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COLONIAL 
ECHO 



1914- 



WILLIAM AND MART 
COLLEGE 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

LYRASIS members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/colonialecho191416coll 



€ 




PUBLISHED BY THE STUDENTS OF 

WILLIAM AND MARY COLLEGE 

WILLIAMSBURG. VIRGINIA 

VOLUME TWELVE 



©ebication 



Co a native of t1)t titp anh a rrtipirnt of Ijonors 
from our belobrb cllma fflater; to one tui)o is a paragon 
for long pears of fattijful serbicr; to one luljoer biitp !)as 
tbtr been a pleasure, grotoing stoecter anb stoeeter as 
l)iS bars greb) frluer anb fetoer; to a man of (©ob anb an 
bumble serbant of t)umanitp tobose quarter centurp of 
intellettual anb moral uplift of mankinb merit ttje meeb 
of our apprenation; 

to 

Van jFranfelm (Barrett, ^.iW., iH.B. 

tf)ts bolume is respectfuUp bebicateb. 




VAN FRANKLIN GARRETT. A. M.. M. D. 



<<1 





Robert M. Hughes, Esq Norfolk. Va. 

Hon. James N. Stubbs Vood Cross Roadi Vi 

George P. Coleman. Esq Williamsburg. V'a. 

Hon. J. D. Eccleston Richmond. V'a. 

Hon. Joseph H. Chitwood Roanoke. Va. 

James Robert Jordan, Esq Smithiield. V'a. 

Hon. Joseph M. Hurt Blarkstone. Va. 

Hon. William M. Ellis Shawsville. Va. 

W. C. L. Taliaferro, Esq Hampton, Va. 

Hon. Manly H. Barne<> Providrncf Forge. Va. 

Hon. I. P. Kane Gale Ciiv. Va. 



Page Seven 



^Ima iHater 

^artt the stiititntg' boiccs stucUing. 

jfetrong anft true aii6 clfiir; 
aima iWatcr's lolie tot'it tclliiig. 

^RiiiBina far nnb iitnr. 

Cfjortis : 

^SSliUiam aiib itiarf. lobri) of olb, 

J^arfa upon lt)c gale : 
J^rar ttie tbuiitirrs of our chorus. 

aima illater— fijaill 

3(U ti)? sons arr faithful to thcr 
iEbrongh thrir College bapS. 

£>iiiging loub from hearts that lobe thee, 
aima JMater'S praise. 

Sron-Stiab or solbrn Sanbaleb 

^fjaO tf)( pears go bp : 
$tt our tiearts Stjall tueabe about thee 

ILobe ttat cannot bie. 

®ob. our jfatfier. bear our boices. 

listen to our crp : 
VitM ti)e College of our bophoob. 

let tier neber bie. 



Page Eight 




Upon (Parbinrr aCjPler, ill.9.. TLIL.^.. lirrsibent 

Professor of American History and Politics 



Born in Charles Cily County, V^irginia. Master of Arts of University of Virginia; Doctor of 
Laws of Trinity College. Hartford, Conn.; Ex-Mcmbcr of V^irginia Legislature from Richmond. Va.; 
Author of Letters and Times of the T}flcrs, Cradle of the Republic, and Parties and f^atronagc : Founder 
and Editor of H^illiam and Mary Qttarterix;. Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



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Jfacultp 




JOHN LESSLIE HALL. Ph.D. (J. H. U.) 

Professor of English Language and Literature 

Born in Richmond, Virginia. He received his education at the 
University School, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College; took his 
Doctor's degree from John Hopkins University and was elected Professor 
al WiUiam and Mary in 1888. Dr. Hall has pubhshed A Translation 
of Beowulf ; Old English IJyls ; Judith, Phoenix and Other Anglo-Saxon 
Poems; Half Hours in Southern Historv; and many articles for educa- 
tional journals ; member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



THOMAS JEFFERSON STUBBS. A. M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 

Born in Gloucester County. Virginia; received early education at 
Cappahosic Academy; A. B. from William and Mary College in I860; 
served in the Confederate Army 1861 -'65; attended University of Vir- 
ginia 1865-'66; Master Grammar and Matty School 1868-'69; M. .A. 
from William and Mary 1869; Professor of Mathematics and History in 
Arkansas College for sixteen years; Lower House of General Assembly 
of Arkansas 1877-79; Ph. D. conferred upon him by Arkansas Col- 
lege 1889; Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 





VAN FRANKLIN GARRETT, A. M., M. D. 
Professor of C/iemii/rt; 

Dr. Garrett was born in Williamsburg. Virginia, where he received 
his early education. After being graduated from V. M. I., he attended 
William and Mary College, which conferred upon him the honorary 
degree of Master of Arts. He studied medicine at the University of 
N'irginia and Bellevue Hospital Medical College. New York, where he 
received his M. D. Taught two years in Giles College. Tenn.. and 
became Professor of Natural Science in William and Mary in 1888. 
Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



JOHN WOODSIDE RITCHIE. B. A. 

Professor of Biology 

A native of Illinois. Professor Ritchie received his Bachelor's degree 
at Maryville College, Tennessee; graduate student of University of 
Chicago; taught government school in Philippines; Professor of Biology 
at William and Mary 1905; author of Human Phvsiotog\/. Primer of 
Sanitation, Primer of Hygiene, Primer of Phvsiolo^y and other books on 
Biological subjects. Graduate student and fellow of University of Chicago. 
Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 




Page Ten 



n 




RICHARD McLEOD CRAWFORD, B. S.. M. A. 
Profiiiior of Manual Arts and Draining in the College and Academy 

A native of North Carolina. For three years he pursued Art at the 
Art Students" League of New ^'ork City, and at Teachers' College, 
Columbia University, of which he is a graduate. Professor Crav\'ford*s 
undergraduate work was done at Trinity College, Durham, N. C. Mem- 
ber of Eastern Art Teachers' Association; Eastern Manual Framing 
.Association; three years a member of Columbia's Glee Club; Professor 
of Manual Arts University of Virginia Summer School, K08-'ll. Mem- 
ber of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



WILLIAM HOUSTON KEEBLE, B. S. 
Professor of Physics 

A native of Tennessee. Professor Keeble received his Bachelor's 

degree at the University of Tennessee, 1903; three years a graduate 

student in Physics, University of Chicago. Member of Phi Beta Kappa 
Society. 





HENRY EASTMAN BENNETT. A. B. 
Professor of Philosoph)) and Education 

Educated Florida .-Xgricullural College. Peabody Normal, and Uni- 
versity of Chicago; teacher Okahumpka, Fla., l892-'94; Principal 
Fernandina High School, 1896; Professor Latin and Mathematics , Florida 
Stale Normal College, l897-'00; Assistant to State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction, 1900- '03; President Florida Slate Normal School. 
1903-05; Dean Normal Department, University of Florida, 1905-'06; 
Editor Southern School and Home. Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 



JAMES SOUTHALL WILSON, M, A.. Ph.D. 
Professor of History and Associate Professor of English 

A. B. of William and Mary College; M. A. of University of 
Virginia; Ph. D. of Princeton; Author of Alexander IVilson, Poet, 
Naturalist, and joint author of Pausanias. Member of Phi Beta Kappa 
Society. 




Page Eleven 




JOHN C. CALHOUN, C. F... M. A., Lilt. D., LL. D. 
Professor of German, French and Spanish 

Born in Alabama; received Lilt. D. degree at Washington and Lee 
University; studied in Germany. Switzerland and France; Professor of 
Greek and Modern l^anguages in King College. Tennessee; Professor of 
Greek and Latin and Instructor in Spanish in University of Alabama; 
Professor of Romance Languages and German in Florida State College 
for Women; Professor at \^'illiam and Mary in 1911. Member of Phi 
Beta Kappa Society. 



GEORGE OSCAR FERGUSON, M. A. 

Professor of Philosophy) and Psychology and Principal of William and 

Mary I\ormal Academy 

Graduate of William and Mary. .A. B.; Teacher in Public Schools 
of .Albemarle; graduate student at University of \'irginia; M. A. Col- 
umbia University of New \'ork. Member of Phi Beta Kappa Society. 





WESLEY PLUMMER CLARK. M. A. 
Professor of Latin and Creek 

Professor Clark received his .A. B. and A. M. degrees at Richmond 
College, 1903-"04; Instructor of Latin and Greek in Jacksonville College, 
Texas; Professor of Latin and Greek in Washburn College, Kansas; 
Graduate student at University of Chicago; .Assistant in Greek at Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 1910; elected at William and Mary, 1912. 



D. \X'. DRAPER. M. D. 
College Physician and Physical Director 

Graduate of Springfield Training School; graduate of University of 
Pennsylvania. Elected at William and Mary in 1913. 




Page Taehe 




HERBERT LEE BRIDGES, A. B. 
Regiilrar for ihn College ant! AcaJcm)), and Secretary lo the Faculty 

A. B. of William and Mary; Principal of High School at Marion; 
Superintendent of Schools for Gloucester, his native county; Superinten- 
dent of Grounds and Buildings al the College of William and Mary. 
Member of Phi Beta Kappa. 



JOHN HALPHIN WRIGHT, A. B., B. S. 
Assistant in Physics 

CHARLES HARMON SCHEPMOES, A. B. 
Assistant in Chemislr\f 

PERCY LEWIS WITCHLEY. A. B. 

Assistant in Chemistry 

MISS EMILY PRYOR CHRISTIAN 

Librarian 

LEON JERL WALTON 
Assistant Librarian 

RA^ RUFUS ADDINGTON 
Proclor 



Page Thirteen 



c<1 





^be Jiortfjlaub 

Of) ! lanD of tl)f Still anb Silent. 

0\) ! lanb of tlie stjteteb snoto. 
(grant me sljart of tl)j' solttubf , 

aUbilf 3 btoell on eartf) tflolu, 
ainb 31 am tuorn loitf) stress of life, 

3lts clamor anb stribing bain, 
ambition's rambling trobm of tfjorns 

anb error's cross of pain. 

©ibe me tfje balm of tt)p fir trees, 

(2^bors of cebar anb pine, 
a coucf) of tlje resinous fjemlocfe, 

anb air as rare olb tome. 
OTitl) tf)iS boeS mp Soul finb fjealing. 

?Baf)ile tlje J^arpcr toinb sings loto, 
?MHf)o stjares in tlje plan of nature 

?KHins foretaste of fjeaben beloto. 

—e. M. aatus 



Puec Fourteen 



Motto: Finis coronat opus. 



Senior Clagg 

Floaer: Asler. 
YELL 

Be— Blitz— Drew— Ham. 

Par — Pea — Scheie, sheen! 
Tay — Tuck — Win — Worn, 

Seniors of fourteen. 



Colors: Brown and Gold. 



OFFICERS 

John Lewis Tucker President. 

Walter Leslie Drewry yice-President. 

Hugh Leonard Womack Secrefarji. 

Charles Hemten Hamlin Treasurer. 

William Walter Winsbro Historian. 

Bathurst Dancerfield Peachy Prophet. 

Henry Godwin Parker Poet. 

John Eldridce Taylor yaleJiclorian. 

Alvin Francis Beale ' Chaplain. 

Max Blitzer Leif Ericson Scheie 



M. A. CLASS 

Charles Harmon Schepmoes "LL. D." 

