norton Fellowship for Greece, 1910-12, Field Director of the Fogg Art 
Museum, excavated with Alice Leslie Walker Kosmopoulous the site of Halae in 
Locris; excavated both the site of Colphon in Asia Minor and the site of Eutresis in 
Boeotia under the auspices of the Fogg Art Museum in cooperation with the American 
School of Classical Studies at Athens, represented the Fogg Art Museum at the 
excavations at Starcevo on the Danube under the joint auspices of the Fogg Art 
Museum, the Peabody Museum and the American School of Prehistoric Research; 
author of Excavations at Eutresis, Boeotia and The Oresteia of Aeschylus as 
Illustrated by Greek Vase Paintings, as well as many articles contributed to the 
American Journal of Archaeology, The Bulletin of the American School of Pre- 
historic Research, and other publications. Extract of review of her book on 
Eutresis: 

"The book might well serve as a model for the publication of excavations of 
this kind. Eutresis is the first prehistoric site in Boeotia to be adequately excavated 
and adequately published, and Miss Goldman's book closes a gap of long standing 
in our knowledge of the Bronze Age in Central Greece. We owe her hearty thanks 
and congratulations." — (Carl Blegen, American Journal of Archaeology, April- June, 
1932.) 

Compiled by the Academic Committee. 

Ellen Faulkner, Chairman. 
(14) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



I 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 

President Park sends the following message to the alumnae in regard to the 
Alumnae Fund: 

"In these two lean years of dismal economies and cut salaries^ what have the 
gifts of the graduates of Bryn Mawr to the College done? 

"They have made it possible for many able girls to get a solid and I hope 
useful education; they have built up reduced salaries of the faculty and staff; they 
have through the President's Fund opened a purse from which a hundred small 
services making for efficiency and contentment at the College can be paid for. 
Indirectly they have injected courage and confidence in us all. The thread which 
the alumnae contribute to the College loom is woven into every campus pattern. 
I am sometimes sorry it is not recognizable in one clear figure — this is not possible 
because it is even more important — a part of all the figures of the pattern." 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS 

On March 16th President Park announced awards of two European fellowships 
to members of the present Graduate School. The Fanny Bullock Workman Fellow- 
ship was awarded to Maude M. Frame, A.B. University of Pennsylvania, 1927, 
now working at Bryn Mawr in the Departments of Philosophy and History of Art; 
and the Mary E. Garrett Fellowship to Hope Broome, A.B. Mount Holyoke, 1927; 
A.M. Bryn Mawr, 1931; now Fellow in Biblical Literature at Bryn Mawr. 

Among the other announcements which were made, the following will be of 
special interest to readers of the Bulletin. Resident Fellowships at Bryn Mawr 
for the year 1934-35 were awarded in Biology to Elizabeth Ufford, 1929; in 
Archaeology to Jeannette Le Saulnier, 1933; in Education to Joyce Ilott, 1933; in 
English to Dorothy Buchanan, A.M. Bryn Mawr, 1931; in Greek to Emily Grace, 
1933; in History of Art (for the second time) to Marianna Jenkins, 1931 ; in Latin 
to Susan Savage, 1933; in Psychology to Charlotte Balough, 1933. 

President Park read a list of the students who so far have maintained a 
cum laude average. The Class of 1934 has 41% of its members on this Honor Roll; 
the Class of 1935 has 32%; the Class of 1936 has 23%; the Class of 1937 has 
19%. Twenty-two of the present Regional Scholars and six others who entered 
as Regional Scholars are represented in this group. The following daughters of 
alumnae are included: 

Daughter Mother 

Janet Barber, 1934 Lucy Lombardi, 1904 

Margaret Dannenbaum, 1931 Gertrude Gimbel, 1911 

Eva Levin, 1934 Bertha Szold, 1895 

Evelyn Patterson, 1934 EveljTi Holliday, 1904 

Margaret Righter, 1934 Ren^e Mitchell,* 1900 

Phyllis Goodhart, 1935 Marjorie Walter, 1912 

Frederica Bellamy, 1936 Frederica Le Fevre, 1905 

Betty Bock, 1936 Stella Nathan, 1908 

Caroline Brown, 1936 .. Anna Hartshorne, 1912 

Barbara Gary, 1936 Margaret Reeve, 1907 

Eleanor Fabyan, 1936 .. Eleanor McCormick, 1904 

Louise Dickey, 1937 Louise Atherton, 1903 

Sylvia Evans, 1937 Sylvia Hathaway, 1913 

Esther Hardenbergh, 1937 Margaret Nichols, 1905 

Margaret Jackson, 1937 Elizabeth Jackson, 1897 

Kathryn Jacoby, 1937 .. Helen Lowengrund, 1906 

Eleanore Tobin, 1937 Helen Roche, 1907 

(15) 



SUMMARY OF ALUMNAE FUND FOR 1933 




No. in 


No. of 


Percentage 


Undesignated 


Designated 
Contributions 


Total 


Class 


Class 


Contributors 


of Class 


Contributions 


Contributed 


Ph.D.'s 


116 


32 


27.5 


$191.50 


$50:00 


$241.50 


M.A.'s 


122 


15 


12.2 


154.00 




154.00 


Grad. Students 
(A. A. members) . 


57 


15 


26.3 


47.00 





47.00 


1889 


28 


8 


28.5 


60.00 


300.66 


360.00 


1890 


8 


7 


87.5 


40.00 




40.00 


1891 


15 


3 


20. 


60.00 




60.00 


1892 


22 


8 


36.3 


71.00 


5.00 


76.00 


1893 


35 


10 


28.5 


112.00 





112.00 


1894 


39 


10 


25.6 


75.50 




75.50 


1895 


30 


16 


53.3 


292.50 




292.50 


1896 


62 


32 


51.6 


- 327.50 




327.50 


1897 


70 


28 


40. 


418.50 


315.85 


734.35 


1898 


55 


10 


18.1 


440.00 




440.00 


1899 


59 


17 


28.8 


217.00 





217.00 


1900 


63 


23 


36.5 


305.00 





305.00 


1901 


83 


18 


21.6 


261.50 





261.50 


1902 


74 


29 


39.1 


383.00 




383.00 


1903 


110 


20 


18.1 


299.50 


100.00 


399.50 


1904 


91 


27 


29.6 


280.79 




280.79 


1905 


114 


27 


23.6 


338.00 


232.48 


570.48 


1906 


72 


29 


40.2 


1,429.00 


300.00 


1,729.00 


1907 


113 


37 


32.7 


301.00 




301.00 


1908 


97 


24 


24.7 


357.00 




357.00 


1909 


100 


19 


19. 


145.25 





145.25 


1910 


85 


23 


27. 


208.30 




208.30 


1911. 


85 


30 


35.2 


214.00 




214.00 


1912 


94 


21 


22.3 


154.00 




154.00 


1913 


104 


35 


33.6 


405.93 


200.00 


605.93 


1914 


106 


48 


45.2 


557.00 





557.00 


1915 


125 


33 


26.4 


283.50 




283.50 


1916 


104 


32 


30.7 


237.00 


10.00 


247.00 


1917 


112 


18 


16. 


134.00 





134.00 


1918 


95 


17 


17.8 


259.00 




259.00 


1919 


117 


26 


22.2 


246.00 




246.00 


1920 


106 


28 


26.4 


325.50 




325.50 


1921 


134 


28 


20.8 


276.00 




276.00 


1922 


97 


23 


23.7 


313.00 





313.00 


1923 


103 


13 


12.6 


189.00 


200.66 


389.00 


1924 


115 


17 


14.7 


199.00 




199.00 


1925 


111 


10 


9. 


60.00 




60.00 


1926 


125 


21 


16.8 


120.00 




120.00 


1927 


125 


17 


13.6 


113.00 




113.00 


1928 


115 


8 


6.9 


119.00 




119.00 


1929 


106 


16 


15. 


87.00 




87.00 


1930 


125 


19 


15.2 


172.00 




172.00 


1931 


116 


22 


18.9 


293.98 


100.00 


393.98 


1932 


128 


31 


24.2 


443.00 




443.00 


1933 


123 


7 


5.6 


29.00 




29.00 




4,291 


1,007 


.... 


$12,044.75 


$1,813.33 


$13,858.08 



Total Class Collections for 1933 

Group Contributions for Scholarships 

Special Scholarships (donations from outsiders) 

Miscellaneous (including $500 profit on Bryn Mawr Plates) 

Total Contributions through Alumnae Fund 

Donations to Loan Fund 

Total Contributed in 1933 



$13,858.08 

11,656.50 

902.71 

632.15 

$27,049.44 

1,025.00 

$28,074.44 



ANALYSIS OF ALUMNAE FUND FOR 1933 

Payments on Music Endowment and Auditorium pledges $32.48 

Furnishings for Goodhart Hall (payments on pledges) 10.00 

Interest on 1898 Portrait Fund 132.15 

Microscope Fund, Class 1931 100.00 

Books for Library: 

Archaeology Department $300.00 

Margaret Nichols Smith Memorial Fund, 1897. . . 265.85 

• 565.85 



Special Scholarships 2,007.71 

Regional Scholarships 1 1,656.50 

District I. ($500.00 additional sent direct to College) . . $3,005.00 

District II. : 

New York $1,700.00 

New Jersey 1,000.00 

Eastern Pennsylvania 

payment for 1932-33 $400. 

" 1933-34 1,400. 

1,800.00 



Western Pennsylvania 200.00 



4,700.00 
District III.: 

Baltimore $850.00 

Washington 400.00 

South 500.00 

1,750.00 

District IV 751.50 

District V 800.00 

District VI. (payment for 1932-33) 100.00 

District VII. : 

Northern California $3CX).00 

Southern California (payment for 

1932-33) 250.00 

550.00 



President Park's Fund 1,000.00 

Rhoads Scholarship 250.00 

Alumnae Association Expenses (of this $500 came from profit on 

Bryn Mawr Plates) 4,097.92 

Surplus : 

Appropriated for Register or Address Book $196.83 

Appropriated for Academic Purposes 7,000.00 

7,196.83 



$27,049.44 
Donations to Loan Fund 1 ,025.00 



Total Contributed in 1933 $28,074.44 



COMPARISON OF ALUMNAE FUND RECEIPTS 

*No. of Contributions to Contributions to Other Designated 

Year Contributors Undesignated Fund Scholarship & Loan Fund Contributions TOTAL 

1933 1007 $12,044.75 $14,639.21 $1,340.48 $28,074.44 

1932 948 12,096.13 18,548.20 2,230.53 32,874.86 

* Contributors to Regional Scholarships not included, although amount contributed is 
incorporated in figures given. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLEXIN 



BALLOT 

[The Nominating Committee has prepared the following ballot, which is here 
presented for the consideration of the Association. According to the By-laws, 
additional nominations may be filed with the Alumnae Secretary before May 1st.] 

ALUMNAE DIRECTOR 

(For term of office 1934-39) 




Bachrach 

ELEANOR LITTLE ALDRICH, 1905 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Councillor for District I. of the Alumnae Association, 1925-28; Chairman of Nominating 
Committee, 1928-32; Member of Regional Scholarships Committee since 1925, and Chairman 
of this committee since 1929. 



Nominated by the Nominating Committee. 

Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898, Chairman. 
Olga Kelly, 1913. 
Evelyn Holt Lowry, 1909. 
Katharine Walker Bradford, 1921. 
Julia Lee McDill, 1927. 

(18) 



BRYN MAWll ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



k 



POETRY ON THE CAMPUS 

Reprinted in part from the College News, March l//.th 

The modestly entitled Afternoon of Poetry, held at the Deanery on Tuesday, 
March 13th, was in our opinion from start to finish an unqualified success. The 
reading proved conclusively that creative effort is not dead or dying on the campus, 
but that on the contrary fine, finished verse is being produced by our own fellow- 
classmates under our very noses. 

The six undergraduates who read their verses are well known to us in other 
spheres of college activity on the Lantern, in Dramatics, on the News. Three of 
them come from the Junior class, two from the Sophomore, and one from the Senior. 

Miss Donnelly introduced the poets by recalling the wish of Miss Thomas that 
there might always be a school of poets on the Bryn Mawr campus. Never has 
that wish come more near fulfillment than at the present time. The conviction of 
us who are naturally partial to our poets is borne out by the comment of James 
Stephens, who, when he was here to lecture, read poems produced by students and 
gave them high praise, both here and in other places. The proportion of poetry to 
prose in the Lantern has always been remarkably high; the popularity of the 
Poetry Club and the prospect of a larger Poetry-Speaking Society in the near 
future promise well for the development on the campus of an increasing interest in 
poetry and the modern poets. 

The most striking thing about the undergraduate verse as a whole was its 
restraint, the conscious discipline of form to which it was submitted. Verily free 
verse has had its day and is no more. The present generation seems particularly 
devoted to the sonnet-form, with the precise checks and balances which it requires. 
Stanzas of short rhyming lines appeared also popular, to judge by the reading. 

Elizabeth Wyckoff, '36, opened the reading with a sonnet, Jeanne d'Arc, 
smooth in form and with striking pictorial effects. 

Following Miss Wyckoff, Evelyn Thompson, '35, read three poems. My Prince, 
Wish, and The Orb. The delicacy of feeling and the sway of the rhythm in these 
was very good. Geraldine Rhoads, '35, read one piece, Jacob's Ladder, which in 
idea and expression was more strongly rendered than the poems which came before. 

Clara Frances Grant, '34, read her verses. Idol and Nocturne. The mood of 
these was complex and somewhat difficult. The imagery in the first was particularly 
fine. Gerta Franchot, '35, showed more versatility of tone in the poems she read 
than any of the other undergraduate poets. Her protest against being reproached 
with flippancy, A Cautionary Tale for a Humorist and His Airs, was cleverly 
satirical, using unexpected rhymes to great effect. 

Margaret Kidder, '36, closed the undergraduate reading Avith her Song at 
Sixteen, really written at that age. The atmosphere of critical maturity which she 
created in the poem was delightful. She confirmed the conviction which had been 
growing on us as we listened to the reading, that the undergraduates, who feel 
themselves at lall endowed with the poetic instinct, are working very hard for 
clear, restrained expression and mastery of form. 

Following the undergraduates, Hortense Flexner King, of the English Depart- 
ment, and Lysbeth Boyd Borie, of the Class of 1925, read numerous selections from 
their published and unpublished verse. Both were enthusiastically enchored. 

(19) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. S. Hannan 

During the snowy month of February^ Bryn Mawr came the closest it ever will 
to having a winter sports carnival^ ice-hockey team, and all the attractions of a 
winter sports resort. Skis and sleds lay around the halls in a marvelous profusion, 
and ski-boots became the popular footwear, one outsize pair appearing at Pembroke 
Hall tea. The intramural activity was not, however, wholly confined to sleigh- 
riding, for an unusual number of singers, lecturers and miscellaneous visitors man- 
aged to fight their way through the snow walls and into Goodhart and the Deanery. 

To the Princeton Glee Club and the Vienna Choir Boys must go the prize for 
being the largest groups to get through from civilization — and with scarcely a man 
missing. The college at large seemed more enthusiastic about the Choir Boys than 
the Glee Club. Although the dance after Glee Club was well attended, we heard 
louder cooing over the ten-year-olds of the Vienna Choir than over their slightly 
older rivals. A comparison of the headlines of the News reviews, as good a summary 
of either group as one could find, may cast a revealing light on the object of our 
preferences. The Choir Boys: "Passionless Clarity, Sweetness, Precision, and Flex- 
ibility Mark Singing." The Princeton Glee Club: "Concert Was Punctuated by 
Unsophisticated Farce of Underclassmen; Virility is Emphasized." Yet, as we said, 
the attendance at the dance was large and everyone looked quite happy. 

Our literary celebrity of the month was Shane Leslie, an authority on Swift, 
and an authority with a great deal of charm as well as the usual quota of learning. 
Not content with hearing him in Goodhart only, the English classes dragged him 
into the classroom and made him tell more of Swift and Stella. Apparently eager 
listeners were hanging from the rafters in Room F, for most of the 12 o'clock 
classes were made up of rows of empty seats, vacated by those who thirsted after 
Swiftiana. Our other literary celebrity was Margaret Ayer Barnes, who, in the 
words of the News, directed "a sort of symposium for the members of the College 
interested in writing." The story of her own initiation into writing novels served 
as a means of giving advice to the undergraduate who "wants to write something." 
Her theory that playwriting is valuable to the novel writer as discipline in a 
stylized form came as encouraging news to the playwriting class; if they cannot 
write the famous and non-existent Great American Play, they may be able to fall 
back on the novel form. 

Three lectures during the month of February that attracted a large attendance 
were those given by Miss G. G. King, head of the History of Art Department; 
Dr. Herben, of the English Department, and Mr. Edward M. M. Warburg, for- 
merly of the History of Art Department. Miss King spoke on Gertrude Stein, 
whom she knows personally, and on her work, which she also knows very well. 
Parallels drawn from French painting were used to explain Gertrude Stein's work 
to a rather baffled audience; and a denial that Miss Stein uses, or ever used auto- 
matic writing was made by Miss King in answer to the article in the Atlantic 
Monthly which labeled her as an automatic writer. Following Miss King's talk on 
Gertrude Stein, there seemed to be a sudden renewal of interest in her rather 
esoteric work, for, as we know from experience, all the library copies of Gertrude 
Stein's books were removed for weeks on end by seekers after more Stein. 

(20) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Mr. Warburg^ whom most of the College remembers as Ed Wynn in the 
Faculty Show last spring, returned to our midst to give a very serious talk on 
"The Artist in the World Today." As he is now working in the Museum of 
Modern Art in New York, he possesses an unequaled opportunity of diagnosing 
the troubles that afflict the modern artist, and one in particular, the lack of connec- 
tion between good art and the living wage. He emphasized the need of propaganda 
by the scholar in art to make the public conscious of really great work. "The 
purpose of art education," said Mr. Warburg, "must be to establish a class that is 
not dependent on personal opinion alone, but can also recognize the opinion of the 
scholar, and acquire a vision of real art." He pointed out that the graduate of 
Bryn Mawr who is "interested in modern art" could not do better than to lend 
herself to such work of propaganda, thus putting to use what she has learned as 
an undergraduate and helping the poor artist at one and tlie same time. Mr. 
Warburg did a very efficient bit of propaganda himself and it will be interesting to 
see whether his suggestion will bear fruit. 

The lecture given by Dr. Herben as an introduction to an exhibit of Oxford 
printing in the Deanery also concerned the dissemination of scholarship. The inter- 
esting and careful lecture which Dr. Herben gave proved again that after all, most 
of the best lectures in Bryn Mawr are given by our own professors, with, of course, 
a few brilliant exceptions. If the professors of Bryn Mawr emerged from their 
classrooms more often, the campus, as indicated by the large attendance at the 
above three lectures, would be only too willing to hear them ; more willing, perhaps, 
than to attend a lecture given by an unknown quantity. 

The Freshmen, after scrapping one show which promised to have a succes de 
scandale, finally pulled themselves together and gave a melodious melodrama called 
Never Darken My Doors Again. The Little Nell of the show was a Bryn Mawr 
girl, and the villain a "sneak from the Greeks." The plot was laid in some inde- 
terminate period when everyone wore bustles and when, supposedly. President Park 
and Dean Manning were in college together; for they appeared in the show as 
denizens of the campus at that time. The Freshmen not only had the distinction 
of putting on a funny show which everyone talked about, but also succeeded in 
concealing the identity of their animal — a green turtle. We onlj'^ hope that they can 
control themselves in the face of such dazzling success. 



DOINGS OF ALUMNAE 

SYLVIA BOWDITCH, 1933, TELLS OF HER WORK AS COURIER WITH 
THE FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE 

Reprinted in part from the Boston Sundaj/ Herald. 

A courier is really a sort of general errand boy. We do all sorts of jobs, from 
getting the horses saddled to taking children to the hospital. The Frontier Nursing 
Service covers 700 square miles of that country, and since there are only 30 nurses 
you can see that we were all pretty busy. Some time at the end of the day we'd 
literally flop into bed, we were so tired. But the next morning with so much to be 
done we'd all be just as eager as ever. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Just imagine a heavily wooded country where the cabins are sometimes miles 
apart — where radios and telephones don't exist and where the natives would look 
at you with blank expressions if you asked them who Greta Garbo was. It's almost 
like going to a foreign country. But all the people are very friendly and nice. 
As you ride along one trail you may go for miles before you meet a single person^ 
but when you do^ there is one universal greeting — Howdee! They all know the 
frontier nurses and what they do. In the morning the courier and I cleaned the 
horses and got them all ready for anyone who might be making a trip that day. 
There are several dogs at our place^, and when they see the horses being saddled 
they start right out all ready for a long trip. I don't see why they don't get 
exhausted, but apparently there's something in that mountain country that gives 
them very great energy. They would trot along beside the horses for miles and 
miles. Sometimes we'd lose them as they darted after a squirrel, but they'd soon 
turn up again. One day the nurse and I were visiting a woman who had a bad case 
of influenza. We had a hard time making her stay in bed to begin with. The women 
are terribly energetic, and unless we actually force them to go to bed they want to 
be up working. When you realize that hundreds of families have six or seven 
children and more, j^ou can see why the mother knows that she has to get things 
done. This woman's oldest girl was 12, so we convinced the mother that she could 
take care of the house for a while. The little girl looked quite amenable, and I 
think that this idea gradually spread into other cabins, because later on I visited 
several where young children were washing, dressing and cooking for their younger 
brothers and sisters while the mother was ill. 

The place is overrun with children. Most of the people just keep right on 
having them. The mothers and fathers have grown up in large families themselves 
and it seems to be the thing to do. Family feeling is very strong, and it's quite 
nice to see the way the brothers and sisters stay together and help each other. 
One day I was taking a woman home from the hospital. We were miles away from 
her cabin when suddenly in the path before us I saw something that! looked at first 
like a little white pig. Gradually the form came nearer and through the trees we 
discovered that it was her small son who had come a long way to welcome his 
mother. "Paw" had told him his "Mom" was coming home, he said, and he wanted 
to be the first to see her. 

You can't imagine how rough the little cabins are, — just one big room, with 
two beds usually, and a little stove. Many of them haven't even oil lamps, so, when 
it gets dark, the people go to bed. They have no clocks or watches because they 
just don't need them. When I was there they told me a funny story about one man 
who, after he had been in bed some time, was awakened by a cock crowing. Though 
he still felt a little sleepy he got up, dressed and went on the front porch to watch 
the sun rise. Then he fell asleep. When he woke up again he was extremely stiff 
and wondered why. It was still dark, but getting lighter all the time. That morning 
one of his neighbors asked him if he had heard the cock crow the night before. The 
neighbor explained that it was frightened by a gun, and when the two men com- 
pared notes they found that it must have been around 10 o'clock when he had 
gotten up. 

For Christmas celebration the people collect armfuls of holly, and it's lovely. 
But as for presents, they just didn't know anything about it until the Frontier 

(22) 



REDACTED: p. 22 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume for copyright reasons: 

Vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 22-23: Doings of 
Alumnae: Sylvia Bowditch, 1933, tells of her 
work as a courier with the frontier nursing 
service, reprinted in part from the Boston 
Sunday Herald. 



REDACTED: p. 23 



The following material has been removed 
from this volume for copyright reasons: 

Vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 22-23: Doings of 
Alumnoe: Syfs/ia Bowditch, 1933, tells of her 
work as a courier with the frontier nursing 
service, reprinted in part from the Boston 
Sunday Herald. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



nurses came in there some years ago. Then^ when people from outside were so 
nice about sending down gifts or money, the children and grown-ups had a wonder- 
ful time. We were quite busy before Christmas sorting these presents and finding 
out what districts wanted more boys' presents and which ones needed dolls, and so 
on. You should have seen the expressions on the children's faces when they opened 
their parcels. The little girls, some of them, had never even heard of a doll before, 
and when they found out that the eyes would close — well, it was nothing short of 
miraculous. Then it's interesting when the bundles of clothing come in. We don't 
give these away, because one of the foremost ideas is to make these people feel that 
they are not objects of charity. So we sell them. Well, this day I was in charge of 
the store. Of course, we don't charge very mucli. For instance, a good coat might 
be a dollar and a pair of shoes perhaps 25 cents. 

I remember a sweater suit that turned up at one of these sales. The top was 
captured by one woman and the skirt by another. I tried to persuade them that the 
whole thing should really go to one person, but it was of no use. They were both 
perfectly happy. 

The most thrilling thing to realize is that in over 1700 maternity cases super- 
vised by the Frontier nurses not one mother's life has been lost. This is especially 
significant when we realize that the United States maternity death rate is disgrace- 
fully high. The nurses usually charge $5 for a maternity case, but of course 
they'd do it for nothing if the patient couldn't pay. The way the patients 
do pay is extremely interesting. After the baby is born the chances are the father 
will appear at the nursing centre with some potatoes, dried apples, preserves or a 
cut of pork. Very rarely do we get the fee in cash. As a matter of fact, there is 
very little cash there at all. You might think you were living in some medieval 
time when you see one exchanging an old hat for eggs or a hen for a worn saddle. 
One day the nurse and I were visiting a woman who had had a baby a few months 
before, but who had not paid all of the fee. We'd never spoken to her about it 
because they were desperately poor like all the others. Then we saw her fishing 
around in a jar full of senna leaves. We couldn't imagine what she was after. 
Finally she brought out triumphantly a 50-cent piece which she had somehow gotten 
hold of. She gave this to us, with some eggs and potatoes, and said she felt 
immensely relieved. If we made the cases charity cases you'd never find this sort 
of self-respect. 

One might wonder how word travels in such a sparsely settled country. Once 
we planned to hold a clinic on a certain cabin porch the following day. The other 
courier and I were dispatched to let the people know all along the line. We started 
out a few hours later, and every one said he knew about it anyway. It was the big 
news of the day and it had been passed on by word of mouth much faster than it 
could have been by a backwoods telephone. Every one arrived for the clinic the 
next day as jf it were a Broadway show — mother and father and children. 

And so the work goes on. Hours and hours on the saddle in all sorts of 
weather; visits to dilapidated and sometimes dirty cabins; gingerly footsteps down 
an incline as a stretcher with an appendicitis case is carried in. Gauze and iodine 
wanted down Possum Creek; a warm coat needed desperately on Carter's Ledge. 
Night calls, day calls, endless calls! 

It's all expected when you work with the Frontier nurses. 

(23) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Sunday, April 8th — 5 p. in., The Deanery* 

Talk on "The Reading of Poetry" by Stephen Vincent Benet. 

Sunday, April 8fh — 7.30 p. m., Music Roonn of Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by Dr. Rufus M. Jones, Professor of Philosophy at Haverford College and 
Chairman of the Board of Directors of Bryn Mawr College. 

Friday, April 13th, and Saturday, April 14th — 8.30 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Varsity Play, "Pygmalion," by Bernard Shaw, presented by the Varsity Players of 

Bryn Mawr College. 

Reserved seats: Friday, $1.25 and $.75; Saturday, $1.75 and $1.25; Unreserved seats in the 

Balcony, $.75. 

Sunday, April 15th — 7.30 p. nn.. Music Room of Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by the Reverend George A. Buttrick, D.D., Rector of the Madison Avenue 
Presbyterian Church, New York City. 

Wednesday, April 18th— 8.20 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Dance Recital by Jacques Cartier, Reserved seats $1.50 and $1.25. 

Sunday, April 22nd — 5 p. m., The Deanery* 

A group of Madrigals by Leslie Hotson, Francis B. Gummere Professor of English at 
Haverford College, Elizabethan Scholar, Author of the "Death of Christopher Marlowe" and 
"Shakespeare vs. Shallow," and Mrs. Hotson, Singer of Elizabethan Songs to the Virginals. 

Sunday, April 22nd — 7.30 p. nn., Music Roonn of Goodhart Hall 

Service conducted by the Reverend Alexander C. Zabriskie, of the Theological Seminary, 
Alexandria, Virginia. 

NOTE: The Glee Club will give "The Gondoliers" in Goodhart Hall on Friday and Saturday, 
May I Ith and 12th, at 8.30 p. m. 
*Tea and cookies will be served informally without charge at half past four o'clock. 

An informal hujfet supper at 75 cents will he served at seven o'cloc\ every Sunday evening. 
Reservations should he made in advance, if possihle, to the Manager of the Deanery. 

Alumnae may bring guests to the Deanery parties. 

RECENT BOOKS WANTED FOR DEANERY 

A number of alumnae have called the attention of the Deanery Library 
Committee to the need for recent books in the Lounges to provide reading matter 
for visitors. The Deanery Library at present possesses few books published after 
the year 1928. If any member of the Alumnae Association^ therefore, cares to 
send to the Deanery any interesting or amusing books for the benefit of visiting 
alumnae or guests of the College, the Deanery Library Committee will be most 
grateful. Library Committee of the Deanery. 



COUNCILLOR FOR DISTRICT VI. 

The Executive Board is happy to announce that Emily Lewis, 1931, now 
President of the St. Louis Bryn Mawr Club, has consented to act as Councillor for 
District VI. to fill the unexpired term (1932-35) of Erna Rice Eisendrath, 1930, 
whose change of residence to Chicago necessitated her resignation. 

(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

1889 

No Editor Appointed. 

1890 
No Editor Appointed. 

1891 
No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., New York City 

Early in January, Helen Clements Kirk sailed 
with her daughter, Marcella Homire, to spend 
a month with her youngest daughter, Barbara 
Foster, whose husband is completing his diplo- 
matic studies in Geneva. 

The following extract from a letter from 
Edith Hall was not written from Switzerland, 
but from New Canaan, Connecticut, where she 
lives with her sister. It was dated February 
28th: "We went to bed with a gentle snow 
fall which turned the trees and shrubs into a 
fairyland. We woke to a howling gale which 
had stripped the white from the trees and was 
busy piling drifts feet high around the house 
and up and down the road as far as we could 
see. When we went down stairs we found the 
electric current off, which in these days of fool 
proof luxury means no heat, nothing to cook 
by, no light, no telephone. Fortunately, we had 
some food and supplies and plenty of wood, 
which we kept piling on the open fire, thereby 
keeping the thermometer up to 45° till 9 o'clock 
that night, when the current came on and 
started our furnace again. In the meantime, 
clad like Eskimos, we cooked what sketchy 
meals we could over the wood fire, and scanned 
the billowing white horizon for any sign of 
other humans. It took about three days for the 
combined efforts of the town plow, the C. W. A. 
and our own husky sinews to get us (and 
others) dug out to normal connection with the 
outside world. But now that is accomplished 
and we have nothing further to do but to wait 
and watch the piles of snow melt, and to feed 
the bewildered birds cut off from their custom- 
ary bugs and berries. Of course our slight dis- 
comfort and anxiety was nothing compared 
with the real suffering of many in regions 
harder hit than ours — families with children or 
invalids, marooned without food or fuel behind 



drifts ten and fifteen feet high! The most spec- 
tacular of these rescues have to do with the 
man who brought his pack of racing huskies up 
from Buck Hill Falls and delivered supplies by 
sledge in a large area around Westport." 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

c/o Brearley School 

610 East 83rd St., New York City. 
Louise Davis Brooks has sent to the editor 
a pamphlet entitled "Patriotic Service of the 
Hon. John Dudley of Raymond." She prepared 
it last summer to commemorate a ceremony 
which she arranged and carried out at the 
house in Raymond, New Hampshire, where her 
mother was born in 1834; a succession of 
Dudleys have owned land in Raymond since 
1718. A bronze tablet was erected bearing an 
inscription and relief portraits of Louise's 
grandparents, which are very interesting; the 
tablet is the work of Louise's daughter, Ruth 
Walker Brooks. The pict\ires of the old house 
shows a place that is the quintessence of New 
England; it is no wonder that Louise loves it. 
She is the present owner, and has restored much 
of the old interior, finding fine selected pine 
woodwork under coats of paint, a 90-year old 
wall paper, and, in two rooms, stencilled walls. 
The pamphlet abounds in delightful anecdotes 
and reminiscences, and has a luimber of illus- 
trations. One of these shows Ruth at work on 
her group of Mother and Child wliirh she 
erected in 1932 in the Church of the Ascension 
in New York, a memorial to her sister Nancy. 
It is a lovely thing. Ruth is at present work- 
ing on a commission given to her by the Ameri- 
can Bison Society, a tablet to commemorate 
the great herds of buffalo or earlier times; two 
copies are to be put up on the Oregon trail, 
in Nebraska and in Wyoming. In 1932 her 
design of Joan of Arc was chosen by the 
American Woman's Association for a medal 
that is awarded annually. All this is but a 
small part of the work which this gifted and 
industrious young artist of ours has produced. 
She has a studio in Ninth Street in New York, 
opposite to her home; she is studying relief 
work with Adolph Weinmann, and Mahonri 
Young criticizes her other work. She has also 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



worked at the National Academy under Charles 
Keck. 

Esther Steele teaches at the Baldwin School; 
her home is in Wayne, with her sister-in-law, 
Mrs. John D. Steele. Her Ford car takes her 
to Bryn Mawr to the school. In summer she 
goes to Nova Scotia, and has visited the 
Grenfell hospitals in Newfoundland and 
Labrador. 

Mary Flexner is at home in New York this 
winter, where she lives with her brother 
Bernard. Last summer -she was in the White 
Mountains. 

Edith Ames Stevens writes from Ormond, 
Florida; she and her husband have had a 
winter home there for several years. Mrs. 
Ames lives nearby; General Ames died last 
April. Edith and her mother have many joint 
interests, including "carving and painting, con- 
struction work about our places, aviation, and 
birth-control," her letter said. Edith plays golf, 
experiments with gardening in Florida, super- 
vises the farm and garden in Massachusetts in 
summer and autumn, and has four children, 
all married, and fourteen grandchildren. Her 
two daughters are Bryn Mawr alumnae, Edith 
Stevens Stevens, 1920, and Harriet Stevens 
Robey, 1922. 

Ella Malott Evans lives in Indianapolis. She 
writes: "As to how I deport myself, most of the 
year I lead an active city life in clubs, societies, 
boards, and committees, with family and friends 
sandwiched in between, on top, and underneath. 
By family, I mean, a busy business man in- 
terested actively in all sorts of civic and phil- 
anthropic enterprises; two daughters, each with 
a husband; Eleanor has one wee daughter, 
Mary, two boys and a girl. Our summers are 
mostly spent in our cottage in Northern 
Michigan, overlooking Little Traverse Bay, 
Last summer, however, Mr. Evans and I were 
in the Canadian Rockies and on our Pacific 
Coast. Our annual winter trip this year is to 
take us to Florida and the Carolinas. Mr. 
Evans is called to Washington occasionally; last 
month (January) it was the Millers' Code that 
drew him there, and Mary and I went along." 

Harriet Shreve is living in Plainfield, New 
Jersey, with her sister, in the house where they 
were born. Harriet is teaching Latin at the 
Hartridge School, with zest, and in the summer 
tutors a good deal, her pupils then being 
chiefly boys. One of the sentences in her letter 
it will please many of us to read: "Surely Dr. 
Lodge laid a good foundation for us; I so often 
realize I am using what he taught us." Be- 
yond her work, she says, "We have time for 
many pleasures, for visiting and entertaining; 
and although all this sounds very uneventful, 
we love it and wish for no great changes. Fay 
Stockwell is to spend tomorrow night with us; 
she is to address a meeting of Vassar alumnae. 



Anna West invited me to spend last week-end 
with her and take in the alumnae activities at 
college (i.e. the Annual Meeting) but our 
exams came then and I had to decline." 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Elizabeth Towle, valued teacher of Science 
at the Baldwin School, is looking forward to her 
sabbatical next year. She plans to spend it 
in Europe if existing conditions at that time 
make it possible. 

Marion Taber is managing a gala perform- 
ance of Richard of Bordeaux for the benefit 
of the New York City Visiting Committee of 
the State Charities Aid Association. 

Frances Hand spent ten days of February 
in the frigid north of New Hampshire. Her 
second daughter Frances, who was married 
last fall to Robert Ferguson, son of Mrs. 
Greenway, the representative in Washington 
from Arizona, is continuing her medical work 
in New York at the P. and S. 

Mary Converse is making her annual tour 
visiting friends and relatives in the sunny 
south. 

From her charming home, "Shady Steps," 
Westfield, New Jersey, Molly Peckham Tubby 
writes: "My garden talks and tutoring go on 
and are fun and fodder but not news for the 
Bulletin. My job of Chairman of the New 
Jersey State Committee for Protection of 
Roadside Beauty (the committee works for bill- 
board advertising restriction, roadside planting, 
parkways, etc.) has led to some weird experi- 
ence of politics and politicians at Trenton, and 
I am a much interested member of the Land 
Use Committee. 

"As chairman of the Bill-board and Roadside 
Committee of the New Jersey Federated Garden 
Clubs, 1 am staging a joint exhibit with the 
New York ditto at the International Flower 
Show in New York, March 19-25. Laura has 
modelled a village in duplicate (school-house, 
bank, pond, residences, etc.) and we show one 
with, the other without bill-boards. We are 
also selling licenses which read, 'Bill-boards 
Offend Tourists Who Spend,' and we hope to 
spot the U. S. A. with cars wearing same. The 
models are crated to travel and will go on the 
road after the New York show. 

"Ruth is going strong. She has just been 
made a member of the International Committee 
for Library work with Children and she is in- 
creasingly interested in her job." 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

Reunion Headquarters this spring will be in 
Pembroke East, with Betty Nields Bancroft as 
Manager. The class will be the guests of 
President Park and Miss Margaret Lord at 
dinner on the evening of Saturday, June 2nd. 

1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 
Reunion Headquarters will be in Pembroke 
West with Emma Guffey Miller as Manager. 
The Class Dinner will be held in the Common 
Room, Goodhart Hall, on Monday evening, 
June 5th. Other plans include luncheon on 
Monday with the classes of '98, 1900 and 1901; 
tea with May Schoneman Saxe and dinner with 
Gertrude Ely. 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

Once more we are fortunate in having 
Wyndham for our headquarters during our re- 
union in June. We are also fortunate in having 
Helen MacCoy to manage and take care of us. 

Our class supper will be Monday evening, 
June 4th, and Edna has promised to be toast- 
mistress. On Sunday there will be an alumnae 
meeting so you must all come in time for that. 
And sometime on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday 
there will be a joint picnic with '98, '99 and 
1901. Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, Emma Guffey 
Miller and Beatrice McGeorge are negotiating 
with our Mac. 

1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 
(Mrs. Warren Thorpe) 
15 East 64th St., New York City. 

Reunion Notice 
"Ladies, what is your pleasure?" 
According to the complicated Reunion Plan, 
our next reunion should take place in June, 
1934. We cannot put it off for a year, as 
changing our date would destroy the balance 
of the entire schedule. We can miss a reunion, 
and forego the pleasure of seeing each other 
until 1939. We can have our class supper on 
either Saturday, the second, or Monday, the 
fourth, of June; attend the alumnae meeting 
and luncheon on Sunday; have a joint picnic 
with the members of the three distinguished 
classes immediately preceding ours, on Mon- 
day; and in the intervals enjoy the benefits 
of each other's society. 



Rockefeller is being reserved for our head- 
quarters. Please send a postcard as soon as 
possible to 

Mrs. Andrew H. Woods 

1100 North Dubuque Street 
Iowa City, Iowa 
stating whether you want the supper on Satur- 
day or Monday, and what other activities you 
would like. 

We assume that you want to come as much 
as we want to see you. 

Beatrice McGeorge. 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 
Ethel Clinton Russell is President of the 
Board of Managers of the Church Home in 
Buffalo, a director in the Garret Club and active 
in church work. Her eldest son, Nelson Jr., 
graduates from McGill Medical this spring 
and expects to enter the Buffalo General Hos- 
pital in July. Her second son, Clinton, is in 
insurance. Her daughter, Nancy, graduates 
from Sweet Briar this spring. Ethel writes she 
herself is knitting a boucle suit and reading 
Anthony Adverse, which seems to our light 
mind a life work for any woman. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Dr. Anna Jonas delivered a paper entitled 
"Hyperstheme Granodiorite in Virginia, its 
change to Anakite and its Age," at the 513th 
Meeting of the Geological Society of Washington 
in the Assembly Hall of the Cosmos Club, on 
Wednesday evening, February 28, 1934. 

Marjorie Sellers writes a letter full of inter- 
esting facts; she says: "I don't know who will 
be interested but here is the family up to date, 
at least — the older ones. My son Townsend 
was married on January 13th to Gertrude Sligh, 
of Grand Rapids, Michigan, Vassar, '29. She 
is a Social Service Worker and he is a copy- 
writer. They are living in Bala. My oldest 
daughter, Marjorie, is engaged to Henry Brunt 
Riepe, of Baltimore. Elizabeth is engaged to 
Marcel Peck, of Charleston, West Virginia, in 
the class of 1934, Lehigh. He belongs to the 
same fraternity my husband does — Kappa 
Alpha; and is also the nephew of Jim's room- 
mate at Lehigh. My daughter Helen is a 
Senior at Lower Merion High School. That is 
the extent of my news at present. Quite a 
record isn't it?" 



(27) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Hilda Canan Vauclain has announced the 
engagement of her daughter Patricia Vauclain, 
to Mr. Thomas Hollingsworth Andrews, 3rd, 
of "Rose Tree Farm," Media. 

Harriet Southerland Wright's husband, Butler 
Wright, was nominated on February 10th, by 
President Roosevelt as minister to Czecho- 
slovakia. He is at present Minister to 
Uruguay, and was a member of the Delegation 
to the Tenth Pan-American Conference in 
Montevideo. He was earlier Minister to 
Hungary. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs, Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston Mass. 

Bess Goodrich Reckitt writes: "I do like to 
know what other 1905ers are doing, so here 
goes for whatever of interest I can contribute. 
Last April, my husband having been obliged 
to go to England on business, I took the car 
and the faithful chauffeur and a young lady 
going to Hollywood to her young man, and 
drove from Geneva to Los Angeles. It was 
a never-to-be-forgotten experience. We stayed 
at camps every night and fared exceedingly 
well. One heavenly day we had the joy of 
going through miles and miles of the Arizona 
desert in full bloom. While in California 1 
had a month in Carmel-by-the-Sea and rejoiced 
once more in the inconsequent gaiety of an 
artists' colony after the troubles of the Middle 
West. I found myself far more relaxed and 
philosophical at the end of my visit than when 
I went out. . . . Just now my husband and I 
are at Santa Fe for a little change. We loved 
it when we! were here five years ago. ... I am 
sure you won't want to use all I have jotted 
down but as I don't report often I will send it 
along. Anyway, I have spared you descriptions 
of scenery!" 

Gladys Seligman van Heukelom writes from 
her home in Paris, "I have just received the 
Bulletin and read the kind expression of 
sympathy. Now I have lost my mother as well, 
she died five weeks after my father. . . . My 
elder girl, Katherine, married five years ago, 
has just had her first child, a son, Michael 
Peter Anthony Winn, four months old now, 
and of course the most remarkably intelligent 
baby! My younger girl, Constance, the trained 
nurse, spends all her time among the poor at 
the City Hospital at Boucicault and doing 
social service in the homes. ... I am very in- 
terested in spiritual work and am in close 
contact with the Sun Centre at Akron, Ohio, 
which teaches the meaning and purpose of life 
and the methods of evolution through soul 
growth." 

Helen Read Fox says that they are still farm- 
ing and struggling vainly to keep a Jersey herd 



that will pay for its keep. She herself is much 
occupied trying to catch up with much younger 
mothers in the business of steering a six year 
old along the way of living intelligently. 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Haughwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 

From Fall River, Mass., comes the announce- 
ment of the death, on February 17, of Mr. V. 
W. Haughwout, father of Helen Haughwout 
Putnam. 

1907 
Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Alice Sussman Arnstein paid a brief visit to 
the campus early in March to see her Fresh- 
man niece, Louise Steinhardt, daughter of her 
sister Amy, 1902. She thinks nothing of leaping 
lightly from continent to continent — a trip to 
Paris to buy for her shop in San Francisco, 
where her daughter is helping her; a dash to 
New York to give some pre-grandmotherly ad- 
vice to her eldest son and his wife; a flight 
from there to Oregon to attend the wedding of 
her second son; a return to take up the cud- 
gels for better conditions in the Juvenile Court, 
with an eye on the School system in which she 
still has a personal interest because of her 
youngest son — all these she takes in her stride 
during a year. We suppose that being married 
as she escaped from the ruins of San Francisco, 
just a week after the great Earthquake, has 
made her consider as all in the day's work 
happenings that seem epoch-making to most of 
the rest of us. 

Another California dweller, Eleanor Ecob 
Sawyer, writes: "The last few years have been 
given up to a struggle with poor health, inter- 
spersed with a few (quite a few!) good times. 
The trouble has at last been diagnosed as the 
fashionable ameba, so now I am hoping for a 
■speedy cure." 

Eleanor enclosed a clipping showing a picture 
of Genevieve Thompson's distinguished looking 
husband, now Rear Admiral Norman Murray 
Smith, who has just been made chief of the 
Naval Bureau of Yards and Docks, with head- 
quarters in Washington. 

A big 1907 social event was held on the 
campus at the end of February, when Eunice 
Schenck collected a party of eight in honor of 
Peggy Ayer Barnes. She was making a tour, 
and sandwiched speaking to the Freshman 
English class between talks to various schools 
and women's clubs. Anne Vauclain, Mabel 
O'Sullivan, Hortense Flexner King, Tink Meigs, 
Alice Hawkins, and Mary Swindler, an hon- 
orary member of 1907, had supper together in 
Eunice's living room, all talking at once, ac- 
tually drowning out the guest of honor, and 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



engaging in a violent discussion of the merits 
of the movie, Little Women. Eunice and 
Hortense thought it dripping with sentimental- 
ity; Peg and Mabel thought it perfect, with no 
sob stuff added which was not in the book 
already. We endeavored to have Tink as the 
authority on Louisa Alcott, decide the matter, 
but, when she was able to make her voice heard 
above the -shouting, she said that she had not 
seen it, but that her sympathy on the whole was 
with the sentimentalists. After supper we at- 
tended the Freshman Show, where two features 
in particular made us feel natural. Peg sat on 
the front row and made audible comments 
throughout the evening, and the class animal 
turned out to be a turtle. As 1937 is a red 
class, this was surprising, but no more startling 
than some of the other innovations since the 
Ladies'' Home Learnall. As noted elsewhere in 
this number, the date seemed a trifle hazy. The 
costumes and hair dressing, however, had un- 
doubtedly been copied from the class pictures 
which used to hang above the Trophy club 
cases in Pembroke East, and made 1907 feel 
at home. 

1908 
Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

Margaret Lewis MacVeagh writes: "I re- 
proach myself considerably for the time I've 
let go by since you asked me for some news 
from Athens. I am really pretty busy, what 
with a larger household and more obligations 
of one sort and another than I ever dreamed 
of having before, and the mania for continuing 
to dabble in archaeology and Greek as I used 
to do when Greece meant just a playground 
for my husband and me. We were here three 
times on vacations, you know — in between 
rather strenuous sessions in London, and our 
return to work-a-day occupations at home — and 
I got a habit I can't seem to drop of spending 
a lot of time on my own very incomplete 
education. 

"I can't go into any general statements about 
this country, the people, or the politics, be- 
cause whatever one says today about Greece, 
on the best of authority, will be completely out 
of date tomorrow. Industries are developing 
by leaps and bounds, experiments in social or- 
ganization, in agriculture, in education, even in 
the language the people speak, are being 
tried out, and discarded or adopted and de- 
veloped week by week, and the habit of mind 
of this highly intelligent, hardworking and 
adaptable people is changing with their out- 
look and their opportunities, more rapidly than 
one can follow it. They are amazingly inde- 
pendent and individualistic, these modern 
Greeks, just like their ancient forefathers, and 
they are doing new things with breath-taking 
speed. 



"We are living happily in the Legation, a 
large stucco house on one of the main busi- 
ness streets of the city, which our Government 
has leased for the past twenty years to house 
the Minister and the offices of the Secretaries 
and clerks. The address is 14 University Street, 
and if any of 1908 chance to come this way 
they have only to ring the door bell to find a 
warm welcome waiting. 'Warm' is what I 
mean, though metaphorically. The Legation 
has no central heating, and though we think of 
Athens as in a sunny, southern clime, it does 
not feel so southern when the mountains all 
about us are capped with snow and the north 
wind blows straight from them through the 
chinks to us. 

"We almost lost house and home last week, 
as a matter of fact, in our efforts to keep 
warm though unheated. We had a fine log 
fire in our drawing room hearth for the lunch- 
eon hour when we expected some presumably 
shivery guests, and that evening I smelled the 
ominous odor of smoke. I went all over the 
house in my search for its source, and, finding 
nothing wrong, came to the conclusion that the 
maids must have burned up some more linen 
on the laundry stove. My maids are pleasantly 
irresponsible in some respects, be it said. The 
next morning I had breakfast alone in perfect 
tranquility and only when I was all through 
was I approached by our beaming little house- 
boy, who said vivaciously: 'Madame veut voir 
dans le salon fumee.' Madame did, in haste. 
(I am learning to speak Greek, rather well, 
as I fancy, but I notice that if the servants 
really want me to understand what they say, 
they continue to say it in French. Not flatter- 
ing!) 

"Sure enough, the smoke was coming up thick 
all around the baseboard, which was thoroughly 
blackened. The boy, Nikko, was excited 
enough to enjoy himself immensely. He sug- 
gested that he might send for the carpenter, 
and when I frowned on that notion he had 
the bright idea that perhaps I'd like him to 
telephone for the plumber. However, my hus- 
band arrived on the scene and asked for the 
fire department in no uncertain terms, and 
presently they were with us. Four polite little 
Greeks in immaculate uniforms came stepping 
gingerly into our drawing room, apologized for 
the damage they felt called upon to inflict, 
neatly removed the baseboard, disclosing a lot 
of harmless looking plaster, and found the 
edge of the hardwood floor smouldering just 
behind where the panelling of the wall came 
down. They put it out with a glass full of 
water or so, and took their leave with smiles 
and bows. 

"All that day I smelled charred wood and 
wondered why the odor ivould persist. Nothing 
moves very fast in Greece, and though we noti- 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



fied the landlord and expected the Insurance 
Company to send someone sometime, we were 
not at all surprised that nothing happened right 
away, and left the salon alone until something 
did. The next morning about 4.30 I was 
awakened by my mother who stood beside my 
bed and announced that she wanted to show 
me something. In spite of the odd hour, I got 
up at once to see what there was to see, and 
she took me down to the same old salon. This 
time there was a fire! Crackling and fuming, 
and all around the edge of the baseboard, as 
we watched, it began to lick up hungrily for 
the panelling of the wall, which in another few 
minutes it would certainly have reached. That 
time we got the fire department in earnest, some 
twenty of it. In handsome boots and helmets, 
with pink faces, bright eyes and magnificent 
black mustaches, they marched through our 
front door. At the precise moment they en- 
tered, the lights went out — not because a wire 
was burned, as we assumed at the time, but 
just because, by coincidence, a fuse blew out! 
It would, of course. I retreated to the landing 
of the stairs, and watched the little army ma- 
neuvering below, in our enormous high-ceil- 
inged hall, weaving in and out from the draw- 
ing room, with electric torches and a flare 
playing on their shiny black accoutrements, and 
I half expected them to burst into song. It 
looked so exactly like a 'Firemen's Chorus' on 
the opera stage! However, instead of singing, 
they went to work in very orderly fashion, 
hewed up our nice floor and hewed out our 
panelled wall, and poured buckets of chemical 
into the ditches they dug, and really put out 
the fire. A perfectly immense wooden beam, 
the kind of thing one sees in old-fashioned 
hay lofts at home, starting under the fireplace, 
had been happily smouldering for 36 hours, 
and being quite hidden by the loose plaster in 
the wall and floor, had had things all its own 
way. It would certainly have broken cover 
very shortly if my mother had not chanced to 
be prowling just when she was." 

1909 

Class Editor: Ellen Shippen 

14 East 8th St., New York City. 

1909 will hold its 25th Reunion on June 2nd. 
Informal supper in the Deanery, Headquarters 
in Denbigh. 

Frances Browne, Manager. 

1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

Margaret Shearer Kellogg-Smith: "We are 
doing about what we have done for some years. 



We live on an arm of the Chesapeake Bay 
on a farm. We have four children of our 
own and several others who live with us all 
the time — children whose parents are abroad 
or dead or otherwise occupied. We have sev- 
eral horses, five ponies, colts, kittens and pup- 
pies. This winter there are twelve children 
here studying with two tutors. Our oldest 
child, Joan, is 14, has been away at boarding 
school since she was 8, and is now at home 
preparing for Bennington. We are interested 
in Music and have a string quartet; we dance 
square dances and English country and Morris 
dances; we read anything we can, and go to 
New York as often as we can get away from 
home. We hope to go further this year if the 
school is calm enough. My husband builds 
houses, does some iron work, teaches, paints. 
At present my absorbing interest is education." 

Marion Kirk: "The practice of law is very 
exciting, and keeps me happy though poor. The 
family say it is interesting to me because it 
satisfies the gossipy side of my nature. And, 
in fact, I recommend it for that very reason." 

Frances Hearne Brown : "Antoinette is at Bryn 
Mawr, a Sophomore, and Harry is a Freshman 
at Kenyon College. Bob, Jr., is a Sophomore 
in High School; Frances, Jr., a sixth grader. 
Last summer we had six peaceful weeks at our 
camp in Canada — but that seems long ago, and 
now we are involved in our usual activities. 
My husband is on the Winnetka Public School 
Board. We had a fight last spring to retain 
our 'progressiveness,' but won out." 