P. Lewis Witchley "M. D." 

John Halpin Wright "M. E." 



Page Seventeen 




Phoenix: Bachelor of Arls : Aaislant in Chemiitrv. 

AN INTRODUCTION to this important personage would be superfluous, 
for his musical voice has reverberated in the halls of this old College for 
nearly a decade of years. Why embarrass him by presenting him to the 
reading public as Mr. Schepmoes, when he is so very familiraly known as "Schep." 
and also by his soubriquet, "The Devourer of Books"? 'Tis true you can judge 
a man by the books he peruses, but "Schep" cannot be diagnosed in this way, for 
he reads everything from Herrick's Epigrams to the St. James Bible. Charles 
is an exceptional student, capable of passing any course in the curriculum, and 
having no mean ability as a debater and as a writer of trashy articles. En outre 
"Schep's" main asset for his popularity in college is his affability, his good heart- 
edness and pleasing smile. A success awaits him whatever career he enters, and 
a host of friends will boast of his name among their number. 



Page Eighleen 




\ ^^./^fa^-^^ 



Philomalhcan ; A'. A'. O.; Northern Lights; Cerman Cliih : 
Spotsmood ; Cordon-Hope. 

44OKIP" did you say? Yes, "Skip." Do you know anyone else around 
/^ our venerable College who carries with him such an air of magnanimity, 
kindliness, and condescension? Do you know anyone else who takes a 
ticket so various and maintains an A standard "in toto"? Just look "who he is : 
A. M. Senior, Editor of the Lilerary Magazine, Assistant in Chemistry, President 
of the Athletic Association, member of the German Club, Spotswood, etc., etc. 

This personality, popularly known by all as "Skip," is none other than Percy 
Lewis Witchley, the poet, prose writer, "curler," "heart-grinder," scientist, doctor; 
in brief, the impelling, dynamic force behind practically all of our College activities. 

We have no more degrees to offer you, so we close by predicting for you as 
much success in your romance of love as in your college career. 



Page Nineteen 




[ 



OXCH/Vt. 



J' vjuJP\ 



ALVIN'S chief characteristic is the inimitable edai with which he can roll a 
cigarette. Bull Durham is his forte, and the nonchalance with which he 
can bum the "makins" is a source of never-failing admiration. Yet he is 
as fine and companionable a little runt as ever stunted his growth with nicotine. 
His motto is, "Never let your books interfere with your education." If he spent 
half the time with his books that he does with that old crippled mandolin, there's 
no telling what heights of erudition he might achieve. Anyhow, Alvin is a good 
sort to be classmates with, and if he ever lost his good humor nobody was around 
to note it. He's too lazy to lose anything, for fear he might have to go find it at 
some later time. Inertia is, or at any rate should be, his middle name, it permeates 
him and saturates him till he resembles Gibraltar in the ease with which he can be 
made to move. He is an ardent exponent of the conservation of energy and has 
never been known to make two motions where one would suffice. How he gets by 
the Faculty is a deeply shrouded mystery, but he refuses to divulge the formula. 
Alvin is living proof that all great men are small of stature. He is every inch a 
man, a friend and a philosopher. Here's to Alvin Beale. 

Paie Tmenlv 




Manager Baseball Team 1913: 

Manager "The Flat Hat" 191 2-' 13; 
Editor-in-Chief I9I3-'I4. 



'Intellect, talent, and genius, like murder, 'will out.' 



Page Tivent\}-onc 




S MJ^Haam^ ^ 



ENTER, Mr. Drewry, the scientist par excellence of the Class of '14. Leslie 
started by passing Professor Koontz's class in Embryology with a grade of 
B the first time he took it, which in itself would entitle him to a high niche 
in William and Mary's Hall of Fame. To cap the climax of his biological achieve- 
ments, Drewry has discovered a secret process for manufacturing butter out of 
grass. On interview he merely says: "Very simple; all you need is a cow and a 
churn." Next in importance was Leslie's due hunting expedition on Cary field 
on a certain P. M. So successful was he that the Faculty, after learned and 
mature deliberation, advised him to go home and rest up until the next session. Like 
the proverbial bad penny, he came back last fall, and barring accidents, will be 
seen parading with the cap and gown brigade in June. For sound, sensible college 
spirit, with trimmings or without, Drewry can hold his own with the best of them. 
In his chosen profession, that of M. D., we predict that he wnll give us all good 
cause to be proud that Drewry was with us in our last lap in the race for an 
education and the chase for a sheepskin. 

Pcjjje Tivenl\)-tnw 




ENTER a vest-pocket edition of Mt. Vesuvius. Mr. Hamlin, ladies and gen- 
tlemen! Genial, happy, good natured as are all brick -tops. Ham possesses 
a superabundance of all these qualities. His smile has calcified on his physi- 
ognomy and he couldn't remove it if he tried — which he never has and never will, 
for he realizes that it is one of his chief assets in the journey through life. Charlie 
comes and goes; one year finds him on the green, shaded triangle in the old Capital, 
the next finds him somewhere out in the sticks working for the edification of the 
youth of the Old Dominion. But when he is here, everybody knows it; in fact it's 
impossible not to be cognizant of his presence, on account of his bright dome, if 
for no other reason. "Bright dome," did we say? Yes, bright on the outside and 
brighter in the interior. Charlie's chief occupation consists in piling up A's and 
accumulating scholarships. He says the certificates look nice on his wall. One 
drawback about your graduation. Ham, the College loses a good man when you 
go, but the Class of *1 4 is so much the better off for your having been one of them. 



Puj?c Tjvent\j-thrci^ 




Pi Kappa Alpha; A. A. O. ; 
Spolhueood ; Cordon-Hope. 

WE DRINK to Parker. An enigma to his intimates, a friend to all, a 
sphynx for conversation, but a good listener, "Buzzie" is hereby handed 
over for posterity to decipher. He has been with us for six years; has 
seen classes come and go, but not one of us knows any more about him than when 
he first invaded our sacred premises. This much we can say for him: he is the 
only man we have seen who has been able to persuade the Faculty that he is be- 
stowing great honor upon them by attending classes, and that it will be a supreme 
act of condescension on his part to accept a sheepskin from this most humble insti- 
tution of learning. His inordinate modesty or his confounded inertia may be the 
cause for Parker's retreat from the spot-light. "\'et for all his reticence, a more 
lovable fellow than "Buzzie" is not to be found in a week's travel. It's a safe bet 
that when a sound, level head is needed in a tight place H. Godwin will be a 
good man to call on. Rise, gentlemen, I give you H. G. Parker. 



Pc^e Taenl^-fouT 




Kappa Sigma; A'. N. O.; SpoltsTvood Club; 

Caplain Baseball Team 1914; 

CorJon-Hopc. 



HANDSOME, genial, modest, efficient and at all times a Virginia gentle- 
man of the highest type — this is "Bat." We all know him, we all admire 
him, we all love him. Neglecting the attention that a cute little fellow 
like Bathurst always attracts, he was first bathed in the fickle lime-light of fame 
when as a mere shaver (or a non-shaver, to be precise) he held down left field on 
our championship baseball team of 1911. Since then he has divided his time about 
equally pursuing baseballs, ladies and his studies — always with unvarying success. 
In fact, it seems that life would get monotonous to one who, like Peachy, always 
gets what he goes after, without much effort. His latest acquisition is the captaincy 
of the baseball team, and it's a safe prediction it will be a good team, and a credit 
to its leader. Good luck to you. Bat — wherever you go the best wishes of the 
Class of 1914 will ever be with you. 

Page Tvenly-five 




IN THE cafe to your right, ladies and gentlemen, you see the only specimen of 
the Scandinavian wampus in captivity. Reared in the dark fens of Denmark, 
Leif at an early period condescended to grace the ancient Capital with his 
presence, and has been gracing it ever since. For versatility, Scheie has a cameleon 
or college professor beaten to a frazzle. An athlete, a scientist, a professional 
beauty and an inventor — all of these he is, nay even a human being — almost. 
Scheie's athletic bent is rather a tender subject and we drop it right here. As an 
inventor, however, his fame rests secure; he can invent more excuses per minute 
than a Philadelphia lawyer in a month. Leif's inseparable companion is a wicked, 
black mule, cleped Demosthenes, who is as eloquent with his hinder limbs as his 
master with his tongue — and much more effective. With all his faults we love 
him still. Leif's tow-head is a welcome sight on the campus, and when we see it 
we prepare for five-foot-six of college spirit, good fellowship and level-headedness. 



Page Ta>ent\f-iix 




SLEEPYHEAD! Johnny's chief contribution to the annals of his Alma Mater 
is his record of rapid dressing. On chapel mornings he can rise when the 
bell commences to ring, dress, breakfast and scuttle over to chapel in time to 
answer to his name. Can you beat it ? John has other characteristics, of course — 
he is a heavy calico sport, but don't say calico to him, she's fine silk to his love- 
lorn notions. Taylor is one of the old reliables — steady, always dependable and 
enthusiastic about anything that will bring glory to his Alma Mater. College 
spirit? He's chock full of it, and it oozes out of every pore in his soft, fair 
epidermis. Next to the fair sex John's softest spot is for Brafferton traditions. If 
dead roosters could tell tales, Taylor would now be only a memory at the College, 
but a pleasant one to be sure. His favorite grouch is the grub at the Mess-hall. 
One day he was going up the steps to the dining-hall when the dinner bell was 
ringing. Just at that time John's cur dog was heard to growl and bark. Taylor 
turned to him indignantly and asked: "What in hell are you growling about? 
You don't have to eat it." But he seems to have thrived on it just the same, and 
claims to have gained 7f^ ounces during the five years he has spent here. He 
doesn't look any heavier, so we assume the gain was in his cerebrum. 

Rogc Tntent\i-ieven 







Y. Xc-<^4^ 



3 



Pi Kappa Alpha; .V. .V. O.; Manager Baseball Team 1914; 

Manager "Colonial Echo" 1913 and 1914; 

President Class 1914. 

THE subject of this sketch is John Lewis Tucker: the object of it is to acquaint 
you with a man who does things without talking. In fact, he won't talk 
anyway, whether he's busy or not. But as a man who can get things done, 
John Lewis is hard to beat. He has been doing things here at William and Mary 
for five years — and doing them well. A glance at his career will astound you : 
he's managed and presided over so many things that it just comes natural to one 
to address him as "Mr. President," or "Mr. Manager." The Literary Society, 
the Junior Class and the Senior Class have all known him as their president. Then 
he's managed a baseball team, a Literary Magazine and two COLONIAL 
Echoes — a veritable glutton for work. We doff our hats to John Lewis, an 
ardent exponent, at all times, of what is highest and most wholesome in under- 
graduate life. We doff our hat and offer our hand to the President of the Class 
of 1914. 



Page Tiventy-eight 




\nrta^ 



^ ("T^ ILLY" hails from the land where gentlemen are born, not made; witness 
IJ the specimen they sent to Wilham and Mary. The boys call him "Billy" 
for short, but the fact is there isn't anything short about him ; he's six-feet- 
something-and-a-half tall and shaped like a dyspeptic darning needle. Winsbro 
is a rather uncertain quantity, but one thing we can guarantee — he will stand 
without hitching. Not lazy, of course, just born tired and hasn't had time to get 
over it. His long suit is economics, but one question troubles him sorely : he hasn t 
been able to find out whether marriage is a necessity or a luxury. We fear greatly 
that he will awake some fine day and discover that it is an incurable disease. 
Bill's time here in Williamsburg has been spent in pursuing A's rather than in 
acquiring an education, and his stock argument is that a man possessed of a degree 
is an educated mortal; knowledge, erudition, learning, information, count for noth- 
ing; his cosmos is all based on A's. Bill gained undying fame by standing, tooth- 
pick in mouth, on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, and asking a policeman 
whether it would be convenient for President Taft to step down to see him for a 
minute. It wasn't. 