Lillie James is still in Middleburg, Virginia, 
headmistress of a three-year-old "Buckley" 
School for the hunting set. From Monday un- 
til Friday she jingles three keys, cottage, 
school, and car, but week-ends find her in 
Washington. She spent Christmas before last 
in Florida and last summer cruised the 
Mediterranean and Black Seas, enjoying espe- 
cially the African cities, the Levant, Russia, 
and the Mediterranean Islands. "Perhaps my 
biggest thrill was the ascent to Delphi from 
the Corinthian Gulf, and lunching in the 
shadow of Parnassus under the plane trees 
at the Castalian Spring." 

Lucie Reichenbach Sayler: "My principal oc- 
cupation consists in trying to keep up with a 
lively ten-year-old daughter and her school 
career. She has been very well ever since we 
came out here three years ago, is getting on 
splendidly in the local public school, and has 
become a loyal and ardent Californian. I am 
very much at home here now, and enjoy rais- 
ing a garden full of flowers all the year round, 
and motoring over all the country within reach. 
I have had a little class of French pupils this 
summer, including my own child, also some in- 
termittent tutoring among High School students. 
I still continue to be an active and enthusiastic 



(30) 



U 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



member of the Women's Overseas Service 
League, of which we have a fine unit in Los 
Angeles, and review war books for the quar- 
terly magazine published by this group of 
veterans. We still do a little service work in 
the veterans' hospitals and through the Red 
Cross. At tlie last meeting of the Southern 
California Bryn Mawr Club, I had the good 
luck to meet Ruth George. She is teaching 
English in Scripps College at Claremont some 
thirty miles from Los Angeles. She looks just 
as she did in 1910," 

Betty Tenney Cheney reports two bouts with 
the surgeons in the last year, and two daughters, 
Eleanor, a Junior at Bryn Mawr, and Jane, a 
Freshman at the North Shore Country Day 
School. 

Susanne Allinson Wulsin, writing from 
Providence, Rhode Island: "After we came 
back from Persia, where we did do an inter- 
esting dig, we spent some months working up 
our notes and then wasted more time trying to 
raise money to go back. Like everyone else 
we are feeling the pinch of hard times. My 
father died while I was in Persia and my step- 
mother was killed by a motor the summer after 
we got home. ... I am sending you the report 
of our Persian dig which may amuse you," 

Mary Boyd Shipley Mills writes from 
Switzerland: "We sailed from Shanghai July 
1st, and made our way slowly, via Hongkong, 
Manila, Singapore, Sumatra, East Africa, the 
Red Sea and Cairo, finally to Genoa. We had 
a very rushed eight days in Northern Italy, 
visiting — it seems a sacrilege to write it — Pisa, 
Florence, Siena (for the Palio), Venice, and 
Milan; came through the Simplon to Vevey 
where I had expected to stay for the winter. 
The place was ideal on a hill with a magnifi- 
cent view over Lake Geneva, with high moun- 
tains right across the water, and I loved it. 
My husband was with, us there for a week be- 
fore he left to go on to America to his new 
job in the Haverford School. Then the 
American dollar slid downhill so fast that I had 
to hunt some other place or else go straight 
home. Now we are settled in Morges, a very 
small town west of Lausanne right on the 
lake with a fine view of the Savoy Alps and 
Mont Blanc when its clear, but it mostly isn't. 
The children go to day schools in the town 
and are beginning to get a little French, though 
it is a slow process. In May we shall begin 
to move northward for short visits in France 
and England, and I hope to be in America 
by the 10th of June." 

Florence Wilbur Wyckoff: "We are still liv- 
ing in Niagara Falls — for the sixteenth year — 
and find it a very desirable home town. But 
we are expecting to move to West Virginia 
sometime within the next six months, as soon 
as my husband's company opens its new metal- 



lurgical plant there. I am having a pleasant, 
busy winter, being on the advisory board of a 
local chapter of the Delphinian Literary So- 
ciety, vice-chairman of the social committee of 
our Niagara Falls College Club, and president 
of the Mothers' Forum." 

Charlotte Simonds Sage (now living in 
Weston, Mass.): "Polly, is back taking her 
second year in the Swain School of Design in 
New Bedford and living with some neighbors. 
Betsey is finishing at the Winsor School and 
living with my brother and his family in 
Brookline. Nat, Jr., is at Pomfret School and 
the two youngest are with me. ... I have no 
professional status. Domestically, I am ten 
times as efficient as I was B. C, and we seem 
to flourish happily with graying hair and 'com- 
fortable' figures for the elders and great energy 
and ambition for the youngers. Thanks to 
Bennington College, I have seen Izette Taber 
whose daughter has just started there." 

Your Editor, her health greatly bettered and 
on her way to Bermuda for six weeks, reports 
a husband, still Professor of Physiology at the 
Harvard School of Public Health; a 16-year-old 
daughter, Nancy, at the Winsor School and 
Vassar bound after another year; and a son, 
Cecil, Jr,, aged 11. Her activities at present 
are entirely domestic and, after a lapse of 
twenty years, she has resumed golf as a 
pastime. 

1911 
Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 

The class send their sympathy to Jane 
Beardwood, whose mother died in February. 

Elizabeth Pinney Hunt reports that her boys 
are flourishing and that she herself lias been 
reading hard in philosophy, Spengler and 
Santayana, From the drift of her letter one 
gathers that she is not in favor of Mr. 
Roosevelt. 

The report, always indirect in her case, is 
that Mary Gertrude Fendall is much of the 
time in Washington, looking very stylish, and 
happily finding new causes to espouse, as the 
old ones die out, or should one say, off? 

1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven. Conn. 
From Rose Mabon Davis: 
"Doing — Remedial work at the Brearley 
School. Studying for an M.A. degree at 
Teachers College, 



(31) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



"Reading — The New Yorker and Saturday 
Evening Post. Books and books on Educa- 
tional Psychology. 

"Family — The same husband, neurologist; 
one son, 14, at Millbrook School." 

From Louisa Henderson Pierce: "Anything 
like this surely shows me up. Am just back 
from two weeks in Maryland. You ask what 
we read. I try to read the best as they come 
out, but you know the difficulties of getting 
new ones from libraries. I also review books 
for a church library. Play some bad bridge 
and worse golf. Built a camp on Winnegance 
Bay, near Bath, Maine, and hope all 1913ers 
going that way will come see us. No elec- 
tricity, but lots of hot water." 

From Katherine Williams Hodgdon: "In re- 
sponse to your very worthy effort to extract 
information, I am: (1) functioning more or 
less successfully as a housewife, less rather 
than more at the moment, trying to cope with 
the results of sub-zero weather; dabbling in 
town politics and holding down the job of 
school committee member for Westwood and 
members of various other inevitable boards. 
(2) Reading the newspapers with an eye to 
Anthony, when he has made the rounds of the 
family. (3) Interested in keeping the house- 
hold warm and happy, and the car from 
freezing solid. (4)' Intending to hoW my po- 
litical job against odds at the March election 
and to visit New York again as soon as pos- 
sible, for the memory of my last four days 
there, thanks to my very blooming classmates, 
is still a stimulating one. Laudable ambitions!" 

From Gwendolyn Rawson: "I have nothing 
astonishing to report about my present exist- 
ence, but feel I want to reward your effort to 
glean news of 1913, so I hereby acknowledge 
your postcard." 

From Isabel Cooper Mahaffie: "Am very 
busy and happy raising a small son. I find 
very little time for any of my ancient pursuits, 
but I take a whirl with pen, brush or type- 
writer from time to time. I see Eleanor 
Bontecou as often as I can get across the 
Potomac River to her retreat. She is putting 
up a very fine fight for the recovery of her 
health. We have an energetic B. M. C. Club 
in this town (Washington), of which I am 
perhaps the most languid member." 

1914 

C7a55 Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 

A letter from Marian Camp Newberry has 
just been received from Lincoln, England, with 
the following interesting information: 

"The very different improvement in business 
conditions over here has been encouraging. 



Roger and I have been to several Balls or 
dances during the holidays and what a different 
atmosphere from last year; a forced gaiety 
changed into a real one, an exuberance that 
has comd from reviving hope and the feeling 
that happy days are coming, if not quite here. 
Tickets for the Hunt Ball were much more ex- 
pensive, but in spite of the price there were 
many more people than last year and everyone 
was on the crest of the wave. There was the 
same atmosphere at the company dance that 
we always attend and usually enjoy more than 
the smarter Balls. The joyous atmosphere may 
have been due partly to the fact that the cut 
on all salaries has recently been restored, but 
there is certainly a general feeling of hope all 
over England. Of course, there have been no 
radical changes in England except the new 
tariff, but there are two movements that we are 
told are growing rapidly here, the Fascist and 
the strength of the Co-operative Stores. Just 
what may be the result remains to be seen. 
I felt very ancient recently when I went with 
Mary and Nancy to supper to an old Hall after 
which we all went to a village barndance. The 
girls' dancing partners were between 17 and 
20, very good dancers and tall, luckily. The 
girls had a whirl while Mother sat by the wall 
and selected the prize winners which the Lady 
of the Hall presented. Finally her aged butler, 
who was a sort of Master of Ceremonies, took 
pity on me and we did a barndance together. 

"We read that interest in Bridge is dying out 
in America, but we play a lot, and since 
"Contract" has just arrived in Lincoln, I hope 
that it will last for awhile. We play especially 
in the dark months of the year. In summer, 
when it is dry enough, tennis is always the 
rage. 

"All the married ladies here and a number 
that are 'not so young' have joined a class 
promoted by the 'League of Health and 
Beauty.' We do it in black satine shorts and 
white blouses. Several look blue with the cold, 
but it is all great fun. 

"We are hoping that Mary may go to Bryn 
Mawr and it seems to be looming rather near." 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Class extends its deepest sympathy to 
Adeline Werner Vorys, whose mother died in 
February. 



(32) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Helen Riegel Oliver has sent news of herself 
and Lois Goodnow MacMurray. Of herself, 
she says that she and her husband are spending 
the winter at the Park Lane. She is president 
of the New York Bryn Mawr Club and is on 
the Finance Committee of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. She is also serving on a number of 
boards and committees of the Y. W. C. A. and 
finds the work interesting and stimulating. She 
had a pleasant meeting with Louise Dillingham 
m in October and hears Dilly's praises as head- 
V mistress at Westover sung on all sides. 

Lois Goodnow MacMurray's husband is min- 
ister to Latvia, Lithuania and Esthonia with 
headquarters in Riga. The whole family sailed 
most eagerly in the fall, Mr. MacMurray is a 
member of a grain commission which kept 
them in London for three weeks when they 
first landed and was to take them to Italy 
in February. 

Larie Klein Boas recently completed a two 
months' good will tour to points east and 
middle west casting her light about in a way 
as yet unequaled. A small reunion in New 
York, in the way of a luncheon with Juliet 
Branham Williams, Lilla Worthington 
Kirkpatrick and Monica O'Shea Muray (1917) 
was worthy of note. Larie found Juliet looking 
as young and blonde as in her freshman year, 
and amusing, gay and witty. In being the 
wife of one and the mother of four very satis- 
factory individuals, Larie sees the secret of all 
this charm. She was equally enthusiastic over 
the way Lilla is holding her own. Besides her 
\: job of play broker Lilla has two sons, one 
town house and two country estates (spring on 
Long Island and mid-summer in Jersey) to fill 
in the odd moments. One son is president 
of his class. 

Margaret Chase Locke went to New York to 
see Larie and lo! Larie found another of us 
unchanged. Is it her point of view or can it 
be that some of us have been blessed with 
eternal youth? Chaso's husband has an im- 
portant job with the N. R. A. which keeps him 
dashing around and she dashes with him. By 
way of relaxation she is studying Greek. 

Of her own family Larie reports favorably. 
On her return to San Francisco she found her 
son, Roger, sturdier than ever and the newly 
elected president of the student body of his 
school. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenouch 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

'17 is at last coming to life! Yes, we're 
going to be reborn in June, for it is reunion 
year along with '18 and '19. It is seventeen 
years since the College got rid of us, and its 
the last reunion we'll have before the gray 
hairs predominate. Anyone who doesn't come 



back will never dare to show her head again. 
Don't forget that "Life Begins at Forty," and 
that the Bryn Mawr campus in June is a sure 
cure for the depression blues. Caroline (Stevens 
Rogers) and Nats (McFaden Blanton) will 
surely bei there, and by next Bulletin we will 
have a much longer list. Plan now to shake 
your jobs and families for three care-free days. 
Word has just been received of the sudden 
death on March 19th of Eleanor Dulles' distin- 
guished husband, Professor David Blondheim. 

1918 

Class Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 
3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. O., Phila. 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, L. L, N. Y. 

Fran Fuller Savage writes: "For the notes, 
tell them I am still alive and flourishing, have 
still two children, girls (ages 5 and 7) and 
send my love to the Class. (1 am still as lazy 
as ever, so I have no conquests or other achieve- 
ments). Cordelia is seven and a half and in 
the third grade at school. The teacher told me a 
while ago that she was 'good college material.' 
Just what that indicates at her tender years, 
I do not know. . . . She loves music and is 
taking piano lessons and doing well at them. 
Maud, my baby, is just five and starting school 
this month. So far, her character is aflfection- 
ate, perverse, humorous and very dramatic." 

The Class extends its sympathy to Marj Ewen 
Simpson for the loss of her father just before 
Christmas. Marj is now living at 3708 Oliver 
Street, Chevy Chase, Washington, D. C. Her 
husband was sent to Washington in October. 
"We are living in the most enormous house 
in Chevy Chase that you ever saw. We have 
lived in tiny apartments for so long that we feel 
absolutely lost in this mansion, and we have 
a lovely yard for the children to play in and 
we are only a block away from the school 
where two of them are now going." 

In February the Twitchells went back to 
the blizzard of '88. For four days we could 
get to the stores only on horesback or by 
sleigh. Drifts, many five feet or more in depth, 
had to be slowly dug through to bring us back 
to the automobile age. 

Reunion Headquarters will be in Pembroke 
West, with Mary Ramsay Phelps as Manager. 
The Class Supper will be held at Wyndham on 
Saturday evening, June 2nd. 

The Class will be grieved to hear that 
Margaret Rhoads died in Aiken, South Caro- 
lina, on March 13th. We wish to express to 
her family our deepest sympathy. 



(83) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 East 57th St., New York City 

Lois Kellogg Jessup: "I can't think of any 
news. We are as ever, except for a few more 
grey hairs. My husband is taking a half a 
sabbatical this year and we are going to Europe 
in June where he will finish writing his biog- 
raphy of 'Elihu Root.' " 

Anna Sanford Werner: "One child, Ann 
(Nancy), aged seven; jobs — College Club Com- 
mittees occasionally, tutoring, when and if; 
teachers' training class at Church School. My 
child says I am a landlady. I guess literally I 
am, as the house is huge, I rent out two of the 
rooms and baths to the world's most perfect 
roomers. Other jobs, parental and housewifely." 

Miriam O'Brien Underbill: "Still living with 
the same husband. Occupation: domestic 
drudge. Summer at Chocorua and doing rock 
climbing all over the White Mountains. First 
two weeks in September went on back trip 
to explore rock climbing possibilities at 
Katahdin in Maine. Found two streams and 
a pond not on U. S. G. S. map; visited trail- 
less regions never before seen by woman (and 
only a few men) ; and were practically eaten up 
by black flies." 

Millicent Carey Mcintosh's sons were seen 
by Kay Townsend, who passed through New 
York recently and inspected the young of '20. 
Kay says that these two young lads have some 
fifty-odd sweaters between them, giving their 
mother a good many notes to write. Kay went 
on to Bryn Mawr to a meeting or inspection 
tour or something of the alumnae health com- 
mittee. She wasn't very explicit. Nor were we 
able to worm out of her any news of Boston. 

Natalie Gookin, speaking of Alice Q. Rood, 
writes to say: "She has two girls. Isabel 
will be three next month ; she's a darling and a 
real beauty. The younger is seven months old, 
and so far rejoices only in the name of Baby 
Sister! I have been trying to persuade her 
mamma that she owes it to the Class to call 
her Belinda. Our Belinda is living in a very 
charming little house which she and her hus- 
band designed themselves and moved into not 
quite a year ago." 

Phoebe Helmer Wadsworth and her daughters 
have been in Florida the last three months. 

Reunion Notice 
Dear 1920: 

In the strange calendar which brings us back 
with classes whom we know, we are destined 
to have a Reunion this spring. The Committee 
has not yet started to work, but you will re- 
ceive notices soon. In the meantime, make 
your plans to come for Saturday and Sunday 
at least, the 2nd and 3rd of June. The Reunion 



will probably be informal, and should be the 
more pleasant because of that fact. 

Millicent Carey McIntosh. 

1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelly Erdman 
(Mrs. C. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave., Pasadena, Calif. 

Helen Parsons Storms was married on Jan- 
uary 8th to William Edward Parker. Chick 
and her groom and their car took a boat 
through the canal to California. (Your Editor 
hoped to hear from her when she landed, but 
nary a word so far.) They plan to motor back 
East and settle at 97 Montvale Road, Newton 
Center, Massachusetts. 

Kitty Barton is at present cataloguing Miss 
Susan Bliss' library in New York, so '20's class 
editor wrote me. She also passed on the news 
that Helen Farrell has taken up commercial 
photography in a big way. 

Frances Jones Tytus — who deserves several 
gold stars as the only one of two dozen who 
returned a news postal this month — writes that 
three children, John, 12, who goes to St. Paul's 
next year, Joan, 9, and Bill, 6, keep her 
busy and are her "job," her "position" and her 
"future plans." They have spent the past few 
summers in France, but do not expect to return 
this year. Jonesey's sister Sallie graduates from 
Bryn Mawr this spring. 

Marion Piatt Jacob wrote from Manitowoc, 
Wisconsin. She has been living half the time 
there and half the timd in Chicago for the last 
four years, but she hopes to get a permanent 
home in Chicago in the near future and has 
promised to send the new address as soon as 
she knows it. She enclosed a clipping of a 
most entrancing looking two-year-old daughter, 
Alida Marion Jacob. Marion is working again 
at her piano, has joined a sketching class and 
is active in two literary groups. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York City. 

Custis Bennett McGrory has a second son, 
Joseph Bennett, born on February 23rd. 

Barbara Clarke is living in Boston for a few 
months, and is working on her thesis for her 
degree in Landscape Architecture. 

Ikey Coleman Cutler has a daughter, Patricia, 
born last November. She is living in New 
York at 430 East 57th Street. 

Peggy Kennard is going abroad next month 
for two years, 

Conty La Boiteaux Buttrick has just had 
her fifth child. She now has four boys and a 
girl, and is living in Bryn Mawr. 

Josie Fisher is teaching a course in American 
History at Bryn Mawr. 



(34) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Katherine Peek is warden of Wyndham this 
year. She hopes to get her doctor's degree in 
June. 

Cornelia Skinner Blodget has been most 
successful with her new historical sketch, 
The Loves of Charles II. She had an engage- 
ment at a New York theatre, and is now on 
tour. 

Prue Smith Rockwell is once more in 
America. Her address is 142 Hillside Street, 
Asheville, N. C. 

Evelyn Rogers has announced her engagement 
to Dr. Henry Inkston, 

1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York City 

1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 

(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 

8102 Ardmore Ave., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 
Blit Mallett Conger has a second son, born 
March 1st. His name is George Mallett Conger. 
Maybe some girls would have ferreted out some 
real news, but we have felt sort of oblivious. 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

Jessie Hendrick Hardie writes a most inter- 
esting letter from the Riviera. She and her 
husband left this country last fall, and after 
motoring through Sicily and Italy finally set- 
tled down at Cannes where they are now prac- 
ticing law for Americans living abroad. The 
address, girls, when you get into difficulties, is 
Beau Soleil, Boulevard Alexandre III, Cannes. 
Jessie says, "It is a delightful place to be this 
cold winter." We venture to remark that she 
doesn't know the half of it. 

Kitty Harris Phillips gets a gold medal and 
our heartfelt thanks. She answered our poor 
little plea for news with one of the grandest, 
longest letters we have had for years. 

Kitty, as you may remember, was married last 
summer to Mr. Henry Phillips and is now living 
at 14 Elm Street, Exeter, New Hampshire, as 
her husband has a job at Exeter Academy. Be- 
fore her marriage, Kitty was studying for her 
Ph.D. at Radcliffe and had charge of one of 
the dormitories there. Here she encountered 



Harriet Parker in a splendid job as secretar) 
to the assistant dean, just as efficient as ever, 
and just as much fun. 

Kitty also reports that Dot Pearce Gustafson 
now has three children, Bobl)y the eldest, and 
twins, a boy and a girl born last year. 

Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt is still in New 
York, and very active in the Bryn Mawr Club 
there. 

Maria Chamberlain Swearingen and hf-r 
husband have returned from their naval wan- 
derings in the Pacific and are now stationed 
at Lakehurst, New Jersey. 

Nancie Benoist Ravenel has a son, Henry, Jr., 
born on January 7th. As this item was gleaned 
from the Washington notes in the Junior 
League Magazine we imagine Nancie is living 
in that city. 

Ginny Newbold Gibbon has a little daughter, 
Virginia, but we are ashamed to admit that we 
have lost the date of her birth, and can only 
say that she is new this winter. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

401 23rd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

The score now reads, 18 girls and 20 boys, 
Edith Morgan Whitaker and Mailie Hopkinson 
Gibbon each having had a son born in 
February. Names, dates and further details 
are unknown. 

The engagement of Jo Stetson to Mr. Robert 
Plant Hatcher, of Hartford, Connecticut, has 
been announced. Mr. Hatcher is the son of 
Judge Marshall Felton Hatcher and Mrs. 
Hatcher of Macon, Georgia, went to Phillips- 
Exeter Academy and was in the Class of '26 at 
Yale University. In 1924 he played on the 
varsity baseball team and that year was chosen 
All-America third baseman. When the -wedding 
will take place was not stated in the newspaper 
announcements. Later report: April 7th. 

As you will notice from the heading, your 
editor has picked up her skirts and fled again. 
Our friends are beginning to think that we 
don't pay the rent. The cause of our removal 
this time was the acquisition of a new job, in 
the Treasury, which came to us very suddenly. 
At the time of writing, we have not yet started 
on it and so will have to defer more detailed 
information until a later issue. 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 
Hilda Wright is teaching at tlie Madeira 
School doing, she says, "exactly what I did 
last year with perhaps a few less mistakes." 
She gives a vivid account of her stay in San 
Francisco with Kit Collins Hayes: "On the 
way from Portland to Washington this fall, I 
stopped two days with Kit Collins Hayes in 



(35) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



San Francisco, and as we nosed terrifyingly 
down one dizzy hill after another or rode on 
the windy ferries across the Bay, I heard about 
the delights of living in California. The week- 
ends in the Sierras sounded particularly jolly. 
Kit is more vigorous than ever and the spon- 
taneous combustion I always expect seems more 
and more imminent. She is president of the 
Bryn Mawr Club in San Francisco and spends 
several days a week in some kind of clinic. 
I had lunch with Eccie Moran, who has dedi- 
cated herself body and soul to the ballet, and 
was anticipating taking part in (the ballet) 
the Coq d'Or this winter. She looked very 
happy and very blooming. She may come East 
next spring unless she has a chance to go 
down to Mexico with the Ballet School." 

Elisabeth Packard sailed for Greece on 
February 20th, where she will do archeological 
work at Olynthus with Dr. Robinson of Johns 
Hopkins. 

Jane Bradley is at Westover this winter 
teaching, we believe, French. 

Bobs Mercer was married to Mr. Dunham 
Kirkham, on February 18th, at the Church 
of the Transfiguration, New York City. Mr. 
Kirkham is a graduate of Dartmouth and is 
now studying medicine at Yale, as is also 
Bobs. They will live at 17 Howe Street, New 
Haven for the rest of the winter and then plan 
to motor West for their vacation. 

Beatrice Shipley writes: "Since my interest- 
ing year's study at Pendle Hill two years ago, 
» I have become increasingly interested and busy 
in leading study groups on the life and teach- 
ings of Jesus. I also find interesting committee 
work in the Y. W. C. A. and the Society of 
Friends. I am one of those rare specimens, 
the voluntarily unemployed, as I find it possible 
to live at home, and impossible not to do the 
many things that do occupy me." 

Bettie Freeman has received a Sc.D. from 
Johns Hopkins and is now starting a new de- 
partment in Statistics at Dalhousie University, 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. 

Becky Wills Hetzel's husband, Theodore 
Hetzel, is now beginning experiments in prep- 
aration for his thesis at Penn State. He and 
Becky with their two children and several 
animals are living at 602 North Allen Street, 
State College, Pa. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr College. 

Violet Whelen was married in Omaha, 
Nebraska, last summer, to William Glasgow 
Bowling, instructor in English at Washington 
University in St. Louis. 

Frances Lee was married in Washington, 
D. C, on December 27, to Myres S. McDougal, 
and is now living at 506 S. Matthews Street, 



Urbana, Illinois. Mr. McDougal is assistant 
professor of law at the University of Illinois. 

Kathleen Richardson was married in South 
Orange, New Jersey, on February 16th, to 
Arthur Paul Burch, of New York. They are 
taking a two months' wedding trip to Honolulu. 

Kitty Bowler is in Stuttgart for the winter. 
We presume she is studying, but have no cer- 
tain information. 

Allis Brown has her hands full teaching the 
young at the Friends School in Haverford. 

Ellen Douglas is secretary to the Rev, Dr. 
Snowden, of Overbrook, Pa. 

Julia Keasby is in the "progressive school 
business" in the country near Morristown, with 
pottery as a side issue. 

Sally Turner is taking a course in typing 
and shorthand in Philadelphia. 

1931 

Class Editor: Janet Grant Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 

On October 2Ist Kakine Thurber was married 
to Mr. Robert McLaughlin. Marion Turner 
was her maid of honor and Peggy Nuckols Bell, 
Denise Gallaudet and Cecilia Candee were three 
of her six bridesmaids. Kakine's address is 15 
East 77th Street, New York City. 

Mary Oakford is studying architecture at 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Alice Thalman's family has taken over a 
1715 inn, between Albany and Schenectady. 
Her address is Altamont, N. Y. Doubtless 
the inn's is too, but I am hazy. 

Polly Parker Carey is in Reno getting her 
divorce. 

Marion Turner has a position as secretary 
for Mr. Galloway, attorney for the Fidelity 
and Deposit Co. of Maryland, in Baltimore. 

This news was ferreted for me by Peggy 
Nuckols Bell. She herself is now living at 
50 Eileen Str,eet, Albany, N. Y., and owns an 
eight-month-old son and no maid and is busy. 
But not too busy to write it all down. Happily 
I found her letter when I got around to writing 
the class notes of the century. Other letters 
I haven't found which is worse than not getting 
them at all. One I lost from Libby Blanchard 
who is fine and can be reached at Haverford 
Mansions, Haverford, Pa. Libby wants her 
Year-book because she never got it. If any- 
one has an extra copy or even a copy and 
wants to send it to her, I think it would be 
a lovely thing to do. Hers was left in Rock 
on the day of graduation, 1931, and it might 
still be there. She went on to say that she'd 
seen Libby Baer and that she was looking 
very well and others saw her picture in the 
paper holding up a hat-box of documents for 
the library for the press. 



(36) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Libby also saw Sydney Sullivan Parker with 
whom Mimi Dodge was staying. Sydney is 
living in Baltimore in a domestic fashion and 
a letter from her asked us why they wanted to 
change our name to Janet. It has been so 
long now I guess they just forget. New times, 
new titles. 

Mary Drake Hoeffel was with her family in 
Miami at Christmas and I believe was quite 
ill. She is now with Commander Hoeffel again 
in Chicago. 

1932 

Class Editor: Josephine Graton 

182 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

The Class will be shocked and grieved to 
hear of the death of Quita Woodward, who 
died in Switzerland, on March 5th. Our heart- 
felt sympathy goes to her family. A memorial 
service was held in Goodhart Hall on Sunday, 
March Ilth. 

A note received from the Class Editor after 
the announcement of her engagement appeared 
in the March Bulletin says in part: "My only 
comment would be that it might sound as 
though the editor didn't know much about the 



'bridegroom-to-be,' which, strange as it may 
seem, is not the case! Phil graduated from 
Harvard in 1925 and has been doing mining 
geology in one form or another ever since. 
For the past year he has been working in 
Durango, Mexico. Our wedding plans are 
terribly indefinite since they depend almost 
entirely on when and whether the Mexican 
government renews his visa. I don't know how 
the Texas idea got started at College, unless 
it was because I saw Phil in El Paso last 
summer. ... I am sorry to say it, but I am 
resigning as Class Editor because Mexico is 
too far away and mails are too uncertain to 
depend on getting news as I should." 

At the present moment we are scheduled 
to have Reunion Headquarters in Rockefeller, 
and to have a picnic on Saturday evening, 
June 2nd. Molly Atmore Ten Broeck will be 
Reunion Manager. Watch this column for 
more news. 

1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 



Advertisements 



\ 



ABBOT 



^ 



ACADEMY FOR GIRLS 



105th year. Modem in equip- 
ment and methods; strong fac- 
ulty ; delightfuUy located. Gen- 
eral and preparatory courses 
prepare for responsibility and 
leadership. In past five years 
97% of students taking C.E.B. 
examinations were successful. 
Writes president of Brjn Mawr: 
"Every college would like more 
students of the kind Abbot 
Academy has sent us." Art. 
music, dramatics, household 
science. Art gallery. Observ- 
atory. All sports — skating, ski- 
ing, riding. 23 miles from 
Boston. IFrite for catalog. 
Bertha Bailey, Principal 
Box P. Andover, Mass. 




Abbot Hall 



LowTHORPE School 

of Landscape Architecture 
GROTON, MASS. 

Courses in Landscape Architecture, in' 
eluding Horticulture and Garden Design, 
given to a limited number of students 
in residence. Anne Baker, Director. 

Summer School Starts June 25, 1934 
Write for Catalogue 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $L25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Dally and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge, Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on the Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Manager 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 386 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD. President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



a* 



SCHOOL DIMECTOKY 



Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. General 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
small classes. Ample grounds 
near Orange Mountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. Write for 
booklet. 

LUCIE C. BEARD 

Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 

ALICE G. ROWLAND \ 

ELEANOR O. BROWNELL / '*"""''"" 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY. CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M.. 
Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mimtreaa 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. \ Head 
Mary E. Lowndes, M. A., Litt.D. j Mistresses 
Katherine P. Debevoise, Assistant to the Heads 



TOW-HEYWOOn 

I y On theSound^AtShJppm Point \ / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

Om hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, Headmi»treM» 

Box Y, Stamford, Gonn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school established 
1899. Preparation for leading women's 
colleges. Four-year high school course; 
intensive review courses for College 
Board examinations throughout year 
or during second semester; general 
courses. Resident enrollment limited 
to twenty-five. Individual attention in 
small classes. Informal home life. 
Outdoor sports. 
MARY B. THOMPSON. Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletik 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






SCHOOL DIMECTOMY 



I 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art, and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming Pool — ^Ridingr* 



For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 



LAKE FOREST 



ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe, Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A. B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
CoU^es. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hodcey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON, A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 
Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 

SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School, St. Martin's 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Bryn Mawr 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnai Buxxitin 



Jtyeady for 

Delivery . . . 



yf SERIES of twelve 
d/jL Staffordshire dinner 
■plates by Wedgwood . . . 



t?e 




The Views 

Library Cloister 
Merion Hall 
Pembroke Arch 
Library Entrance 
The Owl Gate — Rock- 
feller 
Wing of Pembroke East 
Radnor 

South Wing of Library 
Taylor Tower 
goodhart 
Denbigh 
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Qpirgn (TUat»r (pfa^ea 

SPONSORED by the Alumnae Association, these plates are 
being made expressly for us by Josiah Wedgwood 6- Sons, 
Ltd., of Etruria, England. They are dinner service size (lOj 
inches in diameter) and may be had in blue, rose, green, or 
mulberry. 

THE DESIGN has been carefully studied under the super- 
vision of the Executive Board of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. The College seal dominates the plate, balanced by 
medallions of Bryn Mawr daisies. The background in true 
Victorian fashion is a casual blanket of conventionalized 
field flowers. This border, framing twelve views of the cam- 
pus, offers a pleasing ensemble reminiscent of the Stafford- 
shire ware of a century ago. 

THE PRICE of the plates is $15 per set of twelve (postage 
extra). A deposit of $5 is required with your order, 
balance due when the plates are ready for shipment. All 
profits go to the Alumnae Fund. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please reserve for me sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $ 1 5 per set. I enclose $5 

deposit on each set and will pay balance when notified that the plates are ready for ship- 
ment. 

Color choice Q Blue Q Rose PJ Green Q Mulberry 



Signed. 



Address. 



Make checks payable and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Matvr College 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Matvr, Pennsylvania 




1896 - 1934 




BACK LOG CAMP 

(A CAMP FOR ADULTS AND FAMILIES) 

SABAEL. P. O.. NEW YORK 

On Indian Lake, in the Adirondack Mountains 



THE FLEET 

T) ACK LOG CAMP prides itself particularly on the fleet of boats and canoes which, 
^-^ without any extra charge, are always at the service of its guests. At the bottom 
end of the list are the "water babies," tiny 30 pound canoes used on beaver dams and 
small adjacent lakes. Next come a do2,en or so ordinary canoes; above them a few 
canoes specially fitted for four paddlers and a passenger. King of all is the huge 
Polypody (ask your classical or botanical friends what that means), carrying its load 
of ten paddlers and the steersman. 

In addition is a fine fleet of rowboats, made by the family — not heavy mill-pond 
tubs, but built on the Adirondack model, for lightness and speed. Some have one pair 
of oars, some have two pairs, and the great Tupper carries three oarsmen and six 
passengers. 

It's a gteat sight when ten or fifteen of these boats pull out from Camp for a 
day's trip. 

Letters of inquiry should he addressed to 

MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT (Bryn Mawr, 1904) , 272 Park Avenue, Takoma Park. D. C. 



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BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




w^^m^^ 



MISS KING DISCUSSES GERTRUDE STEIN 



May, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 5 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15. 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, igS-". 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Virginia Atmore, 1928 

r»:,««*^-o „* T„.^-» /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1905 

Directors at Large i Alice Sachs Plaxjt, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Mary C. Parker, 1926 

District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 

District IV Elizabeth Smith Wilson, 1915 

District V Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI Mary Taussig, 1933 

District VII Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Virginia McKennbt Claiborne, 1908 Virginia Knebland Frantz, 1918 

Louise Fleischmann Maclat, 1906 Florance Waterbury, 1905 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith, 1903 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Virginia Atmore, 1928 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen Faulkner, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y, Maguire, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Db. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 



Jform of Pequesit 

m 



I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OP Brtn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompsok, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 
Mary Crawford Dudley, ^96 Elinor Amram Nahm, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV MAY, 1934 No. 5 



For those whose memory goes back to the gallant^ and for many years losing 
battle, waged by Miss Thomas to have Bryn Mawr ranked by virtue of its graduate 
school, not as a college but as a university, the article which appeared in the 
New York Times on April 2nd marked an epoch. The article was based on the 
Report of the American Council of Education, to be printed in the Educational 
Record. As a result of this year's nation-wide survey of the graduate schools 
throughout the country offering work for the doctorate, thirty-five new names have 
been added to the twenty-eight which made up the list of the members of the Asso- 
ciation of American Universities. Third in this new official list of "institutions having 
facilities and staff satisfactory in one or more fields" to offer graduate work, stands 
the name of Bryn Mawr. Such recognition is no empty honour but may very 
definitely influence able students from abroad to come to take work in the various 
fields that are cited, and a very large majority of the departments are cited, — 
Classics, English, German, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Psychology, Romance 
Languages, Sociology, Zoology. The Report further lists certain departments as not 
only "qualified" but "distinguished." The stars indicating this are sparsely scattered 
and for the most part go to the big universities. Under "Fine Arts" are listed 
Bryn Mawr, Harvard (Radcliffe), Johns Hopkins, New York, Princeton, Chicago. 
Of these only Bryn Mawr, Harvard, and Princeton are starred. It is true it is our 
only star, but it is a particularly bright one, and is a rather dramatic climax to the 
survey of the Departments of Art and Archaeology that was published in the 
April Bulletin. The study last year of the Science Departments, with stress on 
the admirable quality of the work and tributes from some of the most eminent men 
in the country, but with equal stress on the lack of facilities, taken with this Report 
of the American Council makes one realize more keenly than ever the need of a 
new Science building, but one realizes it with renewed pride in the Graduate school 
as a whole. Too often we forget that Bryn Mawr is the only separate woman's 
college with a status that entitles it to give the Doctor's degree. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



GERTRUDE STEIN AND FRENCH PAINTING 

From The College News of February 21 and amended by Miss King for the Bulletin 

In the Common Room^ Thursday afternoon^ Miss King gave an illuminating 
talk on Gertrude Stein and French Painting, which was based on her personal 
recollections o£ Miss Stein and on wide reading in her works. 

Miss King met Miss Stein first in New York through Mabel Weeks,<and Estelle 
Rumboldt, the sculptor, who married the architect Robert Kohn. Miss Stein used 
to visit Miss King in her roof-top apartment, built chiefly out of packing boxes 
and tar-paper, on 57th Street, cram herself out of the window to admire the vista 
of the river and the buildings, and finally settle down to talking at length about 
anything from art to psychology. It was about this time that Gertrude Stein began 
to be less and less in New York; she and her brother Leo Stein were a good deal 
abroad. Miss King saw them one summer in Siena, and told an interesting story 
of Miss Stein's falling asleep on the steps of S. John Lateran because the day 
was hot, and she was tired; and another of a dinner in Florence when the party 
of four all escorted each other to their respective lodgings, and then back again, 
up and down the Lung'Arno talking, for the better part of the night. From there 
the scene shifts after a lapse of several years to Paris, where the two had taken a 
studio. Mr. Stein was selling his fine collection of Japanese prints in order to buy 
paintings by the modern French — Renoir, Cezanne, Matisse, and Picasso. Miss King 
did not see Miss Stein again until just before the War, when she enjoyed for 
long evenings sitting in the studio staring at a picture and presently moving around 
to the other side of the table and staring some more. But once she had a hint how 
to look, and also an introduction to Kahnweiler, Picasso's dealer, and so used to go 
and look at the pictures he had. One year they met at odd times in Madrid, where 
Miss King was working at the Bihlioteca Nacional, and Miss Stein was writing 
late at night, and sleeping well into the morning. She lent Miss King her manu- 
scripts of the volumes of portraits. Earlier was the Portrait of Mabel Dodge, which 
had such circulation and imitation at Bryn Mawr: Barbara Ling wrote a good deal, 
very well, in the style, for the course in Modern Art, but she would not make a 
present of the best pieces because she said they were serious and too personal. But 
it was in Spain that Miss King formed that habit of continuous reading which she 
considers necessary to get a full understanding of Miss Stein's writing. Today 
when Miss King is in Paris, she always goes over to Rue Fleurus, sits and stares 
at paintings, and talks with Gertrude Stein. 

In turning to Gertrude Stein's relation to French painting, Miss King said, 
"My own students, present and past, know all I am going to say. They understand 
painting and it does not worry them. They are used to taking a picture for what 
it is, — and so why not take a page for what it is.^ They are used to the all-over 
pattern of Spanish plateresque, without relief, without centralization, where begin- 
ning and middle and end are interchangeable more or less, and right could be left 
and top row could be bottom row. They do not resent this, nor think that the artist 
was a 'thimble-rigger.' They can certainly carry over the same attitude in them- 
selves and the same postulate in tlie designer, when examining a pattern of words 
on a printed page." To illustrate lier point IMiss King read a paragrapli from 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Henry James' Wings of the Dove, chosen at random. A further illustration may 
be found by examining the development of dialogue in English novelists, from 
Trollope and George Eliot to James and then Hemingway. In the dialogue of the 
earlier^ the sentences have beginnings, middles, and ends, and the characters involved 
answer each other in logical sequence. In the dialogue of the moderns, however, 
the sentences often begin with the middle, and the characters answer, for example, 
the thing before the last, or the next to the last question due to be asked. The 
exponents of this new form point out that so things happen in life, — not necessarily 
in sequence. Gertrude Stein thinks that these repetitions and castings-back are the 
manner in which one thinks, but in which one does not talk, because people mostly 
do not. For this reason thoughts are not usually written down until they have been 
worked over into a logical order. 

A mare's nest was in the last Atlantic Monthly about the question of automatic 
writing, to which type of writing none of Miss Stein's work belongs, nor to that 
of free association. ''Automatic writing gives what the person is not aware of 
feeling, whereas this is what the writer and reader are equally aware of." When 
Geography and' Plays came out the friends in New York discussed the likeness to 
free association and knew that she had denied that it was the same. The Sur- 
Realistes had tried that sort of thing in painting, when under hypnosis or while 
telephoning in Paris, in their struggle for pure spontaneity. Miss Stein's work is 
not like this, for it is deliberate in structure and direction. In fact, it is just as 
conscious as Pater's style, though at the opposite extreme from this. "Frankly, it 
seems to me much more like The Dark Night of the Soul, except that is poetry, 
and this is pure prose; that is emotion, and this is a mirror-image of something 
mental going on." Miss King read a selection from Lucy Church Amiably in 
illustration of her point, and showed how what was actually there to be read, was 
merely a sort of libretto, requiring an orchestration in the mind of the reader. 

There is one question which Miss King is often asked: "Is Miss Stein's work 
a joke?" The answer. is "No, it is absolutely in good faith; only one must allow 
for irony, where glance and tone would give it in talk. But how about Swift?" 
Another question, whether or not it is easier to read and understand when one is 
used to it, must also be answered in the negative. One must always work over any 
fine bit of literature in order to get the most out of it. Indeed, one might have a 
horrible doubt, in reading classics, whether one is not missing just as much, because 
it is no work. One should start to understand Gertrude Stein by parallels. Living 
in Paris, in the midst of painting, she could not help being affected by tlie successive 
influences which affected painting. The first parallel lies in her affinity to impres- 
sionism, with its all-over, flat patterns, its lack of relief and centralization, and its 
passion for the momentary image. The Pointillistes offer even more of a flat pattern. 
The work of Cezanne affords a second parallel. The canvas is a plenum, and the 
composition an adjustment of tensions which are three-dimensional, and there are 
no interstices. "Trying to make excerpts from Gertrude Stein, is like trying to 
pick those plants which run a long root underground with stems coming up here 
and there. If you give a tug, the whole comes up, and the roots dangle." Miss 
King read some short pieces, "Dinner," "Celery" and "Pheasants," from Tender 
Buttons, and one or two from Geography and Plays, to show how mutilated such 
fragments become when removed from their content. 

(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The third parallel is to be found in the work of the Cubists, who were always 
her closest friends, especially Picasso and Braque, and Matisse — although he is not 
properly one of them. The interpenetration of masses in Cubism has become either 
interpenetration of a) time, and b) thoughts, in Gertrude Stein's prose; or else 
a design in which the object is used only as a point of departure. The essay on 
Braque in Geography and Plays is a story with the events left out, but the rela- 
tions of the characters and their dialogue left in. It is like the work of Braque 
in one of his later periods. Miss Stein's use of concrete details appliqued to the 
main structure resembles the work of the Dada-ists or of that group of Cubists 
who actually pasted bits of cork or newspaper on their canvases. By the Sur- 
Realistes, she was influenced toward spontaneity, freshness and whimsicality, and 
toward the use of orchestration. "Just as in Operas and Plays the text gives you 
only the libretto, which is completed by what proceeds on the stage, so here, the 
orchestration lies in the suggestions and overtones and connotations. When you 
have read and reread, listening, you know what it is about. So in Geography and 
Plays, you recognize bits of that long living in the South of France, snatches 
of dialogue about the day's incident. And the realism of it is of a fragment of 
actuality." During the War, Miss Stein drove an ambulance in the south of France, 
and "worked like a dog," as she, herself, expressed it. And the war-time experi- 
ences reverberate in her work. 

Gertrude Stein should be read aloud, for the greatest understanding and pleas- 
ure can only be procured if one lets oneself go and follows the rhythm. Like the 
rhythm of train wheels or machinery, the ear picks up a tune. "One cannot take 
the word as a unit, nor the phrase, nor the sentence. There are no units. It is a 
whole long rhythm." There is more to words than the definition, just as there is 
more to the sentence than the syntax. It is precisely out of the rest of it that the 
meaning is borne in on us, the implications and associations: to take a nursery 
instance, "The Palm and the Pine." And the interlace and repetitions are drum- 
ming out the pattern of the music, as in Ravel's Bolero. 

But we have to recognize something actual in the way words feel: "over" feels 
different from "under," "unalterable" from "flexible," voici from 'voila, awakening 
faint kinaesthetic responses which persist in another language, and that is how one 
learns a foreign language really. There are plenty of instances : e. g. "Up with me, 
up with me into the clouds" — vs. "Down went McGinty to the bottom of the sea." 
Or, to demonstrate by thus and not — 

"The phoenix builds the phoenix' nest, 
Love's architecture is his own": 
that is pure concept, with almost no reverberations, and, in the only word that 
carries them, minimized. But compare: 

"Or ever the knightly years were gone 
With the old world to the grave 
I was a king in Babylon 

And you were a Christian slave." 

The use of repetitions and participial constructions of becoming, is partly to 
get the long wave rhythm, which is not the rhythm of the suspended sentence and 
the involved and inverted clause, and the balanced and parallel construction, nor 
the "if" and "whether" and "how" and "on the one part" which make the monu- 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



mental style. Yet after reading enough, one does know what it is all about: and 
even more, these words and sentences may seem dry as a tray full of newly-washed 
dishes, arid as a handful of sand that slips through one's fingers, yet with the sand 
she makes patterns like the diviner at the city gate, when you see what he sees as 
you hear his pipe. 

"It is the technique of dry realism with the irony and the poignancy; and for 
substance it is right American in the tradition from Mark Twain through Sherwood 
Anderson and Ring Lardner. Yet note, for sheer mastery of the craft of style, the 
effect, in the reader's mirror-image of the studio, of Alice Toklas' chairs embroid- 
ered in petit-point after designs by Picasso. It is a sort of pioneer style, and with 
pioneer thrift. Miss Stein wastes nothing. She employs all the implications, the 
half-recognized, the long-f orgotten ; the rhythm and creak of the nursery rocking- 
chair, the intermittently-remembered experience of thought and feeling, the divaga- 
tions of the questing reason, the infinitesimal realities that are the stuff of experience. 

"Any language with enclitics or many particles or conjunctions or adverbs of 
sorts, or double negatives, lends itself to the long swingijig rhythms; not so an 
inflected language or one with sharp differentiation of synonyms and few homonyms. 
A Russian once said he liked writing in English because there were so many words 
that meant about the same thing." "Certainly in writing one wants to write a 
sentence about something," said Miss King, "and it does not much matter what 
words go on, only they must be enough and make a rhythm or the page will rattle. 
Only, I personally like to inlay the sentence with a few handsome words like 
Byzantine or crystalline or inimitably or intermediary. And Miss Stein has no 
inlays: she keeps a level surface, a Muster ohne Ende, just alike at both ends 
and in the middle. It is the oriental pattern, as distinguished from the Gothic 
pattern of supremacy and subordination." 

Miss King ended by reading something both beautiful and moving. For there 
is plenty of feeling in this oeuvre, only you must dig for it, as men dig for water 
where the divining-rod has led. She read The Life and Death of Juan Gris. She 
had read, at one time or another, from nearly all of Gertrude Stein's books. 

COUNCILLOR FOR DISTRICT VL 

Mary Taussig, 1933, has been appointed District Councillor to fill the re- 
mainder of the term of Erna Rice Eisendrath, 1930, which will expire in 1935. 
It was announced last month that Emily Lewis, 1931, would serve in this capacity, 
but Miss Lewis is planning to go to Europe and Miss Taussig has consented to 
take on the duties of the office. Miss Lewis continues as President of the Bryn ^lawr 
Club of St. Louis. 



NEXT COUNCIL MEETING 

The next meeting of the Alumnae Council will be held at the Deanery on 
November 8th, 9th, and 10th. 

(5) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



AN APPRECIATION OF THE BRYN MAWR GIFT 
OF BOOKS TO THE SORBONNE 

The Alumnae will be much interested in the following statement in a recent 
letter from Professor Cestre to Dean Schenck: 

"J'ai obtenu qu'on recherche dans la reserve de la Bibliotheque de la 
Sorbonne des exemplaires en trop des theses des dix dernieres annees. On 
en prepare une caisse qui sera envoyee a Bryn Mawr vers le milieu 
d'avril, j'espere. Vous recevrez done I'envoi au commencement de mai. 
II n'y a pas toutes les theses, mais un certain nombre qui seront 
interessantes. 

"C'est un faible temoignage de notre grande reconnaissance a I'egard 
de Bryn Mawr et de vous." 

I am indebted to Dr. Eunice M. Schenck for my recent knowledge that there 
is a Bulletin of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae. I have great pleasure in using this organ 
to make the Bryn Mawr Alumnae acquainted with some of the work done at the 
University of Paris with the American books provided by the fund so generously 
raised after the war by the Society of the Bryn Mawr Alumnae to supply the want 
of American books in the Library of the Sorbonne, due to lack of funds. I should 
like to give today a short review of a remarkable dissertation for the Doctorat-es- 
Lettres, recently presented at the Sorbonne and received maxima cum laude. It is a 
book on L'Esthetique de Baudelaire,"^ and it contains a first rate chapter on the 
literary relations of Baudelaire with Edgar Allan Poe. 

Those two men offer a unique case in the history of literature of two minds 
developing independently on the same line. When one (the French poet) met the 
work of the other, he welcomed it with enthusiastic recognition and underwent its 
unmistakable influence. This parallelism can be explained, in part, by resemblances 
of temperament between the two writers, and by similar literary affiliations. Their 
minds were formed, on either side of the Atlantic, by the surviving prestige of 
romanticism. Poe began with imitating Byron and Shelley; Baudelaire with 
imitating Chenier, Lamartine and Hugo. Both were mystics, whose mysticism can 
be traced back to the neo-platonists, in the case of Poe through Coleridge, in the 
case of Baudelaire through Swedenborg. Both were attracted towards the dismal 
and the gruesome by weariness of the sentimental, dissatisfaction with cliches (set 
themes and set modes of expression), and a desire for passionate sincerity. It does 
not mean that they were normal. On the contrary, both had morbid constitutions; 
their imagination was attracted by the gloomy or the horrible. Baudelaire intro- 
duced, for the first time in literature, ruthless depiction of sensuality (mostly 
sexual), mixed with harrowing and pathetic remorse. Both were worshippers of 
the beautiful. 

On this latter point, they were perfectly at one. When Baudelaire read 
The Poetic Principle for the first time, he exclaimed: "This is what I have always 
thought. Poe's doctrine is even worded in 'the very terms that have come to my 
mind." It was a great encouragement for the young French poet to find the con- 
firmation of his own meditations in an older poet and critic, whom he admired 
and who had begun (towards 1846) to acquire reputation. Baudelaire made a 

*Andr6 Ferran: L'Esthetique de Baudelaire, Hachette, XII— 736 p. 8° 60 francs. 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



larger use than Poe of the ground-rules of his aesthetics: not only did he extol 
Poe (after having translated him), but, applying his views to painting, he defended 
Delacroix against the onslaught of the classics, and in the realm of music, he dis- 
covered Wagner. All his life he struggled, along the same lines as Poe, for Poetry 
absolute, poetry which has nothing to do with the search of truth or the teaching 
of morals. The two men, through their mystic tendencies, saw in Nature, the con- 
crete representation of the divine. They found analogies (Poe) or correspondence 
(Baudelaire) between matter and spirit, so that the splendors of the visible world 
could be used as symbols of the invisible world, and material beauty became the 
embodiment of spiritual beauty. For them, there was, in spite of gross appearances, 
an affinity between all the senses and between all the arts. Poetry belonged to the 
same essence as music; verbal description was painting by means of imaginative 
coloring; a sculptor, a landscape-gardener were poets, as rightfully as a writer of 
odes and lyric stanzas. The creation of the Beautiful proceeded from quasi-divine 
inspiration. A poem ought to be short, because the ecstasy that gives it birth is 
fleeting and rare. The poet was a being apart from the crowd, marked with the 
sacred sign that severs the elect from the mass of humanity. Both were aristocrats, 
draping themselves, though poor, in their pride and self-sufficiency, having nothing 
but disdain for what Whitman was to call "the equal brood," and recoiling with 
horror from mechanical, industrialized civilization. Baudelaire poured his com- 
passion in the Prefaces to his translations of Poe, on the unhappy victim of 
"la barbaric eclairee au gaz." 

Baudelaire, as a poet and a critic, stands on a higher rank than Poe; but he 
owes to the American poet and theorist of aesthetics to have taken faith in his own 
conception of poetry and confidence in his own genius. Monsieur Andre Ferran has 
emphasized this important indebtedness of the French writer to his American 
predecessor in an illuminating chapter. 