Pa^e Twcnfy nine 




\ <f\/^ ^ a-^^-^^ } 



THE specimen under our microscope is a relic of the dark ages. Womack is 
a trifle belated in this matter of accepting his degree, but his education was 
interrupted by many unfortunate vicissitudes. First, the Civil War com- 
pelled him to abandon the ardent prosecution of his studies. Hardly had he re- 
turned when the news came that two grandchildren were stricken with German 
measles, and dutiful Doc hastened to the bedside. But "it's an ill wind that 
blows," etc., so the Class of '14 has the good fortune to claim Hugh as one of her 
very own. One of our most enthusiastic Y. M. C. A. workers, Womack bids fair 
to become a preacher of no mean attainments — Lyman Abbott, Bishop Randolph 
and John Wycliffe all rolled into one would hardly be a match for the redoubtable 
Doctor. How the Philomathean will fare when he departs is a matter for serious 
cogitation. Ninety-nine per centum of the dignity in the Senior Class is concealed 
on the person of Womack — in fact, he's quite frequently taken for a Professor or 
some other "rara avis." Here's to you, Womack; the Class of 1914 bids you 
godspeed. 

Page Thirty 



en 




enior Clasisi Jlistorp 



HISTORY written from the point of view of simply compiling dry facts 
requires but little effort on the part of the recorder, but when written m 
such a manner as to be interesting, as well as instructive, to the reader, 
it requires more skill than is possessed by the ordinary compiler; the 
writer must be even something of an author. With these facts clearly in mind 
and fully conscious of my weakness, I proceed to my task, not, however, before 
begging the gentle reader to lend me a most sympathetic attitude, and to pardon 
any blunders to which my inability as an historian might give rise. 

But four short years ago we arrived upon the campus, and a green bunch 
of "ducklings" we were as we ascended to the second floor of the Science Hall 
to make our debut before the entrance committee. There we presented our high 
school diplomas with all the majesty of King George and went our way confident. 
No suspicion of our verdancy dawned upon us. 

But time changes all things, and since those days — the scenes of which will 
always be vivid in our minds — many changes have been wrought. Blessings on 
our dear Faculty, for they have worked long and faithfully. They have followed 
us through four distinct stages of metamorphosis, examining us daily with scientific 
precision and carefully recording each observation that no act in the development 
of the species might be missing from the final record. The Judgment day has 
come and past. As we ascended one by one the steps to the golden throne, St. 
Peter quickly turned to the proper page in his Great Book and, seeing our record 
was complete, motioned us with his thumb to enter. 

Since our arrival in this new realm, we have been feasting at a great banquet 
of the gods given in our honor. So far we have not had time to sleep. We spend 
our time during the day eating ambrosia and arguing politics with Father Zeus, 
while at night we go out with Bacchus, who "sets us up" to nectar and then takes 
us to the theater (moving picture show). 

Our records as students and athletes in former classes may be found in back 
numbers of this publication; but as Seniors we do not by any means claim to 



Page Thirfy-onc 





possess the cream of the genius of our Freshman Class of 1911. We are here 
simply because of persistence and hard study. In our course of four years we 
have striven to be "all 'round college men," and we feel safe in saying that our 
strife has not been all in vain. Some of our members have distinguished them- 
selves in the lecture-room, some in athletics, and some in the literary society halls, 
while there are a few who have gained distinction in all three of these fields, and 
some of us still profess to be "curlers," or heroes. 

In regard to number, our Class is far from what it was four years ago. Then 
we numbered sixty; now there are barely fourteen left to be crowned with the 
laurel of graduation. 

Now, in conclusion, we go forth from the cherished halls of our Alma Mater, 
feeling strong in mind and body and equipped with such a store of knowledge 
and precepts received at the hands of a faithful Faculty, that we have little fear 
in stumbling in the stormy course of life. We shall scatter in various directions 
and shall engage in various occupations, but, fellow members of the Senior Class 
of 1914, wherever we go and whatever we do, let us remain faithful to our old 
College of William and Mary. 

Historian. 



RISING over yon eastern hills. 
Tinting the earth with gray, 
Comes the sun that thrills 
Each heart at the break of day; 
For dawn has come. 

Sinking beyond yon western hills. 

Gleaming with crimson ray. 
Lowers the sun that chills 

Each heart at the close of day; 
For night has come. 

P. L. WiTCHLEY. 



Pa^e Thiry-tJvo 



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Senior Class ^ropijecp 

"I cannot tell how the truth may be; 
1 say the tale as it was said to me." 

ANOTHER Senior Class, and still another prophet. Prophet, did I say? 
and why not? Every Senior Class claims to number among its mem- 
bers one who has that superhuman foresight by which he can wrest 
from the future her guarded secrets, and reveal them to those who await 
their fate with abated breath. Truly, the Class of '14 can be no exception. 

But why should I, who has never been deemed prophetic, be clothed with 
the mantle of a prophet? The task at first seemed insurmountable. Yet realizing, 
finally, that this burden was not to be unloaded upon the shoulders of another, I 
set myself to thinking how my predecessors were inspired. By what means were 
they able to rival the Druid priest who presaged the ruin of pristine Rome? A 
number of my predecessors were given magic swords, by some great ancestor, with 
which they solved their problems; others were aided by some powerful portent; 
another sought the aid of a divine goddess; while I have heard it said that the 
mirror has reflected visions of the future to many g-eat prophets. 

For three long months I awaited the shade of some great ancestor to appear 
before me with a brilliant and magic sword, but none appeared. I then invoked 
the aid of all the gods and goddesses that were known to the Greeks and Romans, 
but no god proffered his aid, nor did a fairy goddess whisper in my ear. 

Seeing that it was useless to e.xpect aid from this quarter, and driven to 
desperation to devise some means by which I could tear from the future her stored 
treasures, I went to one of my professors, acquainted him with my knotty problem, 
and implored him to advise me. For a long while he sat in reflective thought, and 
as a recompense for my long and an.xious waiting, told me of a powerful potion 
which, he said, if taken in sufficient quantities, would make me see things. 

That night, having secured an ample quantity of this potion, I carried it 
to my room, where I soon drained the bottle of its contents and stretched out upon 
the lounge, exhausted from the worry of this problem. 



Page Thirty-four 



Soon there appeared before me a mass of snakes — long and short snakes, 
lean and fat snakes — all writhing and twisting into every conceivable shape. 
With a start I dispelled the vision, and awoke, trembling with fear from head to 
foot. 

Seizing the poker, I rearranged the logs in the fireplace, and not being able 
to rid my mind of that elusive problem, I drew a rocker close to the fire and sa^ 
down, still holding the smutty poker in my hand. 

Immediately the poker flared up into a fiery mass. I tried to let it fall, but 
found my arm powerless; my heart jumped into my mouth and my hair stood on 
end. The mass of fire then ran up the poker to the point, took on a blood red 
color, and gradually shaped itself into a minature Satan. Gosh! With a scream 
I tried to shake him off, but he remained standing there with conplacency, utter- 
ing wild and bloodthirsty cries. My heart was pounding itself to pieces upon my 
ribs when he spoke: 

"What is it that thou wouldst know? Ask me and it will be answered." 

"O Mighty Prince of Darkness," I replied, "relate to me the future of each 
of the Class of '14." 

A huge ball of fire shot out from his mouth, and before my frightened eyes 
appeared a circle of many colors. Keeping my eyes fastened upon it, lest it might 
vanish as it had come, I soon saw a change taking place within the circle. It 
widened, slowly vanished, and before me appeared, as if real, a peaceful farm 
house. Everything around it bespoke a progressive farmer and a well-caring 
housewife. But see! a door flew open; a man with arms over his head ran out 
into the yard, closely pursued by his wife, her broom raised high over her head. 
The fugitive ran straight towards me as if seeking my shelter, and I recognized the 
face of our Class President, John Lewis Tucker. 

Immediately the scene shifted, and there appeared a large and brilliantly 
lighted stage. By the words on an immense program on the stage, I judged that 
it was in Germany. The program announced that it was amateur night, when 
all Germans, being able to perform some special feat, might appear before the 
audience for a prize. A keg, seemingly of beer, was brought upon the stage and 
placed upon a table. The stage director then appeared, leading a bashful con- 



Paje Thirty-five 



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testant for the prize by the hand. This bashful fellow, not wishing to face the audi- 
ence, walked backwards to the keg of beer, reclined flat upon his back, placed a 
funnel in his mouth, and turned the beer into it. In a few minutes the keg had 
been drained, and with much warbling, this human reservoir faced the audienc" 
amid deafening applause. It was then that I recognized the face, and only the 
face, of my old classmate, "Buzzy" Parker. "Oh, 'Buzzy,' now I see why you 
are so fond of German," I exclaimed. 

But wait, what familiar face of vermillion hue did I see in a nearby box? 
An immaculately dressed gentleman, with a beautiful lady, gorgeously attired, 
was vigorously applauding this feat of capacity. A smile played upon his features, 
widened, and soon rippled from ear to ear. I recognized it as that of Leif Scheie. 

After seeing this I began to fear, lest the little Satan would prove a bad 
prophet. But what is this that then appeared on the visionary screen? A lavishly 
bedecked ball-room, with hundreds of young ladies and men banked to one side. 
What a brilliant assemblage! It looked as if they were waiting motionless for a 
flashlight picture, when my eye was arrested by a large placard hung upon the 
wall. It read as follows: 

THE PARISIAN SHUFFLE-STEPS 

In the Maxixe 

Introduced by Prof. C. H. Hamlin 

My old classmate. Ham, stepped out before the audience and began to dance 
in the most wonderful fashion. I soon saw that "Ham" had lost none of his 
graceful art. 

The scene then shifted to a room, presumably underneath the ball-room; it 
was a large ratheskellar. Men in evening clothes were seated about the tables; 
white-aproned waiters were running in every direction. One waiter, tripping over 
a chair, let fall a tray of glasses and measured his length upon the floor. To my 
astonishment I recognized him as W. L. Drewry. A low, heavy-set man rushed 
up to the waiter, and with sweeping gestures, seemed to be rebuking him severely. 
The diamonds on his shirt bosom glowed and sparkled, as did his rum-soaked 
nose. I was surprised when I recognized the face of H. L. Womack. 



Pugc ThirtM-six 




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I then leaned back in my chair, lighted my pipe, and was now prepared to 
see the worst. 

In a moment I found myself ga/.ing upon a large baseball field. By the sign 
boards, I saw that it was the Polo Grounds, and that the game was to be played 
between the Giants and the Athletics for the World's Championship. When the 
Giants took the field, the whole grandstand arose, shouting madly and casting 
their hats into the air. I was wondering what was the cause of such an unusual 
demonstration, when I saw the Giants' pitcher walk out before the crowd, bowing 
time and again. He was showered with many flowers and objects of all kinds. 
Stretching forward to get a glimpse of his face, I recognized this husky twirler as 
"Billy" Winsbro. 

"Still 1 can see him before me. 
As in the days of old; 
His lips of serious sweetness. 
Hair of the richest gold." 

Once more the vision changed, and now appeared a peaceful scene indeed. 
A draped gondola lay moored to a many colored post. Overhead a huge tree 
cast its peaceful shade. Lying upon the poop of the boat was the gondolier, 
dressed in blue silk, with a bright red sash. He rose to a sitting posture, opened 
wide his mouth in yawning, and began to play a guitar. Shortly he put aside his 
instrument and arose to his feet, still yawning. I was thunderstruck! Before me 
stood Beale, the musician of the Class. 

Close upon this perfect peace followed a scene of horror. There now 
appeared before me an abyss with roaring flames issuing from its mouth. Around 
Its sides were hovered a mass of wretched beings. Some of these were tossing upon 
the rocks, tearing their hair in desperation. Others on bended knee were raising 
their arms in supplication above their heads, while a few jumped into the flaming 
abyss. Satan, with his pitchfork, now appeared, approaching these unfortunate 
souls. One by one he tossed them into the abyss on the end of his fork, until only 
one was left. Satan made at him, but the poor wretch dodged him, running in 
and out among the boulders. But, alas! he was finally conquered and run through. 
Satan raised him high on the fork while he writhed in agony. I managed to 
get one glimpse of the face of this unfortunate man, and recognized "Sweeney" 
Blitzer. Oh, "Sweeney!" I exclaimed, "I have often heard it said, 'only by the 



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past can we judge the future,' but who would have thought this would be your 
end?" 

Like a flash this scene vanished, and in its stead appeared an enlarged copy 
of the Chase Ciiv Messenger. One column, with huge black headlines, arrested 
my attention: 

HOME FOUNDED B\' J. E. TAYLOR FOR LADY TEACHERS. 

"Teacher or leachers?" 1 asked myself. 

"What touches us ourself shall be the last served. ' 

Once again the scene shifted, and I beheld before my wondering eyes what 
appeared to be the vision of a man, minus head, hands, and feet. "But look!" 
I exclaimed, "this figure is clothed in the garb of a convict." The convict cap is 
in its place, but it rests upon no head! What form will this vision take?" In 
answer to my question, one hand appeared in its proper place, then the other, and 
then both feet, but still no head was to be seen. In the twinkling of an eye the 
head appeared between the cap and the coat. But, oh! the Prophet gazed into 
his own face! 

I hurled the poker into the fire, and with a weird and mocking laugh, the 
little Satan sailed up the chimney. The Devil! He had disappeared! 

Hearken, O Ye Seniors! You have heard your future prophesied, but 
"Detest the slander which, with a satanic smile, exults over the characters it has 
ruined." 

Prophet. 



I'cge 1 hlriy-eight 



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Junior Clasps BoU 

Moito: Gradatim. Colors: Red and Green. 

Flolifcr: Tulips. 

YELL 

Gradatim, gradalim, 

Red and green. 
Juniors, Juniors, 

Nineteen fourteen. 



OFFICERS 

E. L. Wright Praidenl. 

Clarence Jennings Vke-PresiJcnt. 

F. W. Cooke Treasurer. 

C. C. Renick Secrc/arj). 

\'. E. G. Emery Historian. 



MEMBERS 



Barnes. F. M Williamsburg, Va. .'oNEi. L 

CoOKE, F. W Gloucester, Va. NouRSE, W. B.. 

Emery. V. E. G Kinsman, Ohio. Outland. G. C. 

Harris, H. L Coehurn, Va. Penick, C. C... 

Healy, J. H Streets, Va. Smith. J. W.... 

Holler. C. W Terre Haute. Ind. SoMERS. W. E.. 

Jennings. C Hickory, Va. Taylor, P. P.. . 

Jones. H. H Williamsburg. Va. Wrxht. E. L. . 



. Urbanna, Va. 

. Casinova, Va. 

. Boaz. Va. 

. CilUway, Va. 

. Waynesboro, Va. 

. Bloxom, Va. 

. Urbanna, Va. 

. Tappahannock, Va 



/'aTc Forlv-onc 



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FRANKLIN MASON BARNES 

He lives in Williamsburg and is proud of it? Why shouldn't 
he be? Franklin tripped it with fair Audrey on her fantastic toe! 
But he couldn't help it. Few dances has he missed m "ye ancient 
citie" since the introduction of the "cradle snatch and the happy- 
go-tang." That's not all. F. M. ts a debater and a good one. His 
audience is convinced whether he says anything or not. An owl at 
looking wise. This one also filches from the pen of the Profs 
a curler's mark. Despite the long face, Barnes, you'll get there 
just the same — "it comes to him who goes after it. 




FRANCIS WEST COOKE 

No; Cookie didn't discover any pole, nor is he particularly 
fond of frigidness. In fact, on a cold wintry day, one would be 
at a loss were he not to find "Doc " perched on the radiator play- 
ing "you take this one, I'll take that" with the profoundest of 
philosophers. Francis is reticent; but that gray matter of his is 
always in motion. He is a student — a real student, and a man 
who finds pleasure in work. Active in the literary society, "Doctor 
Cooke is verily a Desmosthenes ; a better debater is hard to find. 
Smile? Mon Dieu! The first time in his college career. Francis 
West you are an honor to your class. 




VICTOR EW.ART GLADSTONE EMERY 

"One anecdote of a man is worth a volume of biography. 
N'ictor once ^vrote on an examination paper in English that "the 
sermon on the mount was preached by Moses on Mount Sinai.' 
Dr. Hall commented " 'his studie was but litel on the Bible. 



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HERMAN LEE HARRIS 

Good student, budding author, scholarship and medal winner — 
these qualities put Herman in a mi generis almost. How he does 
such great thmgs is a mystery. Genius > Don't, it might swell his 
head; his opinion of himself already is sufficient. If The Flat Hal 
and Colonial Echo would let him alone, he would be a real 
curler. But he is careful to divide his time, making everything 
count. Another secret: Herman Lee is a ladies' man; never yet 
has he failed to put a blue-eyed heroine in his stories. Last and 
least! The student body has chosen H. L. as its best prose writer 
and most eloquent speaker — Harris of the Class of 15. 



JOHN HILLIARD HEALY 

"Omnipotent John" he would fain be called, yet he's modest. 
loo. Why. we can't explain, except that — ah. slush ! Er — a. 
John's a singer of songs and a dreamer of dreams. He sang his 
swan song at V. M. I. last year. "Nohing to military." he says 
nonchantly. He dreams of fair women, even more so, perhaps, 
than did Tennyson himself, yet that modesty! He should worry. 
But Jonnie's an athlete as well as a soldier. In tSat memorable 
battle last year between eleven husky "Williams " and as many 
tender 'Marys." Healy's form distinguished, or rather extinguished, 
him. Having starred he fled from the greetings of the fair dam- 
sels, and sought refuge m the woods, where he has been playing 
soldier ever since. Jchn is made of real stuff, he is a true blue, 
and a loyal William and Mary man. 




CLARENCE JENNINGS 

Quiet and unassuming, did you say? Yes, he is all iSat. but 
a curler and athlete just the same. Clarence's is reticent genius, 
if you please, and comes out in the form of "pep* just at the 
right time always. He is iomc football player. His opponent 
never fails to liken him to a seige of artillery. The ^ . M. C. .-X. 
boasts Clarence as its president — cnc of the best it has ever had; 
iSe magazine staff has dubbed him assistant business manager: while 
the Junior Class counts him as one of her most loyal members, and 
the young ladies? — ah. a plenty. 



Page Fort^' three 




HUGH HOWARD JONES 

Wonderful! All-round athlete and student. Nay verily, he 
15 "spry as a cat" and as game as a strutting peacock. Jonsey Joes 
play balls — foot, basket, and base. How do it? That no one 
knows; his style and form are individual. Howard doesn't stop 
at stars either; nothing under a moon or sun can satisfy his craving. 
Sure — he makes his classes — well — er — a — now and then, 
but rumor has it that he is especially fond of English V and "hates 
like the deuce" to leave it. Albeit H. H. is a hard student and an 
athlete of exceptional quality. We repeat — "Wonderful!" 



LEWIS JONES 

Lewis Jones. C. B. C. — that's his official title; and if he 
never gets an A. B., he may rest upon iKis distinguished epithet. 
It IS the very latest degree, and was conferred by the Belles of 
Williamsburg. Cutest Boy in College — it means just that. This 
IS a very exclusive title, for though some of us are "cute." and 
some are "cuter." Lewis alone is "cutest." He has many more 
laurels, but besides this they all pale. Even his wonderful pitching 
IS forgotten and that famous contest wherein he "pitched a very 
creditable game, being touched up for only sixteen bingles. " is only 
a memory. Lewis, you re a wonder, and a miracle of good sense, 
rood friendship, and good fun. 




WALTER BURTON NOURSE 

The subject of this sketch is Walter B. Nourse — the object 
of it to introduce you to one of William and Mary's most loving 
and lovable sons. Seldom is a man's love for his Alma Mater 
stronger than Waller's; witness the fight he has shown on Cary 
Field for the last four years. It would take a book to do justice 
to him. One who could write glowing verses about moonlight's 
silvery beams, and the last fond kiss m the sheltering shadows of 
Tea-Kettle Alley, Walter has been with us long, and has become 
as it were the center of gravity, except when he smiles. We can 
say no more of him, save that God made him and made him well. 



Page Forty-four 



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GROVER CLEVELAND OUTLAND 

Outlandish? No. except when it comes lo debating whether 
suffrage should be granted to women or not. Grover w.ns on 
either side of any question, debatable or otherwise — doesn't mailer. 
It has been rumored ihal he has the unique power of generating 
enough "hot air " to fill both Literary Society halls, which he does 
with great effect (?). Enthusiasm? Well, one should smile; 
enthusiasm is the key lo Grover's flowing genius. He is an ardent 
supporter of everything progressive, and a loyal "booster " in those 
tSinc-s which are sialic. The Junior Class and the College are 
proud lo claim a m n such as Grover Cleveland Oulland. 




CHARLES CLARK RENICK 

"Charlie" took first honors for scholarship last year. ^ ou say 
he has brain power? Well, he has. Last year, and this too, he 
developed some of it by seven hours' study a day in the power- 
house. Oh no, he doesn't room down there; he's merely assistant 
stoker. Between stokes of coal he stokes his cerebral cortex with 
knowledge and at the end of the month his pocket book withal. 
What he can't curl the professors on, isn't taught at William and 
Mary. He curls them up so light they never come undone, except 
upon someone else. However that may be, he is a good fellow — 
ah ^ — ■ er, as good as a Brafferton Indian can be. 




JOHN WALLER SMITH. Jr. 

John Smith — pathfinder, Indian hunter, and student. His 
name is sufficient to bluff any Brafferton Indian; consequently, he 
doesn't have to avoid the water bag — it avoids him. Pathfinder? 
Why he tramped all the way from the University of Virginia lo 
William and Mary in search of a breath of Colonial atmosphere. 
Smith is progressive, loo. The Gordon-Hope Literary Club is 
but one of the fruits of his cerebral fertility. Another: the inlro- 
duclion of new dances a la moile. Among the ladies he is a 
center of gyration. What else? His rareness debates occasionally 
— and (?). Poet, tangocr, song bird and man. He alone would 
make the Class of '15 famous. Come, boys, three wassails. 