C. Cestre. 

THE BRYN MAWR ROOM AT THE CITE UNIVERSITAIRE 

Applications for the Bryn Mawr room at the Cite Universitaire in Paris for 
the French academic year, November 15th, 1934- July 1st, 1935, should be made 
before June 1st to President Park. The following classes of applicants will be 
considered: (1) Holders of Bryn Mawr degrees (A.B., A.M., Ph.D.). (2) Other 
present and former students of the Bryn Mawr Graduate School. (3) Members 
of the Senior Class. 

During the academic year the cost of a room per month, including service 
amounts to approximately fifteen to eighteen dollars at the present rates of exchange. 
Meals are served in the building on the cafeteria plan. The minimum expenditure 
for food is fifteen francs daily, and the average less than twenty. 

A careful plan for the year's work should be submitted, and if the candidate is 
not at the time of application a student at Bryn Mawr College, at least three people 
competent to estimate her work should be referred to. Application may also be 
made before June 1st to President Park for the use of the Bryn Mawr room for a 
period of not less than two months during the summer. This application should be 
accompanied by a plan of work and academic references. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



DANCING AS AN EDUCATIONAL FACTOR 
IN CHILDREN'S LIVES 

Josephine Petts, Director of Physical Education at Bryn Mawr 

I shall begin this paper with the words of Isadora Duncan, who, with her 
sister Elizabeth, has created from her genius the only kind of dancing which seems 
to me to have anything of importance to do with children's lives. I am quoting from 
her book The Art of the Dance: . . . "The dance is the most natural and beautiful 
aid to the development of the growing child in its constant movement. And only 
that education is right which includes' the dance. . . . For every child that is born 
in civilization has the right to a heritage of beauty. . . . Within two years my 
school has transformed sickly and badly formed children into frescoes that out- 
rivaled the loveliness of Donatello or Luca della Robia. There is no more simple 
and direct means to give art to the people — to give a conception of art to the 
working man — than to transform his own children into living works of art. The 
children of my school at an early age learned to sing the chorals of Mendelssohn, 
Mozart, Bach and the songs of Schubert; for every child, no matter of what class, 
if he sings and moves to this music, will penetrate the spiritual message of the 
great Masters. 

"And so the first great aim of my school was social and educational. But I 
succeeded so well in giving this expression to the children that the bourgeois hailed 
them as phenomena, and were willing to pay large sums to put them on the stage and 
stare at them through opera glasses. How many times have I come out after a 
performance and explained: 'These dancing children whom I have formed in my 
school are not performing as theatre artists. I bring them before you simply to 
show you what can be accomplished with every child. Now give me the means to 
work this experiment in a greater field and I will further prove that the beauty 
which you applaud tonight can be the natural expression of every child in the 
world.'" 

And it is because I know that this is true, because I have seen the children 
in her school change from just ordinary children into lovely, shining human beings 
that I speak to you with such conviction. 

It seems to me that dancing as an educational factor concerns the whole field 
of physical instruction. In our homes, in our class-rooms, we strive to invest our 
children with graceful, cultured, sensitive minds; in our gymnasia and on our 
playing fields we turn them into what D. H. Lawrence has aptly termed police- 
women, and may I add police-men too. Why have we done this ? We have done it, 
I believe, because we have tried to develop the body and the spirit as two separate 
entities. We have not applied to Physical Education what seem to me to be the 
two fundamental factors in this field, namely that the movement of the body is 
governed by definite scientific laws which if obeyed or disobeyed in the end deter- 
mine its structure, and second that the body and spirit are an indivisible unit, and 
that one cannot possibly be developed to its highest point without the other. To 
attain any real stability, physical strength must develop from an inner, spiritual 
power, which in turn is advanced by beautiful movement. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The way one moves is far more expressive than the way one speaks, and at 
the moment the manner in which our young people move is immeasurably cheap. 

We look about us for a medium which shall prevent this catastrophe in the 
rising generation, and which shall lift the rest of us to a higher plane of living. 
We find it in dancing. 

If, however, dancing is to be the very essence and core of Physical Education, 
with games and sports used for recreation of a physical type, we must choose it 
with care. 

1. For example, it will not be the ballet, because the ballet tortures the pliable 
bodies of children into shoes and dresses that deform them, and teaches unnatural 
and forced movement, and because it comes from France at the time of the most 
polluted and false and shallow of courts and does not find itself at home in our 
generation, or in the land of Walt Whitman. 

2. It will not be dancing of any sort that does not coincide with the stage 
of maturity which the child has reached. 

3. It will not be dancing to music in such a way that one cannot listen to 
the lovely, simple melody above the push, push and the shove, shove of the beat. 

4. Or dancing to music such as that of most of the Moderns which has 
no cosmic quality, makes for angularity of movement and which speaks only of 
skepticism, depression and sterility. 

5. It will not be dancing done to percussion instruments, which mistakes time 
for rhythm, which uses only the brain and tends to make people rough and common 
because it ignores all the elements of the spirit. 

6. It will not be the sort of dancing in which children imitate animals or the 
opening and closing of flowers. To quote Isadora again: "Nature must be the 
source of all art, and the dance must make use of nature's forces in harmony and 
rhythm, but the dancers' movement will always be separate from any movement 
in nature." 

7. The dance is not made up of gestures which are of this world, but of 
rhythms which are of all worlds. 

8. The dance which we must choose has nothing to do with pirouettes. It is 
not movement of a conventional and mechanical conception of life imposed from 
without. But it is dancing which is in harmony with the laws of the child's own 
body, so that it will grow more beautiful with dancing and so that its latent energies 
will be released, and it must also be an expression of serenity. 

It must be quieting and expanding enough in its effect to increase the child's 
powers of concentration, and to make him more sensitive and responsive to the 
other things he is learning. It should be of the sort to teach him to look on all 
great art with understanding and to hear great music in all its beauty and subtlety. 

And, finally, the dancing of which I speak has not as its purpose to develop 
a star, one person who outdoes all the others, but rather, must it be done in groups 
where children will learn that in movement, never resting is life itself and that 
while the movement of each is separate, and individual, and independent, it must 
also be in harmony with that of the others, for dancing is not only living, it is 
a way of life as well. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 

With the retirement of Professor Leuba, Professor Crandall and Professor 
Wright last year, the changes in the Faculty announced in the spring were striking. 
The changes of this year cut less deeply into the old Bryn Mawr. They seem to 
me interesting in their connection with courses definitely called for by students. 

The first are a group of temporary variations. As usual, instructors absent on 
Sabbatical leaves are returning, and others going. Professor Agnes Rogers comes 
back after two years away. Her year began with lectures in London and in 
Cambridge, and she worked later at her own university, St. Andrews. A serious 
illness has made her second year a less pleasant form of absence, but she is now 
entirely on her feet again and returns to do full time work in the fall. Her 
colleague. Professor Use Forest, has received an appointment as Sterling Fellow 
in Education at Yale and will spend the Sabbatical year, which now falls to her, 
at work in New Haven in Education and in Philosophy. 

Professor Anna Pell Wheeler is away from full time teaching work next year 
on leave, but her present plans keep her in this neighborhood and within reach of 
the increased group of graduate students who are arriving, one from Europe, and 
several from American universities to work under Dr. Emmy Noether. Dr. Hedlund 
returns from his year's work as National Research Fellow at Princeton and will 
give next year in Mrs. Wheeler's place a Seminary at the University of Pennsylvania 
to which both Bryn Mawr and University students are admitted. 

Professor Oilman returns from a semester's absence, the greater part of which 
she is spending in Paris, carrying on research for a book on Baudelaire as a critic. 
Professor Lily Ross Taylor spends the coming year as Acting-Professor in 
charge of the School of Classical Studies at the American Academy in Rome, 
where she was earlier herself Fellow. Her place will be taken by Dr. Louise Adams 
Holland, a graduate of Barnard, and like Miss Taylor, herself a Ph.D. under 
Professor Tenney Frank at Bryn Mawr. Mrs. Holland has in several past years 
given courses at Bryn Mawr, and she comes into the Department as an old friend, 
as well as an interesting and stimulating scholar. 

A year ago Professor Henry Cadbury accepted the Hollingsworth Professorship 
of Divinity at Harvard and resigned the chair of Biblical Literature at Bryn Mawr, 
his resignation to take effect in 1934. His loss from the Faculty at Bryn Mawr is a 
grave and indeed irreparable one. He has not only brought honor to Bryn Mawr 
by his work and publications in his own department, but he has made possible 
excursions into his field on the part of students in Latin, and he has connected 
himself with the whole graduate school by his admirable work as Secretary of the 
Committee on Graduate Students. For the time being, at least, the College is not 
attempting to replace him and graduate students who wish work in his field will be 
sent in to courses at the University of Pennsylvania. His undergraduate courses 
in Biblical Literature, however, will be supplied, and alumnae who remember 
Professor Chew's course in The Bible as Literature, given in 1925-26 and several 
times earlier, will be glad to know that he has consented to give the course again 
next year. Mr. Chew has in the meantime given it three times in the Department of 
Comparative Literature at the University of Chicago Summer School. A second 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



course in The History of Religions will also be arranged for, but the instructor 
has not yet been appointed. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Norton Potter has to my great regret resigned her position in 
the Department of Art and in her place Mr. Harold Wethey, who takes his 
Doctorate at Harvard this summer, has been appointed. For the past year 
Mr. Wethey has been Assistant in the Department of Art at the University and he 
comes to Bryn Mawr with warm recommendations from the members of the 
Harvard Department. The connections between these two departments of Art at 
Harvard and Bryn Mawr have been unusually close, and Professor King and I are 
glad to cement them by an appointment direct from Cambridge to Bryn Mawr. 
Mr. Wethey's field is Gothic and Renaissance Sculpture and he is set down for a 
Seminary as well as for undergraduate courses. 

I said to the Alumnae at the February luncheon that the increasing registration 
in Economics would make necessary the appointment of an additional instructor in 
that Department, and that it was almost as clear a necessity to increase, even if by 
a little, the fields of Economics which the college oifers. With this in view, Dr. Karl 
Anderson has been appointed Associate in Economics. Like Mr. Wethey, he comes 
directly from Harvard, where he took his Doctor's degree two years ago. He has 
been Instructor in Economics for four years and comes with an excellent name for 
his work in teaching, as well as for his interest in research. The freshman work in 
Economics will be divided between Professor Wells and Dr. Anderson, and the 
latter will give a Second Year undergraduate course and a Seminary in Money 
and Banking. 

Dr. Richtmyer, in the Department of Chemistry, is resigning, and his place 
will be taken by another of the long line of instructors whom Professor Kohler has 
sent down to Bryn Mawr. The new appointee is Dr. Arthur Clay Cope, a Ph.D. 
of the University of Wisconsin, and for the past two years National Research 
Fellow at Harvard. 

Miss Agnes Kirsopp Lake, A.B., Bryn Mawr College, 1930, and A.M. 1931, 
and Fellow in the American Academy in Rome, 1931-33, who is taking her Doctor's 
degree this year, has been appointed Instructor in Latin; and Miss Margaret Palfrey, 
A.B., Smith College, 1930, and a teacher since her graduation at the Katherine 
Branson School, Ross, California, has been appointed Instructor in English. 

At the request of the English Department I have invited Professor John 
Livingston Lowes to give the Mary Flexner Lectures next year and suggested that 
he use Keats on whom he is working this yeal* as subject matter for his public 
lectures. It is not certain that Mr. Lowes can rearrange his work at Harvard and 
make a six week visit to Bryn Mawr possible. We are waiting eagerly for his 
answer. 

Dr. Minor Latham has consented to resume lier Tuesday journeys from New 
York next year in order to give her course in Play Writing. 

The alumnae will be interested in tlie latest news of the Bryn INIawr Dig. 
A radiogram which was sent on April 18th from Adana by Miss Hetty Goldman, 
Director of the Excavation, gives the following encouraging report: "Excellent 
Arrangements. Government Permission. Preliminary Soundings. Sites Promising." 



(11) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. Elizabeth Hannan, 1934 

The month of March started off very treacherously with halcyon weather and 
a lull in academic activity. Neither lasted out the first week and we found our- 
selves faced with the usual unbelievable quota of quizzes and reports, done to the 
accompaniment of howling wind and rain, with a mixture of dirty snow. Bad 
weather and books did not, however, prevent the campus from buzzing with extra- 
curricular activity — mental and physical. The mental activity was, we are pleased 
to report, on the very highest level; and the physical activity indicated what 
Bryn Mawr athletes can do if they really use their muscles. 

Our aesthetic events included two poetry teas, a recital by Mr. Alwyne, a 
lecture by Mr. Eeginald Pole of the theatre world, and one by Mr. Charles 
Hopkinson, well-known artist. It seems obvious that someone has the future of 
poetry at Bryn Mawr very much at heart; for at a tea given by Miss Ely, March 
11th, a poetry-speaking society was discussed and two days after that an "After- 
noon of Poetry" was held at the Deanery, where Bryn Mawr poets, alumnae and 
undergraduates read their own poetry. The idea of forming a poetry-speaking 
society seems to have developed into a reality, as a meeting has been announced for 
April 10th for which "prospective members will undertake to learn a favourite 
poem, which they will recite at the meeting.'* It seems to be a useful and painless 
method of encouraging good diction, and we intend to be at the first meeting to 
collect statistics on the delivery of the contestants, whether modeled upon Graduated 
Exercises in Articulation or natural. For all our belittling of Bryn Mawr poets in 
this column, we were impressed by the quality and quantity of poets and poetry at 
the second event, the "Afternoon of Poetry." The opinion has several times been 
stated here that creative writing, especially poetry, is not to be met with on the 
Bryn Mawr campus. In contradiction to that theory, stands the undeniably good 
poetry read at that meeting, an account of which has already been given in the 
Bulletin. 

As a supplement to our afternoons of poetry we heard Dr. Dhan Ghopal 
Mukerji rehearse his oft-given lecture on the need to meditate. Even those who 
had many times heard the Indian sage deliver his message that "silence within man 
outweighs all things and measures the universe," said that they never tire of being 
told to go off somewhere and contemplate. No cases of contemplation have been 
noticed on the campus, but we suppose Dr. Mukerji's hearers take a certain aca- 
demic pleasure in being advised to climb a Himalayan precipice and sit. Perhaps 
more applicable to our present surroundings and situation was the talk given on 
art appreciation by Mr. Hopkinson, who is at present engaged in painting Miss 
Park's portrait. His advice, addressed to the layman as well as the Art Major, 
was to analyze a picture not only for its subject, but also for the formal elements 
of composition, form and colour; and to improve our technique of art criticism, he 
described what the artist looks for in a painting, and incidentally how he composes 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



his own paintings. It was all very fascinating and the audience looked even more 
attentive than usual. 

We were led through the intricacies of another department of the arts by 
Mr. Reginald Pole, who spoke on The Theatre of the Future and its Signposts. 
Mr. Pole, as actor, playwright, and producer, was especially well-fitted to speak 
on the subject of the future of the theatre, and a large audience assembled in the 
Deanery to be given a look into the future. Although Mr. Pole began his lecture 
by describing the origin of the theatre in the Greek religious festivals, an intro- 
duction peculiarly irritating to a Bryn Mawr audience thrice-dipped in the "Birth 
of the Drama," he soon repaired that slip by his inspired comment on modern 
dramatists and readings from their plays. Mr. Pole's theory that the theatre of 
the future will be the meeting-place of all the arts was received with enthusiasm 
by a group predominantly interested in the stage, and we may say that he had a 
great success. Since speakers on the drama, at least those as excellent as was 
Mr. Pole, are always well-attended, it is to be hoped that the Players' Club will 
carry out its often-threatened plan of having a series of talks given by people 
prominent in the theatre. That body has, by the way, elected itself a president, 
B. Lord, '35, and now promises to be more active than it has been in its uneventful 
past. 

The Varsity Dramat Board is presenting Pygmalion this year. The Board 
very wisely decided not to attempt a repetition of its success of last fall in the 
period drama. The Knight of the Burning Pestle, and in a somewhat distracted 
canvass of modern plays finally came back to that old standby, George Bernard 
Shaw. He is not popular with the present generation of undergraduates, many of 
whom recall The DeviVs Disciple, Too Good to Be True, and Heartbreak House, 
not without a shudder of horror, but the moving spirits in Dramat — M. Kidder, 
J. Barber and H. Bruere — should be able to confound his unkind critics and 
produce a success. In their Shaw revival they are assisted by a male cast all of 
whom are members of the Philadelphia Plays and Players' Club, and by the first 
professional director that our stage has seen in a long while. 

The divers accomplishments and plans of the aesthetes are well-matched by 
those of the athletes of the campus. In basketball, fencing, and swimming, the 
month of March was one long triumph for Bryn Mawr. Swarthmore, our rival in 
athletics, was defeated in both swimming and basketball. Although the swimming 
meet was for the first time held off campus and the members of the team had to 
cope with unfamiliar surroundings, they overcame their handicaps and came home 
victorious. That there was some interest on campus regarding the meet is proved 
by the fact that enough people to fill a large bus roused themselves from Friday 
lethargy and went along to cheer the team. We have no way of accounting for 
sudden enthusiasms that sweep the campus, yet there should be some good reason 
for the interest shown in sports this year. All the class basketball games, as well 
as those with outside teams, were attended by cheering parties whose bellows rocked 
the campus and made the library quite uninhabitable. The energy promises to be 
duplicated in tennis this spring and we look forward to an overwhelming victory 
over Vassar. 

(18) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



FURTHER CAMPUS NOTES FROM THE COLLEGE NEWS 

Dr. Miller, Lecturer in Social Economy, spoke at the Foreign Policy luncheon 
in Columbus, Ohio, on The Relation of Czechoslovakia to the Present Austrian 
Situation. Dr. Miller emphasized the point that the support of Austria and Hungary 
by Mussolini and the proposed revision of boundaries is creating a very tense feeling 
and that the Czechoslovakians are likely to resist any attempt at revision. 

At the spring meeting of the New York branch of the American Psychological 
Association on April 11, Dr. Turner, Instructor in Psychology, read a paper on 
Early Non-Tropistic Visual Orientation in the White Rat. 

Dr. Theodore de Laguna*s article on The Problem of the Laches is in the 
April issue of Mind. 

Pragmatism and Pragmaticism, the fifth volume of the collected papers of 
Charles Saunders Peirce, will be published this month by the Harvard University 
Press. Dr. Weiss, Associate Professor in Philosophy, is editing it in collaboration 
with Charles Hartshorne, of the University of Chicago. Volume V should be of 
the greatest interest to the general public, according to Dr. Weiss, since it contains 
all Peirce's published papers and many of his unpublished ones on Pragmatism. 

Dr. Weiss also has an article appearing this month as one of a number of 
credos of academic and non-academic philosophers in American Philosophy Today 
and Tomorrow. 

RADICAL UNDERGRADUATES DEMAND RHETORIC 

It has always been our belief that Freshman English was supposed to be a 
course in English Composition, but we are rapidly becoming convinced that it fails 
to give as good an English training as is either possible or necessary. We feel that 
there is not one of us who would not be grateful for a really stiff training in 
construction and style, and it is unfortunate that Freshman English gives us too 
little of either. They seem to assume that our schools will have provided us with 
a training in the fundamental characteristics of good writing so thorough that the 
college needs merely to elaborate upon our foundational knowledge. 

For the majority of us this assumption is unfounded, and we are enabled to go 
through college never feeling quite sure of the proper treatment of participial 
sentences, of infinitives used as subjects, of clausal constructions, and of the proper 
usage of "shall" and "will," of "only" and "merely" and of "due to." It is "never 
drilled into most of us that sentences should not end with prepositions, that dashes 
can be used only in certain specific cases, that dangling participles may make 
intensely amusing reading, and that there is a distinction of meaning between 
'The man, who was walking,' and 'The man who was walking.' " 

We believe that lectures on style should be given as the most important part 
of the Freshman English course, and that instruction in writing should not be 
confined entirely to interviews. It is possible that while we are taking Freshman 
English, we may never make the mistakes or run up against the problems which 
will turn up to bother us later so that individual instruction does not necessarily 
cover all the possible needs of each person in the class. The writing of reports in 
later years would be considerably simplified if we had been so thoroughly drilled 
in English construction that the usual problems never turned up to trouble us. 

(14) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ALUMNAE BOOKSHELF 

British Colonial Government After the American Revolution, 1782-1820, 
bi/ Helen Taft Manning. 580 pp. New Haven: Yale University Press. $4.00. 
Reprinted from Review by William MacDonald in New York Herald-Tribune, April 8th 
The dean of Bryn Mawr College has here explored a historical field in which 
comparatively little work has been done. It is true that the loss of the American 
colonies was followed in England by tlie appearance of a considerable body of 
anti-imperialist sentiment, and that notliing happened after 1782 in the Colonial 
field that equaled in dramatic interest the events of the twenty years preceding, but 
the anti-imperialist opposition was probably due, as Dean Manning points out, not 
so much to the defeat at Yorktown as to the "sudden and unexampled prosperity" 
which followed the peace and made the occupation and development of overseas 
possessions seem less attractive or profitable. What the intellectuals thought, how- 
ever, made little impression upon the government, and ministers busied themselves 
"staking out claims to the dominant political power on two Continents, rounding out 
British rule in India, and acquiring new outposts in other parts of the world." 
There was no particular theory of colonization or empire about it; the colonies were 
governed "with a minimum of explanation or justification," and "as far as the older 
provinces were concerned" the ministers "continued to pen dispatches which might 
have been written between 1715 and 1750." 

The field is a large one, and Dean Manning does not try to cover the whole 
of it. The first half of the book is occupied with a description of government and 
administration in the West India colonies that remained after the Continental 
United States had broken away, the particular topics being the Colonial Constitu- 
tions, the powers, duties and relations of Governors, Assemblies and courts, the 
financial problems of the civil and military establishments and the machinery in 
England for Colonial administration and the regulation of Colonial trade. The 
second half deals with the Constitutional problems of Canada, the administration 
of the West India possessions taken from France between 1793 and 1799 and the 
Cape Colony, Ceylon and Mauritius. Such obvious lack of unity as the presentation 
shows is the fault of the subject, not of Dean Manning, but wherever the narrative 
admits of a summary or an observation tliat can interpret events in terms of 
Colonial policy advantage is taken of it. It is not often that a learned monograph, 
based in large part upon manuscript material and assembling printed data, much of 
which has not before been brought together in any one place, is so admirably 
balanced or so interestingly written. 

Women Who Work, by Grace Hutchins. International Publishers, N. Y. $2.00. 

The employment of women, the conditions of their work, their wages and 
opportunities for life and liberty, make an excellent topic if one wants to look at 
modern industrial civilization in this country without adornment. This book pre- 
sents the picture with stark reality, but, in the reviewer's opinion, with a realism 
that calls loudly for public attention and understanding. The glimpse of insecurity, 
meager living and fear of pauperism that is presented here as the typical fate of 
working women in industry, in much of agriculture, in the so-called migratory 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



trades, even in offices and some professions, is taken from cold and factual govern- 
ment reports. Their authority can be questioned no more than that of other 
government census figures. The book is an excellent collection of available material 
regarding working women. It is carefully annotated, in most parts ; its sources may 
be verified readily. If the picture is appalling to the lay reader, and it will be so, 
it is a picture which any student of industrial workers, especially of women in 
industry, will recognize probably as bleakly familiar. American industry is at its 
worst in dealing with women, as in dealing with Negroes, old people, and the 
unemployed. 

The book, nevertheless, is not written for the middle class or bourgeois reader. 
It is written for working women themselves. It assumes little or no knowledge of 
history, economics or politics on the part of the reader and it is written obviously 
and honestly with propaganda intent. The writer is frankly Communist and recog- 
nizes only the left wing Communist organizations of workers as qualified to deliver 
American workers, especially wtnnen workers, from their present conditions of life 
and labour. Her references to Marx and Engels, Lenin and Stalin, are given in the 
tone of the oracle. In places, generalization in her conclusions tempts her to 
sweeping statements that are in sharp contrast to her more careful and disciplined 
collection of data. From the point of view of scholarship and of carefully sub- 
stantiated scientific statement, the reviewer cannot approve or recommend without 
qualification the phraseology, style or technique of interpretation. As a vivid pic- 
ture of the life and struggles of a large and growing part of the American people, 
not only now but for the most of our industrial history, it is probably accurate, 
however. It could be read with profit by everyone. 

The small section on the Soviet Union is good and in spirit correct in the 
reviewer's judgment. It assumes a higher degree of universality than may be 
justified, but not more than may be allowable within comparatively few years. 

Mildred Fairchild, Ph.D., 1929, 
Associate in Social Economy, Bryn Mawr College. 

The Rural Community and Social Case Work, by Josephine Brown. Family 
Welfare Association of America. $1.00. 

This book is very pertinent at a time when, to quote the preface, "in most 
states the complete absence of any form of social service in rural and small town 
communities has been brought forcibly to the attention of state and Federal relief 
administrations.'* The scheme of the book is frankly that of a text book, and deals, 
with a wealth of specific and practical detail, with problems of family life and 
social case work in the rural community. Miss Brown writes with an authority 
based on her own broad experience, and her book should be invaluable not only 
for the worker in the field, but for those in the community who wish to organize 
such work. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



PLANS FOR COMMENCEMENT WEEK 

Saturday, June 2nd, to Wednesday, June 6th 



Class 


Headquarters 


Class Supper 


Reunion Managers 


1898 


Pembroke East 


The President's House 


Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 


1899 


Pembroke West 


Common Room 


Emma Guffey Miller 


1900 


Wyndham 


Wyndham 


Helen MacCoy 


1901 


Rockefeller 


College Inn 


Beatrice McGeorge 


1909 


Denbigh 


Common Room 


Frances Browne 


1917 


Merion 


Merion 


Bertha Greenough 


1918 


Denbigh 


Denbigh 


Ruth Cheney Streeter 


1919 


Pembroke West 


Wyndham 


Mary Ramsay Phelps 


1920 


Pembroke East 


Rockefeller 


Catherine Robinson 


1932 


Rockefeller 


Picnic 


Molly Atmore Ten Broeck 


1933 


Rockefeller 


Picnic 


Margaret Collier 



The Class Suppers or Class Picnics will all be held Saturday evening, June 2nd, 
except those for 1899 and 1900, which will take place Monday evening. President 
Park has invited the Classes of 1932 and 1933 to breakfast with her at her house 
on Sunday morning. 

At noon on Sunday there will be a special meeting of the Alumnae Association 
in Goodhart Hall. This will be followed by the Alumnae Luncheon in the Deanery 
at 1.30, at which President Park and representatives of the reuning classes will 
speak. At 5 o'clock in the Reading Room of the Library there will be a short 
ceremony in connection with the unveiling of the portrait of President Park. This 
portrait, painted by Mr. Charles Hopkinson, of Boston, is the gift of the Class of 
1898. On Sunday evening, June 3rd, the Baccalaureate Sermon will be preached by 
the Reverend Donald Mackenzie, of Princeton Theological Seminary. 

On Monday two picnic luncheons have been planned for the classes of 1898- 
1901 and for 1917-1920. The Alumnae Association will give a Tea to the Senior 
Class in the Deanery at 4.30 on Monday. There will be an Alumnae- Varsity Tennis 
Tournament on Monday or Tuesday, and the Senior Garden Party will be held 
on the campus, Tuesday afternoon, June 5th. 

Dr. Karl T. Compton, President of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 
will deliver the Commencement Address in the Auditorium of Goodhart Hall on 
Wednesday morning, June 6th. 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE BOARD— A CENTURY OF PROGRESS 

Bryn Mawr is again cooperating in maintaining the Woman's College Board 
K for a Century of Progress. This year the Board has been able to secure space in 
W the Hall of Social Sciences. A paid secretary will be on hand, and on May 27th, 
K June 18th, July 9th, July 27th, August 15th, September 2nd, September 22nd, 
K October 15th, and November 1st, which will be known as Bryn Mawr Days, a 
K number of Bryn Mawr students, past and present, will serve as hostesses. Repre- 
B senting Bryn Mawr on the Executive Board is Mrs. John F. Manierre (Rachel 
K- Foster, 1925). 
■ (17) 

i 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Friday and Saturday, May I Ith and 12th — 8.20 p. nn., Goodhart Hall 

The Bryn Mawr College Glee Club presents "The Gondoliers" for the benefit of the 
Bryn Mawr Sunnmer School. Tickets: Friday, $1.75 and $1.50; Saturday, $2.00 and $1.75. 

Sunday, May 13th — 8.30 p. nn., Goodhart Hall 

First of three progranns of Chamber Music symbolizing a "Century of Progress" in Music 
by the Pro Arte String Quartet of Brussels, tendered by the Library of Congress, 
"Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge Foundation." The program will consist of quartets by 
Beethoven, Chadwick, Brahms. 

Tuesday, May 15th — 5 p. m., The Deanery (Tea at 4.30) 

A talk on "Mohammedan Life in Damascus," by Dr. Christine Adamson Essenberg, head of 
the American School for Girls at Damascus. 

Wednesday, May 16th — 8.30 p. nn., Goodhart Hall 

Second of three programs of Chamber Music by the Pro Arte String Quartet of Brussels. 
The program will consist of quartets by Franck, Carpenter, Debussy. 

Thursday, May 17th — 8.15 p. m.. The Deanery Garden 

An informal demonstration of the work done by the College Dancing Classes under the 
auspices of the Entertainment Committee of the Deanery. 

Saturday, May 19th— 8.30 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Last of three programs of Chamber Music by the Pro Arte String Quartet of Brussels. 
The program will consist of quartets by Schonberg, Harris, Hindemith. 

Sunday, May 20th — 7.30 p. m.. Out of doors, below the Music Walk 
(The Music Roonn in case of rain) 

Service conducted by the Reverend W, Brooke Stabler, Chaplain of the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

Sunday. June 3rd — 8 p. m., Goodhart Hall 

Baccalaureate Sermon by Reverend Donald Mackenzie, D.D., 
of Princeton Theological Seminary. 

Tuesday, June 5th — 4 to 7 p. nn. 

Senior Garden Party. ^ 

Wednesday, June 6th — I I a. m., Goodhart Hall 

Conferring of Degrees. Address by Dr. Karl L Compton, President of 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

All events scheduled on Daylight Saving Time 
(18) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



DOINGS OF ALUMNAE 

Helen Chapin^ 19 15^ has had such a picturesque trainings as well as a thorough 
and unique one^ that the Bulletin cannot refrain from taking some items from her 
vita sent to the Academic Committee and by them very kindly forwarded to the 
Editor. At the time that she lectured in Bryn Mawr two or three years ago spe- 
cific mention was made of her achievements in research^ and again in the last 
number of the Bulletin, in the study by the Academic Committee. This is merely 
an attempt to give some details of her experience, not of her work accomplislied, 
which consisted both of research and of making a collection of Chinese books, of 
Lamaist paintings, and of various and sundry other objects, illustrating phases of 
Chinese culture from the Han Dynasty down to the 20th Century. 

After studying both Chinese and Japanese in this country for seven years 
while she was working at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts, in 1924 she went to 
China as a clerk in the American Consulate General in Shanghai. 

"There I spent two years, during which I used my leisure hours in the study 
of Mandarin with a teacher from Peking and in the study of the classical written 
language with a member of the staff of the Chinese section of the Editorial Depart- 
ment of the Commercial Press. I also visited all the Buddhist and Taoist temples 
in the vicinity, saw a number of private collections, and used the library of tlie 
North China Branch of the Royal Asiatic Society. During my vacations I took 
trips in the interior, visiting Soochow, Hangchow (Western Lake), where I stayed 
in a Buddhist temple, Nanking, Ihsing, Shushan and Tingshan, where there are 
interesting pottery kilns in continuous operation since Ming times, P'u-t'o Shan 
and other places, taking especial care to see all the archaeological and historical 
sites in the territory I covered. During my stay in Shanghai I also found time to 
go twice a week to the Japanese movies, where there is an explainer, and to be a 
member of the Shobukai, or (Japanese) Military Arts Club. In this way I learned 
something about jujutsu, increased my powers of endurance and practiced using 
and understanding spoken Japanese. 

"At the end of my two years' contract, in April, 1926, I resigned to accept a 
temporary position with the Japanese Government in connection with the meeting 
of the Pan-Pacific Science Congress held in Tokyo in October-November, 1926. I 
spent eight months in Tokyo, living with a Japanese family; and while there I 
found the time outside of my official duties to go once a Meek to the Komazawa 
Daigaku, a Zen Buddhist university, where, with tlie help of a priest, I read a 
portion (two out of eight volumes) of the Vimalahirti Nirdesa — Chinese text. I 
also once a week took a lesson in calligraphy. A delegate to the Congress from the 
Museum of Fine Arts, I accompanied the other delegates, as a guest of the 
Japanese Government, on excursions to historic sites and old temples in different 
parts of Japan. In November of this year, 1926, I saw for the first time tlie 
world-famous collection in the Shos5in, so important for the study of Oriental art. 
Before returning to America, I spent several months studying in the famous temple 
of Yakushiji, near Nara. 

*'I have made three separate visits to Korea, the first of which was at this 
time. I have visited all, or nearly all, of the historic and archaeological sites in 
Korea, from Rakuro (colonized by Chinese of the Han dynasty, 2nd century B. C. 

(19) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



to 2nd century A. D.) and the tombs containing paintings of the 6th century near 
Heijo, and the remains at Bukkokuji and Sekkutsuan near Keishu^ to the modern 
city of Keijo (Seoul), where I saw the Chosen Exposition in 1929. After my visit 
to Korea in 1927, I started on my way to America, via India and England. I spent 
six weeks in India and Ceylon, in order to visit as many as possible of the 
archaeological sites and museums. I saw many famous sculptures and paintings, 
including those in the cave-pockets of the great rock at Sigiriya, Ceylon, and the 
sculptures and frescoes at Ajanta, in the state of the Nizam of Hyderabad, which 
are of the greatest importance for the study of Buddhist art." 

From India she went to London to work at the British Museum. Her work 
there with Mr. Waley is well known, and her help is acknowledged by him in his 
preface to the catalogue of the Stein Collection. After her return to America, she 
was again at the Boston Museum for a year before she made use of a traveling 
fellowship to return to the Orient. The account is continued in her own words. 

*'In April, 1929, I left Boston for the Orient, proceeding to the temple of 
Yakushiji, near Nara, where I had previously studied. There I continued to learn 
to use the Japanese language and to absorb a knowledge of Buddhist art. I 
attended the session of the Nara Summer School for the study of the history and 
art of the Nara period (8th century) — from the study of which much may be 
learned of the Chinese civilization of early T'ang times. I was accorded special 
privileges for repeated examination of the treasures in the Shdsoin, the famous 
collection of objects used by the household of the Emperor Shomu (who ruled Japan 
from 724) to 749), which contains, besides much that is Japanese, fine specimens of 
different kinds of Chinese art. Beautiful inlaid tables for the Chinese form of 
chess, lacquer musical instruments of exquisite workmanship, bronze mirrors, tex- 
tiles and other articles too numerous to mention are treasured in the original 8th 
century building. Among these works are many which, without stretching the 
meaning of the word, may be said to be unique or to be duplicated only within this 
collection. The Shosoin is opened to a chosen few once a year only, on the first 
fifteen days of November ; and there can be no question that the privilege of coming 
back day after day all day long which was granted to me is unusual. 

**In December, 1929, I reached Peking, where I settled down to study the 
Chinese language — continuing at the same time instruction and practice in written 
and spoken Japanese — and to see what I could of examples of Chinese art. 

"Besides visiting the temples in the vicinity, which, though they can boast 
nothing earlier than Ming (1368-1644), have yet interesting examples of archi- 
tecture and sculpture dating from this dynasty, I took trips in the interior in order 
to see archaeological sites. I visited Yiin-kang, where there are stone sculptures 
representing the Tartar Buddhist art of North Wei (5th-6th century), as well as 
the Buddhist art of T'ang (7th and 8th centuries), and T'ien-lung Shan, where 
there are stone sculptures, also Buddhist, made under the Northern Ch'i and T'ang 
dynasties (6th, 7th and 8th centuries). I saw the excavations being carried out by 
Dr. Li Chi at Anyang on the site of the old Shang capital and examined many 
specimens of pottery, oracle bones, bronze, etc., thus recovered, both on the spot 
and in Peking. I went to Kaifeng, where I saw the famous Hsin-ch'eng bronzes. 
I visited the cave-temples at Kung Hsien and at Lung-men, which are so important 
in the history of Chinese Buddhist art — ^Wei and T'ang sculptures. I may add 

(20) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



that^ on account of fear of bandits^ the expedition from Yenching University, 
which preceded me by several weeks on my trip to Hsi-an Fu, did not get to 
Lung-men. I, however, by means of a letter from Monsieur Fleury, an engineer 
working on the westward extension of the Lunghai Railway, to a Chinese in 
Loyang, was able to go — in a military car and accompanied by fourteen soldiers. 
each armed with a bayoneted gun. I went on from Loyang to Hsi-an Fu, where I 
saw many interesting and important examples of Chinese architecture and sculpture. 

"From the beginning of 1931, I was accorded the highly valuable privilege of 
attending the weekly meetings of the Committee on Paintings of the Palace Museum, 
at which the paintings formerly in the Imperial Collection are examined, discussed 
and judged. This collection, besides an overwhelmingly large number of paintings, 
good, bad, and indifferent, of the Ch'ing dynasty, and besides an unfortunately 
large number of forgeries, contains as well a number of excellent paintings of the 
best periods far greater than most Western students of Chinese art suspect. At one 
of these meetings in November, 1931, a long roll of Buddhist images was brought 
out from the hidden closets of the Palace, probably for the first time since the fall 
of the Empire. As I was the only foreigner present, with the exception of 
Dr. John C. Ferguson, whose lack of interest in Buddhist works of art is well 
known and who took but a passing interest in the scroll, I think I may justly lay 
claim to the discovery of this important painting, at least so far as we of the West 
are concerned. I have since been able, from the Nan Chao Yeh Shih, a chronicle 
dealing with the history and legends of the kingdoms once flourishing in what is 
now Yiinnan, to find the date of the Emperor Li Chen, for whom the painting was 
made. Li Chen is, strictly speaking, the period which lasted from 1173 to 1176 
(and during these years the roll was painted) included in the reign of the Emperor 
Chih Hsing (Tuan family) of the Later Li Kingdom, who reigned 1172-1200. 

"After my return to America, I found in the possession of Messrs. Yamanaka 
and Company, New York, a copy (made, I believe, in the 13th century) of a 
painting executed in 899, the second year of the reign of Chung Hsing, King of 
Nan Chao, the name of the kingdom then in power in what is now Yunnan. The 
name Chung Hsing, though applied to the Emperor, is, like Li Chen and Ch'ien 
Lung, strictly speaking, the name of a period; in this case, the period beginning in 
A. D. 898, during the reign of Shun-hua-chen, the last of the Meng family. The 
second year of Chung Hsing, I found thus from the Nan Chao Yeh Shih to corre- 
spond to the year 899 (the Yamanaka people had wrongly given the date as 
corresponding to A. D. 947). Through the kind offices of Dr. Duyvendak, I was 
asked to come to Columbia University temporarily to take charge of the Japanese 
Collection of the Library, in the absence of the Curator. This was in April, 1933, 
and I have been here ever since — after the return of the Curator, in the capacity 
of Assistant. It is since I came to Columbia that I have been able to transfer, first 
to Chinese reign dates and from these to Western dating, the reign dates of Nan 
Chao and the Later Li kingdoms, and have thus been able to date definitely the 
Palace Museum painting and the original of the copy formerly in the possession 
of Messrs. Yamanaka and Company (now in a private collection in Japan). 

"Recently I have made some translations of Chinese poems from a collection 
of T*ang poems made by the Sung scholar Wang Anshih (chiefly known for his 
economic reforms) and from the Ku Shih Hsien, made by Yiian Ting." 

(21) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish)^ 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

Dr. Louise Dudley is very interested in a 
class in "Humanities," an orientation course in 
the Fine Arts, which she is conducting at 
Stephen's College, Columbia, Mo. She prom- 
ises to let us know more about the course at 
another time. 

Dr. Edith Frances Claflin is doing research 
work at Columbia University this year. In 
February she read a paper before the Linguis- 
tic Society on "The East Caucausian r-Forms 
and the Indo-European Medio-passive r." 

Quoting from her letter telling about the 
paper: "This paper had the excitement of an 
adventure for me, since it marked the first 
occasion on which I had gone outside the 
limits of Indo-European linguistics (or com- 
parative philology, as we used to call it). The 
paper was very well received, I am glad to 
say, and led to a lively discussion, in which the 
President of the society, Professor Edward Sapir 
(one of the most distinguished of our American 
linguists, especially in the field of American 
Indian languages) joined, leaving for a few 
minutes for the purpose. So I feel encouraged 
to hope that I have succeeded in obeying the 
difficult Spenserian admonition, "Be bold, be 
bold, be not too bold!" 

"These r-forms, which are none other than 
our old friends, sequor, sequitur, etcetera, of 
Latin grammar days, and their cognates in 
Old Irish and other languages, have become a 
kind of storm center in linguistics. Formerly it 
was thought that they were a peculiarity of the 
Italic and Celtic languages. But with the epoch- 
making discovery of two new Indo-European 
languages, Tocharian, in Chinese Turkestan, 
and Hittite, in Asia Minor, both of which sur- 
prised us by possessing a well-developed passive 
and deponent system with r-endings similar to 
those of Latin and Celtic, pre-conceived no- 
tions on the subject have suffered a bouleverse- 
ment. The r-endings are important because on 
our interpretation of them depends our whole 
theory of the interrelationships among the 
Indo-European languages. 

"It happens that I had been interested in the 
r-forms for a long time, in fact, since my 
student days in the Bryn Mawr Latin Seminar. 
So it is as if my little private garden plot had 
suddenly come into the spotlight! The fact 
I have been cultivating it diligently so long 
give me a certain advantage in approaching 
a problem which has been called by Thurneysen 
(an eminent Danish scholar) 'the riddle of 
the Sphinx.' 



"Now it appears that there are also r-endings 
in certain dialects among the Caucasian lan- 
guages, a fascinating little group of non-Indo- 
European languages that have survived in the 
deep valleys of the Caucasus. The question is, 
'Is there any connection between these r-forms 
and those of Indo-European?' I venture to 
answer, 'Yes — -perhaps.' " 

Dr. Claflin also attended the meeting of the 
American Philological Association and the 
Archaeological Institute, both of which met in 
Washington at the same time that the Linguistic 
Society of America held its meeting. Her ad- 
dress at present is 417 West 118th Street, 
New York City. 

Dr. Leona Gabel writes: "I am embarking 
upon my first sabbatical, which is to be devoted 
to the investigation of Englishmen at the papal 
court in the early fifteenth century. The enter- 
prise will take me to Rome and later to 
England. 

"This is my eleventh year at Smith, where I 
have been teaching Renaissance and Reforma- 
tion, French Revolution, and assisting in the 
•survey course in European History. Next year 
I shall take my turn in directing the last-named 
course — it has around 350 students and is 
'manned' by a staflf of eight instructors. A 
three-year taste of administrative work as Dean 
of the Class of 1932 constitutes my only side- 
stepping from the academic path." 

1889 
No Editor Appointed. 

1890 

No Editor Appointed. 

1891 

No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., New York City. 

1B93 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 
c/o Brearley School 
610 East 83rd St., New York City. 

Linda Neville will not answer the Editor's 
letters, but through the kindness of Rosalie 
Furman Collins an article in a Lexington 
(Kentucky) newspaper was sent in, giving an 
account of Linda's work and of an honour 
recently conferred on her. The trophy of the 
Lexington Optimist Club was presented to her 
"for the most outstanding service to the com- 
munity during the first year," her work for the 
blind. Before a distinguished company the 
presentation was made by the Commonwealth's 
attorney, who spoke of Linda's "great spiritual 
contribution to the community." He made it 
clear that her contribution has been material, 
too, for he said that more than 700 persons 
owe to her work restored or improved sight. 
He recalled also her leadership in the fight 
against tuberculosis, and her important work in 
civic and welfare organization in public educa- 
tion as a member of the city board, and in the 
Red Cross during the World War. She has 
received awards of merit' before this, the 
Sullivan award from the University of Kentucky 
and a medal for distinguished services. It is 
more than twenty-five years since she went into 
the Kentucky mountains, saw the suflfering from 
trachoma, and organized the Kentucky Moun- 
tain Club, through which hundreds of persons 
have had medical treatment. She was instru- 
mental in the establishment of hospitals for 
trachoma by the United States Public Health 
Service, as well as in the organization of the 
Kentucky Society for the Prevention of Blind- 
ness. To quote again from the newspaper: 
"She has served as a clearing house or medium 
through which contact could be made between 
the afflicted and the best physicians. She pro- 
cured railroad passes and reduced hospital rates, 
and personally conducted the afflicted to larger 
centers for treatment." In her own home she 
has recently converted some rooms to the use 
of blind children, who need treatment while 
on the way from their homes to hospital, and 
she has also provided there a meeting-place 
for a troop of Boy Scouts; her yard is a play- 
ground for the neighborhood children! In ac- 
cepting the trophy, Linda quoted from an ad- 
dress made by her father, when he was eighty 
years old, to a group of university students: 
"If a man work for himself, the fruit of his 
work will turn to ashes on his lips." Clearly 
Linda has the best chances to enjoy a sweet 
savor in her life-work. 

Annette Hall Phillips has written from Paris. 
She is living at the Paris centre of the Asso- 
ciation of University Women (4, rue de 
Chevreuse), and is going to lectures at the 
Sorbonne. Her fundamental purpose in her 



\ 



» Sorb 

L 



travels appears to have been to transmute the 
depression to happiness. She spent a summer 
•studying at Grenoble and exploring the moun- 
tains; was in Rome for a winter, and in spring 
drove north, visiting many of those towns 
whose dear names connote joys of association, 
scenery and art. A very original idea was her 
trip from Genoa to England on a Dutch East 
Indies boat, a most satisfactory route, she says. 
She traversed the British Isles and found 
Ireland to possess "surprising charm"; and, 
for contrast, while spending a winter in Egypt, 
she went as far south as Khartoum and 
Omdurman. She has now been traveling for 
three years, and expects to return to Philadel- 
phia in June. 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

In March, Elizabeth Higginson Jackson and 
her husband took a silver wedding journey to 
Mexico. The following is snatched from a 
personal letter: "We spent a week in Yucatan 
fascinated by the ruins at Chichenitza and 
Uxmal, and by the Indians in the city of 
Merida; such a clean, beautiful, small race! 
The little baskets I got in Taxco (pronounced 
Tasco) from a little Indian girl with a squeal- 
ing baby slung on her back in a reboso, a big 
scarf that they use for many things. We had 
only eight days in Mexico, but we saw a great 
many beautiful places. Then we had to hurry 
home by rail to be in time for all our Easter 
vacations." 

Wouldn't you all like to hit the trail with 
E. 0. B. and go West, young women? "Five 
years ago," she writes, "Alice Howland and I 
went to Santa Fe under orders from the doctor. 
We had never been West and didn't want to 
go because we were provincial and rejoiced in 
the fact. However, with Sylvia Ann and Mary 
Shipley — our two small daughters — we arrived 
at the Bishop's Lodge and had hardly been 
there twenty-four hours before we decided that 
was the country where we should like to own 
land and build. We clambered onto horses 
and rode up and down through the mountains 
on the tiny narrow trails. (I don't know 
whether it was more praiseworthy for the two 
who were elderly or the two who were only 
four and five years old!) By dint of wander- 
ing back and forth through the pinyon on the 
sides of the mountain we found a most heaven- 
ly view — 'the world's most wonderful view,' we 
think it — and there we built a simili-adobe 
house. 

"We adore the life out there for many rea- 
sons. In the first place, the beauty of the color 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



is almost intoxicating, the air makes one feel 
like accomplishing everything in the world, and 
in addition there is such a delightful and 
interesting group of people. I also love the 
standards of simplicity and really genuine qual- 
ities. A typical remark was made to me by a 
woman at a luncheon when she said, 'Money 
doesn't count at all out here; it doesn't even 
count against you if you have it!' The romantic 
background of all the Spanish and Indian life 
there, as well as the excitement of the archeo- 
logical discoveries keeps one constantly on the 
qui-vive. If you want a life of unusual interest, 
which includes ancient cliff dwellers, primitive 
Indians, 17th century Spaniards, and very mod- 
ern artists and writers, I recommend to you 
Santa Fe, and then again — last as well as 
first — there is its marvelous color." 

"What is my news that might interest the 
great Class of '97?" asks Julia Duke Henning, 
the never-to-be-forgotten Trilby of our sopho- 
more days. "First and very foremost is Joan 
Henning, ten weeks old, a mutual grand- 
daughter of mine and Elizabeth Hosford 
Yandell's — a joy to both and from present indi- 
cations a candidate for a B. M. future as well 
as a past. My youngest child and son is in 
the Yale Graduate School, digging away at 
17th Century English History. My daughters 
are keen on the possibilities of art encourage- 
ment about to be developed by national 
patronage. 

"Last summer I re-uned with Emma Cadbury 
in Vienna. We had tea together after true 
B. M. C. fashion in Emma's rooms, which 
might have harbored Schubert — so late 18th 
century or early 19th were they — whatever the 
correct date should be. She is coping with 
Nazi-Heimwehr-Christian Socialist in a peaceful 
way that should furnish an example to Dolfuss. 

"The Bryn Mawr student days, in spite of 
absence, years and fortune, are a golden mem- 
ory, and those friends the most delightful peo- 
ple in the world." J. D. H.'s present address 
is Willow Terrace Apartments, Louisville, 
Kentucky. 

1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 



1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 
(Mrs. Warren Thorpe) 
15 East 64th St., New York City. 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

Elizabeth Allen Hackett writes she is doing 
nothing in particular. What follows is edi- 
torially speaking. In an idle period in an 
unusually busy life, she is qualifying as wife 
of the headmaster of a boys' school, a girls' 
■school, and a music school, with the "usual 
church work, hospital and social service, 
Shakespeare Club, etc." Her children are func- 
tioning as follows: Stephen, aged nine, in the 
boys' school; Betty, aged ten, in the girls'; 
Fred, a Sophomore at Dartmouth; Dan, a first- 
year student in the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons; Bob, finished at Princeton, has a job 
with du Pont; Allen, Jr., is pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Fulton, New York, 
and has a daughter two years old. What'll you 
bet Elizabeth plays a corking game of bridge, 
too? 

Helen Billmeyer writes that she gave up her 
work at the Baldwin School in 1927 in order 
to be at home with her mother, and since then 
has led "a quiet, domestic life interspersed 
with the usual outside activities." 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
58 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Haughwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 

The Class Editor hates to curtail any of the 
news which has suddenly begun to pour in. 

Louise Maclay writes that she goes to 
Bryn Mawr at intervals. She is just starting, 
you remember, her second year as Alumnae 
Director. She is serving on the Buildings and 
Grounds Committee, and is Secretary of the 
new Deanery Committee. Louise goes about 
beautifying the country. In Millbrook she is 
Chairman of Roadside and Conservation of that 
garden club. Incidentally, the Maclays have 



(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



been making war on termites, the presence of 
which, she writes, is not newspaper talk, but 
sad fact. They would have caused the collapse 
of Louise's house but for the Maclays' timely 
and successful interference. 

Helen Brown Gibbons' daughter, Christine 
Este Gibbons, is to marry on June- 12th 
Alpheus Thomas Mason, of the Department of 
Politics at Princeton University. Dr. Mason 
is a writer of note and the young bride is also 
a writer as well as a musician. 

From Shanghai comes a fascinating letter 
from Louise Cruice Sturdevant. She is junk 
sailing along the China coast, teaching the 
Chinese new ways to ride in rickshas, and 
peering into volcanoes. The Sturdevants have 
a house on Tunsin Road, which is almost coun- 
try, living like plutocrats. Her husband is in 
command of the First Battalion. Mary Alice 
attends the Shanghai American School, expect- 
ing to take her preliminaries next spring. 

Mariam Coffin Canaday's daughter, Doreen, 
is President of 1936 at Bryn Mawr. 

Alice Ropes Kellogg's husband has returned 
from China and is now pastor in a Congrega- 
tional Church in Forest Grove, Oregon, where 
they are living, Alice helping in the church 
work. Their oldest daughter attends the Con- 
gregational College in Forest Grove, the second 
is at the Oregon State Normal School. There 
are two younger daughters at home. 

1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edna Brown Wherry punctuates her year 
nicely by pleasant vacations with her husband. 
In March they took a southern cruise; in May 
they always take a long week-end at Cape Cod 
to open their house at West Falmouth; they 
spend July there themselves, and have always 
been fortunate enough to rent it for the rest 
of the summer, and then take another holiday 
over Labor Day, with a few extra days to see 
about closing the place for the winter. She is 
planning, to abandon her husband to golf for 
a few days in May while she and May Ballin 
try out the Deanery. In justice to the Wherry 
household I should say that Fred is one of the 
hardest working, as well as one of the most 
prominent lawyers of Newark, and that Edna's 
name is connected with every worthy cause in 
the city. She has just concluded her term as 
a member of the School Board. 

Grace Hutchins has just published a new 
book, Women Who Work. This is reviewed on 
page 15 of this issue. 

Mabel Foster Spinney's daughter, Johanna, 
is a Freshman at Leland Stanford, and her big 
boy is at Middlebury College, Vermont. 