Page Forty five 



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WILSON EDWARD SOMERS 

Betler known as "Jumbo. * He s only six feet one; weighs one 
hundred eighty-hve. His interest m college activities stands al 
scalding temperature. Somers is a curler, football player, debater 
and sport. One muit be a curler to gain admittance to Dr. Halls 
W. T. C. U. class: ergo — nufF sed! Monograms and stars literally 
leap from the gridiron into "Jumbo's ' grasp, while walled cities fall 
beneath the lash of his strong argumentation. "A girl in every 
town" IS his motto. Wilson is a sport from your heart, and a 
paragon for graceful dancing. Stick to it. "Jumbo" ; you'll be a 
great (er) man some day. 




PRESTON PHILLIPS TAYLOR 

Aboul P. P. there seems always lo have spread a shroud of 
inexphcable mystery. Whether it be on account of some of those 
peculiarly attractive eccentricities or his dry, exotic way of domg 
things no one has ever said. Mysterious — yes, perhaps, mys- 
teriously — romantic (in his case it amounts to the same). But 
Taylor is a student and a student's friend. He makes his classes, 
plays at fcolball and baseball and does everything in his unique 
systematic way. A huge smile adorns his big lips and creaps 
stealthily to his eyes, when he is asked to show his monograms and 
stars. Preslcn you are cut out for a real man. Stick to it! \ our 
classmates own you with a feeling of amiable pride. Praeslo et 
pcrsto. Taylor 



ERNEST LINWOOD WRIGHT 

"Pipe's" our president and a man always. (W)right on the 
job. That great immovable smile of his isn't easily forgotten, nor 
its influence either. Scmetimes. like Wilbur, the birdman, he soars 
high — high on the wings of musical notes. The ladies say he has 
a "perfectly heavenly voice," and, of course, he sings "superbly 
grand." This one is athletic, too. Not any half -fry; il was he 
who distinguished himself as half back on the 1912 'Varsity; his 
"pig skin" work was really stellar. Manager of this year's learn, 
and — well, we can't tell everything. "Pipe" hails from "Hobs 
Hole,"" Tappahannock — that"s a panacea for all .lis. Here's luck, 
"Prexie"! 



Pnge Forl\)-six 



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Motto: Not to know some trifles is praise. 
Colors : Pale Green and White. 



YELL 

Razzle-dazzle, never frazzle. 
Not a thread but wool. 

Altogether, altogether. 

That s the way we pull. 

Sophomores! 



OFFICERS 

W. S. Shackelford Preiidenl. 

A. P. Tucker Vice-President. 

H. A. Campbell Treasurer. 

W. C. Ferguson Sccrelarv. 

v. L. Guv .H!:lorian. 



Addincton, R. R. 
Barnes. J. F. 
Bennett, B. D. 
Caldwell, G. T. 
Campbell. H. A. 
Combs, R. L. 
Davis, S. T. 
Duke, W. J. 
Ferguson. W. C. 
Forrest. A. S. 
Frev. O. W. 
Garnett. F. M. 
Gillions. D. L. 
Givens. E. E. 
GoODE. G. M. 
Guy. V. L. 



MEMBERS 

Harris. W. D. 
Hedrick, J. W. 
huffines. i. d. 
James, E. R. 
Jennings. N. H. 
Lewis. E. 5. 
Lewis. } I. M. 
Massev. J. W. 
Major. E. W. 
Moss, P. H. 
Muncaster. C. .-^ 
O'Neill. J. B. 
Palmer. R. O. 
Pierce. A. K. 
Rosenbalm. R. L 
Scott. C. A. 



Shackelford. W. 
Shiers. W. 
Shockley, N. 
Stephens. J. W. 
TiLLEV. T. C. 
Thorpe. H. W. 
Tucker, A. P. 
Van Horne. H. R. 
Walton, L. J. 
Wells, E. B. 
Williams. H. P. 
Woods. B. W. 
Woodson. W. T. 
Zehmer. G. B. 
ZioN. W. E. 



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^opljomore Class J^istorp 

THE second lap of the race toward our goal is now on — we are nearly 
done. Some who survived the hardships of the first lap have come back 
to us with renewed vigor, other winners of last year's sprint have for- 
saken us (oh, brothers, where are you?) and still others from various 
schools have received our hearty handclasps as brothers. 

We ha%e stepped out of the ranks as "dues" and have come into our own. 
We are a great class — the Sophomore Class; great not only in numbers, but 
also in quality. 

As one would look over the list of members of our Class he would find there 
men represent.ng all the different phases of college life, from athletics to "calico- 
ing. We have several of the most renowned "curlers" or "twisters" known about 
school. They ha^e only kept up their good work of the past. 

A history of any Class would be lacking if there were not included the most 
favorite college sport — football. We were represented in football by Tilley, 
Hedrick and Addington. Tilley has left us to enter his father's business, but 
there are rumors that he will be back with us next year. Tom, wherever you 
are when you read this, say you will live up to the rumor and come back to your 
A'ma Mater. In basketball we were glad and proud to have the two famous 
guards, Z:on and Zehmer, as members of our Class. 

We shall also be represented in baseball, some of last year's men as well as 
new students be-.ng neophytic Marquards. The prospects are more than excep- 
tcnally bright Pe: des the monogram men — Add ngton. Combs, Tucker, 
Zehmer — we have Shiers, Zion, Shackelford, Garnett and Will'amT of last year 
and some prom's-'ng new material. Also the track work of Woods, Muncaster 
and James has been of high honor to the Class. 

In literary society work, the Philomathean has Huffines and Gwens, whi'e 
the good work of Zehmer and Scott has ganed them high honors from the Phoenix. 
Last, but not least, we have members active in Y. M. C. A. work. One of 
us. Barnes, being president, and several others members of the cabinet. 

Class of 1917, you are thus greeted with what you have done and VNnth a 
true desire that you accomplish still more in the future; and in after life may your 
work reflect honor upon your Alma Mater. 



Historian'. 



Poge Fifl-g 







Z 

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X 

a: 

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Jf resitjman ClasiS 3^U 



Xlotio : Ad asira per aspera. 



Colon: Orange and Black. 



YELL 

A. B.. B. S.. A. B., B. S.. 
Where; when; when; where — 
Haven't you heard, haven't you seen? 
In ihe year of Seventeen. 



OFFICERS 

L. Add;son President. 

W. T. Stone Vice-Presider.l. 

H. A. Prillama.- Treasurer. 

W. B. Ramey .Secretary. 

C. M. Rumble Historian. 



MEMBERS 

Addison, E Eastville, \'a. 

ACEE, J. L Teddy. Va. 

Bertschey, S. L Old Point, \'a. 

BoNNEY, J. H London Bridge. \'a. 

Booth, G. W Middletown. Va. 

Boyd, J. H Portsmouth, \'a. 

Brent, 'W. S Heathsville, \'a. 

Brooks, G. T Williamsburg, Va. 

Carter. A. E Spacta, Va. 

Clary, R. A Newville. Va. 

CoFFIELD, J. A Portsmouth, Va. 

Derrinc. p. M Norfolk. Va. 

Doss. R. R Drake's Branch, Va. 

FtELD. E. G Gloucester. Va. 

Flick, J. A Norfolk. Va. 

Gardner. C. M.. Jr Woodlawn. Va. 

GaYLE. R. B Portsmouth, Va. 

Geddy, G. B Williamsburg. Va. 

Gilliam, R. B Toga. Va. 

Gilliam, R. M Newport News. \'a. 

Green, L. C Surrey. Va. 

Gray. O. S Saluda. Va. 

Graves, C. C Marksville. \'a. 



Page Fifty/- three 



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Grimslev. W. M Van Dyke, V'a. 

GoRDEN, A. C Jr Slaunlon, Va. 

GURLEY, R. H Norfolk. Va. 

Ham. R. E. P Spring Lake. N. J. 

Humphries. E. C Fentress. Va. 

Hurt. S. H Blackslone. Va. 

HuTCHESON. C. S Boydlon. Va. 

Jenkins. F. F Cansville. Va. 

Kennedy. C. P Stony Creek. Va. 

KeyseR. J. D Washington. Va. 

Ladd. C. P Williamsburg. Va. 

Lawson, J. R Brookneal. Va. 

LuPTON. T. A Bedford City. \'a. 

Massie. R. L Washington. Va. 

Mauzy. R. E Hightown. Va. 

McCoRMICK. W. L Pulaski. Va. 

Mitchell. B. B Washington. Va. 

MORRISSETTE. R. T Charlotte C. H.. \'a 

Newton. R. M Hague. Va. 

NoRRIS. W. D Sussex C. H.. Va. 

OwNBEY. A. D Grundy. Va. 

Page. R. M Batesville. Va. 

Petty. O. V Louisa. Va. 

PriLLAMAN, H. a Gallaway. Va. 

QuiLLEN. CM Gate City. Va. 

FUmeY. W. B Clinch. Va. 

Rash, D. O Rady. Va. 

Redden. K. H Chincoteague. Va. 

RlBBLE. F. G., Jr Petersburg. Va. 

Roane. R. D Cash. Va. 

RoTHWELL, S North Garden. Va. 

Rumble. G. M Norfolk. Va. 

Shands. W. R Courtland. Va. 

Smith. J. B. F Banco. Va. 

SmyTHE. a. R Pennington Gap. \'a 

SpraTLEY. R. W Surrey. Va. 

Stone. W. T Ordsburg. Va. 

Swecker. a. D Monterey. Va. 

SwECKER. H. T Monterey, Va. 

SWECKER. J.J Monterey, Va. 

TlLLEY, W. B Norfolk, Va. 

TOLSON. F. B Urbanna. Va. 

Trice. J. B Louisa. Va. 

WadDILL. J. T Victoria. Va. 

Wallace. R. P Hampton. Va 

V^AYBRICHT. H. M Crabbottom. \ a. 

Wilkinson, T. E Olo. Va. 

Wood. B. M Fentress. \ a. 

'lOUNC. J. M Exmore. \ a. 



Pose Fifly-four 




c^ 




Jf resijmau Class J^istorp 

THE history of the Freshman Class is a glorious chronxle of great things 
done, and greater things undone. To attempt to give in detail the accom- 
plishments of this important aggregation would indeed be an arduous 
task, but a rapid survey shows that we have done our part in upholding 
the dignity and honor of William and Mary. A statement of this nature may 
seem bold to the casual reader, but one who is familiar with the College activities 
of this year must realize that there is no room for contradiction. 

Last fall, when the call was sounded for football practice. Freshmen com- 
prised the greater part of the squad responding. They were faithful to their duty, 
and what reward do we perceive? This — six "Dues" received monograms! The 
very mention of the names of Bertschey, Wallace, Gayle, Page, Addison and 
Gilliam carries us back to the scenes of memorable gridiron battles. Hail to our 
fellow classmate, Stanton Bertschey, captain of the 1914 team! 

In basketball we have had further contribution to our glory in the stellar 
work of Bertschey and Gayle. Now comes the baseball season, and all indica- 
tions are that the Freshman Class will be well represented. 