Peggy Barnes, after toying with the idea of 
goilig to Hollywood to write dialogue for the 
movies, decided against it in favor of returning 



to the home circle in time to give a party for 
her mother-in-law in honour of her eightieth 
birthday, and shortly after that entertained her 
three sons, home from Harvard and Milton for 
spring vacation, by driving with them to 
Washington. As material for an interview on 
the home life of some of our illustrious writers 
this is pretty good. 

Don't forget that we have three 1907 children 
graduating this June, daughters of Helen 
Smitheman Baldwin, Brooke Peters Church and 
Grace Brownell Saunders. 

1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

1909 

Class Editor: Ellen Shippen 

14 East 8th St., New York City. 

1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rot an Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road. Brookline, Mass. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 

Carlotta Welles Briggs writes from 31 his 
Boulevard Suchet, Paris: "If Florence Leopold'? 
son Tom, aged ten, is, according to the last 
Bulletin, the son of her old age, then Jimmy, 
aged four and a half years, and Tommy, ten 
months, are the sons of my dotage. But I wish 
to state that one's dotage thus enlivened is a 
delightful time, and I urge all 1912, married or 
single, to do likewise. Please do not expurgate 
this. 

"I find the Bulletin interesting reading and 
sometimes take it to bed wnth me. Then 
Tommy comes in early in the morning and 
chews up the pages, so nothing is wasted. 

"While having strong opinions on the subject 
of recent events here, I should not like to print 
them, and they are probably wrong anyway. 
It is all so very complicated and confused one 
cannot know what is going on. At any rate, 
France is still a free country. People can and 
do say and write what they please and nobody 
comes to arrest them." 

Phyllis Goodhart, the Class Baby, has won a 
position on the Editorial Board of the News. 



(26) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

My humble apologies to the class for the 
lack of news in the last issue. By the time 
this one arrives you will be getting into your 
summer clothes and delighted to cool yourselves 
off with this news of New England in February. 

Katherine Page Loring has spent her second 
winter in Chocorua, N. H., and writes from 
there on February 6th: "I am absolutely sold 
to the remote and lovely (or it may be 'lonely,' 
Ed.) life in the depths of a New England 
winter, thermometer ranging from 42° below 
to 42° above. Doing lots of housework, of 
which I like the washing best. Teaching 
7-year-old son. Standing by for invasions of 
young from school or college, which give me 
an excuse for plenty of skiing, snowshoeing, 
coasting and skating. Reading Life of 
Beveridge, Letters of D. H. Lawrence, On 
Reading Shakespeare, Adventures of Ideas. 
Music: Struggling with Beethoven and Bach." 
Alice Page and Kate Loring are both in board- 
ing school. 

Clara Pond Richards lives on a farm 45 
miles southwest of Rochester and 50 miles 
southeast of Buffalo, on Route 245, near Perry, 
New York. She writes: "I am still house- 
keeping in a little brown farm bungalow, still 
caring for my two sons, a dog, a cat, a hus- 
band and some goldfish. I read Time, The 
Literary Digest, New Yorker, Parents, farm 
journals, and occasional books on child guid- 
ance, schools, travel, etc. My elder son, Teddy, 
is at home this winter on special permission 
for home study. My mother is spending the 
winter with us and is teaching Teddy Latin, 
French, German, and Literature. I am giving 
him a sort of general course in Science and 
Algebra. We thought him too young for high 
school last fall and couldn't swing boarding 
school. The other son, Gilbert, is still in the 
district school, of which I have been Trustee 
for the last few years and out of which I get 
quite a kick. Guernsey cows are the big 
interest of the farm." 

From Marjorie Murray: "I am living a very 
busy and interesting life in Cooperstown, N. Y., 
running the pediatrics at the Bassett Hospital. 
The medical group are most congenial, there is 
plenty to do, and it seems unbelievable that 
these professional opportunities should be set 
in a beautiful country village with a lake and 
hills to make winter and summer sports and 
pleasures possible." 

From Clara Belle Thompson Powell: "I am 
a garden variety of advertising copy writer and 
love it. I can get thrilled over beetles, or 
fountain pens, or steamships, depending on the 
client. In a staff composed exclusively of men 



I am supposed to supply the feminine touch. 
My outside life is fairly normal, theatres, music, 
books, a little contract." 

From Edna Potter Marks: "I am keeping 
house and raising three children on a much 
curtailed budget, 1934 style. I am reading 
daily papers and the cook-book, magazines and 
borrowed books when time permits. I intend 
to stick at it until my two and a half-year-old 
daughter is ready for Bryn Mawr! 

From Alice Ames Crothers: "My life is most- 
ly a pleasant daily routine which I find inter- 
esting, but which is not interesting reading, 
even to classmates. For the moment I am 
•staying out of many committees while Charlie 
is at the beguiling age of two and a half. I 
am on the Difficult Case Committee of the 
Cambridge Family Welfare Society." 

From Alice Hearne Rockwell: "I would not 
dare to write anything for publication after 
reading about the exciting lives which most 
Bryn Mawr graduates seem to live. I never 
travel except to Boston or Pittsfield. My trips 
on the water consist of paddling around the 
pond on our place. My winter sports are driv- 
ing a car on icy roads and shoveling snow. 
I have two sons at Phillips Academy and one 
in the fifth grade of the public schools. They 
are neither especially athletic nor especially 
studious, but I enjoy them. We have a great 
time." 

From Laura Kennedy Gridley: "In November 
there was a great ECONOMY shake-up in 
New York City, so I found myself from Friday 
to Monday transferred from the boys' high 
school on the East Side, in which I had been 
teaching, to a large girls' high school in 
Brooklyn. Boys and girls are undoubtedly both 
human beings, but taken en masse are cer- 
tainly very different. The teachers here are 
mostly women, also, and such an atmosphere 
of sweetness and light prevails that I am still 
gasping for breath in the highly rarefied 
atmosphere." 

1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 
We are glad to have two addresses from 
classmates long unheard from: 
Mrs. Hesser C. Ruhl (Sophie Foster), 

Northfield, Mass. 
Eleanor Gale, 

1715 Oakland Avenue, Piedmont, 
Alameda County, Calif. 
On March 21st many members of the 
Bryn Mawr Club of Boston met to hear Betty 
Lord speak about her work in psychology at 
the Children's Hospital. Betty was in fine 
form and gave a most interesting talk and 
answered innumerable questions afterwards. 
She spends much time giving tests, taking pic- 



(26) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tures, consulting about difficult cases and fol- 
lowing up cases in the wards and outpatient 
departments. All under the guidance of a 
Bryn Mawr husband, Dr. Bronson Crothers. 

Dorothea Bechtel Marshall served two weeks 
in January on the jury in the Federal Court, 
under Kirkie's husband. Judge Welsh. She 
said it was most interesting. 

Margaret Sears Bigelow is Chairman of the 
Junior Red Cross in Framingham. She spoke 
at the conference at the Hotel Statler in Feb- 
ruary, and from her youthful appearance it 
seems fully to agree with her. 

Dorothy Weston has a job in New York that 
has to do with the paper manufacturers' codes. 
She has already been advanced and is in the 
publicity department. She is living at the 
Parkside Hotel in Gramercy Park. 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Constance Dowd Grant is the new Scholarship 
Chairman for District IV. On March 2nd she 
and Elizabeth Smith Wilson, 1915, the new 
Councillor, drove up to Columbus to confer 
with Adeline Werner Vorys and Antoinette 
Hearne Farrar, 1909, who are retiring from 
these offices. They all had luncheon at Ad's 
house and tea at the Columbus School for 
Girls. The rumor that Ad had moved is un- 
founded. She is still in her attractive and 
spacious home at 43 Hamilton Avenue. Early 
in April Cedy drove to New York on business 
pertaining to Camp Runoia's coming season. 

Helen Riegel Oliver had an early spring trip 
to Georgia. On a bleak March day when a 
savage wind tore off our hat at every corner 
and shook our home to its very roots, we re- 
ceived from Helen a postcard all covered over 
with the green grass and leafy trees and sunny 
skies of Augusta, and we thought that some 
people had all the luck. She said that she 
attended the Alumnae meetings in February 
and saw Eleanor Hill Carpenter, Eva Bryne 
and Louise Dillingham. Dilly is on the Aca- 
demic Committee. 

Dorothy Turner Tegtmeier is enjoying her 
four lively children so much that she refuses 
to be daunted by these lean times when it 
takes the maximum of stretching to make ends 
meet around a family of six. Dora, the oldest, 
is headed for a school of design, since she has 
marked artistic ability. Fred, a Freshman in 
high school, hopes to go to the University of 
Pennsylvania and then teach mathematics. Bill, 
aged 11, aspires to be an airplane pilot, though 



as yet his mother is not very air-minded. 
Dorothy, who is 8, wants to go to a school 
where they teach you to be a mother. With 
■such a variety of interests and talents about 
her we don't wonder that Dot finds life any- 
thing but dull. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough 
203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

The class extends its deep sympathy to 
Eleanor Dulles, whose husband died suddenly 
on March 19th in Baltimore, as was noted in 
the last Bulletin, just as it went to press. 
Dr. Blondheim was a Professor of Romance 
Philology at Johns Hopkins University, and 
was regarded as the "outstanding man in the 
field of mediaeval French and French linguis- 
tics." 

Our sympathy is extended also to Natalie 
McFaden Blanton, whose father died suddenly 
last summer, and to Constance Morss Fiske, 
whose father died last fall. 

Elizabeth Granger Brown, who has been 
spending some time abroad, has just returned 
to her home in New York. 

Constance Hall Proctor is now living at the 
Washington Terrace Apartments in Sheffield, 
Alabama. Her husband is building a town for 
the Wheeler Dam at Muscle Shoals. 

REUNION. Can you believe it? '17 is 
coming back for its 17th, June 2nd to 6th. 
There is all kinds of excitement in the air, but 
just what it is, you will have to come and see 
for yourself. (Betty Faulkner, Carrie Shaw 
and Caroline Stevens are back of some of it, 
you may be sure.) S\0 IF you have not already 
sent in your card to Greenie to say you'll be 
there, don't hesitate another minute. We need 
YOU to make this our biggest and best reunion. 

i9ia. 

Class Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 

3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. 0., Phila. 
Last call for Reunion! 1 hope all members 
who are still undecided will obey that impulse 
and come back to Bryn Mawr on June 2nd 
and 3rd. You will find a warm welcome and 
a good time. Ruth Cheney Streeter. 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 

(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell)^ 

Setauket, Long Island. 

It was with great sorrow that we learned of 

the death of our beloved classmate, Margaret 

Rhoads, on March 13th. Peggy had not been 

well for at least two years. Her family had 

taken her South for the winter, hoping the 

warmth would mean her recovery, but about 

the beginning of the year she had to go to the 

hospital, remaining there until her death. For 



(27) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



more than nine years Peggy was connected 
with the Mission Board of Friends as Secretary. 
Twice she was in Japan for extended periods 
in this work. Peggy endeared herself to us all 
by her lovely nature, her deep spirituality, and 
by the fineness of her life. She was to us all 
a Quaker girl who beautifully expressed the 
beauty and friendliness of her faith. Her pass- 
ing leaves us with tender memories and a deep 
respect and gratitude for her splendid example 
and for her sweet gentleness. 

1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 East 57th St., New York Gity 

1920 is to have its fourteenth reunion next 
month. Full details will be sent out as soon 
as Milly can get the committee together. 

From the April Spur we learn that William 
Piatt (Margaret Littell's husband) with two 
other architects has won the "award of fifteen 
thousand kroner for a replanning scheme for 
the Lower Norrmalm section of the Swedish 
capital." 

From Zella Boynton Selden: "My silence is 
due to lack of news. We spent the summer 
on an island in the Muskoka Lake District in 
Ganada. Still have three boys and no more 
and no less. Like everyone else, we are broke, 
so I do much mophandling and caring for 
children. P. T. would disapprove, but then 
she never tried it. The school is still surviv- 
ing. It is my major interest, and, with a 
class in Botany, my winter intellectual pursuit. 
Peg Hutchins is in Westport, according to a 
Ghristmas card." 

Lillian Davis Philip also reports that she 
has three sons, aged eight and a half, four 
and a half, and almost two. And Edith S. 
Stevens has four children, two boys and two 
girls. We suspect that Mary Hardy has been 
visiting Lillian, as she was seen on her way 
to the Staten Island Ferry. 

1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelly Erdman 
(Mrs. G. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave., Pasadena, Galif. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York Gity. 

1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York Gity 

Personally we find this column very interest- 
ing. But not on account of the things that we 



write in it. We appear to have an unknown 
collaborator. Three times we have read over 
our notes in the Bulletin (it's so fascinating 
to see oneself in print) to discover an item 
appended of which we'd never even heard. 
We're not complaining. We're delighted with 
the element of surprise that it brings into our 
editorial life, and we piously thank heaven 
that someone knows something about 1923, 
bless its little heart. We're just disclaiming 
responsibility! 

We have some addenda to the note on Helen 
Dunbar in the March issue. Her lecture on 
The Relation of. Emotion to Health, given at 
the Junior League was also delivered at sev- 
eral other clubs in New York. She is Execu- 
tive Director of the Federal Gouncil of 
Ghurches of Ghrist in America and the 
New York Academy of Medicine. On the per- 
sonal side, she is married, lives, and has her 
office! at 935 Park Avenue. 

We have held over this note for a couple of 
months, hoping for more detail. Esther Rhoads 
Houghton had a daughter, born some time in 
December. Name unknown. The Houghtons 
live at 35 Ash Street, Gambridge, Mass. 

Isabelle Beaudrias Murray has been doing 
work in the clinic at Roosevelt Hospital two 
afternoons a week. She has moved to another 
apartment in Yonkers and thereby acquired a 
telephone exchange brand new in that city. 

Marion Lawrence is teaching in the Fine 
Arts Department at Golumbia University and 
living with an aunt in New York. 

1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 
(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 
8102 Ardmore Ave., Ghestnut Hill, Pa. 

The latest scheme for assisting the weary 
mother struggling with young children is being 
tried out in Gambridge. Ailing Armstrong 
Arnold writes very enthusiastically: "The Gam- 
bridge Home Information Genter is backing 
one of my pet schemes for the training of 
high school graduates, who specialized in home 
economics, to give adequate household service. 
A group of employers, who keep house and 
raise families with the services of one maid, 
have joined together to enlist the interest of 
the high school girls and give them training 
in child and home psychology. This includes 
the subtleties of gracious telephone answering, 
door-bell service, and correct table service. 
Two girls, graduates of the Foxbury High 
School of Practical Arts, are supposedly taking 
a six months' course in my home. The other 
day I dressed up in the uniform and went over 
to Pamela Coyne Taylor's to give a demon- 
stration of household assistant's service, but, 
due to a record-breaking New England blizzard, 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her maid couldn't go out as planned, neither 
did anyone drop in for tea, so I had to confine 
my demonstration to the telephone." 

In reply to many requests, the next reunion 
of '24 will be held in 1935 with the Classes of 
1922, 1923 and 1925. 

The class extends its deepest sympathy to 
Alice Little Nelson, whose husband, Dr. Curtis 
Nelson, died March 3rd. 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Alas, alas — back from the glorious luxury 
of hospital life to the grim realities of house- 
keeping: stalking dust, feeding the tropical fish, 
hunting a spring costume and wondering in 
our urbane fashion what the little green things 
coming up expect us to do about them. 

Far oflf in Manhattan, we hear, Via Saunders 
Agee has been doing a piece of work in 
The Common Sense office. Edith Walton Jones, 
who imparted the news, seemed to think it 
useless to attempt explaining the job. She said 
it was too complicated for us. But Via is 
working hard. 

Edith, herself, goes a merry pace. Besides 
being the good hostess, the bright spot in the 
home and all that, she writes all the book 
reviews for The Forum and the reviews for 
several newspapers — ^all signed work. 

Chisy (Helen Chisolm Tomkins) made a 
sensational entry in the New York Hospital 
in a lovely orchid ambulance (appendicitis in 
February), and now she and her husband are 
traipsing through art museums in Washington 
by way of recuperating. 

Jean Gregory has been working this winter 
in Providence in a Hospital. 

From Algy Linn, our Philadelphia reporter, 
we hear: "The only victim of the storms that 
I know of is poor Carrie (Remak), who, after 
skiing intrepidly all over Chestnut Hill, slipped 
on the ice in town and broke her leg. She 
broke it just above the ankle in a perfectly 
straightforward way, and has it in a cast and 
can hobble around on crutches. The Linns are 
very conservative with ice, taking it practically 
on all fours, and so far have managed to pre- 
serve their brittle bones!" 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellen or Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 



1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr. 

401 23rd St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Maly Hopkinson writes to claim the honor 
of breaking the deadlock in babies for her son 
John, who was born on February 12th. She tells 
us that Cal Crosby Field's daughter Margaret 
did her best to re-establish the tie by arriving 
on February 18th, but the boys still have the 
lead by virtue of Edith Morgan Whitaker's son, 
whose name, we hear, is to be Douglas Hunt 
Whitaker. This still has to be confirmed from 
official sources. 

The engagement of Jean Fenner to Davidge 
Harrison Rowland, of Baltimore, has been an- 
nounced. Mr. Rowland is a graduate of Johns 
Hopkins University. 

Jo Stetson was married on April 5th to 
Robert Hatcher, of East Hartford, Conn., at 
St. James' Church in New York. Her sister 
lola was her maid of honor, and among the 
attendants were Elly Morris, '27, and Rosalie 
Humphrey, '29. 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Mary Durfee was married on the 7th of 
April to Mr. Charles Bennett Brown. They 
will live in New York. 

Olivia Stokes is doing volunteer secretarial 
work at the National Red Cross headquarters 
in Washington. 

Mary Elizabeth Edwards has a job in Okla- 
homa City under the Federal Emergency Relief 
Administration, investigating the cases that 
come up for relief. 

Henrietta Wickes is working for the N. R. A. 
in the Compliance Division at Washington. 

It is rumored that Celeste Page and Betty 
Zalesky have also been seen in the corridors of 
the Commerce Building, but whether they were 
there as workers for the N. R. A. or in some 
other capacity is not known to us. 

1931 

Class Editor: Evelyn Waples Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., New Britain, Conn. 

1932 

Class Editor: Josephine Graton 

182 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. Gen ral 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
small classes. Ample grounds 
near Orange Mountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. Write for 
booklet. 

LUCIE C. BEARD 

Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. ROWLAND 
ELEANOR O. BROWNELL 



Principals 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY. CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 
Bryn Mawr College 

Head Mimtream 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT, A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE LITCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DAVIES, Headmistress 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Caroline Buutz-Rees, Ph.D. \ Head 
Mary E. J^owndes, M. A., Litt.D. J Mistresses 
Katherine P. Debevoise* Assistant to the Heads 



TOW-HEYWOOn 

\ J On theSound^At Shippan Pointy | / 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 
Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 
Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

On$ hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, HeadmUtrem* 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school. Prepares 
for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. 
Four-year high school course. In- 
tensive one-year course for high school 
graduates. Resident enrollment lim- 
ited to twenty-five. Individual instruc- 
tion. Informal home life. Outdoor 
sports including riding. 

MARY B, THOMPSON, Principal 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawk Alumnae Buixetih 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 










FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Art, and Dramatics, 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front— Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming: Pool— Riding:. 



For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 



LAKE FOREST 



ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 miles from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on reauest. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcllffe. Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD, A. B., Bryn Mawr, 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr» Motint 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges. Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS, CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country School College Preparatory 

Head: 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 

150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 



SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School, St. Martinis 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Bryn Mawr 



Kindly mention Bkyn Maws Axumnaz Buuxriv 





BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 












Philadelphia School of 
Occupational Therapy 

Professional training for women — accred- 
ited two and three year courses include 
study of medical subjects,' handcrafts, 
courses at University of Pennsylvania and 
Hospital Practice in Occupational Therapy. 
Pre-requisite High School education. 

• 

MARGARET TYLER PAUL. A.B.. Director 

419 South 19th Street 

Philadelphia 




LowTHORPE School 

of Landscape Architecture 
GROTON, MASS. 

Courses in Landscape Architecture, in' 
eluding Horticulture and Garden Design, 
given to a limited number of students 
in residence. Anne Baker, Director. 

Summer School Starts June 25, 1934 
Write for Catalogue 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge. Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on tlie Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Manager 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 386 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD. President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 



R 



eady now for delivery 



A 



SERIES of twelve Staffordshire 
dinner plates hy "Wedgwood . . . 



^^' prpn ifWalur ^Mt^ 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please reserve for me ;, sets of Bryn MaWr plates at $1? per set. 

I enclose $5 deposit on each set and will pay balance when notified that the plates 
are ready for shipment. 



Color choice Q Blue Q Rose [] Green []] Mulberry 



Signed..., 



Address., 



MaXe chec\s payahle and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 



Kindly mention Bxyn Mawk Alum nab BtnjLSTiN 





1896 1934 

BACK LOG CAMP 

A Camp for Adults and Families 
SABAEL P. O., NEW YORK 

ON INDIAN LAKE. IN THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 

The Toung People in the Family 

At a certain age boys and girls outgrow the regular camjis they have been going to, anr] 
the question arises: Where shall they spend the summer? They are not quite grown up and on 
their own and yet they are no longer kids needing looking after. 

Back Log is not a young persons' camp in the sense that it is chiefly populated by boys 
and girls. But we do have a good many whole families each summer. Many of the young 
people like it for two reasons: There is always something going on in the way of a wilderness trip; 
and there are none of those regulations that are so necessary in the regular boys' and girls' camps. 

We are not making a bid for unaccompanied young people, although we do occasionally 
consent to take such (but not always). We suggest that you consider a holiday en famillc; 
and we prophecy that the whole family will be enthusiastic. Or if you have no family of your 
own, how about your nieces and nephews? 

For illustrated hoo\let address 
MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT : 272 PARK AVENUE. TAKOMA PARK. D. C. 



00 & 1 CELEBRATED HANDS 



By MILTON C. WORK 

Pres.. U. S. Bridge Assn. 
ond 

OLIVE A. PETERSON 

Certified Teocher of the Sims. 

Culbertson, and Official Systems 

Holder of Women's National Championships 



n 
O 



TO 

A book for every Contract player. Nothing similar has ever been ^^ 

published before. Contains one hundred and one famous hands ^^ 

(no freaks) played in leading tournaments. Each hand is bid ^j 
according to the three popular systems. Then the actual play of 

the cards is given. Finally the play is explained and analyzed. RQ 

Invaluable to players and teachers. The hands ^^ ^\^\ ^Tl 

also offer an ideal selection for Duplicate play. ^ | ^^J^J ^^ 

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY W 

WINSTON BUILDING PHILADELPHIA, PA. ^\ 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 




Olicstcrliclcl 
M^'-Smitli? 



1934, LfCGETT & MvFRs ToBArro Co 




Yes, lliank vou 
M'-Smitii! 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




'w^^i^'f 



SIGNIFICANT ACTIVITIES 



OF ALUMNAE 



June, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 6 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT. 193'' 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 







OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 




EXECUTIVE BOARD 




President Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 




Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 




rk;,^«*^« of To„„.> /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins. 1905 
Directors at Large ^j^^p^. g^^^^ p^^^^^^ jgog 




ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 




EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 




DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 
District I Mary C. Parker, 1926 




District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 




District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 




District IV Elizabeth Smith Wilson, 1915 




District V Jean Stirling Gbegort, 1912 




District VI Mary Taussig, 1933 




District VII Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 




ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 




Virginia McKennbt Claiborne, 1908 Virginia. Kneeland Frantz, 1918 
Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 Florance Watbrbury, 1905 
Gertrude Dietrich Smith, 1903 




CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Virginia Atmore, 1928 




CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen FAm.KNBB, 1913 




CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maguirb, 1913 




CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 




CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Niblds Bancroft, 1898 









m 

I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OP Brtn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



J 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, ^96 Elinor Amram Nahm, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-officio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnas Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadelpliia, Pa. 

Vol. XIV JUNE, 1934 No. 6 



All phenomena now are explained by the Depression, just as in an earlier 
period C'est la guerre accounted for everything. One of the things, however, 
that the depression may really account for is the increased intellectual interest and 
curiosity that is being shown by students, everywhere, in the schools and colleges. 
One need only pick up the paper to see the thing stated again and again in different 
terms. Miss Corwin's article on Pre-College Guidance in this number, telling of 
the nine hundred girls from what was after all a limited area, all of whom the 
Conference could not care for, is simply more evidence. Some of the educators 
in the middle west feel that this interest will ultimately express itself in insistent 
demands that may revolutionize all the methods of college training. A recent 
article, discussing the Undergraduate of 1934, says of him, and with equal justice 
could say of her: "A new undergraduate is now in college. . . . He is worth 
listening to . . . and even if he were not, he is insistent on making himself heard. 
And he has something to say." President Park in her Page in the May issue of 
the Bulletin speaks of the changes in the Faculty for next year being interesting 
in their connection with the courses definitely called for by the students themselves. 
She cites again the increasing registration in Economics, which makes necessary 
the appointment of an additional instructor who will give a Second Year under- 
graduate course and a Seminary in Money and Banking. Professor Edman, in the 
article from which I have already quoted, says of the Undergraduate in general: 
"He is seriously concerned in a way hardly precedented in any college generation 
with the current economic and political situation." The undergraduate's preoccu- 
pation, however, is something more fundamental than that. "... he is much 
exercised by what conception of the good life may be framed for a society created 
by machinery and its economic invokements." Some of the elements in this good 
life, as the Bryn Mawr Undergraduates see it, to drop generalizations, are indi- 
cated by the interest with which they are looking forward to such courses as 
Dr. Chew's "Literary History of the Bible," a course in History of Religions, in 
English Composition, and in French Diction, and Modern History, as well as the 
courses in economics. What they desire are resources within themselves. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A WINTER UNDER THE NEW DEAL AT WASHINGTON 

By Emma Guffey Miller, 1899 

It will be some time before any of us forget March 4th, 1933, whether we 
voted in 1932 for Hoover, Thomas or Roosevelt. It was quite definite from 
President Roosevelt's inaugural address that we were entering a New Era. This 
changed Era has been very evident to anyone living in Washington during the past 
winter. Outwardly life goes on here much the same as a few years ago, but there 
are changes which are hard to define. There is gaiety, but less jazz; costly enter- 
tainments, but not such elaborate ones as in former years ; many expensive establish- 
ments, but they are becoming rather the exception than the rule. The capital city 
is filled with huge houses for rent or sale; ornate left-overs of the Gay 90's, hand- 
some Colonial or Georgian reproductions, modified Spanish and Italian villas, stand- 
ing with drawn blinds waiting for another boom period, or hoping to be taken over 
by some enterprising Night Club enthusiast. 

It is curious how little some of the Washingtonians realize how far behind is 
the Coolidge-Hoover type of prosperity, and how definitely we have turned our 
faces away from the blatancy and shallowness of what were termed our most 
prosperous years. It is amusing for anyone accustomed to viewing Washington 
from the outside to see it for the first time from within. It is like coming from 
the great open spaces to a narrow village street. Somehow the people who are 
boastful of being real Washingtonians impress one as being similar to isolated 
villagers. Many of my friends know that my opinion of the political intelligence 
of the average citizen is not very high, but when it comes to Washington it shrinks 
appreciably. Rarely have I met so many women who rank as cultured who are so 
ignorant, or indifferent, to the momentous affairs which surround them. One day 
I heard a very simple and direct talk by a woman who told how women might help 
with and almost control NRA. When discussing it in the hallway with an enthusi- 
astic friend we were interrupted by a woman who said "Such things should be left 
to the men. Women should not soil their hands with such affairs." I asked the 
lady if she considered voting, "soiling one's hands," and she replied, "Certainly I 
do. I live in the District and do not vote and do not want to vote. I could vote 
in Maryland because I own property there, but no member of my family has voted 
for five generations." Mirahile diciu! We had encountered a member of that 
rapidly vanishing race, "Washington Cave Dwellers." Amusement kept me dumb, 
but not so the wife of a Western Congressman, who spoke up sharply and said, 
"Why have you never taken out your naturalization papers?" This non-voting 
woman represents a type common throughout the country, among both men and 
women, whose political philosophy is based upon pure materialism, and whose 
preferences for public office when expressed are on the side of high finance. They 
scarcely ever study policies per se, but are content to gain enlightenment through 
some talkative man who expresses his disgust for new ideas by such remarks as 
"Everything on the Hill is at 6's and 7's," or "The Constitution is being torn 
apart," or "The President is a moron," etc., etc., etc. Such women have lived so 
very complacently for years that now when an administration enters which roughens 
their smugness, they are not merely upset but highly resentful. What a place for a 
Bryn Mawr graduate trained by the dynamic and onward-marching Miss Thomas ! 

(2) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Imagine my going into a room full of women who are left-overs from previous 
Republican administrations^ from the Hayes period down^ being welcomed cour- 
teously and with curiosity as a newcomer from Pennsylvania. Immediately the talk 
turns to the Reed-Pinchot Senatorial primary and I am asked to declare my 
allegiance. When I do and it is to the Democratic Party^ the air immediately grows 
chill. There is a sudden withdrawal into shells and the silence becomes significant. 
Then the conversation is changed to something personal among the ladies. So polite 
farewells are said and out goes the lone Democrat like an untouchable. Evidently 
to many Washingtonians it is still worse to be a Democrat tlian any type of 
Republican. That attitude^ of course^, does not apply to a large number of inter- 
esting people of whom one never reads in the society columns^ whose interests are 
intellectual and who endeavor to keep up with world affairs. Henceforth^ however, 
many of this type may seal their lips since Dr. Wirt did all the talking at a simple 
dinner, now become famous. Little but entertainment came out of the Wirt investi- 
gation as far as discovering any dire plot to ruin the country, but one cannot read 
or hear many of the opposition utterances without realizing that, according to some 
members of Congress, it has become a disgrace to be educated and a crime to be 
an expert. 

No one should object in the least to constructive criticism of Government 
policies or administrative experiments, but when members of Congress, some of 
them college trained, level their complaints against educational qualifications, one 
wonders if Congress and the country wouldn't be better off without some of its 
present antagonistic membership. Isn't it about time we were ready to acknowledge 
that many of our present-day ills are due to the fact that after the War we followed 
the philanderings of a "man from the ranks" instead of the carefully drawn plans 
of a trained thinker .^ 

Poor Professor Tugwell! What crime has he committed! When you meet or 
hear Professor Tugwell you are almost disappointed by his gentleness and soft- 
spoken but perfectly phrased utterances in regard to the so-called newer economics. 
His talk before a Woman's Club last winter on "Wine, Women and Drinking" was 
one of the finest things I have ever heard. It had to do with the art of drinking, 
the right use of liquor, how women might influence the Nation to a return to a sane 
and balanced life in which the proper use of wines, including our own excellent 
American brands, should have its part as it has had in the best civilizations. His 
talk was something both the intolerant Dry and the militant Wet might well profit 
by. I suppose this whole controversy over the Brain Trust resolves itself into 
what is education, or how many educated people use the facts they have learned 
in college, and how few of them think through to a conclusion. 

For the last few years I have been interested in talking to the sons and 
daughters of parents, at least one of whom was college trained, who are now being 
educated in our best-known schools and colleges along the Atlantic sea coast. The 
majority of these young people make remarks similar to the indifferent and non- 
voting group of whom I have spoken. Pat expressions about the Tariff, the League 
of Nations, Government Control of Utilities, Recognition of Russia ; trite remarks 
which apparently come from parents who, despite their educational advantages, have 
taken their political opinions from men who have succeeded in making a lot of 
money. I sometimes wonder if all intelligence is left behind when the student 

(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



closes the classroom door and leaves the professor on the other side. However, 
there are many signs throughout the country that youth is on the mental move. 
I get that from questions, from letters and bffers of young people to help, which 
shows that youth is no longer satisfied with a quiescent attitude. 

Then there is the White House! Surely it sets a mental pace. Never in our 
history, in that historic home have there been so many forward strides, so many 
precedents broken, or so much hospitality coupled with true dignity, as is the 
rule now. Our country is accustomed to observing the wife of a President with 
intense interest, but never has any First Lady aroused so much interest as 
Mrs. Roosevelt. People are interested in her not merely because of her activity, 
but they have come to realize that her many comings and goings arise from a 
motive of helpfulness and general interest in the betterment of human relations. 
She has an active and brilliant mind and one notably free from prejudice. For 
example, conflicting reports were brought to Washington in regard to conditions in 
Porto Rico. Mrs. Roosevelt flew down, made a quick but thorough survey, and 
came back with definite opinions and practical plans for improvement. Her eager, 
fervent personality pervades everything that sponsors human improvement, whether 
it be selecting paintings from the exhibitions of unemployed artists, speaking to a 
Nurses' Convention, attending a "zodiac" fashion show for the benefit of charity, 
or inspecting the House of the Girl Scouts. All is done with an unselfish ideal of 
service, which cannot but make for a wider and more useful day for the women 
of America. 

This past Winter has seen many changes in Washington, but none more startling 
than the acceptance of our recognition of Soviet Russia. A number of years ago 
I presided over a meeting of the Women's International League for Peace and 
Freedom, held in Washington, at which Nevin Sayre made a very scholarly plea 
for the recognition of Soviet Russia. The audience was small, not over one hundred 
fifty people. It was very quiet, as if it dared scarcely lift its voice for fear 
of an interruption by the police looking for communists. Nevertheless it was brave 
and ahead of its time, for it voted with but one dissenting voice to petition the 
Government to recognize this new Russia. At that time we were considered so 

radical as to be tagged as Reds, but only a few weeks ago how everyone who 

thought he was anybody in Washington crowded into the renovated and elegant 
Russian Embassy to shake the hand of the Ambassador with the kindly face and 
brilliant eyes, Alexander Troyanovsky, and be greeted by his hospitable and charm- 
ing wife ! Peace people may be scoffed at for being too idealistic, but here is one 
case where they were far more practical than the militarists. 

That word "militarist" naturally makes one think of the D. A. R.'s. Now no 
one denies that many of its women do an excellent work in trying to help the 
children of the foreign born, in preserving historical shrines and in marking ancient 
graves. However, when you study the long list of resolutions passed at their recent 
convention you are forced to agree with the man who termed the Daughters "the 
most unintelligent group which comes to Washington." For the most part these 
resolutions had to do with the crime situation, immigration, naturalization and the 
lieavy increase of armaments both on land and sea. They were passed without a 
dissenting voice, or even a question as to their advisability. It is almost unbe- 
lievable that so many women (3,000 or more in attendance) could come together 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and not disagree on anything except who should be elected to wear the insignia of 
rank. It never seems to occur to these patriotic ladies that it might be well to 
make a study of what causes crime, why some immigrants prefer to remain unnat- 
uralized, what are the causes of war, and who besides the munition makers ever 
profit by wars. In speaking recently in this regard before a group of business 
and professional women, I was informed by a D. A. R. who was present that the 
reason for the military display at the annual convention was due to the fact there 
was once a good deal of gossip about some officer being somewhat pacifistic, there- 
fore they felt obliged to pass strong resolutions to the contrary. 

This reminds one of much that goes on along similar lines at the Capitol. 
Sometimes I think that gossip is the twin brother of half of Washington. I often 
wonder if all capital cities are so infested with scandal mongers and gossip as is 
our own. Much of it is harmless, but frequently one hears something so outrageous 
and so libelous about public persons that I often think the good old Puritan system 
of making the gossips spend a few hours daily in the stocks should be revived. No 
one minds amusing stories, even the prominent persons wlio are supposed to figure 
in them. For instance, I am sure both the President and a certain far-off relative 
would enjoy this tale which doubtless some wag manufactured out of the whole 
cloth. It is said that one night at a White House dinner the near-sighted wife of 
a distinguished jurist said to the President, "Who is that woman in the red dress 
on the other side of the table?" The President replied, "Oh, it is some relative of 
my wife's. I have forgotten her name." It was Alice Roosevelt Longworth! The 
following one I can vouch for. Sitting in the House Gallery one day during that 
period when the House was getting into a snarl over the Independent OfBces Bill 
and when the Republicans were particularly active in getting the Democrats all 
tangled up, I heard a small, tired-looking boy say to his sight-seeing mother, "Who 
are those cross old men way over there?" The mother replied, "Hush, dear, that is 
the Republican minority." Somehow the Republicans do look older than the 
Democrats, but this minority has done its best to keep itself before the public and 
its ablest members have added considerably to the legislative program. There are 
times, however, when one is forced to conclude that its leadership "couldn't say 
less unless it says more." One thing which impresses itself on the listener is the 
fact that as a general rule the men members of Congress are much more apt to 
talk for talk's sake than the women. 

Of course, the woman most in the limelight, aside from Mrs. Roosevelt, is 
Secretary Perkins, whose ability cannot be questioned, although she is anatliema 
to a certain type of old timer. One night at dinner I was seated next to an enter- 
taining white-haired senator whose opinion of Secretary Perkins isn't fit to print; 
he seemed to feel I would naturally agree, but when I insisted on knowing his 
reasons, he replied, "Why, that woman wants an amendment to the Constitution to 
do away with child labor, instead of having it abolished through the due processes 
of law in the various states." The Senator was more than startled when he found 
that I, too, approved of this amendment. Then he said, "That's just like women; 
you use emotion instead of reason." I told him I had worked twenty years to end 
child labor and had come to the conclusion the amendment was the only sure way, 
because when a Northern state did pass a good law half their manufacturers moved 
South to get cheap child labor. His answer was, "What's twenty years in the life 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



of a nation?" I replied^ "Well;, it's practically two generations of children." After 
that the Senator found the lady on his left more attractive and I was reduced to a 
young naval officer on my other side. This nice boy kept telling me that the way 
to keep the peace was to build the biggest navy in the world. I asked him if either 
experience or history proved his statement and he replied irritably, "I bet you 
are a college woman." I confessed the crime as he added, "It's funny how hard 
it is to make educated women see things right." 

Twice during the past Winter we have been treated to an exhibition of the 
new stream-line trains in Washington. People waited in line for hours in order to 
walk through this new type of rail transportation. The one train was made of 
glistering aluminum. The other of polished steel. Both constructed on the same 
lines and for the purpose of great speed. Both arranged with comfort and luxury, 
but both lacking certain small details which make for the travelers' content and 
satisfaction. For instance, neither contained a hook on which to hang a coat or a 
shelf overhead on which to place a parcel. No doubt these details will be added 
later, and then will come the completed idea of the railway train of the future. 

It seems to me that the New Deal is much the same as this train. Old theories 
and plans have been scrapped. Old economic fetishes have been discarded in favor 
of new outlines and quicker methods. Many details may still be lacking, but in the 
language of a noted New England manufacturer who has worked for years to better 
the social conditions of labor and to improve welfare legislation, 'Tn one year I 
have seen more of my ideals fulfilled under the New Deal than I had dared hope 
would come to pass in thirty years." It seems to me that we are actually On the 
Way to a more just and complete life for all. If you do not agree with the 
methods, send helpful criticism. If you have nothing better to offer than the old 
order and the leadership which plunged us into panic, then better keep still. 

45- ■X- * 

REID HALL 

4 RUE DE Chevreuse, Paris VI^ 

If you arc to be in Paris this summer we hope that you will plan to stay at 
Reid Hall, a charming residence for university women, situated in the Latin 
Quarter near the beautiful Luxembourg Gardens and not far from the Sorbonne. 
The resident director is Miss Dorothy F. Leet, whose work in promoting Franco- 
American understanding has resulted in the French Government's granting a sub 
sidy to Reid Hall and the Carnegie Corporation awarding $10,000. 

Reid Hall combines American comfort with old French charm. There is hot 
and cold running water in each bedroom; there are many bathrooms; the rates are 
reasonable. The quiet, shady garden is delightful for afternoon tea or for after- 
dinner coffee. Here is the perfect opportunity for meeting interesting women from 
many different countries and for gaining knowledge of international points of view. 
Reid Hall is open in summer to all university women and their friends. 

Helen Annan Scribner, 1891 
Caroline McCormick Slade, 1896 
Eunice Morgan Schenck, 1907 
Katharine Strauss Mali, 1923 
Bryn Mawr Members of the Board of Directors of Reid Hall. 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF UNDERGRADUATE 
SCHOLARSHIPS 

Little May Day was celebrated fittingly this year on May first. There was not 
a dull moment anywhere on the campus between seven and ten a. m.^ when, except 
during the singing of an unfamiliar hymn substituted for "Ancient of Days/' events 
followed the usual course and the interest and the enthusiasm remained at a liigli 
pitch. President Park made the announcements of tlie undergraduate scholarships 
in slightly diflt'erent order^ working up to a climax with the Seniors, ending witli 
the award to Vung-Yuin Ting, the Chinese Scholar, of the Maria L. Eastman 
Brooke Hall Memorial Scholarship, given annually to the member of the Junior 
Class with the highest academic record. The Charles S. Hinchman Memorial 
Scholarship, awarded to the student whose record shows the greatest ability in her 
major subject^, was divided this year between Miss Ting, in Chemistry, and 
Elizabeth Monroe in Mathematics. 

Among the awards in which the alumnae will be especially interested are those 
won by some of the Regional Scholars in addition to those given by the respective 
Regional Committees. In the Junior Class, Mary Pauline Jones from Scranton 
has won also a State scholarship and one of the Evelyn Hunt scholarships ; 
Catherine Bill from Cleveland, the Elizabeth Wilson White Memorial Scliolarship 
and the Elizabeth S. Shippen Scholarship, awarded for excellence of work in 
foreign languages. In the Sophomore Class, Barbara Merchant of Gloucester, 
Mass., won one of the two Amelia Richards Memorial Scholarships; SojDhie Hunt, 
of Kendal Green, Mass., daughter of Hope Woods, 1904, was given the Constance 
Lewis Memorial Scholarship; Margaret Honour of East Orange, New Jersey, won 
also one of the Evelyn Hunt Scholarships, as well as one of the Sheelah Kilroy 
Memorial Scholarships for excellence in English; Alice Raynor of Yonkers, N. Y., 
has been given again the Alice Ferree Hayt Memorial Scholarship. Of the Freshmen 
Regional Scholars, Elizabeth Lyle of Massachusetts, was awarded the Kilroy 
Scholarship for the best work in the Required English Composition; Louise Dickey 
of Oxford, Penna., daughter of Louise Atherton, 1903, one of the Maria Hopper 
Scholarships; Anne Edwards of Maryland, the James E. Rhoads Sophomore Schol- 
arship; Marcia Anderson of North Carolina, the Mary Anna Longstreth Memorial 
Scholarship; and Margaret Lacy of Iowa, one of the Maria Hopper Scliolarships. 

In addition to the two "Alumnae Daughters" mentioned above, four others 
appear on the roll of honor. Frederica Bellamy, 1936, daughter of Frederica 
Le Fevre, 1905, was awarded a Special Directors' Scholarsliip ; Caroline Brown, 
1936, daughter of Anna Hartshorne, 1912, is to hold again a State Scholarsliip and 
a Foundation Scholarship; Kathryn Jacoby, 1937, daughter of Helen Lowengrund, 
1906, was given one of the Maria Hopper Scholarships; Eleanore Tobin, 1937, 
daughter of Helen Roche, 1907, the first Mary E. Stevens Scholarsliip. 

Scholarships were also awarded to the following students who entered as 
Regional Scholars: Jeannette Morrison, the Abby Brayton Durfee Scholarship; 
Evelyn Thompson, the Leila Houghteling Scholarship; Diana Tate-Smith, the 
Anna Powers Memorial Scholarship; Frances Porcher, one of the Evelyn Hunt 
Scholarships. Elizabeth Wyckoff is to hold the Junior Rhoads Scholarship and 
Ethel Glancy, the James H. Leuba Scholarship. 

(7) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MEDIAEVAL DRAMA IN THE CUMBERLANDS 

By Margaret Hobart Myers, 1911 

It is a hot Sunday morning in May. The air is clear and the flat outlines of 
the tablelands are sharp against the dazzling sky. Nowhere else do the wooded 
mountain tops stretch so straight and sheer as in the Tennessee Cumberlands. It 
is warmer and very still as we descend the steep and winding grade that leads from 
the height of Sewanee, "Mother Mountain/' into the valley below. Late roses and 
sweet shrubs scent the gentle breeze that stirs the gay banners with which our car 
is laden. We turn off the white highway into the welcome shade of trees surround- 
ing the district school. Opposite is the little church, built a few years ago by the 
farmer folk under the leadership of the priest-in-charge of the seventeen far-flung 
missions that comprise Sewanee parish. The men can tell us which part of the 
flooring each laid, wielding hammer and saw side by side with the rector. 

In a moment we are surrounded by the children. The students who have 
accompanied us to the mission and who are, for the period of their three years in 
the theological school at Sewanee, in charge of this work, help me to unpack the 
folded costumes on the rear seats of the car, and unfurl the banners, stacking them 
in due order under the trees. It isn't very long before I am able to parcel out 
tunics and veils, cassocks and cottas, robes and girdles, and in half an hour's time 
we have the cast for the liturgical drama which is to be the feature of the Sunday 
morning service, vested in proper fashion. The girls are delighted with their soft 
colored veils. The boys have never worn cassocks before, and these cassocks are 
no sombre black affairs, but of red, gold, blue and green sateen, matching the 
banners which we now assign to the participants in the play. To the unsophisticated 
city dweller the bare feet that protrude from the church vestments might seem 
unusual. To us they merely recall the barefoot friars of the age when liturgical 
drama was the order of the day, and the festivals of the Dark Ages were illumined 
by drama enacted in the church. Now we lead our little troupe of players across 
the highway and the bridge that spans a tiny stream to the side of the church, 
where they await their part in the morning service. My husband and one of the 
students are already vested. The service begins with a baptism, a number of 
children wh6 have been awaiting the Sunday when a clergyman should visit the 
mission in the valley. There is a short sermon, and then, after a hymn, the play 
begins. It is a modern mystery play, Lady Catechism and the Child. Lady 
Catechism bids the child leave his play for a season, and come and learn his 
Christian duty. At her bidding, one by one, each player with his banner held 
proudly aloft, steps forward to explain his part. It is all done with deepest rev- 
erence, with complete sincerity, and with such clarity of diction that the congrega- 
tion loses not a word. The central part is played with dignity by a young mountain 
woman. The service is concluded by the Holy Communion, and then, just as the 
congregation is filing out-of-doors again, a hurrying mother with a little tot appears 
down the road, and we all return for a second baptism. 

While the players remove their costumes in the grove, they are insistent in 
their demands for another play. Accordingly, at Christmas time there is a nativity 
play, written by a modern author, but based on the old plays of the Mediaeval 
Church. Again we bring the costumes down the mountain and assist the players in 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



many ways. Again the dignity and reverence of the drama makes the mysteries of 
the Christian faith more real_, and the beauty of the costumes, the music and the 
words of the text invest the somewhat bare lives of these valley farming folk witli 
a richness which abides with them and ennobles the trivialities of their daily round. 
A new play is toward as I write, but this time the young women of the mission 
want me, instead of lending costumes, to help them design and make costumes, 
which are to be the beginning of a costume chest of their own, and to help them to 
plan not only more liturgical plays, but plays that can express other phases of 
their lives and develop new possibilities in the routine of the countryside. 

This play which I have described represents only one part of the play move- 
ment which we at Sewanee are fostering. The University of the South is dramatic- 
ally minded. The students of the theological department find their chief diversion 
from their studies in presenting Shakespeare. They have recently played quite 
admirably Hamlet, As You Like It, Twelfth Night. There are numerous play 
groups among the faculty and students. At St. Mary's in the Mountain, a school 
for mountain girls three miles distant from the university (maintained, by the 
way, by a sisterhood which numbers more than one Bryn Mawrtyr in its ranks), 
plays are the usual order of the day. At the present writing. Midsummer Night's 
Dream is in rehearsal. But the group in which I am chiefly interested is a band 
of some sixty children known as the Otey Players. This includes the children both 
of the faculty and of the village, as well as some children who live farther out 
upon the mountain. 

The University of the South is an unusual institution. It is situated in the 
midst of its own domain of ten thousand acres of mountain and forest land, more 
than sixty miles from the nearest city, on a high plateau of the Cumberlands, in 
the midst of great natural beauty. Over this territory the vice-chancellor of the 
university rules, a beneficent tyrant. In Sewanee is the parish church from which 
a string of missions extending over a radius of twenty-five miles is administered. 
A mission hospital under the aegis of the university cares for the mountain folk 
from the coves and valleys and mountainside. 

It was among the university children that I first began to give plays. We 
began with a little out-of-door allegory played in my own garden. Then followed 
at Christmas a nativity play given in our library. The community carol singers 
furnished the music, and after singing for us, went out into the village and to the 
hospital to sing their usual Christmas round of carols. So moving was this nativity 
play that it was repeated in the chancel of the theological school chapel during 
the Epiphany season after the students had returned from their vacation, this time 
with a student choir. Few of the students had ever seen anything like it. The 
crucifer was a rosy-cheeked Freshman, an awkward lad still in his 'teens. He stood 
by the organ, cross in hand, his face transfigured, drinking in the tender beauty of 
the manger scene pictured with such utter simplicity by the children, against a 
background of tall cedar, in the soft glow of the altar lights, the single star gleam- 
ing aloft in the rafters. The old story, told in the old manner of the ^lediaeval 
Church, was to him a revelation, flooding his being with a new perception of the 
grace and wonder of the Christmas story. 

The second stage in the development of our mystery play movement began 
here. My husband, whose course in the philosophy of religion includes each year 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



lectures on the psychology of worship;, decided to use our play group as demon- 
stration for his students. This gave the work a double value. Here was an oppor- 
tunity to train the clergy-to-be in the possibilities and methods of drama as a means 
of education and as a method of worship. 

In the five years that have since elapsed, a well-rounded course in liturgical 
drama has been inserted into the theological curriculum. Each year in May, when 
our garden is full of sweet-smelling shrubs, and the very setting of the lectures 
helps to emphasize the value of a method based onl aesthetic appreciation of the 
gospel, the senior students adjourn to our wide porch and there, gathered around 
a long table, I lecture to them on the religious basis of all drama from the 
Prometheus of Aeschylus onwards. 

But this is not all. The students have charge of various missions. The rector 
of the parish is keen about the use of dramatic method. There is a parish drama 
council, consisting of the rector, of students from the theological school, members 
of the faculty, and other interested persons. This council is able to furnish the 
students with plays suitable for their missions and with such help as they may need 
in order to produce them. The council holds up a high standard of excellence, both 
as regards the literary and the spiritual value of the plays used and the staging, 
costuming and production of the plays themselves. If the rector is not satisfied 
with a projected performance, he either calls it off, or defers it until it has 
attained the standard set by the council. 

A year ago we projected a play needing a large cast and I set to work to 
train a group of village children so that their constrained and difficult enunciation 
might be made clear enough and pleasing enough to act as vehicles for the sacred 
text. One little lad had no remote acquaintance with the value of punctuation. 
I could make no impression on him. He ran his words into one solid mass. At last 
I hit upon a scheme which worked. At stated intervals he counted two, at others 
four, under his breath. After weeks of this laborious process, he learned to speak 
his "piece" so well that not a syllable of it was lost upon his hearers. Sometimes 
it is a matter of carriage that has to be developed and improved in order to make 
the player sufficiently at ease to appear in the chancel clothed in the significant and 
beautiful vestments which we provide. Or it is a sense of dignity and reverence 
which must be infused into a raucous nature. More often it is self-consciousness or 
diffidence which can be met by teaching the player to sink his own personality in 
that of the character which he assumes. 

When the time came for the presentation of the play {The Little Pilgrims and 
the Book Beloved, a modern classic written years ago by my mother and given 
since then from Zululand to Hawaii and from England to China), the dignity and 
poise not only of my seasoned players, but of the recruits was remarkable. After 
our Sewanee performance, we put the play on wheels and took it first to a little 
mining town up in the mountains and then to a typical southern county seat, the 
old town of Winchester, in the valley. The next autumn the banners and costumes 
for this play went to one of the students who had helped in the Sewanee production, 
for use in his newly acquired parish in North Carolina. 

Poise and dignity, reverence and a sense of responsibility, grace of carriage 
and of speech, a sense of intimacy with the church, and an appreciation of beauty 
and color and line and of dramatic values, mark the boys and girls who, some of* 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



them from the age of three or four^ have been members of my band of Otey plaj^ers. 
They are able now to help me conduct rehearsals, make properties, plot the action 
of a play, dress the stage. They now, rather than older helpers, are the assistants 
upon whom I rely. Criticism of each other, usually constructive and always inter- 
esting, gives zest to the rehearsals. 

My chief difficulty is in finding enough parts for all the children who wish to 
take part. Last summer an epidemic of whooping cough decimated our ranks on 
the eve of an important performance. I opened the dress rehearsal by assigning 
new parts to half a dozen of the players, and promoting some of the always 
numerous group of banner-bearers, acolytes and silent angels. With some appre- 
hension of difficulties to be met, we began the rehearsal. But everything went 
through smoothly. I found that what I hoped for was true — from constant observa- 
tion the substitutes knew practically the whole of the new parts assigned to them, 
and few people at the performance next day realized that the cast had been 
reorganized over night. 