A glance at the rolls of the literary societies is sufficient to convince one that 
the Freshmen have taken an active part in this important phase of college life. 
At the time of this writing the members of the Inter-collegiate debating team have 
not been chosen, but prospects are that our Class will have at least one repre- 
sentative. 

In studies we have exerted every effort, and in very few instances has suc- 
cess been lacking. Examinations, the Waterloo of many Freshmen students, were 
boldly faced and conquered. 

Fellow Classmates! It is an honor and a privilege to be a member of the 
Class of 1917. Let us continue in the future as throughout the passing session, 
and there need be no fear that the unstained reputation of William and Mary 
College will ever suffer at our hands. 

Historian. 



Page Flftji-five 



<1 




!! ^ 




] 




enior i^ormal Clasg 



OFFICERS 

G. B. Zeumer President. 

H. P. Williams Vice-PresiJenl. 

D. L. GiLLIONS Secretary. 

^X'. F. ZlON Treasurer. 

MEMBERS 

Barnes, J. F. Major 

Caldwell Outland 

Cooke Pierce 

Davis Rosen balm 

GivENS Scott 

GiLLlONS SOMERS 

Harris. W. D. Williams 

He4Ly Woods 

Hedrick Woodson 

Lew:s Zehmer 

Zjon 

Page Fift\/-six 




A. F. Beale 
Jokes 



J. E. Taylor 
J oka 



«<1 



iiL!a 




<1 




a 




W. L. Drewry 
Club Editor 




H. L. WoMACK 

Y.M.C.A. 




Annual ^taff 




W. S. Shackelford 
Art EJilor 



W. C. W£ST 
Academy Editor 



\\. L. JOVCE 

Academ\/ Editor 




/ ^ 




9 




jflat gat ^taff 




p. Lewis Witchley 
A thleiics 




H. Lee Harris 
Literary Socieliei 



Max Blitzer 
f-tlllor-in-Chicf 




J. R. McAllister 
Y.M.C.A. 




Victor E. G. Emery 
EdlloriaU 



R. H. GURLEY 





Jf lat ftat ^taff 



O. W. Frey 
Business Manager 



J. H. NX'richt 





W. S. Shackelford 

Assistant 



W. C. Ferguson 
Assistant 



<1 




I cfl 




B 




,'\ iHaga?inc ^taff 



W. C. Ferguson 
As$ociale 






W. M. Grimslev 
Aisociale 



P. L. WlTCHLEY 

EJitor-in-Chief 




J. E.Taylor 

Business Manager 



C. Jennings 
>1j5(. Business Manager 



K\)t (^arben of tJjc Bosie 

IN THE sweet perfumed profusion 
Of a garden's aureate glow, 
'Mid the redolence of roses 
By a happy river's flow. 
Where the little hills are peaceful. 
And the waters whisper, "God, 

Arlaru! Arlaru!" 
In the fairest, greenest valley 
Foot of man hath ever trod, 
Where the molten, golden music 
Of the breezes, passion laden. 
Blow softly up from Afton, 
Through the Little Vale of Aiden, 

Allalu! Allalu! 
Where they rest 
On the breast 

Of the Rose they love the best — 
On the bosom of a true and tender maiden! 

John Waller Smith, Jr.. '15. 



Page Sixl^-lhree 



Hbtje Hog Jf ire 

LAPPING and curling. 
Darting and swirling. 
Each flickering flame 
A Satanic elf, 
Hurleth itself 
With devilish wrath 
On its frenzied path 
Into the heart of the oak. 

It nor ceases nor halts 

In its fiendish assaults 

Till its prey is no more; 

Shoots its venomous dart 

At the monarch's heart; 

Its scorpion lashes 

Leaving but ashes 

Of the heart of the giant oak. 

The wandering spark 

Is my reverie's bark 

On the surging sea of dreams. 

With each flash of light 

My fancy takes flight; 

And now I stand 

On the Morphean strand 

Of the realm where the Dream King dwells. 

A flicker, a gasp. 

The death-note's rasp. 

The embers are cold and dead — 

My castles crumble and fall. 

From the dust there call 

The voices of life's 

Turbulent strifes. 

And smoke shrouds the Dream King's form. 



Pcge SixtD-four 



Max Blitzer. 




^ijocnix Hiterarp ^ocietp 



Presiiienls 
Isi Term— J. F. Barnes 
2nd Term— F. M. Barnes 

3rd Term— O. W. FrEY 



ACEE. J. L. 
Barnes. F. M. 
Barnes, J. F. 
Booth. G. W. 
Cooke. F. W. 
Ferguson. W. C 
Field. E. G. 
Fuck, J. A. 
Frey. O. W. 

GlLLlONS. D. L. 

Greene, L. C. 



OFFICERS 

Vice-Preiidents 
J. E. Tay; or 
C. A. Scott 
W. M. Grimsley 

F. W. Cooke. Treasurer 

MEMBERS 

Grimsley. W. M. 
Haml[n. C. H. 

HuTCHESON, C. S. 

Jones, Lewis 
Major, E. W. 
McAllister, J. R. 

OWNBEY. A. D. 
Pierce. A. K. 
Ramey. W. B. 
Ribble, F. G. 
Scheie. L. E. 



Recording Secretaries 
C. A. Scott 

A. D. OwNBEY 

A. K. Pierce 



Scott. C. A. 
Shands. W. R. 
Smith. J. W. 
Spratley. p. \^'. 
SwECKER. J. j. 
Taylor. 1. E. 
Taylor. P. P. 
ToLsoN. F. B. 
Van Horne, H. R. 
Waddill. J. T. 
Zehmer. G. B. 



P.JEC Sixly-six 



<1 




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I 



/«• r 



fit t ^? f «' 



^fjilomatfjean Hiterarp ^ocietp 



Presidents 
III Term — J. L. Tucker 
2nd Term — H. L. WoMACK 
3rd Term — C. Jennings 



Bennett. B. D. 
BONNEY, J. H. 
Campbell, H. A. 
Davis, S. T. 
Drewrv, W. L. 
GivENs, E. E. 
Gordon, A. C. 
gurley, r. h. 
Harris. H. L. 
Harris. W. D. 



OFFICERS 

Vice-PresiJenh 
E. E. GivENs 
W. S. Shackelford 
G. C. Outland 

W. E. SoMERS, Treasurer 

MEMBERS 
Hedrick, J. W. 

HuFFINES. J. D. 

Jennings, C. 
Moss. P. H. 
Morris, W. D. 
Outland, G. C. 
Rash, D. O. 
Redden, K. H. 

RoSENBALM. R. L. 

Rumble, G. M. 



Reconling Secretaries 
H, A. Campbell 
G. M. Rumble 
H. W. Thorpe 



Shackelford, W. 
Smith, J. H. 
Somers, W. F.. 
Thorpe, H. W. 
Tucker, A. P. 
Tucker, J. L. 
W'itchley, p. L, 
\X'omack. H. L. 
Woods, B. W. 
ZioN, W. E. 



Page Sixtxj-scven 




§. iH. C. ^. Cabinet 



OFFICERS 
Clarence Jennings President. 

R. H. CuRLEY Vice-President. 

I. H. Woodson 5ccre(ary. 

P. W. Spratley Treasurer. 

COMMITTEES 

S. L. NuNNALLY Chairman Bible Societ]/. 

F. \T'. Cooke ^bairman Missions. 

E. L. Wright '^hairman Delegation. 

J. F. Barnes 'Chairman Membership. 

L. J. Walton "hairman Music. 

D. O. Rash "Chairman Hall. 



Page Sixtv-eight 



§. ill. C. ^. §tat poofe 

IT IS with exceptional interest that we record the good and profitable work in 
which the Y. M. C. A. may exult in accomplishing during the past college 
year. Interest was manifested from the first, and has ever been kept aflame 
by the untiring and ceaseless efforts of the cabinet. We are not detracting 
one iota from the credit of our predecessors when we say that the work this year 
has reached its highest expression, for it is upon the splendid past that the excellent 
present is built. 

It was with pride that we noted the success of the usual reception to new 
students at the beginning of the session. After a number of speeches made by 
members of the Faculty and old students concerning various phases of college 
activities, refreshments were served while many new acquaintanceships were 
inaugurated. Upon invitation to join the Association, the new men as well as 
the old responded, to our great satisfaction. 

The series of addresses given in the hall every year, was begun by Dr. Hall 
of the Faculty. Dr. Hall has for a number of years honored us with the first 
address of the season. He was followed by other members of the Faculty, and 
by the ministers of the town. An invaluable feature of the past year's work was 
the series of addresses on "Life Work," delivered by such men as Dr. Young, 
Mr. F. M. Purder. Hon. John Garland Pollard. Mr. W. S. Copeland, and Mr. 
Gorden. These speakers did not maintain that their professions were the only 
ones worth following, but pictured the good and the bad, the sweet and the bitter. 
the homely and the beautiful of their respective vocations. They endeavored to 
reveal the facts, based on experience, which forewarn young men of the obstacles 
they have to face, and help them to the-r destined obstructions and convert them 
into stepping stones to success rather than pitfalls of failure. 

In numerous places about college there have been classes in Bible and mis- 
sion study. A very interesting and instructive course on the "Liquor Problem" 
was given in the dormitory by Prof. H. H. Young of the city. This course was 
an unbiased and unprejudire'' study of the problem before us. 



Page SlulV-nSnc 



ca 




<^ 



4 



A feature of great importance in the Y. M. C. A. work was the sending of 
a delegation of three to the Student Volunteer Convention held in Kansas City, 
Mo., during the Christmas holidays. This convention is held only once in four 
years, and is composed of the largest aggregation of students and scholars known 
in America. We deem ourselves fortunate in having sent a delegation, that it 
might bring back a renewed and more catholic spirit of uplift to our comparatively 
small Association. 



Hincsi to tfje Statue of Hibertp 

FAIR goddess Liberty, that keepst the gate 
Through which have come Eurasia's chosen few 
(The tribute of the Old World to the New), 
With fair Columbia to link their fate. 
Their fortunes with our western land to mate. 
Thy noble form, the first to greet their view. 
Holds forth the promise of success or rue; 
They enter now whose sons shall rule the State. 



Guard well, fair maid, the gates thou dost adorn. 
Give none but worthy leave into this land; 
For virtue let thy gates aside be borne, 
'Gainst vice uplift thy mighty brazen hand; 
The scum and offal that would enter, scorn; 
Let not their footprints mar our beauteous strand. 



Max Blitzer. 



Page Seventy 



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i-BK Charter Granted to Harvard 

BY NX'lLLIAM AND MaRY 





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Virginia IDelta Cljapter 
of ^igma $f)i Cpsilon 



Colors: Scarlel and Purple. 
FloTvers: American Beauties and Violets. 



YELL 

S:c-a-laca 

Sic-a-sun 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Delia 



FR.ATRES IN COLLEGIO 

Thomas Allen Lupton 

WiLBERT Thomas Woodson 
Ol]\er Walter Frey 

Leon Jerl Walton 

John Brooks O'Neill 

Edward Ralph James 

Robert Lincoln Combs 

Richard Eugene Paddock Ham 
Ray Rufus .'\ddincton 

Karl Henry Redden 



PLEDGES 



Robert Cowles Taylor 
Pcgc SeVcnlM-eioht 



J. Frank Wilson 



^ 




^igma piji Cpsilon Jf raternitp 

FOUNDERS 

Carter G. Jenkins Goldsboro, N. C. 