In the New York Times for last December 24, Mr. Brooks Atkinson makes *a 
plea for what he terms ''an honest observance of Christmas . . . the ancient mystery 
plays that were given in the cathedral and public squares of Old England" and 
which seem to "communicate the divine and human aspects of Christmas with more 
adoration than any other kind of observance." He then proceeded to describe with 
numerous quotations from the text, the eleventh century liturgical play presented 
in York and still extant in all the rude simplicity of its original form. Now it 
happened that just at the moment that Mr. Atkinson's readers were perusing his 
article, our Otey players were presenting after the old manner of the Middle Ages 
the nativity cycle of the York mysteries. "Stations" or platforms were set at con- 
venient places in the church and labeled according to tradition "Bethleem," "Feeldes 
nere Bethleem." The centre aisle was entitled "Roade to Jerusaleme," and the 
chancel steps "Nazarethe." (We heard afterwards that our spelling was somewhat 
impugned by certain of the uninitiated.) At the traditional place in the Com- 
munion service the play began. Three vested priests as the triune "Voice of God" 
read the prologue from the altar steps. Then the Angelus appeared to Mary with 
his message, and so followed the other episodes or "plays"- — tlie Nativity, the 
Shepherds, the Meeting of the Three Kings and the Adoration of tlie Three Kings, 
done so far as possible in traditional manner even to the star, which was a lantern 
pulled by Gabriel along a wire strung in the roof, from the back of the churcli to 
the sanctuary steps, while the three Kings followed the light of the star down the 
Roade to Jerusaleme to the manger in the stable. The music consisted chiefly of 
old Latin hymns and chants. Two weeks later the mysteries were repeated in the 
college chapel, where the English department turned out its students in full force. 
The lofty arches and deep beauty of the Gothic chapel, tlie tall cedars and the dim 
lighting, the student choir chanting the old Latin hymns and plainsong, seemed to 
bridge the thousand years between Sewanee and Y^'ork, and to unite in a mystical 
union this twentieth century band of youtliful players witli the workmen of 
Mediaeval England. "These are such moving little fragments of faith and aspira- 
tion" — (I quote a letter from Mr. Brooks Atkinson) — "tliat I know they must lift 
your entire community. The churches are the place for them. The theatre is no 
longer the proper background for simple and reverent themes." 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



AN INTERNATIONAL INCIDENT 

When an Ambassador from a foreign country visits a college it is an event; 
when the Ambassador of the Soviet Union makes the visit it is a great event, and 
when he fits into a garden party at the Deanery as though he were born to it, it is 
an event with a climax. It proves, after all, that Russians are quite normal human 
beings, however strange their ideas are thought to be. Oddly enough, none of 
Mr. Troyanovsky's ideas, as he expressed them, either publicly or privately, sounded 
strange even to American ears. 

The Ambassador and Mrs. Troyanovsky and the Charge d' Affaires and Mrs. 
Skvirsky came as informal week-end guests of Professor Kingsbury and Dr. 
Fairchild, whose interest in Russia is well known. President Park collaborated 
by giving a reception for them at the Deanery to which a large number of guests 
were invited. 

Because the leading news in the morning papers was about a decision regarding 
Russian debts, Mr. Troyanovsky's presence was especially intriguing to a horde of 
reporters who invaded the Sabbath peace of the Bryn Mawr campus. It was an 
opportunity for big news which usually falls to the Washington correspondents. 
The Ambassador is no novice at the business of being a diplomat and could manage 
even American reporters in a masterly fashion, as was shown in the papers the 
following day. 

The high point of the visit was the reception and brief talk at the Deanery 
Sunday afternoon. It may be confessed that some wondered what the Ambassador 
could talk about. Everyone knows that there are many controversial opinions 
about Soviet Russia, and that anyway diplomats are supposed to be noncommittal, 
so there was some sympathy for his difficult position of having to be interesting and 
illuminating without arousing antagonisms or overstepping the traditional limita- 
tions. It was wasted sympathy. Mr. Troyanovsky captivated his audience. 

President Park presented him in a happy introduction as they stood on the 
steps in the garden. She quoted from something he had previously written to 
the effect that internationalism is a plant of slow growth, and its earlier friends, not 
realizing this, became discouraged. It is something which must be waited for with 
patience while the warmth of friendship nourishes it. She added that it was 
gatherings like this one in which such international understanding and friendship 
could grow. 

Mr. Troyanovsky acknowledged the introduction with a smile and a chuckle, 
and stepped down to the level of the audience. The smile and the chuckle recurred 
several times and increased the entente. Unfortunately his speech may not be 
quoted by agreement with his request. 

After the reception there was a buffet supper at Miss Kingsbury's, and then 
Mr. Troyanovsky, who had intended to spend another night here, felt that he must 
hurry back to Washington to be ready to begin the task of solving the problem of 
debts and trade relations between his country and ours. We were thus brought out 
of an idyllic situation into juxtaposition with one of the most realistic of inter- 
national problems. 

Herbert A. Miller, Lecturer in Social Economy. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



THE PRESIDENT'S PAGE 

My gaze is so often focused on Bryn Mawr and Bryn Mawr interests alone 
that I enjoy particularly an escape into a wider landscape. Two such have I made 
this year — a journey to St. Louis in early November in company with the Presidents 
of the six other colleges with which Bryn Mawr is leagued^ to put jointly before an 
audience collected for us by the St. Louis Alumnae something of the history and the 
hopes of the colleges for women; and a drive to New Brunswick in late April to see 
400 High School girls still one or even two years away from college, from New 
Jersey, Southern New York, and Connecticut, who had been invited to spend a 
three-day week-end at the New Jersey College for Women in order that they might 
learn something not of that college and this spring only, but of all college days 
and ways. 

No two journeys could have been more dissimilar — the first through long hours 
of Pullman cars and the autumn landscapes of Ohio and Indiana, the second along 
a country road through spring rain to the open green of the New Jersey College 
set high above the horse-shoe curve of the Raritan. The first audience, a thousand 
men and women, listened with good humour and interest to brief words from each 
president, with longer speeches from Mr. Neilson and the guest of the occasion, 
Mr. Walter Lippman, on the stirring history of colleges for women and the present 
anxiety and alarm of these colleges over the danger of not being able to meet as 
wisely and as fully as they wish the demands that many young women, some of 
them the ablest of the next generation, are making of them. In New Brunswick 
on the other hand I found the next generation itself, a delightful great roomful 
of girls, very young and very serious, writing down earnestly in their note-books 
the facts they had come to hear. As nearly as possible it seemed to me they were 
given a genuine look-in at college: nights in the college houses, classes and lab- 
oratory sessions, chapel, music, games, plays, all these saw not once only, but 
twice or three times. Several women from outside and inside the college were pro- 
duced at different moments to say something about what each girl might hope to 
get out of college discipline: something which would help her to find her place in 
the world which her generation is to make or mar. They were told how they 
might understand that world, might enjoy it and might find for themselves an 
intelligent way of living in it. Though they will not remember our cataracts of 
abstract words and will carry off only an impression of our great age and, I hope, 
of our kindly disposition toward them, I shall not forget them ! 

My two unlike expeditions brought me to the same point; they have stirred 
me to a new ardor. I hope Bryn Mawr will throw itself more vigorously than ever 
into its attempts to solve the problems of sound and timely training, and to accumu- 
late those endowments on which that training must be in part built, no matter what 
other factors of learning and of good will are put into it. And I came away from 
both expeditions cheerful, in part because I had seen in action in both places 
women who had long ago or lately gone through Bryn Mawr training and were 
using it as one would pray the next generation would use it : with intelligence, energy 
and generosity toward others. Edna Fischel Gellhorn in St. Louis and Margaret 
Corwin in New Brunswick, can perhaps be named without prejudice to anyone else, 
but there are many more in my mind. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



AN EXPERIMENT IN PRE-COLLEGE GUIDANCE 

By Margaret T. Corwin, 1912 

When I arrived at New Jersey College for Women in mid-February, I found 
a college which had grown from nothing in 1918 to approximately a thousand 
students at the present time. I could only guess then how such a rapid growth had 
been effected. Now, after the completion of an experiment in which we have all 
worked together — staff, faculty and students — I can understand the spirit which 
made it possible. 

I found my colleagues interested in the problems of our Freshmen, problems 
to which they seem to have no prior rights, but which they share with their sisters 
on campuses the world over. Clearly, some of our students were coming to college 
without a clear conception of what college is. It occurred to us that it might help 
a girl who was thinking vaguely about college, if she could get a true picture of it 
with all its various phases. We wondered whether it would be possible to show 
girls a cross-section of college life, six months or more before they were ready to 
take their places on a campus. Up to this point we had discussed colleges in 
general, but as we considered the possibilities of such a project more seriously, we 
decided that New Jersey College for Women more specifically might attempt such 
an experiment. 

The more we thought of what we could do for a group of potential college 
students, the more the plan appealed to us. Such a meeting should be during the 
college year, we thought, so that the pre-college group would see the campus really 
in action, inhabited by students who would continue their classes, sports, club 
meetings and activities without interruption, and who would also guide the high 
school group as it explored a strange country. 

The visitors would live in student dormitories, eat in the college dining room, 
visit classes, laboratories, language houses, and art studios, explore the social life 
of the campus, and know the thrill or anguish of a first roommate. 

We decided to turn to school principals to see whether the idea seemed to 
them to be worth considering further. We wrote to the principals of the important 
schools within a radius of about one hundred miles of New Brunswick, telling them 
that it had occurred to some of us that high school students could be prepared for 
the problems they will meet without warning at the beginning of the freshman year 
by means of a foretaste of college, showing the ways it differs most from high school. 
We proposed to arrange a four-day program of pre-college guidance, not alone for 
future students of this college, but for all girls interested in higher education, 
regardless of where they might wish to get it. Speakers, we said boldly, would be 
recruited from the faculties of various colleges. All this, of course, before we had 
invited a single speaker! If you favor the plan, we asked the principals, what 
suggestions have you for the program? 

The letter was sent out without too much optimism. Replies began to come in 
two days later, and came in increasing numbers as the days went by. Of approxi- 
mately 300 principals, 7 wrote that they were not interested, 40-odd thought the 
plan a good one but could not cooperate because of distance, expense, or other 
reasons. The remaining 250 answered with enthusiasm that the plan had their 
wholehearted endorsement, and that they would gladly excuse their students to take 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



part in it. Many of the principals had suggestions for the program. They told us 
to teach the girls to budget their time^, to give them vocational help^ to tell them 
frankly what college costs^ to tell them something of study habits^, to tell them not 
to be discouraged during their freshman year if they did not receive the same high 
grades they had been accustomed to getting in high school. One principal wrote: 
"If your conference could point out that^ irrespective of what the girls might do 
later, a broad liberal arts education is the background of any vocation, I think a 
great many would be helped." 

At this time a professor who was interested in the plan asked one of her 
sophomore classes whether they felt that girls entered college with definite miscon- 
ceptions. There were 85 girls in the class. To the question as to whether tlie 
average girl enters college with misconceptions as to academic life, 40 answers were 
negative, 45 affirmative. As to social life, 25 answers were negative, 59 affirmative 
and 1 blank. As to misconceptions in ethics and ideals, 31 answers were negative. 
49 affirmative and 5 blank. The girls were asked for suggestions as to points whicli 
should be clarified for the girl who is considering college. Vocational help and 
advice, and emphasis of the need of responsibility for one's self, led the needs, as 
the sophomore group saw them. Help as to study methods and an explanation of 
the amount of work expected of a college student were suggested. Better guidance 
as to courses and emphasis as to the importance of academic life over social were 
also named by the sophomores. 

With the assurance of high school principals that they favored the project, 
and with proof from a cross-section of our own students that there are definite 
misconceptions, the work of the committee actually began. 

When a tentative program had been drawn up, we wrote a second letter to the 
principals who had answered our first favorably, enclosing the tentative program 
and a few registration forms, and asked them to present the plan to their students. 
One principal had copies of the program mimeographed and sent to the parents of 
Seniors and Juniors, the eligible classes. Another suggested that we send one of our 
students who was a graduate of his high school to talk with the girls of tlie plan. 
This suggestion we followed out in 40 cases where Seniors spoke in their home town 
high schools during the spring recess. 

We had been told that since the idea had never been tried before and since 
there was expense involved for the girls who came, we could count on only a very 
small group this year. We had thought the program might be considered successful 
if 60 girls joined us for this first attempt. With accommodations for 300, we felt 
quite justified in being extremely generous with our invitations. With April 15th 
set as the closing date for registration, we accepted applications as they arrived at 
first, and sent girls acknowledgments and directions. On April 12th registration 
reached 200, and we decided that all received from that time on would be held and 
apportioned. All schools represented before the 12th were given no more represen- 
tation. Only one girl was accepted from each of the schools from which applications 
arrived after that date. In many cases we asked the principal to designate the girl 
he wished to represent his school. To the unlucky ones we returned fees and invited 
them to the sessions of the closing day.- By the opening of the conference we had 
received applications from well over 900 girls. We were able to accept 314, repre- 
senting 134 high and preparatory schools. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The program was planned to fill four needs. First, we wished to give the girls 
some broad understanding of what college means and how it can help them make 
the best possible adjustment to this modern world. Second, we wished them to be 
given a true picture of the relation of college to one's vocation, with special empha- 
sis on the fact that college cannot guarantee a job. Third, we wished to give them 
an opportunity to gather specific information regarding colleges; and finally, we 
wanted them to sample college life— its classes, its dormitory life, its parties, teas, 
plays, sports — to have a complete picture of what college is like. 

We demanded the impossible of our speakers, for we wanted real wisdom com- 
bined with an ability to speak to a young group. But we were lucky enough to 
secure it. Miss Park was good enough to find time in her heavy spring program to 
come on to talk on "Enjoying the Modern World." She acted on our request to tell 
what paths lay open via the arts and literature, but in a way so completely and 
delightfully her own that it exceeded our fondest dreams. Mrs. Laura W. L. Scales, 
Warden of Smith College, spoke on "Adjusting Yourself to the Modern World," 
from her full experience with extra-curricular activities on that campus. Her 
suggestions of what should be included under good taste were excellent. Dr. Emily 
Hickman, professor of History here at our own college, showed what marvels 
science and the social sciences have to offer — under the heading "Understanding 
the Modern World." 

For the vocational aspect of the program we had Miss Helen MacM. Voorhees, 
Director of the Appointment Bureau at Mount Holyoke College, whose topic was 
"College and Your Vocation in the Modern World." In order that the girls might 
see that what one learns at college is definitely helpful in one's work, though it may 
have seemed to have little connection at the time, we selected three college alumni, 
Miss Kita de Lodyguine, '26, of Barnard, Miss Cornelia Ernst, '32, of Vassar, and 
Miss Violet Sieder, '30, of New Jersey College for Women, who are doing interest- 
ing things in the fields of international banking, library work and social service 
work, and asked them to talk about their jobs in relation to college. 

To help the girls from th^ vocational point of view, we asked a number of 
members of our faculty to serve as professional advisers, and conferences were 
arranged for girls in the fields of Art, Dramatic Arts, Education, English, Languages, 
Home Economics, Journalism, Library Work, Music, Psychology, Physical Educa- 
tion, Science, and the Social Sciences. 

To answer specific questions regarding colleges, we asked a number of colleges 
to send representatives who would meet with the girls and who would give them 
definite information regarding their institutions. Three sessions on "Choosing Your 
College" were scheduled during the conference, when girls met with representatives 
of Barnard, Bryn Mawr, Connecticut College, University of Delaware, Goucher, 
Mount Holyoke, New Jersey College for Women, New York University, Radcliffe, 
Smith, Vassar, and Wellesley. 

To help with the social end of the program we called upon both our students 
and our faculty. There were 18 small dormitories available on the campus in which 
we housed the delegates. A faculty member was chosen to be hostess in each of the 
houses, to advise the girls as to their programs and to help them in general. Our 
students brought pictures, lamps and flowers to make the dormitory rooms of the 
strangers attractive, met them when they registered on the opening day of the 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



conference and took them to their dormitories, entertained them at the opening 
session and later in the conference had a tea and a party, loaned them sports equip- 
ment, and helped them find their way about the campus. They took part in a 
performance at our practice theatre, presented for them a most alive forum — "Peace 
through Preparedness?" — and, in short, proved invaluable to us, and were cer- 
tainly a determining factor in the success of the conference. 

Our pre-coUege guidance program began Thursday, April 26th, and ended 
Sunday, April 29th. We had invited parents to join their daughters at the final 
session on Sunday, and for the speaker at that closing session we asked President 
Ada Comstock, of Radcliffe College, to tell why she believes in college. Her descrip- 
tion of the real things that college offers made us all more sensible of the privileges 
and opportunities offered on our campus. President Comstock's speech was heard 
not only by the 300 girls who had attended the sessions, but by their parents and 
by many of the girls whom we had been unable to accept for the whole period but 
who came down on Sunday to talk with the college representatives and to attend 
that session. 

Throughout the four days in which we presented the various programs I have 
described, we were all watching very carefully to see the reactions of our high school 
guests. We had been warned that we might give them "mental indigestion" by 
plunging them so suddenly into the whirl of activity that is college. We had pre- 
pared our speakers for the fact that theirs was to be a young audience, and we had 
worded our program so that there could be no question as to its intelligibility. We 
had been warned also that it was more than possible that we were being inundated 
with applications perhaps a little less because of intellectual interest than because 
of the appeal of a sort of spree on a college campus. It seemed likely that the offer 
of a round of tennis, parties, teas and even an intercollegiate lacrosse game would 
bring to our campus some light-hearted maidens who were not perhaps very much 
interested in pre-college guidance. Because we had been so thoroughly warned we 
watched the reactions of our girls very carefully and the hostesses had frank talks 
with the girls as to the features of the program that they enjoyed. We were amazed 
and pleased to see how earnestly they listened to the speakers, how diligently they 
took notes on what they were told, how active was their interest in classes and 
laboratories, and how seriously they took part in discussions both in classes and at 
the forum. We know now that we need have had no fears of talking "over their 
heads." They were alive and curious in mind, and they had come to our campus 
definitely to learn about college. They participated in the social features of the 
program, but their real interest was in its serious aspects. 

There seemed so much fresh thinking in the talks by Miss Park, Mrs. Scales, 
Miss Voorhees and Miss Comstock that we are arranging to print them in a small 
pamphlet for the benefit of the 600 and more girls who applied to come to the 
conference after our facilities had been stretched to the limit. 



Special Meeting of the Alumnae Association in Goodhart Hall on Sunday. 
June 3rd at 12 Noon, followed by Alumnae Luncheon in the Deanery at 1.30 
(Tickets $1.26). 

Commencement in Goodhart Hall on Wednesday, June 6th at 11.00 a. m. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A BRYN MAWR MEETING IN TENNESSEE 

The first meeting on record of the Bryn Mawr women in the State of Tennessee 
was held on the 24th of April at Sewanee^ the seat of the University of the South. 
There are some twenty-four Bryn Mawr women listed in Tennessee. Of these almost 
a third are graduate students whose loyalties are divided between Bryn Mawr and 
their original alma mater. Of the others^ several are teaching out of the State of 
Tennessee during the winter; one or two have young families which cannot be left; 
and others are teaching and unable to get away for a whole day at a time. Sewanee 
is the geographical centre of Bryn Mawr influence in Tennessee, and Tennesseeans 
are used to coming to Sewanee and its neighboring town of Monteagle for gather- 
ings of all kinds. It proved, therefore, not a difficult matter to persuade eleven 
Bryn Mawr people to gather at "Bairnwick," the home of Margaret Hobart Myers, 
1911, present chairman of District III. Regional Scholarship for Tennessee, on 
Tuesday, April 24th. The special inducement to those who climbed the Mountain 
to enjoy this Bryn Mawr reunion for a day, was that Dean Manning, after her 
visit to Nashville on April 23rd, stopped off with Margaret Myers for a flying visit 
of twenty-four hours en route for Philadelphia and Bryn Mawr. 

On Monday night, the 23rd, Dean Manning had an opportunity to meet socially 
and informally some members of the Sewanee faculty and their wives. Especial 
interest attaches to Dean Manning's visit because of the fact that her father visited 
Sewanee during his presidency, having been led to do this by the enthusiasm of his 
aide. Major Archie Butt, who was an old Sewanee alumnus. On Tuesday morning 
Mrs. Manning addressed the students and faculty of the University on Dilemmas of 
Education. Her dignity of presence and her charming voice, as well as the interest 
of her address, and the similarity of the ideals which she elucidated to those pre- 
vailing at Sewanee, captured her audience, and faculty and students talked for days 
with approval and enthusiasm of her address. 

The Bryn Mawr women who gathered at Sewanee on the morning of the 
24th of April in time to hear Mrs. Manning's address were: from Nashville — 
K. Dodd, 1914; M. Dodd Sangree, 1916; M. Brown Hibbits, 1920; and Elizabeth 
Estes Kirkman, 1920-21; from Chattanooga — I. Bixler Poste, 1910; B. Mitchell 
Hailey, 1911, and Thelma Williams Kleinau, 1921; from Memphis — Agnes Grabau, 
1916; from South Pittsburgh — Edith Lodge Kellerman, 1903; and from Sewanee — 
Winifred Kirkland, graduate scholar in English, 1898-1900, and M. Hobart Myers, 
1911. 

After chapel, and a visit to some of the buildings and the beautiful views on 
the edges of the 10,000 acre domain of the University of the South, the twelve 
Bryn Mawr representatives foregathered at a hilarious luncheon. After luncheon, 
the Bryn Mawr group met with the twenty-odd college women drawn from institu- 
tions all over the country, and now resident at Sewanee. This meeting listened to 
excellent addresses from the Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South, Dean 
Baker of the University, and Dean Manning. Dean Baker's thoughtful paper on 
Education dovetailed so completely with Dean Manning's chapel address in the 
morning that it rounded out the day quite perfectly. After tea, the Bryn Mawr 
group set forth again in their automobiles along dogwood and azalea bordered 
roads to their various homes. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



I 



WILSON AT BRYN MAWR 

WooDROw Wilson: The Caricature^ The Myth^ and The Man^ hy Edith Gittings 
Reid. 237 pp. New York: Oxford University Press. $3.50. 

Mrs. Reid has given us another life of Woodrow Wilson, a brief, clear, well- 
organized account which reveals Wilson as he appeared to his private friends, whose 
love and admiration were never strained by political issues, but were liis, untainted, 
until his death. Those who are interested in Wilson as an historical figure will find 
little new material in this book, for it largely consists of a restatement in smooth 
and adequate prose, of facts already known and recorded. But those who are 
fascinated by the man, by the complex personality, at once the inspiration and 
despair of our times, will discover certain illuminating anecdotes and interchanges 
which disclose the disarming and captivating side Wilson reserved for his friends. 
The title, then, is misleading. The author knew Wilson too well to sustain tlie 
myth; she loved him too well to appreciate the caricature, and the man was, first 
and foremost, her friend. 

Their friendship extended from Wilson's youth to his death. He opened his 
heart and intellect as generously to her when he was President as when he was a 
college professor, and those tantalizing scraps of conversation in Princeton or in 
Washington reveal him in his most becoming light, as do those flashes of "quick, 
whimsical humor" kept "for a friend" and hard to reconcile with the world's con- 
ception of the idealist frozen into the mould of an ideal. 

The value of most reminiscences lies in just such intimate, unhampered talk, 
in chance encounters and stray comments which seem insignificant at the time, but 
to which the reader from his superior position down the years can look back and 
give a significance pregnant with irony or tragedy. 

"Unfortunately, I like my own way too much for my own and other people's 
comfort." 

These first words which Wilson utters in Mrs. Reid's presence strike a pro- 
phetic note almost worthy of the entrance of the hero of Shakespearian tragedy. 
As the drama unfolds itself, the reader often wonders how far the course of tlie 
tragedy could have been averted had Wilson listened to this or tliat advice, or 
heeded the warning of one of his friends: 

"You, I think, too often try to put a gallon in a pint cup, and you clioosc too 
rich a vintage for the quality of tlie cup." 

Where Mrs. Reid considers the Friend, slie sees clearly as well as sympa- 
thetically. She recognizes "that we, his friends, were quite sure he would not have 
known whether our eyes were blue or brown." Slie can give an impersonal analysis 
of his brief sojourn as Professor of History at Bryn :Mawr, a period in his life 
which will be of peculiar interest to Bryn INIawr Alumnae even tliough "the wliole 
episode must be looked upon as a detour from the main course of his life." That a 
man of Wilson's traditions, who believed Woman should be "persuasive rather than 
coercive" should have found Bryn Mawr antipathetic to his temperament was pre- 
ordained. His biographer feels it to be so. But she also sees tlie other side, and 
can say of the Dean, "We must give this dauntless, able woman the admiration 
Wilson never could give her." 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



The accusations of history against Wilson, however, are neither defended nor 
excused. Lansing and Garfield are dismissed with a sentence. Mrs. Reid sees only 
"a touch of originality in Colonel House's lack of official position/* and of Page, 
pouring out his soul to a chief who did not support, a friend who did not respond, 
she disposes in a paragraph. As Mrs. Reid herself states, this book is not political. 
That it should be prejudiced is, perhaps, the price that must be paid for its 
intimacy and interest. 

Pamela Burr, 1928. 



A FRENCH TRIBUTE TO A BRYN MAWR MAY DAY 

One of the most distinguished visitors to the May Day of 1932 was Monsieur 
Felix Gaiffe, Professeur a la Faculte des Lettres de VUniversite de Paris and 
Visiting Professor at Columbia University for the second semester 1931-32. 

Monsieur Gaiffe is an authority on French Dramatic Literature, was one of 
the founders of the Societe des Historiens du Theatre, is the author of Le Drame 
en France au Dix-Huitieme Siecle, Le Rire et la Scene Frangaise, etc., etc. 

In the Revue Universitaire of July, 1933, in an article entitled Theatre et 
Universite, Monsieur Gaiffe gives his impressions of the Bryn Mawr Day: 

"Au cours d'un sejour d'un semestre aux Etats-Unis, I'an dernier, les plus 
beaux spectacles dramatiques auxquels il m'ait ete donne d'assister eurent lieu dans 
des colleges ou des universites; plus que les galas du Metropolitan Opera, ou que 
les comedies, operettes ou revues nouvelles de Broadway, le May Day de 
Bryn Mawr et les fetes du centenaire du Lafayette College m'ont paru representer 
la reussite complete d'un effort d'art original. Les etudiants des deux sexes excellent 
la-bas dans un genre de spectacle en plein air, designe par le terme difficilement 
traduisible de pageant et qui tient a la fois du cortege et du drame historique. 
Bryn Mawr, college de jeunes filles situe aux environs de Philadelphie, etale ses 
confortables et elegants edifices pseudo-gothiques aux extremites du magnifique 
pare que constitue son campus} C'est la que tous les quatre ans se donnent les 
fetes du May Day, dont I'attraction centrale est constituee par le defile traditionnel 
ou la reine Elisabeth, annoncee par six herauts d'armes, precedee de ses archers, 
apparait au milieu de toute sa cour ; elle est suivie des personnages qui vont tout 
a I'heure, aux quatre coins du campus, jouer, — et fort bien, — des fragments de 
Shakespeare et d'autres anciens ecrivains anglais ou ecossais, tandis que sur le 
green, des danses populaires en costumes du X^VI^ siecle finissant se derouleront au 
son d'une musique de la meme epoque. La parfaite harmonic du spectacle est 
obtenue non seulement par le respect d'une tradition deja longue, mais par le 
concours d'un metteur en scene professionnel, — actuellement M. Arthur King,^ — 
assiste dans sa direction par des eleves ou anciennes eleves du college dont plusieurs 
sont entrees au theatre. Cette reconstitution feerique, inoubliable, ou Ton ne peut 
relever ni une maladresse de conception, ni une erreur d'execution, attire toujours 
un enorme concours de spectateurs: des trains speciaux sont organises au depart 
de New York et des grandes villes voisines." 

1 II est a peine besoin de rappeler que le college amerlcain correspond aux classes superi- 
eures de nos lycees et aux premieres annees de nos facultes: les eleves y ont de dix-huit 
a vingt-deux ans, Le campus est le terrain, generalement tres vaste, ou se trouvent les 
batiments, salles de cours, chapelle, dormitories, tennis, golf, etc, du college ou de 
I'universite. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



NEW YORK BRYN MAWR CLUB CUTS RESIDENT DUES 
FOR RECENT GRADUATES 

The New York Bryn Mawr Club has drastically lowered its schedule of dues 
for resident members who are recent Alumnae. Heretofore^ all resident members — 
those living within a radius of forty miles of New York — were charged $25.00 
annually. Now the schedule has been lowered as follows: 

Those out of college less than three years pay annual dues of $10.00. 

Those out of college three and four years pay annual dues of $15.00. 

Those out of college five years pay annual dues of $20.00. 

Thereafter the annual dues are $25.00. 

Seniors joining now may pay $10.00 and will not be billed again for dues 
until October^ 1935. In other words^ they will receive seventeen months' privileges 
for the price of twelve months' dues. Those who have stopped in at the Club at 
the Park Lane Hotel understand why membership in the Club is so desirable. 

Non-resident dues are still $10.00, and undergraduate $5.00 annually. Non- 
resident and undergraduate members may have all club privileges except those of 
voting and holding office. 

All Bryn Mawr students and graduates are very w-elcome to drop in at the 
Club whenever they are in New York. In fairness to members, guest cards must be 
obtained before using the privileges. The secretary at the desk will be very glad 
to show visitors around the rooms and the hotel, to answer questions, and to explain 
the routine of obtaining guest cards. 

Ruth Rickaby Darmstadt, 1927, 

(Mrs. Louis Darmstadt) 
Chairman of the Membership Committee. 

AN OPEN LETTER 

To the Editor of the Bulletin: 

Last month these pages contained a letter, quoted from the College Neics, and 
light-heartedly headed: "Radical Undergraduates Demand Rhetoric." I realize tliat 
the Bulletin Board felt that many of its readers, particularly those who in their 
time had felt themselves to be radicals when they lifted their voices against rig- 
orous training in Rhetoric, would be amused by this turn in events. As was the 
case with the earlier radicals, these of the present day represent only the minority 
point of view. The letter, however, was unexpectedly misunderstood by one or two 
people. The undergraduates have not risen in a body to demand tliat they be taught 
about subjects and predicates and the mystery of participles; far from it. As a 
matter of fact, they are being given, as they always have been, very genuine train- 
ing in Rhetoric, but it is no longer tagged and labeled, and so they do not realize 
their good fortune. The voice in the News indicated, possibly, merely a vernal 
impulse toward change, an impulse that is epidemic at this season on the campus, 
and that, as regularly as the spring, manifests itself in suggestions for changing 

Freshman English. 

Cornelia Meigs, 1907, 

Associate in English. 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. E. Hannan, 1934 

Usually after vacation there is a lull in campus activity^ but no sooner had the 
undergraduate body completely reassembled and settled down to study after Easter 
vacation, than it found itself setting blindly forth on a scavenger hunt the like of 
which the college has never seen before. This monster hunt was organized as a 
charity affair to raise money for Summer School and Bryn Mawr Camp (Bates 
House) ; but, as it turned out, it was not the undergraduates who made the affair 
a success, but the faculty who gave and gave. They gave woolen underdrawers 
and they gave themselves, dressed as the typical undergraduate or as the Funniest 
Thing; and when the Hunt was over, they, together with at least one hundred 
shouting and hallooing undergraduates, were herded together in Pembroke. The 
hour or more during which the committee of judges, consisting of Mrs. Chadwick- 
Collins, Miss Ely, Mrs. Wyncie King, and Dean Manning, decided which team 
had won the lollipops was undoubtedly the high point of the evening. A circus 
sideshow atmosphere prevailed and no one talked in less than a scream. In spite 
of the fact that the hoydenish assembly in Pembroke showcase was the feature of 
the evening, we cannot omit to mention the fact that the final event was a talk on 
Russia, a very good talk, but still, on Russia and after a Scavenger Hunt. It 
would not have happened anywhere else, but it was appropriate enough to us to 
cause no comment. 

As another contribution to the never-a-dull-moment ideal. Varsity Dramat 
presented Pygmalion, April 13th and 14th. The actual production of the play, 
certainly as well if not better done than usual, would have seemed to call for no 
comment other than praise for the hard-working producers; but the News started 
a small row by editorially pointing out that there were only four undergraduates in 
the cast, three of whom had minor parts. The theory was advanced that the 
exclusion of all but a few from taking part in the play was the reason for lack of 
undergraduate interest in Varsity Dramat. No less than four letters turned up 
in the News of the following week: one heavily sarcastic of the idea that every 
student should be given a chance to tread Goodhart stage at least once; another 
holding out for period plays and miracle plays as more suitable to our stage, and 
again dragging in the well-worn phrase, "imitation Broadway," as applied to 
Varsity Dramat's productions ; a third pointing out that the choice of the play was 
unfortunate, but the casting, acting, and production excellent ; and a fourth from 
Varsity Dramat itself, giving statistics of undergraduate participation in Dramat 
productions for the past two years and showing that fourteen per cent of the 
students had made some contribution and eight and one-half per cent a large 
contribution. 

There is, of course, much to be said for either side; and, we may add, it has 
been said again and again in the past month. It all boils down to the fact that 
part of the college look upon their Dramatic Club as an enlarged edition of school 
dramatic organizations, which try to give everyone a chance to be in a play, whether 
as an offstage noise or an anonymous member of a mob scene. The opposing group, 
and the one that has control of Dramat at this point, sees Goodhart stage as a place 

(22) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



for serious trial of talent^ a sort of pre-tlieatre incubator. It is liard to understand 
why the objectors to the semi-professionalism of Varsity Dramat are not satisfied 
with things as they are. They can take part in Glee Club productions or occa- 
sional miracle plays or one-act plays; and in view of the fact that only thirteen 
undergraduates came to tryouts for Pygmalion, it seems unfair to object to the 
exclusiveness of Varsity Dramat. If they find that they cannot stay away from 
the stage and haven't the voice for Glee Club^ we suggest that they pump some 
life into Players' Club and make it fulfill the function for which it was intended, 
that iS;, to discover and train promising actresses for Varsity Dramat. One very 
lovely thing about Bryn Mawr^, and no one would wish it different, is its fondness 
for conscientious objecting. It has probably been irritating to the managers of 
Dramat in this instance and they doubtless feel that the objections leveled at their 
very constructive efforts are unfair; but the criticisms made by the conscientious 
objectors may in the end help to make Dramat a healthier organization, drawing 
better quality if not greater quantity of support from the campus ; or again, the 
critics may continue to deal in words and leave action to the criticized. That they 
are fairly numerous is shown by the fact that their criticisms came out in the 
News, the campus organ of public opinion. 

The new Board of the News, which after vacation took up the onerous task of 
keeping the News columns free from proof errors, started an investigation of the 
curriculum in the same issue as its attack on Varsity Dramat. The questionnaire 
which they set the college asked: "Does each course (a) involve mostly memory 
work, originality, broad trends^ small details, too much reading; (b) cover the 
material announced; (c) discourage further study in the subject." The results as 
published may be gleaned from the spread-head over the article: "Questionnaire 
Describes College Courses; Students Discouraged by Almost One-Half — Strikingly 
Small Proportion Emphasize Originality; Detailed Memory Work Predominates — 
Forty-One Have Excessive Reading Required — Most of Courses Cover Material 
Announced." As the question quoted indicates, the survey was ambitious and rather 
difficult to carry out. The results were, however, presented in a careful, even if 
not statistically perfect form. The shortcomings of the editors, such as they were, 
did not escape the gimlet eyes of certain News readers; and in the next issue no 
less than twelve Bryn Mawr alumnae now studying in the Graduate School wrote 
a letter pointing out the lapses from statistical perfection. They asked: "What 
percentage of the students actually answered the questionnaire and what percentage 
of the enrollment of each course discussed?" and added that "anyone with any 
experience in the interpretation of statistics will realize that this is a vital factor 
for the value of the results. . . .,If statistics are to be used as an indication of 
undergraduate opinion, they should be computed and presented by someone witli an 
adequate training in the statistical method." Their criticism is, of course, correct, 
yet one would hate to see the News investigators supplanted by statisticians from 
the Carnegie Foundation, who would pin us down and find out the exact ratio 
of discouragement to originality in the Bryn jNIaM-r brain-pan. Every normal 
undergraduate likes a good trend, sweeping and general, of course, and we realize 
that we cannot have our lovely trends, such as "Students Discouraged by Almost 
One-Half of Courses," and accurate detail at the same time. The result is that we 
usually take our trends and leave the details to their own devices. We may add 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



that most undergraduates take the startling generalizations about themselves with 
a grain of salt; and that our mentors^ the faculty, seem to have developed the 
same happy attitude. 

The blitheness of our spirits was illustrated again this year at Little May Day. 
There is, fortunately, nothing new about May Day and so no one ever feels called 
upon to criticize it as a departure from tradition. There is also nothing tiresome 
about it, so it had never degenerated into mere tradition. 

As usual, scholarships and prizes were read out in Chapel and the best of 
Bryn Mawr got their reward. One comment made by President Park upon the 
award of the Hinchman Memorial Scholarship deserves mention in proof of the 
fact that the campus is becoming more serious and scholarly every year. In an- 
nouncing the winners of the Scholarship, which had to be divided between two 
students equally good. President Park*said, "The list of candidates proposed by the 
various departments is being given for the first time, because five of the seven 
candidates would undoubtedly have won the scholarship if competing with an 
ordinary class." That, we feel, is proof of a very nice trend. 

DEAN SCHENCK IS GIVEN THE CROSS OF THE 
CHEVALIER OF THE LEGION OF HONOR 

Early in May, Dean Schenck of the Graduate School received from 
M. de Laboulaye, the French Ambassador, a letter saying: "I take pleasure in 
informing you that the President of the French Republic has conferred upon you the 
Cross of the Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. I will bestow this high distinction 
upon you during the ceremonies at the University of Delaware on May 12th." 

The occasion was an impressive one, in connection with the centenary celebra- 
tion of the founding of the University of Delaware, and M. de Laboulaye was him- 
self the recipient of the honorary degree of LL.D. The Cross of the Chevalier of 
the Legion of Honor was conferred upon! Miss Schenck, and also upon Florence 
White, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 1915, Head of the Department of French at Vassar, and 
Horatio Smith, Head of the Department of French at Brown University. In 
making the award the Ambassador stressed the great part played in establishing 
the best kind of international relations by these three distinguished scholars, who 
have all been for some years members of the Committee on Foreign Study of the 
Institute of International Education, which arranges for the junior year in France. 

It will be remembered that Miss Schenck spent two summers just after the 
war in the devastated regions of France, as Associate Director of a Red Cross unit, 
in charge of a Jardin d'Enfants. She has been from its inception Chairman of the 
Alumnae Committee, which makes an annual gift of books to the Department of 
American Literature at the Sorbonne, and is foreign correspondent of the Academy 
at BesanQon. In 1929 she was decorated by the French Government and was made 
an Officier d'Academie francaise. Bryn Mawr has another close link with France in 
the Bryn Mawr room at the Cite Universitaire, endowed by Anne Vauclain, 1907, 
in memory of her mother. This room is to be occupied this summer by one of two 
Bryn Mawr students, Ruth Jacobson, Graduate Scholar in History of Art, or 
Suzanne Halstead, candidate for B.A. 1934, both of whom have won scholarships 
offered by the Institute of International Education. 

(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



EXCERPTS FROM FURTHER CAMPUS NOTES 

By Geraldine Rhoads^ 1935 

Campus activity is by no means entirely confined to dramatic activity, and 
those of us who are not histrionically inclined take a great deal of pleasure in the 
informal lectures at the Deanery. The opening of the Deanery has given us mucli 
more chance to gather informally and has made possible such events as the after- 
noon of undergraduate poetry, the group singing of madrigals under Mr. and Mrs. 
Hotson's direction, and the forthcoming undergraduate dance recital in the Deanery 
Garden. Also in the Deanery we had the rare opportunity of hearing Stephen 
Vincent Benet speak on the reading of poetry. 

In the art of the dance we were brought Jacques Cartier, and the recital he 
gave was really memorable to us because the dancer not only showed originality in 
the arrangement and execution of his dances, but showed great ability at synthesizing 
and absorbing many of the details found in thei different techniques of the many 
modern schools of the dance. Within the month the program was varied with 
two lectures on subjects not pertaining to letters or to arts: Professor Blanchard, 
of Swarthmore, came to talk on What Is Truth? and Dr. Arthur H. Compton 
spoke recently on Do We Live in a World of Chance? Both the philosophical 
and the scientific lecture had a more limited appeal, however, and both lectures left 
us asking more vehemently than before the questions which the lecturers pre- 
sumably discussed. 

With Little May Day past, the maypoles taken from the green, and only a 
few futile hoop-ribbons lying around Senior Row, we are coming to a sudden and 
shocking realization that the year is nearly gone, and that three-fourths of us must 
decide what courses we shall take next year. It was, therefore, with interest that 
the News questionnaire on courses was discussed among the undergraduates. We 
were surprised to know that as a group we found that many more courses demanded 
of us an ability to memorize than any capacity for doing original work; and we 
were depressed to find out that almost one-half of the courses in college discouraged 
a considerable number of students taking them from further study in the subject. 
But we were cheered to know that almost all of the courses cover the material 
announced, and with the announcement of the splendid new courses scheduled for 
next year, we are optimistically trying to convince Mrs. Manning that we shall 
return next year and work very hard at any number of courses. In addition to 
Dr. Chew's course in the Literary History of the Bible, announced in the last 
Bulletin, we are looking forward to a course in History of Religions, a composi- 
tion course to be given by Miss Donnelly, a new course in Rapid Reading of Latin, 
modern courses in English History, Art, Money and Banking, Contemporary Politics 
and Problems in Economic Recovery, and a long-needed course in French Diction, 
to be presented by Mile. Maud Rey, well known to us for her admirable work on 
past French Club plays. 

With all of these bright prospects, we find that not even the infirmary is 
worried about our spring fever. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

Edith Melcher, Ph.D. Bryn, Mawr 1928, has 
been promoted to Assistant Professor at 
Wellesley College. 

Edith Cumings, candidate for the Ph.D. de- 
gree at Bryn Mawr this June, has been pro- 
moted to Assistant Professor at Lake Erie 
College. 

Jean Gray Wright, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 1933, 
has been made a full Professor at Westhampton 
College. 

Edith Fishtine, Ph.D. Bryn Mawr 1933, has 
received a grant from the American Council of 
Learned Societies. 

Helen Bagenstose, Fellow in Education at 
Bryn Mawr 1933-34, has received a University 
Scholarship in the School of Education at 
Harvard University for 1934-35. 

Vera A. Ames, Fellow in Mathematics at 
Bryn Mawr this year, has been appointed sub- 
stitute instructor in Mathematics at the 
H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College for 
1934-35. 

Florence White, Ph.D. 1915, has been made 
a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. See 
page 24. 

1889 
No Editor Appointed. 

1890 
No Editor Appointed. 

1891 
No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 

1435 Lexington Ave., New York City. 
Mathilde Weil has been most successful in 
her "Writer's Workshop" in New York, where 
she advises writers and helps them locate their 
work. She says in a letter: "Your letter ar- 
rived while 1 was away on an all-too-brief 
motoring trip through the Great Smokies, for 
my work makes it difficult for me to get away 
from my office. Except for week-ends at the 
seashore I expect to be here all summer taking 
occasional short trips during the fall and winter 
and spring instead of a summer vacation, which 
is the time when my four secretaries have 
their turns. I did take a month off for a 
Norway cruise a year ago, but 1 am glad to 
say that I always have far more than enough 
work to keep me busy." 



1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 

610 East 83rd St., New York City. 
The Class will be grieved to hear that Adolphe 
Borie, the distinguished husband of Edith Pettit 
Borie, died of pneumonia on May 14th. His loss 
to his family, to his many friends, to Philadel- 
phia, and to American Art is an irreparable one. 

1896 

Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 
Ida Ogilvie is in the hospital at Mt. Kisco, 
recovering from a serious operation for appen- 
dicitis. The attack came on while she was on 
a field trip with her students. At last reports 
Ida was well out of danger. 

1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, Dunkirk, N. Y. 
Aimee Leffingwell McKenzie (can't you see 
her dashing across the basketball field like a 
spirited little long-maned pony — in a very long 
corduroy skirt?) has been devoting some of 
that same energy to preparations for the annual 
sale of used books for the benefit of the Bryn 
Mawr Regional Scholarship Fund held in an 
empty shop on Nassau Street, Princeton, on the 
second and third of May. She writes that it 
is great fun being so near Bryn Mawr. In 
October she went down for the opening of the 
Deanery and enjoyed every minute of the two 
days spent in the Deanery. In April she drove 
down with Renee Mitchell Righter to hear 
Stephen Vincent Benet's talk on Poetry. Re- 
cently she and her husband had as luncheon 
guests Mary Converse and Alice Cilley Weist 
who drove over in Mary's "marvelous car. 
(A. C. W. also writes with enthusiasm of this 
visit to Princeton, of the charming house and 
hostess, the delightful husband and the deli- 
cious luncheon and of being taken to see the 
Graduate School and Chapel where they saw 
John Angel's inspiring sculpture). Aimee, when 
she wrote, was looking forward to a visit with 
Susan Follansbee Hibbard who came east for 
the National League of Women Voters Con- 
vention in Boston. 



(26) 



BRYN MAWli ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Alice Cilley Weist is enjoying life and work 
at the Shipley School and looks forward to 
being there next winter as well as this summer. 

From the Department of Art and Archaeology 
at Holyoke, Caroline Gait writes: "I am by way 
of being an archaeologist although I was not 
listed as such in the April Bulletin, perhaps 
because I had had all my training in the sub- 
ject away from Bryn Mawr. (Note: The class 
editor has ascertained from the chairman of the 
Academic Committee that this surmise is cor- 
rect. The committee does know about C. G.'s 
splendid career and although she is not 
mentioned by name, she is listed among the 
twenty-six college professors.) I have never 
supervised a "dig," but a few years ago I was 
sent out to the American School of Classical 
Studies at Athens as Annual Professor, the first 
woman to be sent in that capacity to one of 
the foreign schools. I send many of my students 
on to Bryn Mawr for their graduate training, 
and some of them have won such honors as 
the Mary Garrett and the European fellowships. 
Two of my former students are in Athens this 
year on fellowships, one at the Archaeological 
Institute, and the other the Drisler Fellow from 
Columbia. Other former students are in muse- 
um work in New York, Boston, Philadelphia 
and Indianapolis. 

"Teachers of Greek and Archaeology these 
days cannot boast of having large numbers in 
their classes, but they do have the satisfaction 
of having some of the finest students in each 
class elect their subjects. That is my 'lay' 
at present," 

M. Miller Buckminster writing from 31 
Marlborough Street, Boston, says that her feel- 
ings will not be hurt if her letter goes into 
the waste basket: 'I have not one scrap of 
news that could interest a soul. I am the most 
insignificant of human beings and take a great 
deal of trouble to be just that. Nothing has 
happened to me of late I am happy to say. 
I live in the same house winters as above and 
when it gets warmish take myself and my 
household to our funny little house in Chocorua 
where we greatly enjoy the lake bathing, the 
woods and the garden. My niece is spending 
a winter or two with me, kindly lent me by 
my sister to bring much needed young life 
into the household, and in the summer I bor- 
row my grandchildren (without their parents), 
and so I have grand summers. My husband 
has had a year of invalidism but we enjoy 
many things together in spite of his limited 
activities. It is really my turn to read aloud. 
He has done it so many years, and while I 
do not do it as well as he did, I am improving. 

"I keep my eyes well turned in upon my 
own affairs and regard with great disfavor 
nearly everything I see when I raise them from 
my own concerns. What energy I have after 
attending to my own personal interests, I spend 



in non-cooperative effort. I am the ruggedest 
of rugged individualists and mean to stay that 
way. I doubt if the millenium is at hand, and 
'man' and his welfare is a subject of total 
indifference to me. Men and their happiness 
is another matter and we cannot be weary of 
well doing for them — but in a very personal 
way that is nobody's business. 

"I still spend my mornings at the N. E. His- 
torical and Geneological Society in the com- 
pany of the happily dead, and my books — four 
of them — are nearing completion. (Note: The 
C. E. was curious about the books and learned 
that they are family histories, among them the 
Millard, Millerd, Miller family and the Buck- 
master, Buckminster family.) 

"I live at such a distance from my child that 
there is a good deal of letter writing to be 
done and my husband's illness prevents my 
hopping on the night train for Buffalo as 1 
used to do. My son-in-law is Minister-Coun- 
cillor to Germany (from Spain) and I am 
thinking of going for a fifteen days' spree in 
June to see what I can see in Germany, five 
days over, five days in Berlin and five days 
back. If my roses lived through the winter 
in New Hampshire and are behaving as well 
covered roses should, I can go, but if they are 
all gone and there is a great lot of planting 
to be looked after just at that time, I shall 
not be able to get away. I have not seen a 
classmate in a dog's age. I hear from Itha 
Thomas — Mabel Haynes Leick's daughter — fre- 
quently. She is very interesting on the sub- 
ject of Austrian politics and happy at the 
way things have gone in Austria up to this 
point. Her husband is a government official — 
Oberregierungsrath. Mabel says . little about 
Austrian politics. Her grandchildren, Solveig 
and Dagmar Thomas, are picture-book children 
very lovely to behold. 

'Tf any of you read my daughter's article 
called 'They Shall Call Me Grandma,' in the 
January Junior League Magazine, you will see 
that I have a good deal to live up to and that 
I shan't have to account to you further as to 
what I do with my time. With which happiest of 
thoughts I conclude. Ever affectionately yours."' 

1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

1899 

Editor: Carolyn Trowbridge Brown Lewis 
(Mrs. H. Radnor Lewis) 
451 Milton Road, Rye, N. Y. 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard S. Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1901 

Class Editor: Helen Converse Thorpe 
(Mrs. Warren Thorpe) 
15 East 64th St., New York City. 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Hilda Vauclain's daughter, Patricia Vauclain, 
was( married on Saturday, April 28th, to Mr. 
Thomas Hollingsworth Andrews, 3rd, of Rose 
Tree Farm, Media. Amelie Vauclain Tatnall, 
Hilda's oldest daughter, was maid of honor, 
and Lucy Fry, Marjorie's daughter, was one 
of the bridesmaids. Patricia was a very lovely 
bride. 

Hope Woods Hunt, with her daughters Sophie 
and Martha, accompanied her husband, Merrill 
Hunt, to the White House at Washington on 
April 21st for the 30th Reunion of Harvard 
1904, which President Roosevelt was holding. 
It was a memorable occasion. Merrill Hunt is 
at present associated with the Home Owners 
Loan Corporation in the State of Rhode Island. 

Patty Rockwell Moorhouse's husband, Wilson 
Moorhouse, has returned home from the 
Bryn Mawr Hospital after a very critical ill- 
ness. 

Adola Greely Adams visited Patty for a 
couple of days and they attended the "Little 
May Day Fete." Adola was delighted to see the 
College again after years of absence and com- 
mented upon how unfamiliar it seemed to see 
the Library building instead of the stretches of 
once familiar green lawn. Adola has just 
recently returned from a trip to Honolulu to 
visit her brother. Colonel John W. Greely, at 
Schofield Barracks. She sailed on November 
17th from New York, through the Panama 
Canal, stopping at all the Central American 
countries, and returning through the canal 
stopped at Guatemala, and Cartagena in South 
America. She returned to celebrate her father, 
Admiral Greely's 90th birthday. She says her 
father is still in excellent health. Adola herself 
is sunburned and very well; she motored from 
Washington to her home near Fryburg, Maine. 

Katrina Van Wagenen Bugge's address is 
now Jaegerveine 11, Slemdal, Oslo, Norway. 

Bertha Brown Lambert has sent me a notice 
of Back Log Camp on Indian Lake, Sabael, 
New York. Helen and Thomas Brown are 
conducting a European tour. In the Back Log 



Camp greetings Bert Brown writes as follows: 
"For ten months I lived with my Japanese 
college friend and roommate, Michi Kawai, 
herself an old Back Logger, and now one of 
the foremost women leaders in Japan. She has 
a girls' five-year high school in the suburbs of 
Tokyo, a long, low building in two acres of 
grounds, where is also her roomy, American- 
style home. During the summer, Michi Kawai 
and I, with her maid, settled down on a se- 
cluded lake, where I helped her write a book 
now published under the title Japanese Women 
Speak." 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

Mary Underbill Hall writes from her home 
in Berkeley, California: "I wish I had written 
to you on my return from China three years 
ago. There was more to tell then of teaching 
Chinese boys English, of vacations in Buddhist 
monasteries and Philippine mountains, of 
Ankor, Bangkok, and an arm broken in a 
Sicilian hotel. Life is pleasant in Berkeley, 
but comparatively dull. I teach English to 
American youngsters, study Chinese art in 
memory of the Orient and Spanish in hope of 
a Mexican sojourn." 

Leslie Farwell Hill and her daughter came 
East in March and, on the 22nd, sailed with 
Gertrude Hill, '07, for England. Leslie and 
Ellen plan to be over about two months and 
sail back from Italy. 

Nathalie Fairbank Bell and her husband 
went to Germany this winter on 24 hours' 
notice when the President sent him with the 
Commission to investigate American securities 
over, there. Nathalie is at home now after a 
visit to Arizona to recuperate from her trip. 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen Haughwout Putnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St., Milton, Mass. 

1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

A new honor has come to our Dean Schenck, 
who has just been made a Chevalier of the 
Legion of Honour. See page 24. 

Dorothy Howland Leatherbee writes: "My 
oldest son, John, was married last December 
to Helen Ullmann, of Santa Barbara, a grad- 
uate of Stanford University. Virginia at Vassar 
has made the Daisy Chain for the graduation 
this June. Anne is graduating from High 
School this year and hopes to go to Katharine 
Gibbs Secretarial School next fall. I am still 
a housekeeper, and am doing a little business 
of selling sport clothes in this depression." 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Grace Hutchins by request sent in some ad- 
ditional information about her book, Women 
Who Work: "It wasn't done, I must hasten to 
explain, in addition to regular work, since the 
preparation of such books is the main job of 
the Labor Research Association — not all on 
women in industry, of course, but all on labor 
subjects. I started to gather stuff for this one 
in 1929. You'll be duly horrified to know that 
a Hearst paper {N. Y. Evening Journal) carried 
a lurid interview with the author. Shades of 
P. T.!" 

Julie Benjamin Howson brought her daugh- 
ter, Joan, to the campus for a weekend in April. 
They stayed at the Deanery and attended 
Varsity Play in Goodhart and a Miracle Play 
in the Cloister, as well as calling politely on 
all local members of 1907, who were overjoyed 
to see them and to learn that Joan is to be a 
member of the Class of 1938. 

The next campus visitors were May Ballin 
and Edna Brown Wherry. Edna has scrupu- 
lously avoided all reunions for years, but de- 
cided to make up for lost time, and in three 
days took in everyone between ' Newark and 
Baltimore. Among her activities were included 
a visit to Lelia Woodruff Stokes' country place, 
"The Mill," a dream of beauty in its spring 
dress, a dash to Ruxton to call on Calvert 
Myers Beasley Sunday morning; and luncheon 
with Margaret Reeve Cary in Germantown, com- 
bined somehow with a sight-seeing trip to the 
Art Museum and the Planetarium. Just the 
week before she had gone to hear Marjorie 
Young Gifford read at the New York Bryn 
Mawr Club. A host of contemporaries turned 
up, a tribute to Dorothy Forster Miller's gen- 
eralship. Among those present were Ethel 
Harper, Janet Russell, Elizabeth Pope Behr, as 
well as Julie, Dorothy, May and Edna. 

1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

Terry Helburn is the Czarina in The Czarina 
of the Theatre, by Francis Rufus Bellamy, in 
The Reader's Digest for May. "If a woman 
were to be chosen today as dictator of the 
Theatre World, Theresa Helburn would have 
the job," the article begins. 

Marjorie Young Gifford, who has been lec- 
turing most successfully in and around Boston 
on current literature gave a lecture at the New 
York Bryn Mawr Club on April 24th for the 
benefit of the Club Library. Her audience en- 
joyed her witty and original discussion of "The 
Rhyme and Reason of Current Fiction." 

Linda Schaefer Castle spent February in New 
York. She then started on a trip around the 
world with Gwen. She got the full benefit of 
the InsuU incident in Greece, but was more 
interested in the Parthenon. "No disappoint- 
ments!" she declares. 



The Brooklyn Eagle for Sunday, March lllh, 
had the following article, quoted here in part: 

Brooklynites who saw Miss Tracy D. Mygatt 
campaign last fall as Socialist candidate for 
Register probably thought, as they heard the 
weighty statistics and economic-social theories 
with which her speeches bristled, that she had 
prepared for the fray by months of serious 
study during the summer. 

She did nothing of the sort. 

She passed the summer in peaceful retreat 
at her cottage in Maine. 

Her only interest was Miss Julia Newberry — 
a young American miss who fluttered her pretty 
way in the middle of the 1800's through a 
world as prim and quaint as her name. 

The result of this calm before the political 
storm is "Julia Newberry's Sketch Book," re- 
cently published by W. W. Norton & Co. 

The volume, in the long elongated shape of 
an old album, has a black cover embossed with 
delicate gold scrolls, that look as feminine as 
Julia could desire. The book is dressed up 
with a bright blue paper cover, decorated with 
pink posies and daguerreotypes of Miss Julia 
and her cousin and bosom friend. Miss Minnie 
Clapp. 

Miss Julia was gathered to her aristocratic 
forebears at a tender age, but the devoted 
Minnie is a happy, active little old woman liv- 
ing in Manhattan. She is Miss Mygatt's mother 
and it was from her treasures of childhood that 
the Brooklyn writer and Socialist obtained the 
sketch book. 

"Why, it was a relaxation," Miss IMygatt 
said, surprised that anyone else should be sur- 
prised because she had not devoted the pre- 
liminary months to campaign preparation. 

"But, then," she said, after a moment's re- 
flection, "there has always been a conflict in 
my life. I don't know, really" — she chuckled — 
"what the publishers would think if they knew 
of my radical political theories. And, frankly, 
even though I've run so often for office, I'm 
not interested in city politics." 

"1 am, perhaps, most passionately a pacifist," 
she said after further reflection. 

"Sometimes," she confessed, "when I get 
tired of things, of the turmoil and noise of 
today, I wish I could be like Julia. Sometimes 
I have a feeling of nostalgia for that Victoria 
World." 

Caroline Schock Jones gave a very successful 
tea at her home in Madison when Jean Stirling 
Gregoi7 showed Bryn Mawr films to an inter- 
ested audience of mothers and daughters. 

1909 

Class Editor: Ellen Shippen 

14 East 8th St., New York City. 
A letter has just come in from Helen Crane, 
whose job as Class Editor I have taken over 
for the time being: "I am slowly trekking my 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



way back to enough energy to enable me to 
get back to Albany; am spending a few days 
with Sally Webb and relatives and shall go 
on to Philadelphia next week. I'll miss reunion 
by about two weeks; but probably won't stay 
convalescent that long." 

Marianne Moore, of whom we are justly 
proud, had a paper in the April Hound & Horn 
on "Henry James as a Characteristic American" ; 
a review in the April Criterion of Ezra Pound's 
Cantos; a review of William Carlos Williams 
in Poetry. She has also written some important 
new verse: The Plummet Basilisk, The Buffalo, 
The Frigate Pelican, and others. 

Dorothy North is in charge of the exhibit of 
"Creative Arts of Childhood from Vienna," in 
the Hall of Social Science at the world's fair 
in Chicago. Her booth is brilliant with chil- 
dren's huge and gorgeous paintings and fan- 
tastic wood carvings. Mr. Brauer, an Austrian 
architect and Kunstgewerber, will be there also 
to give the very latest word on European art 
doings. 

Helen Gilroy writes Craney from Lignan Uni- 
versity, Canton, China, that she is teaching a 
mixture of electricity, heat, light and sound to 
twenty-four Chinese freshmen and sophomores 
from the civil engineering college. Helen re- 
cently paid two visits to old official homes in 
Canton. In the first house she saw a grand 
array of ancestral portraits, so important to the 
Chinese, and in the second she was fortunate 
enough to discover a Chinese bride in a red 
"sitting chair," receiving, for the first and only 
time in her life, the respectful homage of her 
father, brothers and the other men of her family. 

Fan Barber Berry is getting together a long 
and varied program for Reunion, and she and 
Scrap Ecob have had their heads together in 
magnificent collaboration. 

If more 1909 people would send in word of 
their doings it would be wonderful, but, on the 
whole and as a class, we are as silent as clams. 

1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

1911 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 
(Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 
1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

Margaret Hobart Myer's daughter, Alice, is 
going to be married on June 7th to Olin Gordon 
Beall, of Macon. They are going to live in 
Sewanee for three years while he studies for 
holy orders at the theological school of the 
University of the South. 

True to our threats to print rumors if au- 
thentic news is not forthcoming, we hear that 



Lois Lehman is returning to the U. S. A. after 
an absence of several years, that Kate Seelye 
and her family are to be in America for an- 
other year, that Helen Tredway, the dog, made 
a flying trip to New York at Easter to do a 
bit of research which did not include seeing 
any classmates. Anna Stearns, however, did 
stop for a • few days on her way home from 
Mexico and says she will be writing us all soon 
about you know what always comes at this 
time of the year to remind you about our 
college days. 

We congratulate Gertrude Gimbel on the fine 
record her daughter, Margaret Dannenbaum, 
1934, has made at College. She has maintained 
a cam laude average thus far. 

Changes of address are as follows: Jeannette 
Allen Andrews to Selfridge Field, Michigan. 
Elsie Funkhouser to the Hotel Margaret, 
Brooklyn. 

Word has just been received of the death on 
May 8th of Kate Chambers Seelye's youngest 
daughter, Katharine. The Class sends love and 
sympathy. 

1912 

Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur)' 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 

1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

These are the last of the return post cards 
and unless someone supplies me with gratuitous 
information there will be no class notes. 

From Marguerite Mellen Dewey: "I am 
ashamed of my silence but at least I have kept 
the card for use in the spring of the year. 
I am purely domestic. One boy has just fin- 
ished an emergency appendix (Davis, at Milton. 
— Ed.) in time to leave me free for the other 
who has measles (Bradley, Jr., Freshman at 
Harvard. — Ed.). I hope that Peggy, aged 14, 
will go to Bryn Mawr three years from now. 
The fourth and youngest is Ann, aged 8." 

From Gertrude Ziesing Kemper: "Having in- 
herited three children, aged 16, 18, and 20, 
when I married three years ago, and having 
one of my own, age 13, my life and problems 
are like everyone else's who has a growing 
family. I did go, last summer, with my hus- 
band to the International Association of Com- 
merce Congress in Vienna. We had a glimpse 
of Budapest, Paris, and London, and then home. 
This was my reason for not attending reunion." 

From Margaret Brown Fleming, in Pasadena: 
"I am President of the Bryn Mawr Club of 
Southern California and Vice-President of the 
Woman's Auxiliary — the Episcopal Women's 



(30) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Missionary organization. These two jobs and 
four children keep me pretty well occupied. 
Every spare minute I do a little digging in the 
desert (where I never found anything but 
shards) and read Indian ethnology and archae- 
ology. Much love to all 1913." 

From Helen Lee Gilbert in Norwich, Conn.: 
"I am heading the Civics Department of the 
Woman's Club, Chairman of the Roll Call for 
the Red Cross, interested in my active family 
of three and general civic problems of Norwich. 
Knitting dresses in between." 

From Clara Murray Eager in Baltimore: "My 
daily duties revolve around five children, rang- 
ing in age from fifteen to five, clothing them 
and keeping them more or less in their right 
minds. Between times I am serving on hospital 
boards and a school board — trying to accom- 
plish cleaner movies, and directing temperate 
social amusements in managing dancing classes 
for all aged children. Intend to concentrate 
on vocational work for cripples in Maryland 
when I get a chance and the iron is hot." 

From Lucile Shadburn Yow: "I am on the 
staff of the Ogontz School for Girls. Since my 
work for the School will send me to various 
cities I hereby warn those of 1913 who may 
reside therein that I shall probably call a 
cheery hello to them." 

From Adelaide Simpson: "Am still teaching 
Latin and Greek at Hunter College. At the 
moment I'm interested in 1934, i. e., the present 
and the future, for myself and people like me, 
but much more for the rising generation which 
I teach. Hunter students must be residents of 
New York City, but their background is Europe, 
Asia or Africa as well as New York and their 
American foreground is almost exclusively New 
York. The answer is almost anything, and that 
is why it interests me." 

From Margaret Scruggs Carruth: "Had a suc- 
cessful (both financially and otherwise) show- 
ing of my latest prints, some three dozen, last 
month. Have been keenly interested in starting 
a Crafts School in connection with the Art 
Institute of Dallas. My splendid young son is 
a Sophomore and a joy to us all." 

And last but not least from our very able 
chairman of the Scholarships and Loan Fund 
Committee, of whom 1913 may well be proud, 
Elizabeth Y. Maguire: "My one real job is still 
scholarships and Loan Fund, aided by a grand 
central committee. The work comes to a hectic 
climax in March and April. I loved going to 
Boston for the Council, it was delightful to see 
such a lot of 1913 gathered there and to be 
entertained by hospitable classmates." 

1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 



1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Dorothea Moore was in Washington in Feb- 
ruary and spent Washington's Birthday with 
Florence Kelton on her way to attend some 
medical meetings in Baltimore. 

The name of Susan Brandeis's law firm is 
now Gilbert, Diamond and Brandeis, with offices 
both in New York City and in Washington, 
D. C. A clipping concerning Susan from the 
New York Sun of March 26th reads: "Miss 
Susan Brandeis, attorney and daughter of 
United States Supreme Court Justice Brandeis, 
has accepted the leadership of a movement to 
bring about enactment of legislation which 
would permit savings banks to issue life insur- 
ance policies and old-age annuities. A bill 
already is pending in the Legislature. 

"Miss Brandeis's father sponsored similar 
legislation in Massachusetts nearly thirty years 
ago." 

Dagmar Perkins and Professor Samuel Arthur 
King are listed among others as members of 
the faculty and advisory board of the new 
speech centre of the International Committee 
on American Speech. This Committee formally 
opened the centre at 126 East Thirtieth Street, 
New York City, on March 23rd, 1934. The 
founder of the speech centre. Dr. James Sonnett 
Greene, is quoted in a newspaper inter\iew as 
follows : 

"We aim to wipe out the chaotic and slovenly 
speech habits prevalent in the United States 
and then set up a standard for American speech 
in keeping with the other elements of our 
national character. Specially trained observers 
will record thousands of specimens of the 
American language as it is actually spoken 
under all kinds of conditions. On the basis 
of the laboratory's findings from the correlated 
specimens a practical standard for good Amer- 
ican speech will be established. Anyone of us 
will be able to travel all over the world and 
everyone will be able to understand us." 

An interesting letter from Elizabeth Smith 
Wilson reports that she is still living in Cin- 
cinnati and still spends her summers in Mount 
Desert (Soamesville), Maine. Last summer she 
saw Carlotta Taber, Ruth Hubbard and Miss 
Crandall, and she hopes that any members of 
1915 who are in the neighborhood this summer 
will drop in on her. "Liz" says that she re- 
cently received a charming picture of Jean 
Sattler Marmillot and her four daughters, 
Jeanne, 10, Monique, 8. Anne, 5, and Maud. 3. 
Jean is still living in the Near East where her 
husband is serving as a major in the French 
Army. Liz has two boys aged nine and four. 
Her husband is still in municipal politics, hav- 
ing been elected to City Council last fall on a 



(31) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



non-partisan ticket and having later become 
mayor. Liz says she gets very much excited 
over political campaigns and was really sorry 
when the campaign was over last fall. 

Vashti McCreery and Ruth Tinker Morse 
motored from Boston to Miami and back in 
April. They made a Monday morning call on 
Anne Hardon. Pearce at her home in Palatka 
and stopped off in Washington on the way 
back to see the cherry blossoms. Incidentally 
they called on Peggy Stone, who was delighted 
to see them. They looked much the same as 
they used to in college days. 

Adrienne says she has no news of herself, 
but her description of how her days are spent 
shows that she's certainly not on the "inactive" 
list. Speaking of the past winter she says: 
"What with the snow and the annual grippe 
and the trips to the dentist and the oculist and 
again to the dentist for a tooth broken in 
skating (Jean's), and to the doctor to sew up 
a cut and give anti-tetanus treatment (Ben), 
and driving Frieda's riding club on Thursdays 
to their riding school, and Alan's boys to the 
trip through the sawmills (I'm one of the 
chauffeuring mothers the school calls on in all 
emergencies), etc., etc., the days just rip along 
and months are gone before I realize it." Adie 
tells me that Mil Justice "looks fine and has 
taken advantage of the snow this winter to 
learn to ski." 

Isabel Foster has gone into politics and is 
especially interested in the milk situation in 
Connecticut. 

Catherine Head Coleman is recuperating from 
a long illness following the birth of her second 
son. Reed, last September. She writes: "I am 
much improved after two months in Arizona 
and have a splendid boy to compensate for my 
protracted incapacity. I happened to see Peggy 
Shipway Matthiessen while I was gone and to 
hear directly of Sarah Rozit Smith Bull from 
Mrs. Bull, Sr., who was in Tucson." 

If any members of the class have temporarily 
lost or overlooked the appeal for money to 
furnish a partial scholarship for the class baby, 
here is another reminder. Quite a few members 
have already contributed, but the sum of $500 
has not been reached, and any contribution at 
all will be most welcome. If you intend to send 
something, don't delay, as the class baby is 
ready to enter college this fall and will not be 
able to do so without our help. Checks may be 
made payable to Dorothea M. Moore, Treasurer, 
and sent to her at 30 West 10th St., New York. 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 

768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 

Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Rebecca Fordyoe Gayton and two friends 
drove down to Cincinnati in April for the 
Northeast Conference of the A. A. U. W. For 



is president of the Youngstown League of 
Women Voters this year and therefore was in- 
terested in visiting Cincinnati's City Hall as 
well as in attending meetings. She joined the 
local Bryn Mawr Club at a small luncheon 
given for Dean Manning, who was one of the 
speakers at the Conference, and thereby had a 
brief reunion with Charlotte Westheimer Tobias 
and Catherine Godley. From Cincinnati For 
and her companions continued their trip on to 
Virginia for a view of the gardens. They ex- 
pected to be gone for a week, though they 
insisted that they had no money and should 
not have left their families anyway. 

Constance Dowd Grant went through Youngs- 
town on her trip east in April and stayed long 
enough to have lunch with For, see her three 
children (she reports them very well behaved) 
and interview a scholarship candidate. On her 
way to and from New York Cedy stopped to 
see Ruth Alden Lester who is now living in 
East Aurora, N. Y. Ruth seemed to have stood 
the rigors of a northern winter very well. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha Clark Greenough 
203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. L 

1918 

Class Editor: Margaret Bacon Carey 
(Mrs. H. R. Carey) 
3115 Queen Lane, East Falls P. 0., Phila.. 

1919 

Class Editor: Marjorie Remington Twitchell 
(Mrs. Pierrepont Twitchell) 
Setauket, N. Y. 

Frances Clarke Darling has provided a new 
candidate for Bryn Mawr — her little daughter 
arrived on April 8th. Frannie adopted a baby 
boy last September. He was a year old last 
month. Good luck and congratulations! 

Dotty Walton Price has moved to 251 S. 
Anita Ave., Brentwood Hts., Los Angeles, 
California. She says she was in Bryn Mawr 
"some eighteen months ago and reminisced for 
half an hour on the empty campus. ... I would 
love to see any classmates or other Bryn 
Mawrtyrs hereabout. I am listed in the tele- 
phone book as Mrs. D. W. Price. . . . What 
time I have left after the unassisted job of 
keeping house for my three strenuous offsprings, 
the oldest of whom (Marion) is in Junior High 
School and an embryo poet, I am starting on 
the ground floor of the real estate business. 
So far it is amusing and highly unprofitable." 

Elizabeth Fauvre Owen has moved to 
616 19th Ave., N. E., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Helen Huntting Fulton is living at 4136 
Aldrich Ave., So. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Corinne Mendinhall Catty can be addressed 
now at 40 Colgate-Palmolive Peet, S. A. 
Apartado 2035, Mexico, D. F. 



(32) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Tip Thurman Fletcher is now at 6204 Three 
Chopt Road, Richmond, Va. 

Win Perkins Raven writes us very sad news 
indeed. On April fourth, in Duluth, Vivian 
Turrish Bunnell died. Her father was killed 
that same night in an automobile accident and 
knew nothing of her death. Vivian left a 
twelve-year-old daughter. The class extends its 
deepest sympathy. 

1920 

Class Editor: Mary Porritt Green 
(Mrs. Valentine J. Green) 
430 East 57th St., New York. City 

1921 

Class Editor: Eleanor Donnelley Erdman 
(Mrs. C. Pardee Erdman) 
514 Rosemont Ave,, Pasadena, Calif. 

Nora Newell Burry generously sent en the 
news that Silvine Marbury. Harrold's third 
daughter was born on Silvine's own birthday, 
March 27th. Nora herself went out for a 
ranching winter, but is a little off the great 
southwest after spending a great part of her' 
own vacation in a hospital in Jerome, Arizona, 
and then arriving home with two sick sons. 

Eileen Lyons Donovan writes that she has a 
first and only new daughter — Catherine Mary — 
but she neglected to say how "new." 

Jimmy James Rogers, who collects news for 
the Walker School Bulletin, passed on all of 
the following items to me: Grace Hendrick 
Eustis has two children — Joan Patterson, age 8, 
and George Pomeroy Eustis, age 18 months. 
This is her second year working on the 
Washington Evening Star as a news and feature 
writer, specializing in politics. She spent the 
summer of 1932 getting newspaper experience 
on the Sheridan Press in Sheridan, Wyoming, 
where her description of social life and cos- 
tumes at the Big Horn polo game tripled the 
circulation of the Press. 

Betsy Kales Straus, with an eight-year-old 
and a two-year-old daughter and a three-year- 
old son, puts us mere mothers to shame. In 
her free time she runs an Infant Welfare Clinic 
two days a week, teaches in the medical school 
and is doing research on two different prob- 
lems. She has just returned from a well- de- 
served vacation spent cruising on a 65-foot, 
two-masted schooner. 

Frances Riker Duncombe lives on a farm in 
Katonah, N. Y., where she has been snowed in 
for a great part of the winter. She raises dogs 
and horses, and has two sons and a three- 
month-old daughter, Cynthia. 

1922 

Class Editor: Serena Hand Savage 
(Mrs. William L. Savage) 
106 E. 85th St., New York City. 



1923 

Class Editor: Harriet Scribner Abbott 
(Mrs. John Abbott) 
70 W. 11th St., New York City 

1924 

Class Editor: Dorothy Gardner Butterworth 
(Mrs. J. Ebert Butterworth) 
8102 Ardmore Ave., Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

We are very grateful for a letter from 
Lois Coffin Lund: "For the past three years my 
husband has been Dean of Boys at the North 
Shore Country Day School here in Winnetka. 
Recently he has accepted a position as Head- 
master of the Providence Country Day School, 
in Providence, R. I., beginning next fall. It is 
a wrench for us to leave Winnetka, but after 
a flying visit to Providence we have decided 
the world is pretty much the same wherever 
you go. My two daughters, aged 6i/{> and 4, 
are thriving and both in school. Next year I 
am to be the school secretary and am looking 
forward eagerly to having a fling at it again." 

1925 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Mallett Conger 
(Mrs. Frederic Conger) 
Dongan Hills, Staten Island, N. Y. 

Three of our kinder-hearted classmates have 
answered our postcards. 

From Adelaide Eicks Stoddert we hear: "We 
have spent the winter on leave in Tucson, 
Arizona, with the cactus and polo players, but 
are leaving now for California, where my hus- 
band will join what is left of the fleet on this 
coast." 

Caroline Quarles Coddington has just sent a 
photograph of her daughter, almost a year old 
now — enormous eyes and marvelous tactile 
values. 

Clara Gehring Bickford writes on the eve 
of departure for Bermuda that she and her 
husband have gotten a house and are doing it 
over. They expect to move the grand piano 
and the law library in August. 

Crit Coney D'Arms reports the stories of 
academic life. She says die Mendells (Tibi 
Lawrence) are living in palatial luxury (with 
tivo of the largest size General Electric re- 
frigerators) at 80 High Street, New Haven. 
Tibi's husband, besides being the Dean of Yale, 
is Master of Branford College, Their daughter 
arrived in April. 

"As for the D'Arms," writes Crit, "we lead 
a quiet and pleasant life — tliis year in a house 
which boasts an elegant if tning garden. The 
owner, at great trouble and expense, trans- 
planted from Greece a rare and exotic Greek 
plant and cautioned us before he left for a 



(33) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



year's leave to guard it with our lives. I 
haven't seen it this spring and I'm afraid to 
dig or weed, for fear of uprooting the little 
darling. ... I have been doing a little volun- 
teer work for the Family Welfare Society. 
Otherwise I lead the decorous life of a college 
professor's wife." 

And a long letter from Leila Barber, also at 
Vassar, completes the picture of the professor's 
lot. She writes: "I must be one of the nine 
individuals (according to statistics) who have 
studied at Bryn Mawr within the last ten years 
and are now keeping; body and soul together 
by laboring in the field of art. I live in a 
dormitory where I am supposed to exert a re- 
fining influence upon the young. I have two 
rooms, a bath, four ivies, a begonia and a 
rachitic geranium which is l^/^ years old and 
has never had more than three leaves. It is a 
very agreeable existence. I like my colleagues 
and am amiably inclined toward my little 
charges except when they yelp in the middle 
of the night. I see a good bit of Mrs. D'Arms 
(nee Coney) and go away for as long as I 
can, as often as I can. This sounds rather 
bleak, but don't think I'm not Happy In My 
Work — because I am — especially now when 
there are only six more weeks. I've just spent 
my vacation among the Magouns (Peggy 
Boyden). The coming generation, if Francis 
and Billy are any indication, presents a 
dazzling prospect. A passion for geography 
burns with a hard and gem-like flame within 
the breast of each. They draw maps of 
Australia, love to indicate the precise position 
of Madagascar or the Malay Archipelago, and 
are particularly fond of pointing out the more 
obscure steamer routes, such as from Vancouver 
to Vladivostock. They have an Erd-Globus and 
prefer to do all this in German, although they 
are glad to translate for the benefit of those 
who can't understand. It's very remarkable 
and extremely engaging. Their favorite song 
is the Big Bad Wolf." 

1926 

Class Editor: Harriot Hopkinson 
18 East Elm St., Chicago, 111. 

1927 

Class Editor: Ellenor Morris 
Berwyn, Pa. 

1928 

Class Editor: Cornelia B. Rose, Jr, 
1921 Kalorama Road, N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

Florine Dana Kopper's third child and second 
son was born on April 22nd. He will be named 
William Biruce. 



Jean Fenner and Davidge H. Rowland were 
married in New York on April 14th. The 
engagement of Ruth Holloway to Edward Tarr 
Herndon, of New York, has been announced. 
Mr. Herndon went to Lawrenceville, was grad- 
uated from Princeton in 1921, and from the 
Harvard Business School in 1923. The wed- 
ding will t.ake place in the fall. 

Kate Hepburn Smith has been dashing madly 
about, from Paris to Yucatan, and the papers 
will have it that she was seeking a divorce 
and got one in Mexico. Kate won the gold 
medal awarded annually to the movie actress 
doing the best piece of acting, for her work in 
"Morning Glory," which, according to the pa- 
pers, she considers her best role, although 
"Little Women" she thinks has been her best 
picture to date. It seems a little superfluous 
to report on Kate's activities, since it is so hard 
to escape her in the paper, but we like to keep 
the record complete. 

We promised more about our job and then 
got so absorbed in it that we forgot. It is in 
the office of the Assistant to the Secretary in 
Charge of Public Relations and our appoint- 
ment calls us a "statistician," although that 
seems to be a misnomer. Actually, we are a 
glorified newspaper reader, following news of 
interest to the Treasury, adverse comment, and, 
particularly, from the foreign papers, the situa- 
tion abroad. We are finding the work interest- 
ing and the associates congenial. It is, per- 
haps, a little unnecessary to ask you to note 
that we have moved again. We are sure that 
you would be surprised if you found the same 
address given for us more than twice in suc- 
cession. 

One more wedding this month. On May 12th, 
Babs Rose and L. Laszlo Ecker-Racz were mar- 
ried at the home of Babs' mother in Golden's 
Bridge, New York. Mr. Ecker-Racz is a grad- 
uate of Harvard and at present with the Fed- 
eral Emergency Relief Administration in 
Washington. Babs plans to continue the use 
of her own name. 

1929 

Class Editor: Mary L. Williams 

210 East 68th St., New York City. 

Ruth Biddle Penfield has a son, Thornton 
Bancroft Penfield, III., born April 13th, and 
weighing 6 lbs. 5 oz. 

Doris Blumenthal has been elected to the 
Columbia University chapter of Sigma Xi, a 
national honorary scientific society, for her 
work in biochemistry. 

Louise Morganstern Feldman writes: "I'm 
working at the hospital again in the mornings 
on a research problem, in bacteriology. I'm 
supposed to be finding a bacteriophage for- 
pneumonia which, if found, should be a 'cure- 



(34) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



air for that disease; so far I have made very 
little progress. As for the rest of the time, I 
play at keeping house in a four-room apart- 
ment. I ran into Betty Fry at the Art Exhibit. 
She's teaching at Miss Ellis' school this winter, 
Miss Ellis being a graduate of Bryn Mawr too." 

Honor Minturn Croome (Honor Scott) is 
living at Pearmain, Claygate, Surrey, England, 
and says she is now thoroughly domestic. She 
has now one small son, John Minturn Croome, 
born May 16th, 1933, "very fat, very pink, and 
very full of beans." 

Elizabeth Sargent Doughty has moved from 
Washington, D. C, to Evanston, Illinois. She 
has one son, William Howard Doughty, IV., 
who was a year old December 6th last. 

We hear from Grace Quimby that Josephine 
Cook is still in the Library of the University 
of Pennsylvania. As to herself, she writes: 
"I have an unspectacular but pleasant job, in 
charge of the Reference Library of the Theo- 
logical Seminary here in Princeton; am pes 
tered with strange questions all day by a 
variety of males, and dwell happily with female 
friends by night; warble with the Westminster 
Choir now and then; try to learn the new 
names that are presented to me at teas and 
odd functions; and dash to Philadelphia or 
New York for week-end amusement. No babies, 
not even a husband. All serene in this quarter." 

We received a letter from Patty Speer 
Barbour in December which said she was then 
living in London. A month ago, however, we 
got a notice from the Alumnae Office to the 
effect that her address had been changed to 
Pentlands, Englefield Green, Surrey, England. 
For further information we quote from the 
letter mentioned above: "Bob is working at the 
Macaulay Hospital, doing psychiatry, and I am 
getting used to English housekeeping again. 
We have a lovely "converted flat" in a big 
house near the Crystal Palace. We're high 
enough to escape most of the London fogs, but 
you never can tell if you go out in the car in 
the morning or evening whether you may not 
get caught in one at the foot of the hill. 
Joannie is getting more and more grown up, 
though she is only just over two. Her favorite 
pastimes now are going to the park to find the 
ducks, and painting interminably and indis- 
criminately." 

Ruth Biddle Penfield also wishes to remind 
you that contributions from 1929 to the Alumnae 
Fund will be most welcome, so send in any 
amount you can, no matter how small it all 
counts, if you haven't already done so this year. 

1930 

Class Editor: Edith Grant 

Rockefeller Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Edith Blanche Thrush was married on 
April 4th to Major Charles Meade Lorence. 



Major Lorence is superintendent of the 
Wenonah Military Academy at Wenonah, 
New Jersey. 

Celeste Page was married in Washington on 
the 3rd of May to Mr. Stephen Lumpkin 
Upson. 

Edith Fisk is broadcasting over WBEN and 
is still interested in acting. 

Virginia Loomis was married on May 12th 
to Bayard Schieffelin. 

Hazel Seligman was married on May 11th to 
Dr. Carl Goldmark, Jr. 

1931 

Class Editor: Evelyn Waples Bayless 
(Mrs. Robert N. Bayless) 
301 W. Main St., Cambridge, Mass. 

1932 

Temporary Class Editors: Janet and 
Margaret Woods 
Box 208, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Philip Chase has not yet arrived on the 
scene in Cambridge, and Jo Graton's wedding 
plans are in consequence still uncertain. She 
has, however, given up her job as Class Editor 
and her classes at Radcliffe, and is spending 
her time arranging her affairs and playing 
tennis. 

Virginia Butterworth sends the following re- 
port of herself: "I have had a lowly job in the 
Minimum Wage Division of the Connecticut 
Department of Labor for the past few months, 
and have found it most entertaining. A short 
time ago we made a survey of the wages paid 
industrial homeworkers in this state. That in- 
volved a lot of prowling around among ill- 
smelling Polish hovels on the edges of our 
small industrial towns. Recently we've been 
struggling to make a survey of restaurants here 
for the Federal Women's Bureau, and I have 
been lost among piles of filing cards, far worse 
than those required by my most intricate report 
at dear old B. M. The variety of one's life is 
amazing; this week, for example, my activities 
have included: Supplying a world champion 
prize fighter with information regarding the 
regulation of the sale of liquor to minors. Sur- 
veying for hours in a big hotel, where 1 could 
listen to the help talking professional scandals, 
and in a 5 and 10, where the bookkeeper 1 
was working with was all upset because she 
couldn't decide which department to bill for a 
shipment of squirrels! Raiding a corset factory 
which was violating the N. R. A. And, as 
always, hiking about the state in general hunt- 
ing affidavits with a notary's seal and a type- 
writer." Butter also adds that D. Perkins is 
working for the Macmillan publishing house, 
Pris Rawson is studying music, A. Weygandt 



(35) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



is working in the English Department at Penn, 
and Crissy Brown has been working as an 
apprentice teacher at a school near her home. 

Mary Burnam was to be married to Dr. 
Howard Chandler Smith on April 26th in 
Baltimore. Kate Mitchell was among her 
attendants. 

Mary Maccoun's wedding to James Francis 
Graves, of Nashville, Tenn., is to take place in 
Baltimore on May 12th. Other information is 
lacking, except that Jo Graton is planning to 
go down for the ceremony. 

Migs Bradley spent part of the fall traveling 
in the South with members of the Oxford 
Group. She had to drop out for an appendi- 
citis operation, from which she is now re- 
covered. She writes that she is enjoying a 
busy life as a teacher in a nursery school in 
Washington. Her mornings are given, up to 
the school, and the rest of her time to working 
with the Oxford Group. 

Cordy Crane was married to Willard A. 
Speakman, Jr., in the fall. Grace Dewes, we 
understand, was married on April 21st to 
George Stickle Oram. 

Adele Nichols leads a busy life as an office 
slave in an advertising firm in Wilmington. 
She fills her time to the limit with such mis- 
cellaneous occupations as Business School 
courses, teaching Sunday school, participating 
in a Drama League, and doing leather work 
for orders. 

As for ourselves — and this is no editorial 
"we"' — we have spent a busy and entertaining 
year in Cambridge. Our week of Easter vaca- 
tion we spent on a trip to Philadelphia and 
New York, where we saw several classmates. 
Dining in a 34th Street restaurant on our first 
evening in Philadelphia, we ran into Laura 
Hunter, who is working at Bryn Mawr and 
Penn, if we remember correctly. Nan West met 
us at Bryn Mawr one morning, and we spent 
several hours roaming the campus and watch- 
ing the undergrads returning from their vaca- 
tion. In New York we met Dolly Tyler at the 
Institute of Pacific Relations and had lunch 
together. We spent a night with Lucille 
Shuttleworth in Jamaica Plain. Shuttle has 
given up her medical career, and is leading a 
life of domesticity. Her brand of apricot jam 
and her cakes and cookies, we can testify, are 
beyond compare. 

Kay Franchot has announced her engagement 
to Stuart Gerry Brown, and expects to be 
married in June. 

Constance Ralston was married on May 8th 
to Lieutenant Robert H. Booth, of the 
United States Field Artillery. They will live 
at Schofield Barracks, Honolulu. 

We shall be in Cambridge, Mass., at 
61 Garden Street, until June 6th. After that 
date, please send aU communications about the 
class to our Iowa City address as given above. 



And don't forget that the class is having its 
second reunion on June 2nd and 3rd. Molly 
Atmore Ten Broeck will be reunion manager, 
and headquarters are in Rock. 



Our Class must reune this year without one 
of its best-beloved members. On March 6th 
when we lost Quita Woodward, we lost one 
whom it is a rare privilege to have known. It 
is no eulogy, which Quita herself would be the 
last to want, but the barest truth, that she was 
one of that small company of people who serve 
by simply being. All of us knew her as the 
gay, impulsively generous, completely charming 
person on the hockey field, in the smoking 
room or at a history class; some of us knew 
her as a great deal more. To those in par- 
ticular our second reunion must be incomplete, 
tinged with an exceptionally poignant sadness. 
Among the countless friends who want her with 
them, we take our place, and at this time again 
extend to her family all our deepest, wordless 
sympathy. 

Charlotte Tyler. 

1933 

Class Editor: Janet Marshall 

112 Green Bay Road, Hubbard Woods, 111. 

The spring doesn't seem to be a period of 
great activity among the members of the Class, 
and certainly not one of any great stir of 
communications. The following tidbits have 
been garnered with the greatest difficulty imag- 
inable, and now that we have them, they look 
pretty skimpy after all, 

Anne Ghanning Porter, we learn in a very 
round-about way, is the mother of a baby boy, 
born some time in February. 

Ruth Crossett, now Mrs. Edward French, is 
living in Crossett, Arkansas, which sounds like 
something more than a coincidence. 

Marg UUom and Tilly MacCracken are, or 
were, students at Peirce's Business College in 
Philadelphia, and Marg writes that Eleanor 
Eckstein was in Philadelphia this winter, stage 
managing a Theatre Guild production. We 
apologize for appearing so long after the event 
with such vital news, but perhaps Ecky is doing 
another show for the Guild by this time, and 
it's almost news again. 

Toody Hellmer is in North Carolina, tutoring 
two girls and getting home to Philadelphia only 
at rare intervals. 

As for ourselves, we are setting out for 
Bryn Mawr on the track of some of our former 
sources of information. Any little facts we 
glean en route we shall report faithfully, but 
there lies deep in our heart the rooted con- 
viction that most of the people who used to 
write us letters telling us about other people, 
have passed on or are lying paralyzed upon 
beds of pain. 



(86) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 




934 



-^ 



Hurricane Lodge 

IN THE ADIRONDACKS 
HURRICANE. ESSEX CO.. N. Y. 

Where a vacation for the entire family 
will cost no nnore than it would at honne. 
Where excellent food, pure air and won- 
derful scenery will bring back the joy 
of living. 

360 acres, with a nine-hole golf course 
(the highest in the Adirondacks) , tennis, 
swimming, fishing. 

Cottages — all with open fireplaces and 
modern conveniences — for two or up to 
eight in family. Rooms with bath.' Central 
dining hail. 

Write for illustrated booklet and full 
information. 

MRS. M. G. PRINGLE 
HURRICANE. ESSEX CO., N, Y. 



Spend the Winter in PARIS 

ART, MUSIC, LANGUAGES, 
AND STUDY 



CAN TAKE TWO GIRLS INTO MY 
PARIS HOME 

For further details address 

Mks. Paul A. Rockwell 

(Prue Smith. 1922) 

142 Hillside Street 

ASHEVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Philadelphia School of 
Occupational Therapy 

Professional training for wonnen — accred- 
ited two and three year courses include 
study of medical subjects, handcrafts, 
courses at University of Pennsylvania and 
Hospital Practice in Occupational Therapy. 
Pre-requisite hiigh School education. 

• 

MARGARET TYLER PAUL. A.B.. Director 

419 South 19th Street 

Philadelphia 



BRYN MAWR COLLEGE INN 
TEA ROOM 

Luncheons 40c - 50c - 75c 
Dinners 85c - $1.25 

Meals a la carte and table d'hote 

Daily and Sunday 8:30 A. M. to 7:30 P. M. 

AFTERNOON TEAS 

Bridge. Dinner Parties and Teas may be arranged. 

Meals served on the Terrace when weather permits. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED 

MISS SARA DAVIS. Manager 

Telephone: Bryn Mawr 386 



The Pennsylvania Company 

For Insurances on Lives and 
Granting Annuities 

Trust and Safe Deposit 
Company 

Over a Century of Service 

C. S. W. PACKARD, President 

Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets 



\ 



ABBOT 



^ 



ACADEMY FOR GIRLS 



105th year. Modern in equip- 
ment and methods; strong fac- 
ulty; delightfully located. Gen- 
eral and preparatory courses 
prepare for responsibility and 
leadership. In past five years 
97% of students taking C.E.B. 
examinations were successful. 
Writes president of Bryn Mawr: 
"Every college would like more 
students of the kind Abbot 
Academy has sent us." Art, 
music, dramatics, household 
science. Art gallery. Observ- 
atory. All sports — skating, ski- 
ing, riding, 23 miles from 
Boston. fFrite for catalog. 
Bertha Bailey, Principal 
Box P. Andover, Mass. 




Abbot Hall 



The Bryn Mawr 
College Bookshop 

WILL BE GLAD TO 
FILL MAIL ORDERS 

All Profits Go Toward Scholarships 



Kindly mention Bxyn Mawk Altjunak Bxtxxxtin 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 






^ 
© 



Miss Beard's School 




Prepares girls for College 
Board examinations. General 
courses include Household, 
Fine and Applied Arts, and 
Music. Trained teachers, 
s.Ti a 11 classes. Ample grounds 
near Orange Mountain. Ex- 
cellent health record; varied 
sports program. fFrife /or 
booklet. 


m ' 


LUCIE C. BEARD 




Headmistress 

Berkeley Avenue 

Orange New Jersey 



THE 

SHIPLEY SCHOOL 

BRYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparatory to 
Bryn Mawr College 



ALICE G. ROWLAND 
ELEANOR O. BROWNELL 



Principals 



The Agnes Irwin School 

Lancaster Road 
WYNNEWOOD, PENNA. 



COLLEGE PREPARATORY 
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 

BERTHA M. LAWS, A.B., Headmistress 



The Ethel Walker School 

SIMSBURY, CONNECTICUT 

Head of School 

ETHEL WALKER SMITH, A.M., 

Bryn Mawr College 

Head Miatreta 

JESSIE GERMAIN HEWITT. A.B., 
Bryn Mawr College 



Wykeham Rise 

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT 
IN THE UTCHFIELD HILLS 

College Preparatory and General Courses 

Special Courses in Art and Music 

Riding, Basketball, and Outdoor Sports 

FANNY E. DA VIES, Headmistress 



Rosemary Hall 

Greenwich, Conn. 
COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Caroline Ruutz-Rees, Ph.D. \ Head 
Mary E. Lowndes, M. A., Liit.D. j Mistresses 
Katherine P. Debevoise, Assistant to the Heads 



TOW-HEYWOOfl 

I y On theSomd^AtShippan Point \ J 

ESTABLISHED 1865 

Preparatory to the Leading Colleges for Women. 

Also General Course. 

Art and Music. 

Separate Junior School. 

Outdoor Sports. 

One hour from New York 

Address 

MARY ROGERS ROPER, HeadmtstreMs 

Box Y, Stamford, Conn. 



The Kirk School 

Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Boarding and day school. Prepares 
for Bryn Mawr and other colleges. 
Four-year high school course. In- 
tensive one-year course for high school 
graduates. Resident enrollment lim- 
ited to twenty-five. Individual instruc- 
tion. Informal home life. Outdoor 
sports including riding. 

MARY B. THOMPSON, Principal 



Kindly mention Bxyn Maws Aluunax BiTxxrriir 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tg^ 



SCHOOL DIMECTOMY ^^ 



r^ 



FERRY HALL 

Junior College: Two years of college work. 
Special courses in Music, Arc, and Dramatics. 

Preparatory Department: Prepares for 
colleges requiring entrance examinations, also, 
for certificating colleges and universities. 

General and Special Courses. 

Campus on Lake Front — Outdoor Sports — 
Indoor Swimming: Pool — Riding:. 

For catalog address 

ELOISE R. TREMAIN 

LAKE FOREST ILLINOIS 




Cathedral School of St. Mary 

GARDEN CITY, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 

A school for Girls 19 mUes from New York. College 

preparatory and general courses. Music. Art and 

Domestic Science. Catalogue on request. Box B. 

MIRIAM A. BYTEL, A.B., Radcliffe. Principal 

BERTHA GORDON WOOD. A. B., Bryn Mawr. 

Assistant Principal 



The Baldwin School 

A Country School for Girls 
BRYN MAWR PENNSYLVANIA 

Preparation for Bryn Mawr, Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Vassar and Wellesley 
Colleges, Abundant Outdoor Life. 
Hockey, Basketball, Tennis, 
Indoor Swimming Pool. 
ELIZABETH FORREST JOHNSON. A.B. 

HEAD 



Miss Wright's School 

Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

College Preparatory and 
General Courses 

Mr. and Mrs. Guier Scott Wright 
Directors 



The Katharine Branson School 

ROSS. CALIFORNIA Across the Bay from San Francisco 

A Country Sctiool College Preparatory 

Head: 

Katharine Fleming Branson, A.B., Bryn Mawr 



La Loma Feliz 



HAPPY HILLSIDE 

Residential School for Children 
handicapped by Heart Disease, 
Asthma, and kindred conditions 

INA M. RICHTER, M.D.— Director 

Mission Canyon Road Santa Barbara, California 



The Madeira School 

Greenway, Fairfax County, Virginia 

A resident and country day school 

for girls on the Potomac River 

near Washington, D. C. 



150 acres 10 fireproof buildings 

I LUCY MADEIRA WING, Headmistress 



Springside School 

CHESTNUT HILL PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

College Preparatory 
and General Courses 



SUB-PRIMARY GRADES I-VI 

at Junior School^ St. Martinis 

MARY F. ELLIS, Head Mistress 
A. B. Brvn Mawr 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawb Ai.uiiNAJt Buxxxtiv 



jtyeady for 

Delivery... |; 




yf SERIES of twelve 
Qy± Stajfordshire dinner 
plates by Wedgwood . . . 



. '^ / TM' J 



tit 




The Views 

Library Cloister 
Merion Hall 
Pembroke Arch 
Library Entrance 
The Owl Gate — Rock- 
feller 
Wing of Pembroke East 
Radnor 

South Wing of Library 
Taylor Tower 
Goodhart 
Denbigh 
Pembroke Towers 



QSrgn (TUatwr ^hiu 

SPONSORED by the Alumnae Association, these plates are 
being made expressly for us by Josiah Wedgwood 6- Sons, 
Ltd., of Etruria, England. They are dinner service size (lOj 
inches in diameter) and may be had in blue, rose, green, or 
mulberry. 

THE DESIGN has been carefully studied under the super- 
vision of the Executive Board of the Alumnae Associa- 
tion. The College seal dominates the plate, balanced by 
medallions of Bryn Mawr daisies. The background in true 
Victorian fashion is a casual blanket of conventionalized 
field flowers. This border, framing twelve views of the cam- 
pus, offers a pleasing ensemble reminiscent of the Stafford- 
shire ware of a century ago. 

THE PRICE of the plates is $15 per set of twelve (postage 
extra). A deposit of $5 is required with your order, 
balance due when the plates are ready for shipment. All 
profits go to the Alumnae Fund. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae Association, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

Please reserve for me sets of Bryn Mawr plates at $ 1 5 per set. I enclose $5 

deposit on each set and will pay balance when notified that the plates are ready for ship- 
ment. 

Color choice Q Blue Q Rose Q Green Q Mulberry 



Signed.. 



Address. 



Mahs checks payable and address all inquiries to Alumnae Association of Bryn Mawr College 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 





1896 1934 

BACK LOG CAMP 

A Camp for Adults and Families 
SABAEL P. O.. NEW YORK 
ON INDIAN LAKE. IN THE ADIRONDACK MOUNTAINS 



Whether you come alone or with your family or with a friend, as soon 
as you are at Back Log Camp you are among cultivated people of your 
own sort; and your holiday will be spent in the care of a family born and 
bred to camp life and skilled in the art of making available for you the 
resources of a very wild part of the Adirondack wilderness. At the same 
time you will live very comfortably in the main Camp. 



For illustrated hoo\let address 

MRS. BERTHA BROWN LAMBERT : 272 PARK AVENUE. TAKOMA PARK. D. C. 
After June 20, as above. 



100 & 1 CELEBRATED HANDS 



By MILTON C. WORK 

Pres.. U. S. Bridge Assn. 
and 

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Certified Teacher of the Sims, 

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o 
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A book for every Contract player. Nothing similar has ever been J^ 

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also offer an ideal selection for Duplicate play. N' | .^/^/ ^^ 

THE JOHN C. WINSTON COMPANY O 

WINSTON BUILDING PHILADELPHIA, PA. ^\ 

m 



Kindly mention Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 



BRYN MAWR 
ALUMNAE 
BULLETIN 




COMMENCEMENT 



July, 1934 



Vol. XIV 



No. 7 



Entered as second-class matter, January 15, 1921, at the Post Office, Phila., Pa., under Act of March 3, 1879 

COPYRIGHT, 193/. 
ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OF BRYN MAWR COLLEGE 



/ 



OFFICERS OF THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

President Elizabeth Bent Clabk, 1895 

Vice-President Serena Hand Savage, 1922 

Secretary Josephine Young Case, 1928 

Treasurer Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909 

Chairman of the Finance Committee Virginia Atmorb, 1928 

rk: -*»„„4.T„-», /Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, 1906 

Directors at Large..., \ Alice Sachs Plaut, 1908 

ALUMNAE SECRETARY AND BUSINESS MANAGER OF THE BULLETIN 
Alice M. Hawkins, 1907 

EDITOR OF THE BULLETIN 
Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912 

DISTRICT COUNCILLORS 

District I Mary C. Parker, 1926 

District II Harriet Price Phipps, 1923 

District III Vinton Liddell Pickens, 1922 

District IV Elizabeth Smith Wilson, 1915 

District V Jean Stirling Gregory, 1912 

District VI Mary Taussig, 1933 

District VII Leslie Farwell Hill, 1905 

ALUMNAE DIRECTORS 
Virginia McKbnnbt Claiborne, 1908 Virginia Knbeland Frantz, 1918 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906 Florancb Watbrbury, 1905 

Gertrude Dietrich Smith, 1903 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ALUMNAE FUND 
Virginia Atmorb, 1928 

CHAIRMAN OF THE ACADEMIC COMMITTEE 
Ellen Faulkner, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUND COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Y. Maguirb, 1913 

CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE ON HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Dr. Marjorie Strauss Knauth, 1918 

CHAIRMAN OF THE NOMINATING COMMITTEE 
Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, 1898 



Jform oi Peque£(t 

m 

I give and bequeath to the Alumnae Association 
OP Brtn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, 
the sum of dollars. 



Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
Bulletin 

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF 
THE BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Marjorie L. Thompson, '12, Editor 
Alice M. Hawkins, '07, Business Manager 

EDITORIAL BOARD 

Mary Crawford Dudley, '96 Elinor Aimram Nahm, '28 

Caroline Morrow Chadwick-Collins, '05 Pamela Burr, '28 

Emily Kimbrough Wrench, '21 Denise Gallaudet Francis, '32 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, '95, ex-offlcio 

Subscription Price, $1.50 a Year Single Copies, 25 Cents 

Checks should be drawn to the order of Bryn Mawr Alumnae Bulletin 
Published monthly, except August, September and October, at 1006 Arch St., Philadeljjhia, Pa 

Vol. XIV JULY, 1934 No. 7 



To any one who observed the straws in the wind at the Annual fleeting in 
February, the decision of the Alumnae to pledge themselves to raise a sum in some 
degree commensurate with the dignity of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding 
of Bryn Mawr College, comes with no surprise. In these years of the locust, 
which for most of us still persist, the sum of $1,000^000 undoubtedly sounded 
large, but one of the most interesting and significant things about the meeting was 
the excited and immediate response to the challenge on the part of those women 
who had already gone through the heat and dust of battle in the drive for the 
1920 Endowment. It was pointed out that one of the valuable results of that pre- 
vious campaign was the organization of our present Alumnae Association. Much 
ground had to be cleared at that time that now is already prepared, and we hope 
fruitful. The activities of the Association are focused in a smoothly running and 
efficient Alumnae Office, the District Councillors and the Scholarships Chairmen have 
been ambassadors of good-will in the deepest sense of a rather hackneyed phrase. 
The Committee of Seven Colleges has done an extraordinary amount of work in the 
way of general publicity. All of this is infinitely to the good. That the money will 
be hard but not impossible to get is one of the things that must be faced honestly. 
Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, Chairman of the Fiftieth Anniversary Committee, 
showed herself admirably a realist when she stated in her Report that her Com- 
mittee had evaluated their plans on the basis of the present situation. The desire 
of the Alumnae to increase Bryn Mawr's "financial security and to give greater 
scope to scholastic development" has in no way changed, Bryn Mawr's own needs 
have in no way lessened, b'ut everything lias to be considered in smaller terms. It 
was the part of wisdom to put aside so definitely the Seven Year Plan. 'V\\c two 
great needs are a new science building and a method of increasing in some way the 
college income. If the debts, the interest on which is a constant strain on tlie 
college budget, can be paid, and the new science building can be achieved, these 
two great needs will have been met. "Greater scope to scholastic development," is 
the phrase which still will have power to stir our imaginations as we go about the 
business of doing two practical and concrete things. We shall have to work as we 
have never worked before, because we are women, because we are a small Liberal 
Arts College, but we shall go about our business led by a clear vision of those ideals 
which Bryn Mawr herself taught us to desire her to attain, and shall strive the 
more valiantly since we work not merely for bricks and mortar and a balance in 
the bank. 



i»W< 





President Marion Edwards Park 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



PRESIDENT PARK'S PORTRAIT UNVEILED 

Speech of Arcephince mode hi/ Dr. Rufus Joves 

It gives me great satisfaction and joy on behalf of tlie Directors of the College 
to accept the portrait of President Park which her classmates of the Class of 1898 
have presented. It is a gift of affection^ a striking work of art of perennial worth 
and it is the "express image" of a beloved president. 

"Express image" is a Platonic phrase and calls for a slight interpretation. One 
does not ask of a portrait what calendar year it represents in the life of the person 
painted. If it is an artistic creation it represents the person sub specie aeternitatis 
as the philosophers say— "The instant made eternity." You get caught and ]n-e- 
served in your immortal form, as Homer caught and preserved Ulysses, as young 
at the end as he was at the beginning. 