Benj. p. Caw Stuarls Draft. V'a. 

W. Hugh Carter Chase Cily. Va. 

William G. Wallace Siuaris Draft. Va. 

Thomas T. Wright Ruther Glen, Va. 

William S. Philipps Newark. N.J. 

ACTIVE CHAPTERS 

Virginia Alpha Richmond College. Richmond. \'a. 

West Virginia Beta West Virginia University. Morgantown. W. Va. 

Pennsylvania Gamma Western University of Pennsylvania. Pittsburg. Pa. 

Penn.iYLVANIa Delta University of Pennsylvania. Philadelphia. Pa. 

Colorado Alpha University of Colorado. Boulder. Colo. 

Virginia Delta College of William and Mary, Williamsburg. Va. 

North Carolina Beta North Carolina College of Agr. and Mech. .'\rts. Raleigh. N. C. 

Indiana Alpha Purdue University. W. Lafayette, Indiana. 

New York Alpha Syracuse University. Syracuse. N. Y. 

Virginia Epsilon Washington and Lee University. Lexington. V a. 

Virginia ZeTA Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. 

Georgia Alpha Georgia School of Technology. Atlanta. Ga. 

Delaware Alpha Delaware State College. Newark. Del. 

Virginia Eta University of X'lrgima. Charlottesville. Va. 

Arkansas Alpha University of Arkansas. Fayetteville. Ark. 

Pennsylvania Epsilon Lehigh University. South Bethlehem. Pa. 

Virginia Theta Virginia Military Institute. Lexington. Va. 

Ohio Gamma Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio. 

Vermont Alpha Norwich University. Norlhfield. Vt. 

Alabama Alpha "Mabama Polytechnic Institute. Auburn. Ala. 

North Carolina Gamma Trinity College. Durham, N. C. 

New Hampshire Alpha Dartmouth College. Hanover. N. H. 

District of Columbia Alpha George Washington University. Washinglon. D. C. 

Kansas Alpha Baker University. Baldwin. Kan. 

CxLIFORNIA Alpha University of California. Berkeley. Cal. 

Nebraska Alpha University of Nebraska. Lincoln. Neb. 

Washington Alpha State College of Washington. Pullman. Wash. 

Ohio Alpha Ohio Northern University. Ada. Ohio. 

South Carolina Alpha University of South Carolina. Columbia. S. C. 

Massachusetts Alpha Massachusetts .'\gricultural College, Amherst, Mass. 

New York Beta Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Rhode Island Alpha Brown University, Providence, R. I. 

Michigan Alpha University of Michigan. Ann Arbor. Mich. 

Iowa Alpha 'owa Wcsleyan University. Mt. Pleasant. Iowa. 

Tennessee Alpha University of Tennessee. Knoxville. Tenn. 

Colorado Beta University of Denver. Denver. Colo. 



Page ScVcnfy-ninc 




<1 




^igma ^fji Cpfiilon 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Alpha Richmond, Virginia. 

Beta Norfolk, Virginia. 

Gamma Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Delta Chicago. Illinois. 

Epsilon New York City, N -w York. 

Eta Washington, D. C. 

TheTA San Francisco, California. 

Zeta Atlanta, Georgia. 

Iota Springfield, Ohio. 

Kappa Syracuse, New York. 

Lambda Boston. Massachusetts. 

Mu Asheville, North Carolina. 

Nu Baldwin, Kansas. 

Xl Hampton, Virginia. 

Omicron Union Springs, Alabama. 



Page Eighty 



J^^W/^^ 





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a. 
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fW <1 





i2uC!japtcrofilappa 



igma 



University of Bologna. 1400. 
Universitv of V'iRciNrA, 1869. 



Color: Scarlet. While and Emerald Green. 
Floxner: Lily of liie N'alley. 



FR.ATRES IN FACULTATE 

President Lvon G. Tyler. .A. M., LL. D. 

James Southall Wilson. Ph. D. 

George Oscar Ferguson. A. B.. A. M. 
Frederick Deane Goodwin 



A. B.. .A. M. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

B.^THURST Dancerfield Peachy. Jr.. '14 
Walter Burton Nourse. "15 
John W. Smith. Jr.. '13 

William Cross Ferguson. '16 

George Benjaman Geddy, "16 

Charles Sterling Hutcheson. "16 
Gordon Murray Goode, 16 

George Thornhill Caldwell. 16 
R.\NDOLPH Moore Gilliam. '17 
Walter Ridley Shands. '17 

Clarence Broadwater Neblett. 



Douglas Gary Jackson 
Edward Dudley Spencer 
X'ernon Meredith Geddy 



PLEDGES 



John D. Corbell 
George Jordan Lane 
Henry "Travilian Moncure 



FRATRES IN URBE 



George P. Coleman 
Levin Winder Lane. III. 



Lionel Wynne Roberts 
Thomas Henley Geddy. Jr. 



Joseph Farland Hail 



Piife Eighlv-four 




<\ 




ACTIVE CHAPTtRS 

Beta University of Alabama, University, Ala. 

Gamma Louisiana Slate University, Baton Rouge, La. 

Delta Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. 

Lta Randalph-Macon College, Ashland, Va. 

Theta Cumberland University, Lebanon, Tenn. , 

ioTA Southwestern University. Georgetown, Tex. 

ZetA University of Virginia, Charlottesville, \'a. 

Kappa Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. 

LamBD \ University of I ennessee, Knoxville, Tern. 

Mu ^^ashington and Lee University, Lexingttn, \'a. 

Nu College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va. 

Xl University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Ark. 

Pt Swarthmore College, Swarthmore, Pa. 

SlCMA Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

Tau " University of 1 exas. Austin, Texas. 

UpsilON Hampden-Sidney College, Hampden-Sidney, Va. 

Phi Southwestern Presbyterian University, Clarksville, Tenn. 

Chi Purdue University, Lafayette. Ind. 

Psi University of Maine, Orono, Me. 

OmeCA University of the South. Sewanee, 1 enn. 

Alpha Alpha University of Maryland, Baltimore. Md. 

Alpha Beta Mercer University, Macon, Ga. 

Alpha Gamma University of Illinois, Champaign, 111. 

Alpha Delta Pennsylvania State College. State College, Pa. 

Alpha EpsiLON University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Pa. 

Alpha Zeta University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Alpha Eta George Washington University, Washington, D. C. 

Alpha Kappa Cornell University, Ithaca, N. Y. 

Alpha Lambda University of Vermont. Bulington, Vl. 

Alpha Mu University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Alpha Pi Wabash College, Crawfordsville. Ind. 

Alpha Rho Bcwdoin College. Brunswick, Me. 

Alpha Tau Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta. Ga. 

Alpha Sigma Ohio State University. Columbus. Ohio. 

Alpha Up.silON Millsaps College, Jackson, Miss. 

Alpha Phi Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pa. 

Alpha Chi Lake Forest University. Lake Forest. III. 

Alpha Psi University of Nebraska, Lincoln. Neb. 

Al PHA Omega William Jewell College. Liberty, Mo. 

Beta Alpha Brcwn University, Providence, R. I. 

Beta Beta Richmond College. Richmond. Va. 

Beta GamM \ Missouri State University. Columbus. Mo. 

Beta Delta Washington and Jefferson College, Washington, Pa. 

Beta E.PSIL0N Univcrsitv of Wisconsin. Madison. Wis. 

Beta Zeta Leland Stanford. Jr.. University. Palo Alto. Cal. 

Beta Eta Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, Ala. 

Beta Theta University of Indiana. Bloominglon, Ind. 

Beta Iota Lehigh University. South Bethlehem. Pa. 

Beta Kappa New Hampshire College. Durham, N. H. 

Page Eighty-five 




<1 




Beta Nu Kentucky State College, Lexington. K.y. 

Beta Mu University of Minneapolis, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Beta Lambda University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. 

Beta Xl University of California. Berkley. Cal. 

Beta Omicron University of Denver, University Park. Colo. 

Beta Pi Dickinson College. Carlisle. Pa. 

Beta Rho University of Iowa. Iowa City, Iowa. 

Beta Sigma Washington University, St. Louis. Mo. 

Beta Tau Baker University. Baldwin, Kan. 

Beta Upsilon North Carolina Agr. and Mech. College. Raleigh, N. C. 

Beta Phi Chase School of Applied Science. Cleveland. Ohio. 

Beta Chi Missouri School of Mines. Rolla. Mo. 

Beta Psi University of Washington, Seattle, Wash. 

Beta Omega Colorado College, Colorado Springs. Colo. 

Gamma Alpha University of Oregon, Eugene, Ore. 

Gamma Beta University of Chicago, Chicago. 111. 

Gamma Gamma Colorado School of Mines. Golden. Co!o. 

Gamma Delta Massachusetts State College. .Amherst. Mass. 

Gamma Epsilon Dartmouth College, Hanover. N. H. 

Gamma Zeta New ^'ork University. New ^ ork. N. Y. 

Gamma Eta Harvard University. Cambridge. Mass. 

Gamma Theta University of Idaho. Moscow. Idaho. 

Gamma Iota Syracuse University. Syracuse, N. Y. 

Gamma Kappa University of Oklahoma. Norman. Okla. 

Gamma Lambda Iowa State College, Ames, Iowa. 

Gamma Mu Washington State College. Pullman, Wash. 

Gamma Nu Washburn College, Topeka, Kan. 

Gamma Xi Dennison University, Granville. Ohio. 

ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Boston, Mass. Nashville. Tenn. 

Buffalo, N. Y. Cleveland, Ohio. 

ItSaca. N. Y. Columbus, Ohio. 

New York Cily, N. Y. Louisville, Ky. 

PSiladelphia, Pa. Pillsburg, Pa. 

Schenectady, N. Y. Chicago, 111. 

The Kappa Sigma Club o. Ne..- York, N. Y. Danville, 111. 

Dcnville, V'a. Indianapolis. Ind. 

Lynchburg, \'a. Milwaukee, \X is. 

Newport News, V'a. Fort Smith, Ark. 

Norfolk, \'a. Kansas City, Mo. 

Richmond, Va. Little Rock, Ark. 

Washington, D. C. Pine Bluff, Ark. 

Concord, N. C. S. Louis, Mo, 

Durham, N. C. Jackson, Miss. 

Kingston, N. C. New Orleans, La. 

Wilmington, N. C. Ruston, La. 

.Atlanta, Ca. Texas, Ark. 

Birmingham, .Ala. V'icksburg, Miss. 

Mobile, Ala. Waco. Texas. 

Mcntgomery, Ala. Yazoo City. Miss. 

Savannah. Ga. Denver, Colo. 

Chattanoora. Tenn. Sill Lake City, Utah 

Covington. Tenn. San Francisco, Cal. 

lackson, Tenn. Portland, Ore. 

Memphis, Tenn. Seattle, Wash. 
Page Eighly-six 




X 

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Cpsiilon Cijarge of ^ijeta 
JDelta Cf)i 

{EiUtUhcJ Ma\/ 12. 1653) 



Colors: Black, While and Blue. 

Floiver : Red Carnation. 

Cem; Ruby. 



YELL 

Ziprick! Ziprick! Hi! Ki! Si 
Epsilon! Epstlon! 
Theta Delia Chi! 