Tennyson has expressed in five lines in Idylls of the Kinrj G. F. Watts' 
ideal of a true portrait painter: 

"As when a painter poring on a face^ 
Divinely, thro' all hindrance finds the man 
Behind it^ and so paints him that his face, 
The shape and colour of a mind and life, 
Lives for his children, ever at its best." 

I believe we have here preserved for later generations "the shape and colour of 
a mind and life." 

My period on the Bryn Mawr Board comes between the presentation of 
the portraits of the two women presidents. I was elected to the Board about the 
time that Sargent's portrait of Miss Thomas was presented. And now after a 
whole generation as years go I find myself accepting this one of President Park. 

One of the most critical moments in the life of the College was that moment 
when the choice of Miss Thomas' successor was being made. Everybody knew 
that there was only one Miss Thomas. That type began and ended with her. 
And everybody knew, at least dimly, that it was a matter of supreme importance 
to find the right new type for the new epoch of the third administration. Nobody 
ever knows what would have happened if what did happen had not happened as it 
did happen. But at that crisis the right thing, the best thing. uTuloubtodly hup 
pened. The right new type was found. It stands written in all tlir books lliat a 
great president got chosen when Marion Park was chosen. 

One feels a kind of awe in taking part in such an event as that was. I think 1 
may say with humility but with confidence that the group of persons who had the 
responsibility for that selection were raised above personal prejudice, preference 
and bias and were loyal first and foremost to the highest interests of the College. 
They spared no pains, no efforts to sift all the possibilities, to explore all sugges- 
tions and proposals, and to find the ideally right person for the exalted but difficult 
position. 

This is "the counterfeit presentment" of the person who was chosen at that 
critical time. She has won our esteem, our admiration and our affection. Now she 
has entered the College to go no more out. 

(3) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



A PLACE FOR THE NATURAL SCIENCES 
IN NATIONAL PLANNING 

Commencement Address by Karl T. Compton 

President of Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Of all the attempts which I have heard to define civilization, the one which 
seems to me the keenest and most comprehensive is that "The state of civilization of 
any people is measured by the degree to which they are willing to forego their 
present desires for the sake of their future welfare." It seems to me that it is this 
which distinguishes the animal, or the man with primitive instinct, from the man 
who can properly be described as civilized. I believe that you will find the defini- 
tion to ring true if you begin to analyze it and, by it, test various actions which 
you naturally think of as typical of an uncivilized or of a civilized group. 

One of the most hopeful things in the world at the present time is the extent 
to which national planning is occupying the attention of governments and their 
people. We may not always agree with all elements in the objectives of these 
plans, but they do certainly represent an advanced stage of social consciousness. 
The five-year plan of Russia was remarkable, not so much because of its objectives 
as because of the fact that a great people were willing to sacrifice and to work in 
order to lay the foundations for a better state in the future. The same spirit, 
though expressed in a different way, has been a predominant part of Italy's renais- 
sance in recent years. Whatever opinion one may have of the details of policy of 
the present administration in the United States, there is no doubt that national plan- 
ning on a large scale is the keynote of its activities. This national planning does not 
always appear a clear-cut picture, for obvious reasons. In the first place, it is mixed 
up with the simultaneous effort to get out of the depression and care for upwards 
of 10,000,000 people who are unemployed. In the second place, the plan must of 
necessity be experimental, since national planning on a large scale is a new thing 
with us. Experimenting always involves mistakes, false starts and discouragements, 
and anyone who has had any practical experience, for example, as an experimental 
scientist, will not be disturbed at occasional mistakes and false steps in the progress 
of any great social experiment. 

I think this thought may be worth dwelling on for a moment. As graduate 
students have come to me for advice in regard to the choice of a subject for their 
investigations looking toward a doctor's degree, I have always warned them at the 
beginning that any research which is worthy of the name is a gamble in the sense 
that its conclusion cannot be foreseen from the beginning. If the end could be 
foreseen from the beginning it would not be a research and would not be worth 
doing, because it would not represent any new contribution to knowledge. For this 
reason it is certain that a considerable proportion of experiments which are well 
worth trying will prove to be unsuccessful, whereas others will be successful and 
some few will be really great contributions. This is well understood by the directors 
of great industrial research laboratories, who are looking for practical results from 
research. In their experience they know that much of the work which is done will 
turn out to be unprofitable, but they realize that it is worth the effort because out 
of the whole group of researches, if intelligently carried on, there will be some so 

(4) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



successful as to more than justify the entire effort. This is not always realized 
hy the industrialist who has no background in research, who hears research being 
talked of and decides that he will try it and then quits in disgust if his first attempt 
l)roves unsuccessful. 

I believe that there is a very close analogy between research and development 
in the natural sciences, and research and development in political and social science, 
and that the President is on firm ground when he states that national planning is 
an experiment in which those efforts which prove unsuccessful should be discarded. 
and those which prove successful should be developed. There can be no other way 
of progress, and the failure of some aspect of the plan, such, perhaps, as the plan 
to impose codes on small unorganized industries, cannot be considered as damning 
the entire effort. In this experiment, sometimes described as the "new deal," the 
success or failure will be determined by the answer to the question, after sufficient 
experience, "Is our situation on the whole better or worse than it was ?" The spirit 
of the administration is suggested by the names of some of its agencies, such as the 
National Planning Board, the Business Advisory and Planning Council, the Regional 
Planning Board, various conservation boards, the Federal Coordinator of Trans- 
portation, the Science Advisory Board, etc. To the extent to which these and other 
agencies indicate that the people of the U. S. are attempting to plan more effec- 
tively for their future welfare, to that extent it is justifiable to say that they are 
advancing in their state of civilization. 

Now I come very briefly to a particular element in the situation, nameh', the 
place of the natural sciences in national planning. According to certain criteria, this 
place does not loom very large in the present scheme. For example, the scientific 
bureaus of the federal government all combined, account for only one-half of one 
per cent, of the annual federal budget, and a large proportion of the work of these 
bureaus does not go into planning or constructive work for the future, but into 
testing and other work of immediate interest only. Measured by the pocketbook, 
therefore, we cannot say that the natural sciences occupy a very important place in 
the scheme of federal government. 

Contrast this, if you will, with the expenditures for national defense or for 
emergency relief and employment, both of which are essential. To me the contrast 
appears rather absurd, because the development of pure and applied scienc"^. can hv 
shown to be so fundamentally important for the future that its relative ncglcil 
indicates, in this particular respect, what I would call a very low state of civilization, 
incidentally far below that which is at present shown by the governments of a 
number of the foreign nations. For example, it is the new developnunts in pure 
and applied science which will control the national defense of the future, wliich will 
provide the employment of the future, which will determine the so-calKiI stantln-d 
of living of the future, which will determine the opportunities in the future for 
leisure and cultural pursuits, as well as for health and physical prospiM-ily. ami yet 
the interest of the federal government in these developments for the future is rc]n-e- 
sented by some small portion of half of one per cent, of the federal budget. 

Let me illustrate the kind of thing which has happened over and over again, 
and which is certain to happen in the future to some degree in proportion to the 
extent to which scientific progress is either stimulated or curtailed by the degree 
of its financial or other encouragement. I will take this example from the electrical 

(5) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



industry, although analogous examples could be found in the fields of transporta- 
tion, agriculture, medicine, etc. 

About three years ago there was an international celebration of the discovery 
of the principles of electromagnetism. These principles were discovered by two 
men, Joseph Henry in America and Michael Faraday in England. Joseph Henry 
spent his early life in Albany, N. Y., and had an ardent ambition to lead the life 
of an actor. He organized a local theatrical group and wrote several plays, and 
was well on his way to theatrical success when he was taken sick and spent some 
time in a hospital. While there, a friend loaned him a popular book on natural 
science, which described some experiments which to us seem very elementary but 
which greatly stirred his interest and imagination. This book raised certain ques- 
tions, such as, "Why does a stone fall toward the ground? Why does the flame of 
a candle point upward.^ If the candle were turned upside down, would the flame 
point downward, and if not, why not?" These questions so interested Henry that 
he decided to spend his life investigating them. He resigned from his theatrical 
group, went to school in the Albany Academy, later became a teacher in that 
academy, then Professor of Physics at Princeton, and finally Director of the 
Smithsonian Institution at Washington. He was the first really to understand the 
operation of an electromagnet and to discover the phenomenon of self-induced 
electric current. He built perhaps the first printing telegraph and the first wire- 
less set. He worked under the difficulties of a pioneer. For example, he had to 
make his own insulated copper by wrapping the wire with strips from his wife's 
discarded dresses and petticoats. There being no suitable high-voltage voltmeters 
in existence, he had to estimate his voltages in terms of the number of members 
of his class who, holding hands in a line, could be perceptibly shocked by the 
voltage with which he was working. 

Simultaneously and independently, Faraday in England was investigating the 
mutual action of one electric current on another. It is said that the King once 
visited his laboratory, and pointing to certain apparatus, asked, "What is the use 
of these things?" To which Faraday replied, "Your Majesty, of what use is a 
baby ?" Another time, when the Prime Minister asked the same question, he replied, 
"My Lord, some day you will tax these things." 

Faraday's prophetic vision is evidenced by the fact that the use of electricity 
now affects our life at almost every turn. It is an essential element in a large part 
of our transportation. It performs a considerable proportion of our household 
work. It provides practically all of our light and is therefore basic to all of our 
activities after sunset. It has found important medical applications and, as Faraday 
predicted, it is taxed. At the present time it provides employment in this country 
for 357,000 in the telephone industry, 94,000 people in the radio industry, 290,000 
people in the motion picture industry, 1,035,000 people in the electrical manufac- 
turing and public service industries, or about one and three-quarters million in 
direct employment. To this might be added an even greater number of people 
employed in such industries as the automobile, various metallurgical processes, etc. 

Thus we see that these scientific experiments of Faraday and Henry, followed 
by the practical inventions of Thomas Edison and Elihu Thomson and a host of 
others, have not only created for us comforts and opportunities, but have provided 
for the employment of perhaps three or four million people and the financial sup- 

(6) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



port of their families^ so that it can fairly be said that as a result of this scientific 
and engineering work during the past hundred years, we now have the direct support 
of from ten to twelve million people in this country. 

Important as this is, it would not b'e nearly so important if it were an isolated 
instance. Its significance lies in the fact that it is only one of a great number of 
similar stories which might be told, and they all lead conclusively to the conclusion 
that it pays in the long run to encourage the progress of pure and applied science. 
Had the development of the electric light, or the radio, or the automobile been 
inhibited, our unemployment crisis would have come sooner and would have been 
more severe. If we do not encourage progress in the natural sciences we will suffer 
the consequences in the future, either through lack of advantages or of employment 
which we might otherwise have enjoyed, or through unsuccessful industrial com- 
petition with other nations which take a more progressive attitude and lay a strong 
foundation for future welfare by an interest in the natural sciences which is not 
measured by a portion of half of one per cent. 



THE COMMENCEMENT WEEK-END 

It is curious that each Commencement in the long series that the College can 
now look back on, has so distinct a character of its own. This year was a red letter 
one for the returning Alumnae by the fact that the Deanery was theirs, to be in 
as much as they liked and to enjoy in a thousand ways. Miss Thomas has always 
shared the garden with the Alumnae, welcoming them warmly in it; so that to every 
one, the evenings in it have been part of the pleasure of Commencement time. If she 
could have seen at the Deanery the groups all day long on the verandah, or down 
under the great tree or talking in the cool shadowy rooms, she would have felt that 
it was fulfilling abtmdantly the need that she hoped it would. It was a \cry 
different thing to be able to talk with one's friends in such surroundings from 
sitting in the half-dismantled rooms in the Halls, always too small for the groups 
that gather. The graciousness and dignity, and, one must add, sheer comfort, of 
our new environment, gives a distinctly different quality to the reunions. 

On Sunday morning, in Goodhart, there was a very spirited special meeting 
of the Alumnae Association, reported in more detail on page 9. After the meeting. 
the Alumnae gathered two hundred and twenty-five strong at the Deanery fi)r 
Luncheon, after which Emma Guffey Miller, 1899, spoke with vigor and humour 
about her ideas on women in politics, and the necessity for knowing the political 
game. Barbara Spofford Morgan, 1909, contrasted German and American ideals 
and methods of higher education. She was followed by Natalie ^IcFaden Blanton. 
1917, who talked so delightfully about the philosophy of life that Bryn Mawr 
gives us as women, that her speech is quoted in full on page 19. Next came 
Janet Marshall, 1933, who presented the point of view of the recent graduate from 
college. The speeches were all brief and interesting. The point of special interest, 
however, was President Park's discussion of what the year had meant for the 
college, and her conception of the present undergraduate, and what she wants 
from the college. This also is quoted in full elsewhere in the Bulletin. 

(7) 



y 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



At 5 o'clock that same afternoon the portrait of President Park, painted by 
Charles Hopkinson and a gift to the College from the Class of 1898, was unveiled 
in the reading-room of the Library where it is to hang, on the same wall as the 
Sargent picture of Miss Thomas. The reading desks had been removed at that end 
and a surprisingly large group gathered for the simple but very adequate ceremony. 
Esther Thomas, 1931, and Gertrude Bancroft, 1930, both 1898 daughters, unveiled 
the picture, and Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, President of 1898, made the presenta- 
tion speech. Dr. Rufus Jones accepted it for the Board of Directors; Josephine 
Young Case, 1928, and Mary Nichols, 1934, President of the Undergraduate Asso- 
ciation, also spoke. A photograph of it is in the front of this issue. 

The course of events followed in their usual pleasant orderly round. Classes and 
individuals visited nearby class-mates, and some groups had informal supper-parties 
at the Deanery. A large audience later heard the Reverend Donald Mackenzie, 
Professor of Biblical Literature at Princeton Theological Seminary and father of 
the winner of the European Fellowship, preach the Baccalaureate Sermon. On 
Monday, after the Alumnae vs. Varsity tennis matches, some of the classes met for 
a joint Buffet Luncheon, and others for a communal picnic. At 4 o'clock they all 
adjourned to the Deanery for the auction of the mementoes from the Deanery, odd 
bits of pottery and silver and copper, baskets and trays, some of them lovely. 
Emma Guffey Miller, 1899, was the very successful and indefatigable auctioneer 
and netted over $300 for the Deanery fund. Garden party, gay and charming as 
always, in the cool shade of Senior Row, took place on Tuesday, more colourful 
than usual in the soft, brilliant light that followed a gray morning. 

The clear hot weather still held for Commencement Day itself. The charm 
of the campus, with the banners flying and the long academic procession moving 
slowly down toward Goodhart, is something that no custom can stale. Following 
her plan for the past few years. President Park made a very brief introductory 
address before the 87 seniors, 23 Masters of Arts, and 11 Doctors of Philosophy 
received their degrees. The only announcement of gifts of general academic interest 
was that of two scholarships; one the Mary E. Stevens scholarship, in honour of the 
founder and head of the Stevens School in Germantown, for which more funds are 
available, and the other the Lila M. Wright scholarship, given by the alumnae of 
the Wright School in memory of its founder and head. The high point of interest 
to the College is, of course, the announcement of the European Fellowship, given 
this year to Elizabeth Mackenziis, with Alva Detwiler named as alternate. The 
M. Carey Thomas Essay prize went to Sallie Jones, known to many of the Alumnae 
as Editor of the College News. Forty-two of the Seniors graduated with Honors. 
The address was delivered by Dr. Karl T. Compton, president of the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. What he had to say of the place that pure science plays 
in the whole scheme of civilization was of such especial and immediate interest to 
all of the Alumnae who had on Sunday pledged themselves to raising the money 
for a new science building, that we are carrying the address almost entire. With 
President Park's luncheon on Dalton Green, delightful as always, another Com- 
mencement was over, and for the Alumnae the end of a very happy interlude. 



(8) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



SPECIAL MEETING OF THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

VOTES TO RAISE A MILLION DOLLARS AS A 
FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY GIFT 

At noon on Sunday^ June 3rd; almost two hundred alumnae gathered in 
Goodhart Hall to attend the special meeting of the Alumnae Association called as 
a result of the motion passed at the Annual Meeting of tlie Association held on 
February 3^ 1934^ when it was 

M. S. C. that a special meeting of the Alumnae Association he held during 
Commencement Week, 1934, to consider recommendations to he presented hi/ 
the Fiftieth Anniversary Committee. 

Elizabeth Bent Clark, 1895, President of the Association, opened the meeting 
by reading this motion, and then went on to the otlier motion passed at the same 
time : 

M. S. C. that the Annual Meeting of the Association should he held during 
Commencement Week. 

Mrs. Clark said that, since this new procedure would entail some practical 
changes, she had asked Miss Ehlers to say a few words about the present situation 
of the Association finances. Bertha S. Ehlers, 1909, Treasurer of the Association. 
then presented the following report: 

Report of the Treasurer for Alumnae Meeting, June 3rd 

At the regular meeting held on February 3rd, 1934, the Alumnae Associa- 
tion voted to shift the time of its annual meeting to Commencement Week — 
the present one being a special meeting and the next annual meeting to be held 
in June, 1935. In connection with this action, which makes a change in the 
fiscal year of the Association advisable, I wish to report briefly on our finances 
for the past four months and to submit to you certain recommendations of the 
Finance Committee. 

Prior to voting the change in the time of the annual meeting, the Asso- 
ciation on February 3rd, 1934, approved a budget for the calendar year 193 1-. 
Our actual figures for the first four months of this year indicate tlial this 
budget is a fair and satisfactory one. The expenses of the Association h<n c 
been well within the budget, and income from dues and class collections has 
come in so well that we have in hand a proportionate one-third of the $8,500 
gift portion of our budget (the $7,000 gift for academic expenses, the $1,000 
President's Fund and the $500 for Rhoads Scholarships). 

Before ffoing; on to the recommendations of the Finance Committee I wish 
to express on behalf of the Committee and of its Chairman, Virginia Atmore. 
our appreciation of the despatch with which the Class Collectors have sent out 
the Spring Appeal, and of their personal work to which we owe the excellent 
showing of this four month period. 

May I submit to you the following recommendations of the Finance Com- 
mittee which have been approved by the Executive Board: 

I. That the fiscal year of the Association be considered hcnccfovtii to run 
from May 1st through April 30th. 
II. That the books of the Association be closed on April 30th. 193t. but 
that the formal audit and printing of the report for this four-month 
period be combined with the audit and printing of the report of tlic 
new fiscal year. May 1st, 1934, to April 30th, 1935. 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



III. That the Association be asked to approve for the new fiscal year, 
May 1st, 1934, to April 30th, 1935, a budget on the same basis as the 
budget already approved for the calendar year 1934 — i. e., that the 
present budget on a proportionate basis be extended through a four- 
months period — January 1st, 1935, to April 30th, 1935 — subject, how- 
ever, as regards Section ''B" of the budget (the $8,500 for gifts to the 
College) to possible revision in connection with Fiftieth Anniversary 
plans. 

IV. That the Treasurer of the Association be authorized upon the direction 

of the Executive Board to pay over to Bryn Mawr College before the 
next annual meeting of the Alumnae Association available funds appro- 
priated in accordance with Section "B" of the budget for the calendar 
year 1934 as voted in the annual meeting of February, 1934. 

By formal vote, all the resolutions were accepted by the Association. 

Before going on to the main business of the meeting, Caroline McCormick 
Slade, 1896, and Millicent Carey Mcintosh, 1920, Chairman and Vice-Chairman, 
respectively, of the Deanery Committee, spoke of the very successful first year of 
the Deanery. Mrs. Slade said that at the last meeting of the committee the same 
officers had been reelected, and that the financial statement showed that they are 
closing the year about $1,500 ahead of the estimate made last fall when the 
Deanery opened. Mrs. Mcintosh said that she had felt so enthusiastic that she had 
asked to be allowed to speak on the subject. She said: 

I was asked by the Committee to make a report on the first year of the 
Deanery as Alumnae House, because I came in May to my first meeting since 
October, and there expressed enthusiasm for what I had seen and heard of its 
place in the life of the college. No one can ever express enthusiasm in a group 
of Bryn Mawr alumnae without being immediately presented with a job to do; 
and I was not surprised when this report fell to my lot. 

All year I have heard from various sources, of ways in which the Deanery 
has been used. Anyone who reads the College News must have been impressed 
by the number and variety of occasions which have taken place there. These 
have been the kind which the college has most missed in the past: not large 
public lectures, but informal talks, reading of verse by Bryn Mawr Alumnae 
and other poets, chamber music, pleasant discussions. All the small threads 
which determine the delicate pattern of an intellectual life have been woven 
together for the Bryn Mawr undergraduates at the Deanery. That they appre- 
ciate this fact is witnessed by their individual enthusiasm and by their accounts 
and editorials in the News. 

From the Bryn Mawr Faculty one gets the same impression. The women 
members of the Faculty can use the Deanery on the same basis as Alumnae, and 
for them it has met the desperate need of a private spot in which to have 
meals, and of a center in which they can entertain. "No one can imagine the 
difference it makes," they say again and again. To the college authorities it 
has been endlessly useful — as a lodging for distinguished guests, as a meeting 
ground for conferences of all kinds, as a place for important dinners. 

Its greatest importance must be, however, to the Alumnae themselves. To 
them it was given, and for them it must find its chief reason for existence. To 
me, its significance has been brought home this week-end, in the course of my 
own reunion. It is a queer business, this coming back to college. For we come as 
strangers to a place in wliich our roots are deeply planted; we live as aliens 
in halls in which have been spent four important years of our lives. The 
undergraduates look down their noses at us, and yet we know that Bryn Mawr 
is more fundamentally ours than theirs, because they have not yet learned to 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



know its meaning for them. To this spirit, wliich lias deep foundations but no 
resting place, the Deanery gives a beautiful and familiar shrine. All Saturday, 
groups of Alumnae wandered somewhat shyly through its garden and its cool 
rooms, settling in groups to talk, greeting each other, drinking iced tea — reviv- 
ing their memories^ their friendships^ and their spirits at the same time. Here 
we were at home. For the Deanery has already become to us the symbol of 
what we learned from Bryn Mawr; it has given to our love a local habitation 
and a name. 

Louise Fleischmann Maclay, 1906, Chairman of the Fiftieth Anniversarj^ Com- 
mittee, then read the report of her committee: 

Fifty years! What does that connote? To you and me approaching that 
time, it means an honest acknowledgment of middle age, grey hair perhaps 
and avoirdupois, but no surcease or wish for it, in the activities or responsibili- 
ties of life — with a road and a goal, but no longer heart-throbs or the shining 
strides of youth. 

Fifty years for Bryn Mawr lie as lightly on her as on the entering Fresh- 
man, well prepared and pushing on, with glowing eagerness. 

Young at fifty, her growth depends as it did in the past on the concen- 
trated energy and will of those who regard her as a symbol of intellectual 
integrity and a path to freedom. 

To foster her growth has long been the interest of the Alumnae. Four 
years ago, having in viev/ her Fiftieth Anniversary, Alumnae began to say to 
each other — what thing can we do in commemoration.^ We studied her needs 
and decided upon a plan to increase her financial security and give greater 
scope to scholastic development. 

We called it a Seven Year Plan, as this period was needed to put it into 
operation. 

I want to remind you what this plan was: 

We intended by adding a hundred students to the undergraduate body and 
raising tuition fees to make the college financially capable of meeting its own 
growing needs, with good salaries for its faculty and an adequate and efficient 
plant. A dormitory was to be built from college funds and a science building 
to be solicited by the Directors from foundations or other sources. 

The Alumnae offered as their part to pay the college debt including the 
purchase of Wyndham, to raise scholarship and fellowship funds and build a 
wing in the Library in honor of Miss Thomas. 

This plan was scarcely completed when the depression was upon us, and 
it was laid aside. 

Now with the anniversary only a year ahead — on the basis of the present 
situation, we have again been asked to evaluate our plans in relation to her 
needs. 

We cannot as yet consider increasing the size of the student body or the 
amount of the tuition. Our Directors, and especially our President, have so far 
without success made every effort to obtain the gift of a science building. 

And here lies our crying need. 

Just as Wyndham was once in danger of being lost to the college and will 
remain a liability till we pay for it, so our place in science is in jeopardy 
without a modern building. 

We beg all of you here today to go through Dalton, look for yourselves 
and you will understand why we recommend that we make a supreme effort 
and — 

"Give to Bryn Mawr College a science building — and raise for this and 
other present needs the sum of Oiie ]\Iillion Dollars as a Fiftieth Anniversarv 
gift." 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Mrs. Maclay's report called forth an animated discussion. In reply to various 
questions it was said that the first charge on the money to be raised, with a million 
dollars as the goal, would be used for the much-needed science building, which, 
according to a rough estimate, would require about $600,000 to cover the erection, 
maintenance fund, and equipment. The remaining $400,000 would be used to pay off 
the debt of the College, consisting principally of the purchase price of Wyndham, 
thereby releasing some College income. A number of people spoke on the deplorable 
state of Dalton, and Mrs. Slade urged all the Alumnae to visit Dalton in order to 
convince themselves of the bad existing conditions. 

Ruth Cheney Streeter, 1918, a member of the Fiftieth Anniversary Committee, 
said that, although she had been unavoidably prevented from attending the meeting 
of the Committee at which the recommendation was approved, she felt that she 
must speak vigorously against it. She said that in the present state of the country 
she believed it would be impossible to raise a million dollars because the people 
who in other days had made large gifts are now so heavily taxed that they cannot 
be counted on to contribute to such a project as a science building for a privately 
endowed college, especially when there are heavy demands upon them for practical 
relief. Several people spoke in support of this point of view, but the sense of the 
meeting was overwhelmingly in favor of the recommendation. It was pointed out 
that Vassar had recently raised a large sum of money for a gymnasium, and that 
other colleges, both in the United States and in Canada, had been successful in their 
money raising endeavors. During the discussion it was said that as a result of the 
1920 Endowment Drive came the organization of the Alumnae Association. In the 
intervening years the satisfactory development of this has now given us a ready 
made instrument which can be easily adapted to the work necessary for raising such 
a sum as a million dollars. While no definite plans have been made, several projects 
are under consideration which will call on the alumnae themselves for a great deal 
of work rather than for outright contributions. Finally, after a good many speeches 
had been made on both sides of the question, it was 

M. S. C. that the Alumnae give to Bryn Mawr College a science building, 
and that they raise for this and other present needs the sum of one million 
dollars as a Fiftieth Anniversary Gift. 

Before the end of the meeting, Mrs. Clark brought up the question of the best 
time to hold the Annual Meeting hereafter. A good deal of opposition was expressed 
to the idea of having the regular business meeting on Sunday, as had been pro- 
posed. After considerable discussion it was 

M. S. C. that the matter of the date of the Annual Meeting of the Alumnae 
Association be left to the discretion of the Executive Board. 

The meeting then adjourned for the Alumnae Luncheon in the Deanery. 



President Park has been able to accept the cordial invitation which has 
been given her for several years past by the Alumnae on the Pacific Coast. 
She plans to start West after Christmas. 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



PRESIDENT PARK'S SPEECH AT THE 
ALUMNAE LUNCHEON 

The historian of a happy people is traditionally gravelled for matter, and 
melodrama which is inconvenient to the last degree in tlie president's office is price- 
less when she makes her speech to the alumnae. I can neither record nor invent 
any front page publicity for the Bryn Mawr of this winter. I once asked a small 
cousin of mine who was visiting on her grandfather's farm whether it was lonely. 
"Oh^ no/' she said. "The cow moves round a great deal." Now I am in an equally 
good frame of mind; I have placidly enjoyed the cow and her movements have 
been well calculated and full of content; but I am at a momentary disadvantage 
in making a picture of her for you today. Yet perhaps you will listen indulgently 
to me while I praise our quiet rounds for 1933-34, although it has been uneventful, 
has been perhaps more satisfactory than any of my previous years at Bryn ]\Iawr, 
and as sound as any in its contribution to Bryn Mawr history. 

First of all, like a snail in its shell, we have lived inside our budget. Sometimes 
I have felt like the old woman shut in a closet for two hours who said she survived 
although she had no ventilation except her own breath. This is a disheartening 
way to put efficiency to work. In one out of every hundred crises a bright thouglit 
gave us what we needed without the money, but in the other ninety-nine the college 
has either stolidly or with yells of anguish or anger gone without — whether its 
economy was paint, books, research funds or science buildings. May I interpolate 
a sentence of feverishly warm gratitude? For the paint and book type of need my 
hoarded President's Fund, the thousand dollars given me by the Alumnae, has 
occasionally sufficed. It put trees back in Senior Row blown down in last year's 
tornado, it paid half the cost of transportation for the casts which the Boston 
Museum of Art has given us, it painted the dingy offices of the Denbigh and ]\Ierion 
wardens, it paid a tiny pension for a retired maid, it allowed the Biology and the 
Physics Departments to carry one inch further their mile-long desires for research, 
it paid — or shared — infirmary fees for scholarship students, graduate and under- 
graduate, and completed one or two last-minute scholarsliip funds. Of my thousand 
I have spent $984.40 and I have a use for the remaining $15.60. 

But we succeeded. A year ago the budget was made to meet a probable drop 
in the income from investments and the income from students' fees; wide margin 
was allowed by the omission of every expenditure wliich couUl he iein})orarily dis- 
continued and by a holding back of 10 per cent, of the total salary item. We were 
all — bos'n-tight, midshipmite, crew of captain's gig — paid 90 per cent, of wliat we 
earned. Now the college income did not drop as we feared, the coHege economies 
were all carried out, and the reserved 10 per cent, of his salary is being returned 
to everyone. Laus deo! 

Now for next year! For the past two years the budgets made in the s]-)ring to 
meet conditions six months later have been anxious pieces of work. And no less 
so this May. Put in another form, our experience in the last two years has been 
that our present reduced income will just carry us without reduction of salaries if 
no expensive emergencies in the carrying on of the college — an epidemic, for in- 
stance — or in the upkeep of its property need be met and if our ordinary main- 
CIS) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



tenance fund is kept at a subnormal activity. All of you with experience in the 
care of property know that even barring accidents such a condition can't go on 
long — in fact^ not a third year. Next winter certain work on fifty-year-old roofs 
and plumbing must be donC;, and at the same time we can not as yet venture to 
count on any increase in our income. It will^ therefore^ be necessary again to reduce 
all salaries. This reduction will be smaller than last- year's^ and I believe better 
adjusted. There iS;, on the other hand;, less possibility that it can be repaid^ for 
only a markedly increased income would make that possible. 

I have gone into these details because the Alumnae of Bryn Mawr have always 
interested themselves in the salaries which the College pays. They have realized 
more clearly than any other group connected with Bryn Mawr that on those 
salaries depends more than an increased or decreased comfort of material living, 
that they are important factors in the choice of the teacher and in his retention, 
and that on its teaching Bryn Mawr hangs or falls; that lack of anxiety about the 
present and the future underlies good teaching and loyal service. The Bryn Mawr 
faculty itself, I believe, understands this feeling on the part of the Alumnae and 
will accept a third year of irregularity, with regret certainly, but not with a lack 
of confidence in our good will. 

I have said that our arithmetic this year has been (a) good, and (b) successful. 
Our academic work has been as sound. It is easy to speak of what in it is tangible. 
Forty-two out of eighty-seven members of the Senior Class are graduating with 
Honours, and twenty-three with distinctions in their major subject. Announce- 
ments of the high figures of recent years have met with typical reactions from a 
Bryn Mawr faculty, which suspects that there is something wrong with the marking 
or estimating apparatus and that we of earlier days were all just as clever, although 
a bushel of Merits hid our light. On the other hand, each department asserts that 
a fine flavour of excellence is represented in the honour with which its particular 
student's name will appear in the Commencement list Wednesday. Two of the 
Seniors have won scholarships for next year at Radcliffe, and one a scholarship 
of the Institute of International Education to be held in Paris this summer. Two 
are to study for a further degree at Cambridge. One is entering the Johns Hopkins 
Medical School. One is to be Miss Latham's assistant in her course in Playwriting 
at Barnard and one Miss Ely's in her course toward Harrisburg. 

Even though I speak a year before their time I can not forbear a mention of 
the present junior class — like Sappho's flowers "few but roses." Their quality was 
clear in the seven candidates presented by proud departments for the Hinchman 
Prize, given to the student whose work in her department at the end of her junior 
year promises most. Both the records, the encomiums, and the papers presented as 
proof to the perplexed committee of choice were, as college things go, excellent, and 
the difficult decision finally divided the award between two, one of whom was the 
holder of the Chinese Scholarship. And fortunately, other honours in English, in 
Language, in Science and Philosophy fell naturally and rightly to the others. 

So much for tangible signs of an intangible thing. But to everyone, I think, 
the temper of the work throughout the College this year has seemed serious and 
satisfactory. By and large, the estimate of the students as to what was important 
and what was unimportant has been based on sensible and mature standards, and 
neither the cynic nor the little child has led them. This has been true in the daily 

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BRYN MAWR AT.UMNAE BULLETIN 



i 



routine and in the single occasion. The students have detected dullness in popular 
favorites of the campus and off it, and they have stuck to stiff' courses and to majors 
which made really difficult demands and listened eagerly to lecturers with no asides 
and a complicated argument to develop. They have thouglit it worth while to do 
well either the college work or the music, acting or dancing wJiicli they put on 
themselves, and where they have neglected the work or play set before them to do 
I have usually thought they were right. 

It is not to this audience that I need to say that work at Bryn Mawr is con- 
tinuous. Even thirty-five years ago I was told in the second week of my study of 
German that if I made such elementary mistakes I could never pass the examination. 
The statistics for the week-end absences and for the cuts of classes are not yet 
completed for the year. At the close of the first semester, however, they pointed to 
a decrease in both. I am far from underestimating the effect of lessened pocket- 
money on the travels abroad of the students, but, side by side with that cause, can 
be set a somewhat clearer insight into what our whole business here is about, a 
somewhat diminished impatience with college routine, and a somewhat more mature 
point of view on the use and the abuse of routine-breaking. 

I have found it more interesting than before to discuss policies and plans with 
the students, especially with the undergraduates of the College Council. And they 
have been interested and on the whole, I believe, pleased with the important decision 
of the year, the vote of the faculty at its last meeting to introduce in 1936 the 
general examination as a requirement in every department for the degree. The 
details are many and intricate, and the plan itself, prepared in large part by a 
committee of three — Lucy Donnelly, Helen Manning and Dr. Caroline Robbins, of 
the Department of History — and in many places showing the fine hand of Mary 
Gardiner, the secretary of the Curriculum Committee, which presented the report, 
must be somewhat re-worded before it is published. The plan and a commentary on 
it will appear in course of time in the Bulletin. 

My personal opinion is yours at once. Bryn Mawr stood for tlie value of 
advanced work when she stood almost alone. In the last years the single major 
has, we believe, given that work the strength of concentration and a coveted cliance 
to take a few steps alone. The new proposal does not extend advanced work at the 
expense of the fundamental courses set by the College or of the electives. It is 
rather a spur to each student to make solid her findings, to integrate and inter- 
relate what she knows. It gives her more time to read and to think, more chance 
to show her own gifts and likings. I believe she will add in many cases to lier 
present pedestrian knowledge, got by trudging along the higli roads of her field, by 
poking in its lanes, the sudden illumination of the far airplane view. 

So far I have, as I said, made to you a report of the business of the year — 
I, a working Director, to you, interested stockholders. We are, and must be, under- 
standing of the College as a going concern, with a good faculty, good students, and 
if not a fat bank account, at least few liabilities. But along with tliis reiiort \\ hich 
I am bound to give, and you to hear, I should like to set something wliicli is less 
rotarian, and perhaps when it falls into your mind and begins to work there, more 
fruitful. I want to turn to another way of thinking of the College: What can we 
learn from the role it plays, not to us wdio think of it portentously, with a capital 
C, but to the girl who arrives, lives and studies here and leaves. Her honest esti- 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



mate of our value to her is important;, for however long we may talk of Bryn Mawr's 
place in the educational system of America or her high post as a pre-professional 
school^ the undergraduate is^ after all^, the reason why Bryn Mawr exists. 

Far too often in our anxious one-track way we see the four college years only 
as a neat whole^ organized and finished, into which a newcomer can settle cosily 
and in a leisurely way turn her mind on her mind's good. If our academic con- 
struction is skilfully dovetailed into the school on one side and the university on 
the other, conscience is satisfied. Not so, if I remember myself rightly, did I, the 
freshman, think. Rather that the college was a station stop on a journey from a 
Broad Street of early infancy to a Paoli of final settling into life, whereas the 
important fact was the progress of me, Marion Park, on my line of life. This view 
was not affected by my acknowledgment that I caught up something from 
Bryn Mawr's stock of wares to carry on with me, — not entirely what in my own 
judgment I needed or wanted, but for my needs and wants I still light-heartedly 
believed there would be other chances later on. Underneath the talk of under- 
graduates of this generation some such subordinating, station stop attitude toward 
what we think august and important is disclosed. I should like to talk about it 
briefly and first of its possessor. 

A girl comes over from the Bryn Mawr station to the campus next October. 
She is already a result of the generations that lie behind her, of childhood in her 
own home; to herself at least a definite person. She has also definite hopes and 
expectations. Various things have happened to her in which she is interested, and 
she believes that in the offing wait other things probably more interesting still. 
These have probably little to do in her mind with the school of the past or the 
college of the future; they are connected with the relations to her family, to her 
friends, to boys or girls whom she has met or may meet, to the accident which may 
give this or that turn to her own progress, to her chance for happiness or excite- 
ment or success. I mean to emphasize chance. It is more real to her than to her 
mother. She was born herself at a time of irregularity and she has never lived 
through the continuity of outward experience which most Americans knew up to 
1914. Each year she has probably been aware of fluctuations of income and of the 
ways of life which income controls. Her own family life has perhaps changed 
and reorganized itself and if not at home she has certainly had opportunity to see 
such change and reorganization in families in her town and her street. If she is 
observant she has noticed fluctuations in political opinion, in attitudes toward 
religion, law, toward a moral code. In short, the experience she has stowed away 
to be drawn on in making her own decisions and establishing her own standards 
has been selected consciously or unconsciously by her in an atmosphere of unrest 
and insecurity. Her conclusions are that success is no certainty and that she will 
come through stormy weather better if she has her own hand on the rudder, for no 
one else is as much concerned with her success as she herself. 

So she comes to Bryn Mawr, to herself a definite person, bringing definite 
hopes for herself. She doesn't necessarily tell you this; it often hides under a 
surface of family and school habits ; she has the easy adaptation of her sex and her 
years to an emphasis more generally intellectual than she herself would believe, 
shall I say, quite wise ! And of course, mixed with curiosity about and interest in 
her future there are genuine and keen moments when she likes to use her head for 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



her head's sake — mens pro mente, if I may invent in Latin. But in general she 
rightly thinks that the main current of her experience;, past and future^ is not now 
and is not to be purely intellectual and that she won't travel always on the way of 
continuous preoccupation with libraries and laboratories, with courses and reports 
and academic routine. She builds up, therefore, a set of ways to keep herself in 
touch with "reality." I don't mean only letters and week-ends, visits and telephone 
calls. She uses her free time for theatres, movies and music. She works to get 
or to keep the skills which she admires, acting, tennis, dancing, costume or scenery 
making, singing, whatever it may be. She tries to know as many men as possible. 
She has many other devices. The important thing for us to notice is that these 
casual interests which we are prone to think of as floaters on the surface of the 
serious routine we impose upon her, are, to her, agents keeping her in trim. 

Passivity on the part of the student is a disadvantage to the college which is 
teaching her. On the other hand, that she should see meaning in the four years 
of her work and that her attitude to the work should consequently be active, not 
passive, is of the greatest possible advantage to the college. Pre-medical work, any 
work done in obedience to an early choice of professional interest proves this yearly. 
Can we add to the resources of the past a new one, can we more frequently tap the 
reservoir of the young woman's purpose for her own future existing consistently and 
continuously through the four important years 18-22 which she spends here.^ 

If we can make her see the value to her, as a person, of verj^ considerable 
objective information and the value to her, as a person, of the ability to use some- 
thing beyond elementary method, then in the second place we can perhaps also take 
more pains than we have done in the past to connect possible intellectual interests 
here with those which have already come to her inner attention and which are 
fresh and stirring in her experience. She herself, and her school can direct us here. 
And lastly, we can give her more and better opportunities at Bryn Mawr for 
maintaining the connection with her life before and after her years here, the life 
whose continuity she so rarely wishes to break. The stage in Goodhart, the course 
in Playwriting, Miss Petts' work in dancing are for example already in action : 
comfortable and even enough public space for hospitality in the halls, a good place 
for winter exercise with squash courts, a modern swimming pool, a workshop for 
painting and drawing, another for music, float in the far future. 

This inclusion of the student's point of view in our professional plans for tlie 
college I have spoken of as in the future. It has already appeared in the present. 
You have seen it and you will see it here and there in changes in admissions and in 
curriculum, in increased opportunities for courses of certain types, in recommenda- 
tions for the use of space in future buildings. 

If I am right in regarding it as in general a new resource, I have also, I hope, 
made it clear that I do not regard it as displacing any of the ordinary resources 
for building the college into the ideal we all imagine. It could never displace or 
change the foundation of the college, its continued emphasis on an honest and intel- 
ligent standard in all the college intellectual work. We could let down the modern 
generation in no more cruel way than in making it believe that the individual's own 
life was not profoundly enriched by knowledge or that independence and wise 
power of choice were easy or easily attained. I say only in the hard words of tlie 
New Testament, 'This ought ye to have done and not left the other undone." 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



MARJORIE JEFFERIES WAGONER: A TRIBUTE 

Today^ twenty-four hours after her death^ it is quite possible for me to write 
objectively of Marjorie Wagoner the physician. My judgment of her professional 
work is crystallized^ for in the first years of her term here we realized quietly and 
gradually but decisively her great ability. We shall realize her loss in the same 
way, gradually but in the end completely. For it is irreparable. 

Dr. Wagoner brought to her work excellent training which she used as a 
scientist should, never letting it alone, always comparing, throwing aside or con- 
firming. And to what she retained she constantly added. Although she had a 
full-time job at Bryn Mawr and during the whole time was the head of her own 
household, she read incessantly, she worked during several busy winters a day a 
week at the Gynecological Clinic of the Woman's Hospital, and she took six months 
off to study under Dr. Earl Bond's direction at the Pennsylvania Hospital and at 
Stockbridge. And to this fund of constantly sifted knowledge which she maintained 
she added her own 'experience ; she had unusual ability in interrelating the two so 
that each threw light on the other. The result was a solidity of professional re- 
sources which produced a quite extraordinary confidence in those who depended on 
her for advice. She gave us another ground for this confidence: with her increasing 
professional equipment, she never lost her power to review and to change, her 
singular honesty. In a relatively short time she had become known and respected 
not only at Bryn Mawr but among Philadelphia physicians and in all the college 
health associations. 

Something like this I have said to many friends of the college about 
Dr. Wagoner, and I can say it readily today. What I can not yet set down 
objectively is the character of Marjorie Wagoner herself. Yet she was all of one 
piece, integrated more than most women, as honest, definite,, open minded in her 
personal as in her professional life. The basis she offered for personal relations 
was as solid, as much subject to growth, as little to caprice. She has become to 
everyone who had a chance to know her a trusted friend. Ten years' absence would 
not change such a solid relation; her death will not end it. 

She had besides most endearing qualities ; loveliness of face, quick sympathy and 
kindness,- affections soberly expressed but warm and strong, fortitude. Above all, 
her insight as much as her psychology made her recognize and respect the person- 
ality of everyone she had to do with; she was never careless with people, whether 
she dealt with a famous consultant, a new and frightened maid, or the whole range 
of students, the industrial women of the Summer School as well as Bryn Mawr 
graduates and undergraduates. 

Her life was one of the fullest I have ever known, for her responsibilities to 
her own family were met as scrupulously and as generously as those of her pro- 
fession. And it was full to the very end. With no word to any of us of her increasing 
anxiety about herself, she finished every duty of the college year, every public 
appearance, every report and record. I can only hope that in some way the triumph 
of her unselfishness and her fortitude gave to her a spiritual satisfaction as in these 
last days she contemplated briefly what she had done. 

Marion Edwards Park 

(18) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



BRYN MAWR'S PHILOSOPHY 

By Natalie McFaden Blanton, 1917. 

From East and West and North and Soutli we liave come back to "Our 
Gracious Inspiration." For old alumnae as for young, the glory of Bryn Mawr 
iSjUndimmed, her power to influence unchanged. 

For some of us the secret of this influence lies in a hard won legacy of scholar- 
ship; others turn in grateful memory to some titan of the faculty. But for tlie major- 
ity, I dare say, the secret of Bryn Mawr lies in her fundamental philosophy, a pliilos- 
ophy that conceives, of women as dignified, able human beings, having a contribu- 
tion to make to the world and determined to make it. We imbibed this philosophy 
with every breath we drew as we walked up and down in this little woman's world, 
and few women can have entered it without having their eyes opened to the pos- 
sibilities of .their lives' usefulness. 

Today one has but to read Miss ParTi's talks, to the undergraduates or hear 
her speak, or watch the straws in the wind reported of student life by the Alumnae 
Bulletin and College News to feel that that fundamentally Bryn Mawr's philos- 
ophy is the same, that she believes as of old that a woman must make the most of her 
life because of her ability and because of the need around her. But is there not a 
more practical note in the suggestions for working out this philosophy? Has not 
the undercurrent of bitterness and frustration at the world's unfairness to the sex 
been lessened.^ Is there not "the tang of reality" in various phases of campus 
life that used to be missing? Is, it too much to hope that the Bvjn IVIawr graduate 
of the present and future may marry without that dreadful sense of turning her 
back upon het training or of interpreting in a forbidden path her convictions of 
woman's high calling? May she not now be convinced with entire honesty tliat 
the crux of women's freedom lies in her, right to choose her career rather than in 
what career she chooses? That true independence comes with discipline and accom- 
plishment in human relationship rather than in ascetic withdrawal from them or 
fine scorn of them? That happiness is a by-product of any work well done? Tliat 
earning a salary, whether man or woman, has little to do witli one's usefulness to 
the world? 

The graduate of the older Bryn Mawr may have meant to resist life's com- 
plicated relations, to control them and to stride on untrammelled by tliem, but she 
has nine times out of ten been drawn into them as surely as her mother and grand- 
mother before her. The little life stories so modestly sketched in the Bulletin 
are significant. They are packed with friends and relations, witli sisters and 
cousins and, aunts. There is marriage and giving in marriage. There are babies 
and grandbabies. There are husbands — oh, a great many liusbands. There is 
reading aloud to husb'ands, and traveling with husbands and being proud of hus- 
bands. Careers are mixed with gardens, the writing of books on narcotics with 
the building of houses in Maine. Research work is reported, and dotted swiss 
curtains, and digs in Iraq and the neighbor's whooping cough and string quartet. 
Even our prize winning novelist boasts of writing in her family living room — not 
according toHoyle in "A Room of One's Own." There is gaiety and good spirits, 
sometimes sadness, sometimes tragedy. It is as if these women admitted that work 

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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



and personal success were but the frame work of their lives which they have filled 
with living. 

It is difficult for the expert to interpret current trends, and I from my little 
corner, have no right to attempt it with any hope of correctness, but I hazard a 
guess that the woman's movement has passed into a later phase — that yielding no 
inch of their early conviction that they are capable of assuming, and therefore 
obliged to assume, their share of the world's problems, but no longer having to be 
concerned with storming the opposition, women are interpreting their desire to 
make their lives count in all the new ways, and in all the old. 

THOU GRACIOUS INSPIRATION— 

(Reprinted from the College News for June 5th, 1934) 

The annual custom of class reunions again brings us the great opportunity to 
appreciate the traditions — scholarly and frivolous — that make Bryn Mawr. After 
a year of bustle about our work from day to day we are quite likely to become self- 
centered, and to regard our education as a matter of units to which marks are 
attached at midyears and finals. We are so smug about our own education that 
we forget, momentarily, that our education is the result of the work of many people 
who have gradually developed the present system of courses and events. Our post- 
examination reaction is, perhaps, even more unhappily egoistic than any other, and 
it is our particular good fortune that just then our minds may be refreshed by the 
enthusiastic response of the alumnae to all of the things that have become everyday 
sights and occurrences to us. 

A realization of the actual purpose and meaning of a Bryn Mawr education 
is best gained by this single contact we are enabled to make with the alumnae. 
They, with the wisdom of a more matured and more objective point of view, can 
make us see how the college customs were actually evolved and established. We can 
come to a realization of the pleasure that is afforded us by the atmosphere of 
Bryn Mawr: indeed, only the alumnae, who come to us from the cruel world that 
we anticipate and speculate about so much, can know the relative value and enjoy- 
ment of the four years that we spend so thoughtlessly in amassing our required 
number of units. They have the necessary experience, also, to tell us how helpful 
their actual college courses were to them after they had left college. 

It is through these alumnae reunions that we get a better and wiser perspective 
regarding Bryn Mawr. Wisdom is not automatically the heritage of most under- 
graduates, but we can say unreservedly that we have discovered the wisdom of our 
elders within the past few days. Our greatest hope is that we shall in our turn be 
as intelligently enthusiastic as the alumnae whom we are now meeting on campus, 
and that future generations of Bryn Mawr undergraduates will be as glad to wel- 
come us in their midst as we are glad to welcome this year's reuniting alumnae. 



(20) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CAMPUS NOTES 

By J. E. Hannan, 1934 

May is undoubtedly the best month in the Bryn Mawr year, but it is also the 
time when the undergraduate body makes up for an ill-spent spring. The contrast 
between a fairly lazy early spring and the week before and two weeks of examina- 
tions is one of the most startling in our uneventful lives. In the period immediately 
before and during examinations, week-ends, tennis, and pounce are all forgotten, 
and the whole college goes into a coma, as far as the outside world is concerned. 
The simple fact that only sports-minded faculty make use of the tennis courts, and 
all the students are permanently settled in the Library, shows how seriously we 
take our trials and tribulations. 

But before the trials and tribulations set in, the campus had one last orgy on 
the week-end of the Glee Club production, The Gondoliers. There are few things 
so satisfactory to the Bryn Mawr undergraduate as a successful dance following our 
extremely good Gilbert and Sullivan. The fact that we can manufacture amuse- 
ment on the home campus somehow vindicates us in the eyes of the unkind critics, 
who see Bryn Mawr as the essence of the mental and nothing else. We do not 
mean to intimate that every undergraduate goes to the dance bent grimly upon 
proving herself a well-rounded person; but the satisfaction of being able to produce 
our own revelry certainly adds to the happiness of all. It is pleasant to report that 
the level of men attending was high. Every one made an effort to get the very best 
quality, and the result was impressive. 

As usual, though the triumph always surprises us, and seems almost miraculous. 
Glee Club triumphed. Mr. Willoughby, Mr. Alwyne, and J. Hopkinson, Manager 
of Glee Club, presented the very light, yet very complex operetta. The Gondoliers, 
with a finish which could have been attained only by arduous drudgery for weeks 
beforehand. There were several numbers that proved the directors' excellent sense 
of showmanship. When the Cachuca, a very fandango dance done under shifting 
spotlights, brought down the house and had to be repeated again and again, tliere 
was given proof positive that the directors knew how to use their stage as well as 
the voices of the cast. It was gratifying to the undergraduates who went to it 
before the dance in hope of entertainment. They got it — in the grand manner. 

Glee Club was not, however, our only drama for the montli. Tlic Frcslmian 
One-act Plays followed soon after and provided a transition to the examination 
period. There were three in all — two of which were grim tragedy. Since Freshman 
plays always smell strongly of the lamp and usually belong to that ty]H" of theatre 
labeled "closet drama," they never fail to amuse. The lack of sympathy sliown by 
the audience at the most tragic points must have been disconcerting to the play- 
wrights, but even as we howled with glee, we remembered tlic batlios of our own 
Freshman plays and laughed at them too. 

The week before Finals also saw in Goodhart the Pro Arte Quartet in a series 
of three concerts presented to the College by Mrs. Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge. 
They provided a remarkably soothing overture to the storm and stress of Finals 
period and reminded us that there was still perfection somewhere in a world of 
incomplete course notes. It may seem crass to mention the Pro Arte Quartet and 

(21) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



our troubles in the same breath, but the mixture of the two is unavoidable. At the 
time the music charmed our savage breasts very effectively. 

The course questionnaire issued by the News bobbed up again this month in 
two widely separated places — morning Chapel and an English final. In Chapel, 
Mrs. Manning leveled certain criticisms against the News editors* statistics and 
suggested that the amount of reasoning power required in each course might have 
been a better subject of investigation than the quotient of Originality, Trends, and 
Details in a course. But the most embarrassing result of the questionnaire was the 
practical use made of it in an English final. There were three parts in the final, 
one intended to test "Originality" (one and one-half hours allotted to this section) ; 
one to test the ''Knowledge of Trends" (one hour to this giant subject); and the 
last to test "Memory of Details" (only half an hour). According to the. class, their 
professor did not intend the examination to be "amusing," so they hadn't even an 
excuse to take it lightly. We do not know how well they came- through the trial 
except that no one flunked. Since "Originality" seems to have occupied half the 
paper, it is safe to say that no one was lacking in that — which. is as it should be. 
The "Trends," another third of the paper, must have been fairly well done; but 
we hesitate to guess at what may have happened to the "Details." These, you must 
realize, are not statistical observations and should not under any circumstances be 
taken seriously. It would be all to the good, we feel, if the professor in question 
were to issue statistics of the actual results. Here we might pause to say that a 
prophecy based on a trend came true this month. We said in one of the previous 
numbers of the Bulletin that the athletic spirit rampant on campus led us to 
believe that our tennis team might overwhelm Vassar. They did, and we now have 
a new faith in trends. 

COMMENCEMENT HONOURS 

It must have been a great source of gratification to all those alumnae who 
have worked so valiantly on the Regional Scholarship Committee to read of the 
splendid record of their handpicked products. For the third time — in 1926, in 1928, 
and now in 1934, the Bryn Mawr European Fellowship has been awarded to a 
Regional Scholar. This year the holder is Elizabeth Mackenzie from Aberdeen, 
Scotland, via Pittsburgh, who thus brings to a fitting climax her distinguished 
undergraduate academic career. Miss Mackenzie received her degree magna cum 
laude, with Distinction in English. Suzanne Halstead, sent originally by the New 
England group, Elizabeth Hannan from New York and Marianne Gateson from 
Eastern Pennsylvania also graduated magna cum laude with distinction in their 
special subjects. Betti Goldwasser of New York, Anita de Varon and Frances 
Pleasonton from New England, Haviland Nelson from Northern California and 
Eva Levin (daughter of Bertha Szold, 1895) from Baltimore, all graduated cum 
laude. 

Twelve daughters of alumnae graduated with the Class of 1934. Janet 
Barber, daughter of Lucy Lombardi, 1904, received her degree magna cum laude. 
with Distinction in History of Art; Margaret Righter, daughter of Renee Mitchell. 
1900, Margaret Dannenbaum, daughter of Gertrude Gimbel, 1911, and Evelyn 
Patterson, daughter of Evelyn Holliday, 1904, all graduated cum laude, Miss 

(22) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Patterson taking her degree with Distinction in Archaeology. Tlie list of A.B.'s 
also included Helen Elizabeth Baldwin^ daughter of Helen Smitheman, 1907, 
Gabriel Churchy daughter of Brooke Peters^ 1907, Susan Daniels, daughter of 
Grace Brownell, 1907, Anita Fouilhoux, daughter of Jean Clark, 1899, Julia 
Gardner, daughter of Julia Goodall, 1900, Katharine Gribbel, daughter of Margaret 
Latta, 1909, and Olivia Jarrett, daugliter of Cora Hardy, 1899. 

Of the eleven new Doctors of Philosophy, eight hold a previous degree from 
Bryn Mawr: Virginia Grace, A.B. 1922 and A.M. 1929, Agnes Lake, A.B. 1930 
and A.M. 1931, Elizabeth Fehrer, A.B. 1930, Marion Ambruster, A.M. 1932, Edith 
Cumings, A.M. 1928, Faith Baldwin, A.M. 1931, Berthe Marti, A.M. 1926, Dorothy 
Shaad, A.M. 1930. Eleven of the twenty-three new Masters of Arts are Bryn 
Mawr A.B.'s: Marjorie L. Thompson, 1912, Elizabeth Ufford, 1929, Rosamond 
Cross, 1929, Edith Grant, 1930, Anne Cole, 1931, and Eleanor Yeakel, Susan 
Savage, Mabel Meehan, Joyce Ilott, Charlotte Balough and Emily Grace, all mem- 
bers of the Class of 1933. 

ALUMNAE ATHLETICS 

The annual tennis match between the Alumnae and the Varsity ended in a 
victory for the Varsity by three matches to two. Rebecca Wood, 1933, defeated 
F. Carter, 1935, 6-3, 6-2; Fanny Sinclair Woods, 1901, won her match against 
Doreen Canaday, 1936, by the score of 6-2, 6-1. Mary Hopkinson Gibbon, 1928, 
lost to Margaret Haskell, 1934, by 6-3, 6-1; Margaret Collier, 1933, was beaten 
by Betty Faeth, 1935, 6-4, 6-3. The deciding match was lost by the Alumnae 
doubles team, Mrs. Gibbon and Miss Wood, to Miss Haskell and Miss Faeth by tlie 
score of 6-1, 6-2. 

A NEW COMMITTEE ASKS FOR SUGGESTIONS 

The Committee on Alumnae Relations with the College, appointed by the 
Executive Board at the request of the last Council in Boston, has held two formal 
and two informal meetings, and will be ready to report to the next Council in 
November at Bryn Mawr. The members of the Committee are Helen Evans Lewis, 
1913, Chairman; Frances Fincke Hand, 1897, Alice Hawkins, 1907, Louise 
Dillingham, 1916, Millicent Carey Mcintosh, 1920, Elizabeth Lawrence Mcndell, 
1925, Agnes Howell Mallory, 1930, and Rebecca Wood, 1933. The Committee has 
already consulted with President Park and with the Executive Board, and will be 
glad to receive suggestions from any alumnae on "means of establishing closer 
contact between the College and the Alumnae." They will meet again early in 
October to draft their final report. 



At the Conference of the American Library Association held in ^Montreal 
on June 26th, Cornelia L. Meigs, 1907, received the John Newberry ]\Icdal 
given annually to the author of "the most significant contribution to American 
literature for children." The work which won the award was Invincible Louisa, 
the story of the author of Little Women. The Medal has come to mean to 
writers for children what the Pulitzer Prize means to authors in the adult field. 

(23) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Eleanor Little Aldrich^ 1905, has been nominated to the Trustees of 
Bryn Mawr College as Alumnae Director for the term of years 1934-1939. She 
succeeds Virginia Kneeland Frantz, 1918, whose term expires in December. 



The Executive Board is happy to announce that May Egan Stokes, 1911, has 
consented to act as Chairman of the committee in charge of arrangements for the 
meeting of the Alumnae Council to be held at Bryn Mawr on November 8th, 9th 
and 10th. Harriet Price Phipps, 1923, Councillor for District I., and Elizabeth 
Bent Clark, 1895, President of the Alumnae Association, and a number of alumnae 
living in and near Philadelphia will assist Mrs. Stokes. In addition to the usual 
program it is planned to allow some time for the alumnae to visit classes and lab- 
oratories and to see something of extra-curricular undergraduate activities. All 
members of District II. are invited to attend. A detailed program will be mailed 
early in the autumn. 



A nation-wide broadcast sponsored by the Seven Women's Colleges Committee 
has been arranged for October 22nd. Plans are on foot to have the members of the 
local clubs of each of the Seven Colleges meet together on that day. Please consult 
the President of your nearest Bryn Mawr Club, or ranking officer of any other 
Bryn Mawr organization, about this, and watch the newspapers for announcement 
of the exact time of the broadcast. 



Because of the importance of large families among the more intelligent citizens 
of the country, the Pennsylvania Birth Control Federation offers an award of fifty 
dollars to that class of Bryn Mawr College, graduating in the years 1905-1924 
(inclusive), which, ten years after graduation, had the largest number of children 
per graduate. A questionnaire, which has been approved by the Executive Board 
of the Alumnae Association, is being sent out with their permission. The undertaking 
is in the hands of Fay MacCracken Stockwell, 1894, Field Secretary of the Institute 
of Euthenics at Vassar College. Mrs. Stockwell is to be assisted by Mabel Meehan, 
A.B. 1933 and A.M. 1934, who is planning to use the statistics in connection with 
her thesis. The results of the study should prove valuable for the records of the 
College and the Association. 

FUTURE COLLEGE EVENTS, 1934-35 

Mrs. Vera Micheles Dean, Research Associate of the Foreign Policy Associa- 
tion, will give three lectures under the Anna Howard Shaw Foundation in Goodhart 
Hall at 8.15 on Monday evenings: October 29th, November 5th and November 12th. 

The Pro Arte String Quartet of Brussells, through the courtesy of Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Sprague Coolidge, will give ten concerts in Goodhart Hall at 8.15 on Sunday 
and Wednesday evenings during January and February. 

Professor John Livingston Lowes, of Harvard, will give six lectures under the 
Mary Flexner Lectureship on the "Critical Study of Keats" in Goodhart Hall during 
February and March. 

(24) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



CLASS NOTES 



Ph.D. and Graduate Notes 

Editor: Mary Alice Hanna Parrish 
(Mrs. J. C. Parrish) 
Vandalia, Missouri. 

1889 

No Editor Appointed. 

1890 
No Editor Appointed. 

1891 
No Editor Appointed. 

1892 

Class Editor: Edith Wetherill Ives 
(Mrs. F. M. Ives) 
1435 Lexington Ave., New York City. 

1893 

Class Editor: Susan Walker FitzGerald 
(Mrs. Richard Y. FitzGerald) 
7 Greenough Ave., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 

1894 

Class Editor: Abby Brayton Durfee 
(Mrs. Randall Durfee) 
19 Highland Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

1895 

Class Editor: Susan Fowler 
c/o Brearley School 
610 East 83rd St., New York City. 

1896 
Class Editor: Abigail Camp Dimon 
1411 Genesee St., Utica, N. Y. 

Ruth Porter, our class collector, has sent me 
two letters she received this spring in answer 
to her appeals, and I am glad to have some- 
thing to make up for the aridity of my own 
news. Ruth herself will come east for the 
wedding of her youngest son, John, on June 
20th, to Gertrude Olsen, who has been studying 
in Geology this year at Bryn Mawr. After the 
wedding, Ruth and James will go to Maine, 
where they will spend the summer as usual at 
Great Spruce Head Island. 

Now for extracts from the letters. Clara 
Colton Worthington writes: "My widening in- 
terests for some time have included the birth 
control movement and now I am president of 
the Delaware League and am as busy as can be 
doing a little reorganizing of committees and 
trying to learn enough to be a helpful and 
efficient officer. . . . You may guess from my 
getting actively to work that my eyes are mucb 
better. In fact, I can do almost anyhing I like 
if I am careful not to get overtired. A year 
ago at this time I was ready to slide out of 
the picture and flew to Salt Lake simply be- 
cause it would have been, impossible for me to 



have gone by train. Then I went over to Nevada, 
high up in the mountains and the medicos I 
was visiting put me out in the sun to cook 
every day. The result was extraordinary and 
I have improved right along. I am not sure 
that it was altogether the sun, but believe il 
was for the most part. Perhaps the turn was 
just about due. It seems it was a case of com- 
plete nervous exhaustion and it hit not only 
my eyes but my breathing apparatus, for my 
diaphragm was tied in a knot most of the time. 
The whole thing seems like a miracle. . . .1 am 
not going west this summer as I had planned 
to spend Christmas next winter with Jane and 
Bill and Sabin and now there will be the added 
inducement of the new baby, who should have 
some features by that time. I shall stay here 
most of the time until the first of August, when 
I shall go to Nova Scotia with my one remain- 
ing aunt — it should be cool." 

And from Rebecca Mattson Darlington: 
"Celia has had a great year in Paris, and very 
profitable I am sure. Now I am going over to 
join her for the summer and we'll return to- 
gether early in September, I had no plan of 
going to Europe this summer; had instead 
looked forward to a summer here in Cambridge 
with some courses at the Summer School and 
much sleeping and reading. But Celia pointed 
out convincingly that probably never again 
would I have such a combination of attractions: 
to visit her and her friends in their apartment, 
high in the grenier of one of the old mansions 
on the He S. Louis; and that wherever I wa? 
I'd have to eat and even with tlie bad exchange 
eating will cost no more in Paris than in 
Cambridge. So I am going — sailing "common 
third" on a Red Star Liner, June 15th, witli 
ten days to Havre. That will give me time to 
rest after my most intense year of teaching. 

"My sons are in no hurry to marry it seems; 
Sidney, our young engineer and brilliant mathe- 
matician, is just emerging from the gloom and 
nervous strain of nearly two years at the Bell 
Laboratories, during which, fi-om week to week, 
the young men did not know which one would 
be dropped. Philip, tlie naturalist, is, by nature 
and training, a wanderer. This summer, on a 
grant from Harvard, he is going for tliree or 
more months to Santo Domingo to collect 
zoological specimens in his field. He returns, 
of course, to the museum, ^^■lun■e he has his 
position. 

"As for me, I continue with my teaching at 
Choate. Even with my extra heavy schedule, 
since our staff is perforce reduced, and another 
necessary cut in salary, I am not yet ready to 
retire. I love the work, for every new girl is 
like a new book — worthy an investigation at 
any rate. 



(25) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



1897 

Class Editor: Friedrika Heyl 

104 Lake Shore Drive, East, Dunkirk, N. Y. 

Clara Vail Brooks has a grandson (and 
Peggy '27, incidentally has a son!), John 
Christopher Juhring, III, IV or V, born March 
6th. She has also added to her family group 
two young people of college age about whom 
she writes: "Owing to the death of their father 
last September, I am now the guardian of two 
minors who are now living with me. The girl, 
Mary Vail Hewitt, is finishing her Junior year 
at Smith; the boy, Dexter Wright Hewitt, Jr., 
is a freshman at Amherst. They are nice child- 
ren and fit comfortably into the space between 
Gordon and Tom. I am fond of them and they 
seem happy here. Their mother was my cousin." 
Clara writes also of a very pleasant trip of 
three weeks that she and her husband took in 
March to Bermuda. They will be in Woodstock, 
Vermont, this summer as usual. 

A few days after the above was sent to the 
Bulletin, the newspapers announced the tragic 
death, on June 9th, of Dexter Wright Hewitt 
in an automobile accident near Amherst. The 
affectionate sympathy of the class goes out to 
Clara and her family and to Mary Vail Hewitt. 

Isn't it too bad that the beautiful old house 
(1785) at Barre, Mass., that Elizabeth Seymour 
Angel and her husband recently acquired was 
burned a few weeks ago? Complete details are 
lacking, but we hope that it was not destroyed. 

F. Heyl and her sister, Mrs. Nichols, have 
opened a gift shop — foreign gifts, mostly — in 
their home in Dunkirk, N. Y., on Route 5, 
running along Lake Erie between Buffalo and 
Erie, Pa. "Tea and cookies will be sei-ved 
informally without charge" to Bryn Mawr 
friends who come this way. 

1898 

Acting Editor: Elizabeth Nields Bancroft 
(Mrs. Wilfred Bancroft) 
615 Old Railroad Ave., Haverford, Pa. 

REUNION NOTES 

The Class of 1898 convened on Saturday, 
June 2, as guests of Marion Park at an in- 
formal supper on the terrace of the President's 
house. Twenty-three answered the roll call. 
Catherine Bunnell Mitchell came from 
California and Grace Clark Wright from 
Minneapolis. Others from nearer points were 
Isabel Andrews, Elizabeth Nields Bancroft, Mary, 
Bright, Jennie Browne, Sarah Ridgway Bruce, 
Rebecca Foulke Cregar, Anna Fry, Alice 
Gannett, Josephine Goldmark, Anna Haas, 
Alice Hammond, Alice Hood, Ullericka Oberge, 
Marion Park, Mary Sheppard, Blanche Harnish 
Stein, Martha Tracy, Esther Willitts Thomas, 
Louise Warren, Bertha Wood and Helen 
Williams Woodall. After supper a short busi- 



ness meeting was followed by the showing of 
slides and films taken at other reunions. These 
provoked a flood of reminiscences that was 
stopped only by our departure. 

Sunday afternoon, the 3rd, the class gath- 
ered in the Library to take part in the presen- 
tation of their gift of the portrait of 
Marion Park to the College. 

Later we all had a delightful picnic supper 
at Rebecca Cregar's, cooked by Mr. Cregar 
and Mr. Woodall, assisted by Mr. Bruce, Dr. 
Stein and Mr. Bancroft. Helen Woodall and 
Rebecca were the perfect hostesses — as usual. 

Monday we lunched under the Wyndham 
trees and Tuesday twelve of us had a final 
luncheon at the home of Esther Thomas. 

The class wishes to extend its heartfelt sym- 
pathy to the families of two members of the 
class: Mary Grace Moody, who died on Feb- 
ruary 20th, and Charly Mitchell Jean, who 
died on May 25th. 

1899 

Class Editor: Mary Schoneman Sax 
(Mrs. Percival M. Sax) 
6429 Drexel Road, Overbrook, Phila., Pa. 

reunion notes 
Bryn Mawr, fount of wisdom fair. 
Alma Mater strong and great, 
Love and praise and glory 
All we have are thine, 
Never shall our voices fail 
Never shall our love abate 
While we sing of thee, Bryn Mawr, 
And '99. 

Words written in the youthful exuberance 
of Freshman year, echoed many times since 
then, but never voiced with greater fervor and 
enthusiasm than by the fortunate eighteen 
members of our class who met in the Common 
Room of Goodhart Hall on Monday evening 
of Commencement Week to gather around the 
festice board for Class Supper. 

Mary Hoyt had ushered in '99 on Friday, 
and was followed on Saturday by Ellen 
Kilpatrick, Jean Fouilhoux and Emma Miller, 
May Blakey Ross, Katie Mid Blackwell and 
Dorothy Meredith, as well as your incoming 
editor, appeared in time for the Alumnae meet- 
ing, which was followed by the Alumnae 
luncheon on Sunday. At the luncheon, Guffey, 
as our representative, had her little say. Char- 
acterizing '98 as typical of the best of Scotch 
virtues, she described our more volatile quali- 
ties as Irish (true to our class color), and 
stressed our unconventionality, our irrepressible 
Gaelic youthfulness, and our delightful para- 
doxes. We achieved our first Bryn Mawr A.B. 
daughter ten years ago, and look forward to 
Mary Sax's graduation in 1945; we have a 
grandmother of seven years' standing, and a 
bride of as many months. Our energies are 



(26) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



directed in diverse directions, and we have 
gained success in the varied fields of medicine, 
law, education, art, architecture, literature, 
business, and politics, as well as leadership in 
such important causes as Suffrage, Peace, Birth 
Control, and Anti-Prohibition. After having 
told what we had done, Emma begged for a 
more intelligent slant on political life, decrying 
the side-line attitude "compounded of apathy, 
indifference and ignorance," and counselled 
entrance into politics by starting now as a 
candidate for office, no matter how long the 
rung of the political ladder might seem. 

On Monday, '99's Reunion started officially, 
and by that time Dolly Sipe Bradley, Martha 
Irwin Sheddan, Molly Thurber Dennison, Kate 
Houghton Hepburn, Mary Towle, Evetta Jeffers 
Schock, Content Nichols Smith, and Margaret 
Hall were on hand to join '98, '00, and '01 at 
a most sociable buffet luncheon under the trees 
at Wyndham. There we had a chance to com- 
pare ourselves with our contemporaries and to 
realize how kindly and lightly the passing 
years had touched us. Only Ellen KiF, and 
May Sax have achieved the distinction of being 
"platinum blondes," and on many heads there 
were astonishingly few silver threads among 
the brown and gold. Dorothy and Katie Mid' 
still show strong traces of their Gibson- 
Girlhood, and although our shadows had not 
grown less, our "style" would have gladdened 
Callie's fashion sense had she been able to 
see us. 

Refreshed, recoiffed, and regowned, a most 
distinguished-looking group of women (the 
editor's husband offered this comment entirely 
unsolicited) met for Class Supper with Molly 
and Emma at the heads of the table. Elsie 
Andrews and Gertrude Ely had joined our 
ranks and once seated at the table (made most 
attractive with the help of Elsie's flowers), we 
immediately opened our souvenirs, which had 
been selected with excellent care and skill by 
Gallic, whose job unfortunately prevented her 
from joining us. 

Dispensing with formal toasts, one after 
another we rose to our feet and told what we 
considered most worth recording about our- 
selves, our occupations, or our families. All 
had something of interest to tell, and some 
were far too modest in their recital. The 
mother of our most famous daughter gave m 
most enthusiastic account of her other chil- 
dren; our president astonished and delighted 
us by the modernity and serenity of her out- 
look on life. She blames a concussion of the 
brain for her change of view, proving that 
even an automobile accident may have a happy 
result. Bon Mots were as plentiful as hot cakes, 
but even so the prize was unanimously awarded 
to Jean, who confessed that her life was spent 
in avoiding "the widening hips and the nar- 
rowing mind." Emma then read excerpts from 



the letters of the absentees which gave us a 
glimpse of their interests too. Your editor's 
little daughter came with her father to forge 
another l)right link in her chain of Bryn Mawr 
impressions which had been started so aus- 
piciously last fall at Miss Thomas' reception 
at the Deanery, Then, following a short class 
meeting, Jean's loving cup made its customary 
round, we sang our song, cheered our cheer, 
and after "Thou gracious inspiration," parted 
officially, until the next day. 

Time goes on, but the type continues un- 
changed. Kate Hepburn the elder had con- 
fided to her neighbor at table that she was 
about to explode a bomb which would make 
us sit up. But when she threw it later on at 
headquarters it turned out to be a dud; it ju'-t 
didn't go off at all, for all she did was to 
hand out pamphlets "On understanding Soviet 
Russia!" It happens that on this important 
subject there is really nothing which we do 
not know. How much more popular would she 
be today had she handed out passes to 
daughter Kate's next picture. 

On Tuesday Emma, Mary Hoyt, Content. 
Dorothy, Jean, Martha, Dolly, the two Mays, 
and Katie Mid' motored down to Yardley to 
the last-named's beautifully remodeled colonial 
house, stopping at Roscommon, in Doylestown. 
to admire May's garden and view there. "Pat" 
Blackwell and the younger Katherine welcomed 
us at Yardley, where we enjoyed a well-chosen 
deliciously prepared lunch, and which we had 
to leave all too soon to get back for Garden 
Party. Senior Row looked its best, and our 
graduates, Anita Fouilhoux and Olivia Jarrett, 
did us proud. 

Gertrude was our inimitable hostess in the 
evening, and though Emma left to add another 
leaf to her laurel crown by giving tlie Com- 
mencement Address to the Graduating Class 
of St. Agnes' School for Girls at Alexandri:i. 
Cora Hardy Jarrett, our newest author, who is 
still better recognized abroad than at home, 
had slipped in to take her place. Eleven of 
us dined in Gertrude's walled garden, torn 
between the enjoyment of her food, apprecia- 
tion of her aesthetic surroundings, and amuse- 
ment at her humorous anecdotes. The auto- 
mobile accident in which she had figured dur- 
ing the afternoon had fortunately not given her 
a concussion, so we may hope that she will 
remain unchanged. 

Then, before we separated, in order to add 
more color and light and shade to this picture, 
which is to recreate the scene for those who 
could not come, as well as to sene as a record 
for the re-uners, the following "impressions" 
were entrusted to the editor, ^^'hat pleased 
most had been — 

"The good camraderie," 

"The broad-minded modern points of view 
of these w^onien of the '90"s."" "That all *99ers 



(27) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



were growing older in a perfectly natural man- 
ner, and becoming mellower with the years. 
That there was not a bobbed head, not a 
plucked eyebrow, not a red fingernail to be 
found.", 

"That no member of the class spoke of the 
depression." "The perennial youth, distin- 
guished appearance and the eternal optimism 
of '99." And now comes the last comment, 
which proves that even after thirty-five years 
our orals were not taken in vain. 

"Plus ga change, plus ga reste la meme 
chose." 

1900 

Class Editor: Louise Congdon Francis 
(Mrs. Richard Francis) 
414 Old Lancaster Road, Haverford, Pa. 

1901 

Class Editor: Beatrice MacGeorge 
Vaux Apartments, Gulph Road, 
Bryn Mawr, Fa. 

reunion notes 

"To be or not to be" was the question that 
faced 1901 in regard to its reunion. Thanks 
to the unwavering devotion of our manager, 
Beatrice MacGeorge, ten loyal souls gathered 
at the College Inn to enjoy a supper that was 
really delicious, and a fellowship that was fine 
and true. 

The ten members who celebrated the passing 
of a third of a century were Mary Allis, Alice 
Dillingham, Eleanor Jones, Bertha Laws, Jane 
Righter, Grace Phillips Rogers, Marion Parris 
Smith, Beatrice MacGeorge, Fanny Sinclair 
Woods and Marion Wright Messimer. Later, 
Jessie Miller, Ella Sealy Newell and Mary 
Ayer Rousmaniere joined us, and filled out the 
lucky number of those enjoying the reunion. 

There had been no time to prepare clever 
speeches. We came, we saw, we enjoyed. 
Beatrice with her committee had thought of 
everything that we needed to make us happy, 
and only the presence of absent classmates 
could have heightened our satisfaction. Letters 
were read, and postal card messages, and each 
contributed some information until we had a 
definite picture of the activities of 1901. Life 
has not been easy for many, but the courage 
with which they have met their difficulties 
makes us proud of the 

"Spirit of Nineteen-one, 
We'll never give up till the goal is won!" 
Each banqueter gave a brief sketch of her 
activities in the past and spoke of future plans. 
Two are interested in art — Beatrice MacGeorge 
gives talks illustrated by colored projections, 
on various schools of painting, and Mary Allis 
belongs to the Lantern and Lens Club, and 
wins prizes in photography competitions. 

Marion Parris Smith and Bertha Laws are 
the travelers. Marion and her husband set 



forth shortly on a most alluring trip to 
Australia and New Zealand, the only parts of 
the British domain which they have not yet 
visited. Bertha is off to the Pacific on her way 
to Japan, Manchuria and China. 

Marion Messimer has just had a son mar- 
ried. Eleanor Jones and Grace Phillips Rogers 
are accredited judges of the Massachusetts 
Federation of Garden Clubs, and exhibit in 
flower shows. Caroline Daniels Moore, who, 
by the way, has just sailed to join Harriet in 
London, has also distinguished herself in 
Chicago with a prize-winning rose-garden. 
Jane Righter is an authority on roses, too, and 
talks of them learnedly to flower clubs. 

Among the letters were one from Edith 
Wray Holliday, written two years ago, and one 
from Gertrude Smyth Buell. Edith was mar- 
ried in 1904 and had three children and five 
grandchildren. Her husband died in 1925 after 
a long illness. Her daughter Frances was grad- 
uated with distinctioon from Penn College, 
Oskaloosa, Iowa, two years ago. Edith has 
taught in two colleges and various high schools. 
"In 1918" (to quote from her letter) "I took 
a library course at the New York State College 
for Teachers in Albany . . . and in 1931 wis 
invited to come here (Bacone College, 
Oklahoma) and take charge of the library in 
this, the first Junior College for Indians, and 
the only one fully accredited, 1 believe . . . 
I just love the work, and the Indian students 
are so nice to work with, more respectful than 
those of our own race, and hungry for educa- 
tion." 

Gertrude Smyth Buell writes: . . . "What an 
opportunity 'the Dean' missed when in her fa- 
mous statistics about the percentage of 
Bryn Mawr Alumnae who were married, and 
those who had children, she omitted to add the 
staggering percentage of those who would have 
grandchildren! As neither of my sons is mar- 
ried and I am not eligible for this distinguished 
group, I fear I should hang my head ignomin- 
iously — though inwardly rejoicing, . . . Susan 
Clarke's last beau geste was to give me a trip 
around the world. We sailed the Seven Seas 
together, and had a beautiful time calling our- 
selves the 'Pembroke Suitemates' on the other 
side of the globe. I left her in London and 
came home fifteen months ago. Susan went 
back to the Continent and -she is now in 
Australia visiting one of her distinguished 
Oxford friends and having an interesting time 
meeting all of the university notables and high- 
brows in that part of the world. ... I have 
brought out my 1901 Class Book and have 
been gazing at all of the photographs. How 
the years roll back, and how the memories rush 
in, when we clear our minds from current 
affairs to relive our college days again! 
"And among the dreams of the days that were 
We find our lost youth again." 



(28) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



For youth is never really lost — it is like Alice' ^ 
Cheshire Cat, sitting always on its branch of 
our lives. It fades away; but at times reappears 
as alive as ever, and always smiling at us." 

Marianna Buffum Hill, after experiences that 
would crush a smaller soul, writes dauntlessly: 
"The title of my book shall be Life Begins at 
Fifty!" 

One of the best of the reunion events was a 
supper given by Betty MacGeorge under the 
beautiful trees at Llysyfran. Those who were 
there will never forget the peace and comfort 
with which our generous hostess surrounded 
us. We hardly know how to express our appre- 
ciation for all she has done to make the re- 
union a success. 

On. Monday morning, at the Alumnae-Varsity 
Tennis Tournament, Fanny Woods, in spite of 
her advanced years, beat the fourth member of 
the Varsity team, 6-2, 6-L Following the match 
was the picnic luncheon of '98, '99, 1900 and 
1901, where we saw the old friends of our 
Freshman year and had more delightful visits. 

A few of us remained for Garden Party and 
Commencement, and even then found it difficult 
to tear ourselves away. Of one thing we are 
convinced — ^those of you who stayed away 
missed one of the experiences of life which 
cannot be evaluated in life's currency. 
Eleanor Jones, 
Grace Phillips Rogers, 
Fanny Sinclair Woods. 

The resignation of Helen Converse Thorpe 
as Class Editor was received with regret. In 
her place, Fanny Woods, who was unanimously 
reelected President, .appointed Beatrice Mac- 
George, who will be glad to receive news and 
announcements. 

1902 

Class Editor: Anne Rotan Howe 
(Mrs. Thorndike Howe) 
77 Revere St., Boston, Mass. 

1903 

Class Editor: Gertrude Dietrich Smith 
(Mrs. Herbert Knox Smith) 
Farmington, Conn. 

1904 

Class Editor: Emma 0. Thompson 

320 S. 42nd St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Sunday evening. May 21, we had an informal 
reunion supper and entertained the four daugh- 
ters of the class then in College, Evelyn Patter- 
son and Janet Barber, both Seniors, and Sophie 
Hunt and Eleanor Fabyan, Sophomores. There 
were twenty-two of us who enjoyed the evening 
together — Patty Rockwell and her daughter 
Martha, Gertrude Buffum Barrows and her 
daughter, Agnes Gillinder Carson and her two 
daughters, one an alumna of Bryn Mawr, 
Amy Clapp, Emma Fries, Margaret Ross 
Garner and her daughter, who is entering 



Bryn Mawr next year, Mary Hollar Knox, 
Ruth Wood Smith and her daughter, Hilda 
Vauclain and Lucy Fry, Marjorie's daughter, 
Leda White and Emma Thompson. We en- 
joyed the evening so much that we are hoping 
to make it an annual affair. 

This year the class is especially honored by 
its daughters, Evelyn Patterson, daughter of 
Evelyn Holliday Patterson, who graduate] 
cum laude, and Janet Barber, daughter of Lucy 
Lombardi Barber, who graduated magna cum 
laude. Evelyn Patterson sails in the latter part 
of June for France, where she plans to study 
at the Sorbonne in Paris for two months. 

Isabel Peters and Lucy Lombardi Barber 
motored to Texas in the early spring, and Lucy 
has promised to write up her trip for us. 

Constance Lewis' niece, Mary Lewis, of 
Winnetka, Illinois, is in the Class of 1937, 
B. M. C. She came from the Country Day 
School at Winnetka. 

Alice Waldo and Isabel Peters both came on 
from New York for Garden Party, and of 
course Evelyn and Wallace Patterson were 
here from Chicago, and Colonel Barber from 
Washington. Other members of the class from 
Philadelphia were also at the Garden Party. 

The class desires to offer its sympathy to 
Jane Allen Stevenson, whose mother died in 
the early part of May. 

1905 

Class Editor: Eleanor Little Aldrich 
(Mrs. Talbot Aldrich) 
59 Mount Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 

A card from Marian Cuthbert Walker reads: 
"Just to break the silence! At present we arv 
busy educating the youngsters. The oldest son 
is a Junior at Duke, our daughter a Sophomore 
at Sweet Briar, while the youngest, a l)ny. is 
a high school Junior. I have struck my juice 
at last in writing for the magazines — l)oth fic- 
tion and specialized articles. I have wruni: 
checks from 'p^ilp?/ even, but am more proud 
of those from The Country Gentleman. Parents. 
Country Home, Better Homes and Gardens. 
Chatelaine. House Beautiful, and Home and 
Field. Most of us can thank Bryn Mawr for a 
training in thoroughness and a certain confi- 
dence in one's self which get? you there finally 
after a long, long pull." 

Alice Day McLaren's husliand lias a job on 
Code Hearings in Porto Rico and Alice planned ' 
to sail on May 26 from California via the Canal 
to join him. 

1906 

Class Editor: Helen HAicinvoiT Pitnam 
(Mrs. William E. Putnam) 
126 Adams St.. Milton. Mass. 
Adelaide Neall recently took a three weeks* 
holiday. She went to Europe by the South.?rn 
Route, havinc: two davs ashore. 



(29) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Mary Walcott and her husband have recently 
been in the South, near Louise Maclay's beau- 
tiful place at Tallahassee. It seems that 
Louise's azalias have a world's record for 
beauty. 

Mary's son, Robert R. Walcott, has the 
Bayard Cutting Travelling fellowship and is 
to study for his Ph.D. in England, writing his 
thesis in History. 

1907 

Class Editor: Alice Hawkins 
Taylor Hall, Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Three 1907 daughters graduated with the 
Class of 1934 — Grace Brownell Daniels, Helen 
Smitheman Baldwin and Brooke Peters Church 
all played the part of proud parents. Bunny's 
second daughter is at Radcliffe and her son 
John expects to go to Harvard in the fall. 

Dorothy Forster Miller and Elizabeth Pope 
Behr spent week-ends at the Deanery in the 
latter part of May, showing their daughters 
around the campus. 

See page 23 for news of Tink Meigs. 

1908 

Class Editor: Helen Cadbury Bush 
Haverford, Pa. 

1909 

Class Editor: Ellen Shippen 

14 East 8th St., New York City. 

REUNION NOTES 

"Twenty-fifth reuners we 

Growing old against our will. 
Twenty years hence we shall be 
Twenty years more ancient still." 
— From our opera "Patience" with 
slight variations. 

We 1909 reuners were entirely out of order 
and quite alone in our generation, with 1901 
our nearest class on one side and 1917 our 
closest neighbors on the other. This did not 
depress us, however, and the twenty-fifth was a 
decided success. 

There were nineteen of us at class dinner at 
Goodhart on June 2: Grace Wooldridge Dewes, 
Helen Irey Fletcher, Lillian Laser Strauss, 
Emma White Mitchell, Florence Ballin, Kate 
Ecob, Anna Harlan, Ellen Shippen, Frances 
Ferris, Julia Doe Shero, D. Child, Esther 
Tennent, Emily Solis-Cohen, Bertha Ehlers, 
Frances Browne, Fan Barber Berry, Barbara 
Spofford Morgan, Georgina Biddle, Cynthia 
Wesson. Miss Mary Swindler was our guest 
for dinner and spoke most interestingly on the 
Bryn Mawr "Dig." 

Fan Barber was a grand toast-mistress, 
Georgina did "Gert," D. Child showed us some 
1909 movies, I read some letters from absent 
1909ers, and then Lillian reported on an im- 



portant piece of 1909 research which she and 
Bertha had gotten together. We had each re- 
ceived a questionnaire and all of us had filled 
it in and returned it. The results should really 
appear in full, but I can at least report gen- 
eral impressions. All 1909, judging by the 
report, find travel their chief recreation — release 
complex? — gardening comes second in interest. 
We would all send our daughters to Bryn Mawr 
if they wanted to go; our youngest child is 
three, our oldest twenty-six. Our occupations 
cover a most amazing list of vocations and 
avocations, among which stands out in my 
mind the building of stone walls — mortar and 
stones complete. It was a most impressive 
report. 

We missed the absent members, but enjoyed 
their photographs, telegrams and letters. The 
photographs appeared in large number, notably 
a very lovely bridal one of Grace Dewes Oram, 
our class baby. The marriage was in Chicago 
on April 21st, and Mr. and Mrs. Oram are 
now living in Morristown. Best wishes from 
all of 1909. 

We sang our class song at the end and 
"Thou Gracious Inspiration," and departed, 
most of us, for Denbigh. 

Next day we went out to Senior Row and 
sang some more, visited the Deanery countless 
times, wandered through Pembroke and dis- 
covered Ella still there. Then came Alumnae 
meeting and Alumnae luncheon, but that is 
college news reported elsewhere. 

Here is just a little 1909 information, picked 
up at random: 

Cynthia Wesson has a large black dog with 
a most exciting tail (photographs). 

Georgina has gone botanizing in the pine 
barrens, determined to see New Jersey flora 
every month in the year. She had two large 
botany books in the Ford. 

Emily Solis-Cohen has written several books, 
notably one called Breakfast with the Birds. 
The title is based on the story of the kind 
birds which led the Israelites in safety to the 
Red Sea. Since then the children in Palestine 
give a feast to the birds every year in com- 
memoration. Emily has also written Woman 
in Jewish Law and Life, and is at work on a 
biography of Isaac Leeser. We were disap- 
pointed that we could not have seen her 
puppets at reunion, but the current for lighting 
was not the required kind. 

D. I. Smith Chamberlin is off for Squam 
Lake with all her family, traveling from 
Chicago by Ford. 

Emily Whitney Briggs' daughter Barbara 
was presented at court on May IS. 

Caroline Kamm McKinnon is living in 
Portland, Oregon, and is making a collection 
of dwarf rhododendron. She has some from 
China and India, and reports that the small 
foreigners are doing very well. 



(30) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Eleanor Bartholomew is in Pasadena, has 
two interesting children, and is as generally 
delightful as ever. 

Craney is much better. She spent several 
nights in the Hamlet room at the Deanery and 
was charmed with its appurtenances. She has 
had her hair bobbed. 

Shirley's two children, Desmond and June, 
are described thus in a letter from Shirley her- 
self, so it is authentic; "Desmond is what the 
French call 'Rigolo,' a rollicking soul with 
endless curiosities and a vivid sense of the 
dramatic. He is noted for making 'the best 
faces.' June talks in rhythms and fantasies." 
Desmond is nine, June is six, and the family 
is at Goose Rocks Beach, Maine, for the 
summer. i 

Lacy Van Wagenen writes of meeting Sally 
Jacobs and her husband in Paris and also of 
discovering Gladys Stout and her daughter in 
Rome. Lacy is at Dr. Rudolf Steiner's School 
at Dornach, near Basel, and is painting and 
studying eurhythmy and singing. She has been 
to Greece recently, and last summer she spent 
in Norway. 

Pleasaunce Baker von Gaisberg writes from 
Watford, Herts, England: " 'E. von' carries on 
business here (financial, for private clients) 
with about 10 per cent, of help from me, and 
I carry on the house with about 15 per cent, 
of help from him. With vacations and avoca- 
tions (such as translation jobs and gardening)., 
it seems to run about 50-50. Last year our 
holidays were spent sailing a boat on the 
Norfolk Broads, eating and sleeping on board. 
Our usual summer visit to Germany was made 
via Holland this time. We took our bicycles 
across the Channel, mounted them at the Hook 
and rode them most of the way — via Delft, 
Utrecht, Arnheim, and across the German fron- 
tier and up the Rhine Valley, nearly as far as 
Mannheim. ... I can imagine that some people 
who have found Holland small and dull for the 
motorist might yet find it rewarding to them 
as cyclists. Anyway, Karel Kapek's 'Letters 
from Holland' give , a much better indication 
than I could of what there is to see there — 
both outdoors and in." 

1910 

Class Editor: Katherine Rotan Drinker 
(Mrs. Cecil K. Drinker) 
71 Rawson Road, Brookline, Mass. 

1911 

[ Class Editor: Elizabeth Taylor Russell 

\: (Mrs. John F. Russell, Jr.) 

\: 1085 Park Ave., New York City. 

I 1912 

*' Class Editor: Gladys Spry Augur 
(Mrs. Wheaton Augur) 
820 Camino Atalaya, Santa Fe, N. M. 



1913 

Class Editor: Helen Evans Lewis 
(Mrs. Robert M. Lewis) 
52 Trumbull St., New Haven, Conn. 

Keinath Storrs Davey writes from Lovell, 
Maine: "I'm sorry I fell down on Class News, 
but at the time your postal came I was sur- 
rounded by three children with whooping cough 
and was completely sunk. Can't I interest you 
in a vacation at Conifer this year?" 

Eleanor Bonticou has rented her house in 
Alexandria for the summer and is with her 
mother at Alstead Center, N. H. She is in- 
finitely better and writes with equal zest of the 
garden, a new puppy, and the political situa- 
tion. 

Alice Selig Harris writes: "I wonder if 
everyone turns as eagerly to '13 news as I do? 
My story: 2 girls, 19 and 16; 1 boy, 8: all 
three busy. Ellen, especially interested in 
Music, is at the University of Pennsylvania: 
Jean, with her eye on Wellesley, is a Junior 
at high school; Jimmy, a perfect example of a 
naughty little brother, is in the elementary 
school." 

Amen and Selah. 

1914 

Class Editor: Elizabeth Ayer Inches 
(Mrs. Henderson Inches) 
41 Middlesex Road, Chestnut Hill, ^Mass. 

Elizabeth Braley Dewey has just taken the 
position of Eastern representative of the 
Fountain Valley School in Colorado Springs. 
She recently visited the school for a week and 
reports that it is a progressive boarding school 
for boys with a very exceptional record. On 
the way home she stopped off in Chicago with 
Anne Lindsay; saw Laura Delano and pursued 
Nancy Scribner to the Field Museum. wher(> 
she was busy escorting children from tho 
North Shore Country Day School. She also 
saw Evelyn Shaw, who had just returned from 
Treasure Island, tlieir place near Nassau, ami 
looking very tan and healtliy. 

Ella Oppenheimer speaks frequently on the 
radio in the interests of the Child "V^'t^lfare 
Bureau in Washington. 

While ])icycling around a Cdinn- in l^rrniuda 
at Easter time. Lili Inches almost ran down 
Helen Kirk Welsh. Each jumped off lirr 
bicycle and a date was made for the Inches tn 
take tea with the Welshes. They live on the 
end of Spanish Point, witli the sea on every 
side and a cliarming old Spanish house made 
over to he very comfortable. Kirkie and her 
hnsl)an(l line to work on the place and are 
niakinii a lovely garden in the quarry, a tea- 
room out of the slaughter-house hanging ov?r 
tlie cliff, tennis courts and vegetable garden 
amonc the rocks and limestone walls sawed 



(31) 



BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



by Judge Welsh. The three jolly children had 
mine to tea in the "Fernery," a round room 
under the rocks, with maidenhair in the 
cracks. I do not blame them for staying there 
as much as possible in winter and most of the 
summer as well. 

Sophie Foster Ruhl writes from Northfield 
that she and her husband are farming on a 
four-acre lot and providing plenty of pets for 
her children. She finds life quite strenuous 
with her half-time teaching job at the seminary 
and four children to care for. She hopes any 
classmates in the vicinity will surely look her 
up. 

Dorothy Hughes Herman moved to Washing- 
ton in August. She is caring for her sister's 
two children and her own child will be big 
enough to go to school in the fall. She had a 
visit from Ruth Wallerstein at Easter, who is 
still teaching at Madison, Wis., and looking 
"very handsome and contented." 

The class is sorry to hear of the death of 
Ethel Dunham's father, and sends love and 
sympathy. 

1915 

Class Editor: Margaret Free Stone 
(Mrs. James Austin Stone) 
3039 44th St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Grace Shafer Able and her husband and 
three children now live at 725 Williams Street, 
Denver, Colo. Mary Ellen, the daughter, is at 
the State University at Boulder this year; one 
of the sons will be ready for college in the Fall 
of 1935 and the other one a year later. Grace 
writes (to Ethel Robinson Hyde) that she sees 
Merle Sampson Toll frequently, and that Merle 
"owns and runs a very successful book shop — 
'Pooh Corner' — besides a large family, and is 
as jolly and peppy as ever. Her daughter 
Nancy is just like Merle was at that age." 
Grace admits that when spring comes she has 
a nostalgia for the country around the College 
" — the green, green country (it doesn't get 
green out here until much later) and the vio- 
lets — even the dreadful smell of fertilizer that 
was wafted into Rockefeller from the place 
across the street." 

1916 

Class Editor: Catherine S. Godley 
768 Ridgeway Ave., Avondale 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Frances Bradley Chickering and her family 
are in the Philippines. Captain Chickering has 
been stationed there for a year and they arc 
finding it a pleasant change from Washington. 

Elizabeth Rand Anderson was married sev- 
eral years ago to Mr. Dana Stone and is living 
in the country near Minneapolis. 

Elizabeth Washburn spent the week of May 
21st in Cincinnati with Constance Dowd Grant. 



Betty was on her way home after three months 
of travel jn Europe. Last summer she spent 
two months in Kentucky in the Frontier Nurs- 
ing Service, which satisfied her craving for 
activity in out-of-the-way places. She was un- 
certain about her plans for this summer, but 
thought she would look for new fields and not 
return to Kentucky or Labrador. 

Helen Holmes Carothers claims she spends 
all her time trying to be a model mother. She 
transports her two children to school and to 
riding, dancing and music lessons after school. 
She also directs a Girl Scout Troop of 40 girls 
from the school her daughters attend. Last 
winter they made two quilts, and Nell, who 
insists she never could sew, did all the quilting. 
She will spend the summer at Wianno, as 
usual. 

1917 

Class Editor: Bertha C. Greenough 

203 Blackstone Blvd., Providence, R. I. 

REUNION notes 

'17 came back twenty strong for their 17th 
reunion. The first arrivals were Bertha 
Greenough, Betty Faulkner and Carrie Shaw, 
who came Friday night to prepare the way for 
the rest. Betty and Greeny had a grand 
evening with Eleanora Wilson in her nice, cool 
house in Cynwyd. Saturday afternoon head- 
quarters were established on the third floor of 
Merion and people began to drift in. 

Dinner was set for 8 o'clock, and about that 
time a phone call was received from Blodgie 
advising that she was marooned in Philadelphia 
with engine trouble, so that she didn't get 
there until the salad course. Helen Zimmerman 
was delayed by traffic in New York, due to the 
fact that the fleet was in, and did not appear 
until 8.30. The food was very good and every- 
one was in high spirits. Carrie Shaw made a 
grand toastmistress, and we had extremely in- 
teresting speeches from Con Hall on the 
Tennessee Valley activities, Scat on the NRA 
from the labor point of view, and Blodgie on 
fascinating problems of research at General 
Electric. At this juncture 1919 appeared from 
their banquet and lured us onto the Senior 
Steps, where we sang ( ? ) many of the old 
songs with them and 1920. When the balmy 
breezes began to blow slightly chilly about 
midnight, we returned to the "Showcase" at 
Merion, where we read letters from absent 
members, excerpts of which will follow at a 
later date, and each one present told of her 
activities for the last few years. 

Sunday was filled with the Alumnae meeting 
and luncheon, at which Nats McFaden spoke 
delightfully, the unveiling of President Park's 
portrait, a dinner for fourteen at the Deanery, 
followed by the baccalaureate sermon. Monday 
was a gray, drizzly morning, and at the picnic 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



at noon with 1919 and 1920, 1917 appeared 
quite picturesque in their white berets with 
red salamanders and red capes. The party 
broke up after luncheon, and everybody agreed 
that they had had a grand time, due to the 
excellent management of our Reunion Chair- 
man, Greenie. Those who were back were: 

Mary Andrews Booth, who has been living 
in New York this winter and doing some 
sketching. She is going on the North Cape 
cruise with her daughter Mary, aged 14, for 
the summer. 

Molly Boyd Morton, looking as young as 
when she was in college, and the proud mother 
of a 4-months-old son. 

Katherine Blodgett, accounted for above. 

Doris Bird Aitken, whose family of three 
keeps her quite busy, but leaves some time 
for bridge. 

Amy Dixon Bushman, full of pep and ener- 
gy, active in the Girl Scouts and keeping her 
girlish figure in spite of five children, ranging 
in age from 1 to 10. 

Betty Faulkner Lacey, who drove 393 miles 
Friday in her station wagon and added much 
to the gaiety of our party. Her oldest child, 
Tom, has been at boarding school in Maryland 
and drove home with her. 

Marion Halle Strauss, who had been spend- 
ing three delightful days in the Deanery and 
unfortunately had to leave before all the secrets 
were told Saturday night. 

Constance Hall Proctor, also accounted for 
above. 

Nell Hamill Gorman, looking very well and 
finding herself extremely busy looking after 
her one child. 

Reba Joachim, who has found a lawyer's 
office in Philadelphia an extremely interesting 
place to work for the last ten years. 

Esther Johnson, who has been for some time 
a successful actuary for an insurance company 
in Philadelphia. 

Janet Grace McPhedran, who is occupied 
with her three children and a doctor husband. 

Eleanore Dulles Blondheim, who is working 
very hard on the manuscript of a book, which 
will take her most of the summer. 

Elizabeth Hemingway Hawkes, who is now 
living in Framingham, where she has been 
repainting rooms in her house, looking after 
her own two sons and sometimes her sister 
Judy's daughter. 

Carrie Shaw Tatom, whose ready wit kept us 
constantly amused. 

Mary Glenn, who was only able to be here 
for the picnic. She has been taking a year off 
to recover her health and was looking very 
well. She is quite active in a college group in 
Johnstown, who have in the last five years put 
six girls through college, some of the money 
having been raised by puppet shows, for which 
these girls made the puppets. 



Nats McFaden Blanton, of whom, as always, 
we were proud. 

Marjory Scattergood, full of the work she is 
doing with the American Federation of Labor 
in Washington, and of the place in McLean, 
Va., where she is living, surrounded by gardens 
and dogs. 

Dorothy Shipley White, looking younger and 
more charming than ever, having spent the 
winter with one hundred and one activities. 

Helen Zimmerman, who is still enjoying her 
teaching at the Low-Heywood School in 
Stamford, Conn. 

Mildred Willard Gardiner, just as full as 
ever of psychology and mental testing, with her 
jobs at the Baldwin School and elsewhere. 

Mary Worley Strickland, whose stories about 
farm life, the marketing of a peach crop and 
the activities of her two small children were 
intensely interesting. 

Bertha Clark Greenough, whose foresight and 
executive ability made the reunion an entire 
success. 

Please note: The Class Editor is not re- 
sponsible for the references to herself which 
were contributed by loving friends. 

1918 

Class Editor: Mary Safford Mlmford 

HOOGEWERFF 

(Mrs. Heister Hoogewerff) 

37 Catherine St., Newport, R. I. 

REUNION NOTES 

Well, it's all over and everyone had a grand 
time. It is the class which makes a reunion, 
so first of all I'll tell you who came back. At 
one time or another there were present: Bacon. 
Belleville, Butterfield, Cassel, Cheney, Cording- 
ley, Dodge, Downs, Dufourcq, Dure, Evans. 
Eraser, Frazier, Gardiner, Garrigues, Hammer, 
Hart, Hobbs, Hodges, Holliday, Houghton. 
Huff, Jeffries, Jones, Kneeland, Lynch. 
Mackenzie, Merck, Muniford, Pearson, Persh- 
ing, Quimby, Rhoads, Richardson, Schwarz. 
Schaffer, Stair, Timpson, and W'illianis. 
Marjorie Williams from Texas, Catty Holliday 
from Indianapolis, and Marjorie Mackenzie 
from Halifax hold the long-distance records. 

The celebration began with a picnic in 
Bessie Downs' field, and Bessie took pity on 
us in the hot weather and supplied us witli 
ice-cream cones. Mary Gardiner hung the 1918 
banner out of a Denbigh window and found 
places for returning classmates to lay their 
heads. Peg Bacon arranged the dinner, and 
Lucy Evans was a chai-ming toastmistress. Be- 
tween the coffee and the speeches, a class 
meeting was called in order to provide the 
class with some new officers, the mortality 
among present ones having been severe. The 
Constitution couldn't be found, but it was 
amended anyhow to consolidate the office of 



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BRYN MAWR ALUMNAE BULLETIN 



Vice-President and Treasurer with that of Class 
Collector, and Harriet Hohbs was elected to 
the new position; also, the offices of Secretary 
and Class Editor were consolidated and Mary 
Safford Mumford was elected to that position. 
Members who had previously filled these offices 
spoke feelingly about the lack of cooperation 
of the class in answering appeals for news or 
money, and I hope everyone resolved to turn 
over a new leaf. Our Reunion Gift amounts 
so far to $425, and I have hopes it may grow 
to $500, which I consider very good. 

Varied and entertaining speeches — most of 
them unprintable — were made by Lucy Evans, 
Elsbeth Merck, Virginia Kneeland, Mary 
Safford Mumford, Hester Quimby, Sidney 
Belleville, and Ruth Hart, Leslie Richardson 
was in good voice and led the singing; and 
1920 serenaded us. The only people whom we 
had expected and who weren't able to get 
there at the last minute were Jeannette Ridlon, 
who is getting ready to explore the strato- 
sphere, and Marjorie Strauss, who did such a 
splendid job in preparing the Class Books. 
She has worked hard at it all winter, and I'm 
sure she would have been pleased to hear the 
admiring comments on the results. Books will 
be mailed to all members not present. 

On Sunday we went to the meeting of the 
Alumnae Association at noon, and then to the 
Alumnae luncheon, which was held at the 
Deanery. It was very hot, and Louise Hodges 
revived us all by giving us iced tea and sand- 
wiches afterwards at her house. We are very 
grateful to all our hostesses. 

People began to leave Sunday afternoon, but 
quite a number stayed longer and we had a 
real old-fashioned pow-pow Sunday night. 
Catty Halliday elucidated the mysteries of 
"Anthroposophy" and Adelaide Schaffer gave 
a vivid description of the Bertrand Russell's 
school. Monday noon we had a joint picnic 
with 1917-1919-1920 on Wyndham lawn. 

Altogether it was a very jolly and satisfactory 
week-end, though we missed the members who 
could not be there. We hope they'll all come 
back for the next "happy eve