FR.ATRES IN F.^CULTATE 
.Amos Ralph Koontz. M. A. Charles Chapman Snow, B. S. 

FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 

John Halpin Wright Henry Atwill Turner 

Preston Philips Taylor Richard Otis Palmer 

John Hilliard Healy Cecil Conard Graves 

Clifford Pierpont Ladd George Baskerville Zehmer 

Harvey Pace Williams 

PLEDGES 

L. Corling Harrison Robert E. Jones 

P. Allen Taliaferro 



Pa^e ,\ine(j) 




w <1 



ci^ 




E\)tta Selta Ct)i 

{Fountlcil at Union College. 1848) 



CHARGES 

Beta Cornell University. 1870. 

Gamma Deutero.N' University of Michigan. 1889. 

Delta Deuteron University o( California. KCO. 

EpsilON College of William and Mary. 1853. 

Zeta Brown University. 1853. 

Zeta Deuteron McGill University. 1901. 

Eta Bcwdoin College. 1854. 

Eta Deuteron.. Leiand Stanford. Jr.. University. 1903. 

TheTA Deuteron Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 1890. 

Iota Harvard University. 1856. 

Iota Deuteron Williams College. 1891. 

Kappa Tufts College. 1856. 

Kappa Deuteron University of Illinois. 1908. 

Lambda Boston University, 1877. 

Mu Deuteron Amherst College, 1885. 

Nu University of Virginia, 1857. 

Nu Deutercn Lehigh University. 1884. 

Xl Hobard College. 1857. 

Omicron Deutero.N' '. Dartmouth College, 1 869. 

Pi Deuteron College of the City of New ^ork, 1881 . 

Rho Deuteron Columbia University, 1883. 

SiCMA Deuteron University of Wisconsin, 1895. 

Tau Deuteron University of Minnesota, 1892. 

Phi Lafayette College, 1867. 

Cm University of Rochester. 1867. 

Chi Deuteron George Washington University. 1896. 

Psi Hamilton College, 1868. 

Xl Deuteron University of Washington, 1913. 



Page NinclH-onc 



<1 




#rabuate d^rgaiii^ationg of ^fjeta Delta Ciji 



1:1111;. 

ni-purjuion, lss;j. 



Clii. I'.Hi: 



Cannii.'i 1 ii'iihTun Assm-iiil iciii dI' TlH'ta lii'lia Clil. IMi'.i. 

ICpsiliin Aluniiii Assnciation. 11104. 

Klislliin Vii'iitiTon. 'I'hlrt.vsl.x Chth, ]'.)0:!. 

Zi'Ia Aliimiii Assticiatioii. ISDs. 

>!eln iKnUtM-dii Alnrnui Assticiatiipii. 1002. 

Kta Cliaplcr Ilniisc CdriHiral ion. ISIOl. 

l-'ta Uoiireron Aluiniii AsHocial ion, 11)0.'. 

Iota (Ii-aduato Associnlion. 1!MI2. 

Thi'ta Delia clii Associalion uf Williams ('ollc};c\ 

KSippa Charjit' of Ihc TluMa Uella riii Kratcrnity ('< 

l.aiiiliila (Jracluarc As.sociation. ISHO. 

Thi'la lii'Iia Chi r.uililiivi; Association, Cliantpaijsn. III. 

Nfw Voi-k Assrx-iat ion o!' I.itinlida .\liiinni. 

Mil UiMili'i-on Assoi-iation of Tliila Helta Chi Society. 1 MIO. 

Nil lleutel-on Alnnini Association. lOO.S. 

Xi rharfie of Tiii'la Helta Clii Coipoi-at ion. It.lOT. 

Tile tunici-on Sur\'ivoi-s ,\ssocialion. llMi.s. 

nniicroii lleilleroii Aiiilllili .\ssocial ion. 

(Iraihiate ,\ssociaiion of I'i Iieuleron. lltnii. 

Kho Aliiinni Assncialiim. IIIOT. 

Itlio Iienleron AUiinni .Association. l;'0:i. 

Illio lieuti'ron Company. II104. 

Si;;ma Iieiilei-on Allinuii Association of Tlie 

Tlie Wisi-onsin Association of Tlieta Hella Chi 

Tan Peiiteron .Mnmni .\ssociatioii. 

I'hi .Mnmni .Associaticm. 11104. 

Chi .Mntniii .Association. 

Clii .\Uimni Association of New Ymk. V.iiili. 

Clii Iiinileron (iradnale Association. T.iiH. 

I'si .\lumni .Association. 

(ii-ailiiate Clnli of Theta Helta Chi, New York, 

New York Cradnalc Association, 1 S5G, 

New l-'nulanil .Vssociation. 1.SS4. 

Rhode Island Alumni Association of Theta Delta Chi, l.sns. 

Central New A'ork (Iradiiafe .Vssociation of Theta Delta Chi, lOOo. 

Itochester Cradnate Association of Theta Delta Chi, IIIOL'. 

I'.nffalo Cradnate .Association. IMIl. 

Cradliate Association of Tlleta Delta Chi of Weslein rcnnsylvania. 

Central (Ji-adnate .Association. Chicago. I.SOO. 

Kansas City Tlradnate .Association of Theta Delta Chi. I'.mT. 

Minnesota .'\ssoi-iation. I'.HIO. 

The Theta Delta Chi. Montreal. 11107. 

l-:aslei'n .Maine ,\ssociation. IIIOT. 

'I'heta Delta Chi Corporation of Khode 

The Connecticut .\ssociation of 'I'heta 

California Cradiiale .Assoc-iati(»n of 

.N'oflhwesterii Ci-adiiate .Association of Tliela Delta Chi, Seattle. T.iOO. 



Delta 

1 N.sr. 



isoi;. 



Island. liiO.S. 
Delta Chi. Kios. 
Theta Delta Chi. ]S!17. 
>f Tliela Delta Chi, Seattle 



The Iloslon Clnh of Theta Delta Chi, T.lol), 

Cleveland .Mnmni .Association of Tlleta Delta Chi. litlO. 

'I'he Cenli-ai Illinois Association of Theta Delia clii, I'.ai.s. 

Kappa Semi-Cenlennial Fnnd Trnstees. 

I'si llonsc 'I'nistees. 

Chi Dentei-on Fund Trustees. lilOG. 

I'hi Mouse Trustees. 

Association of Theta Delta Chi. IS'.IT. 

Tlleta Delta Chi I'ress. 11107. 

(iradnale CInli of Theta Delta Chi. ISIMI. 

Tlleta Delta Chi Founders' Corporation, 11112. 

Washinglon (Jradnate Association of Tlleta Delta Chi, I'.Mo. 

Colnmhia Kiver .Association of Theta Delta Chi. lull. 

The Theta Delta Chi Association of the State of A'irsinia. T.ill. 

The Soiitliern Tier (Jradiiate Association of Theta Delta Chi. V.ill. 

Sonthern California Oradnate .Association of 'I'heta Delta Chi. lol'j 

Central llliio Alumni Association of Theta Delta Chi. 11I12. 

The rhlladelphia llradnate Association of Theta Delia Chi. IPl:'.. 

Weslern Maine Associalion cd' Tlieta Delta Chi. IHI:!. 



Page I\ini:lv-tTvo 




(§amma Cijapter of $i ^appa 
^Iplja 

{FounJeJ at the L'ni crsify of Virginia, I8C8) 



Floaers: Lily of ihe Valley and Gold Slandard Tuhp. 
Chapter Flower: Pansy. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 



Franklin Mason Barnes 
William Seymour Brent 

Hugh Alexander Campbell 

Armistead Churchill Gordon 
Lewis Jones 

John Raymond Lawson 

Robert Murphy Newton 



Henry Godwin Parker 

WiLBURN Stephen Shackelford 
James Warren Stephens 
Frank Bowen Tolson 

Arthur Peoples Tucker 
John Lewis Tucker 

Edward Brent Wells 



Ernest Linwood Wright 



PLEDGE 
Paul Barrincton Elcan 



fratres in LRBE 

Dr. G. .a. Hankins C. M. Barnes 

Dr. G. G. Hankins 



Page Xinel\j'six 



<1 




'■ ^ 




3^\ i^appa ^Ipfja iBirectorp 

FOUNDERS 

•Frederick Southcate Taylor. B. A Norfolk, Va. 

*JuLiAN Edward Wood, M. D Elizabeth Cily. 

Littleton Waller Tazewell Norfolk, \'a. 

♦Robertson Howard. M. A., M. D., LL, D Washingion. D. 

*James Benjamin Schlater Richmond. Va, 



N. C. 
C. 



ACTIVE CHAPTERS 
Name Location 

Alpha University of Virginia University, Va. 

Beta Davidson College Davidson, N. C. 

Gamma Wilham and Mary College Williamsburg, Va. 

Delta Southern University Greensboro, Ala. 

ZeTA University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tenn. 

Eta Fulane University New Orleans. La. 

Theta Southwestern Presbyterian University Clarksville. Tenn. 

Iota Hampden-Sidney College Hampden-Sidney. Va. 

Kappa Transylvania University Lexington. Va. 

Omicron "Richmond College Richmond, Va. 

Pi Washington and Lee University 1 .exington. Va. 

Tau University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. N. C. 

UpsiLON Alabama Polytechnic Institute Auburn. Ala. 

Cm University of the South Sewanee. Tenn. 

Psi North Georgia Agricultural College Dahlonega. Ga. 

Omega State University Lexington, Ky. 

Alpha Alpha Trinity College Durham. N. C. 

Alpha Gamma Louisiana Stale University Baton Rouge. La. 

Alpha Delta Georgia School of Technology \tlanta. Ga. 

Alpha Epsilon North Carolina .4. & M. College Haleigh. N. C. 

Alpha Zeta University of Arkansas Fayetteville. Ark. 

Alpha Eta University of State of Florida Gainesville. Fla. 

Alpha Iota Vlillsaps College 'ackson. Miss. 

Alpha Kappa Missouri School of Mines Rolla, Mo. 

Alpha Lambda Georgetown College Georgtown, Ky. 

Alpha Mu University of Georgia Athens. Ga. 

Alpha Nu University of Missouri Columbia. Mo. 

Alpha Xl University of Cincinnati Cincinnati. Ohio. 

Alpha Omicron Southwestern University Georgetcwn. Texas. 

Alpha Pi Howard College '^asl Lake. Ala. 

Alpha Rho Ohio Slate University Columbus, Ohio. 

Alpha Sigma University of California Berkeley. Cal. 

Alpha Tau University of Utah ~ all Lake Cilv. Utah. 

Alpha Upsilon New York University New York. N. 't'. 

Alpha Phi Rutgers College New Brunswick. N. J. 

Alpha Chi Syracuse University Syracuse. N. ^'. 

Alpha Psi Iowa State College .Ames, Iowa. 

Alpha Omega Kansas State Agricultural College 

Beta Alpha Pennsylvania Stale College Gettysburg, Pa. 



* Deceased. 



Pa^c /Vinc/Ji -seven 



«<1 




a 



$i i^appa ^Ipfja 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS 

Alumnus Alpha Richmond, \ a. 

Alumnus Beta Memphis, Tenn. 

Alumnus Gamma White Sulphur Springs, W. Va. 

Alumnus Delta Charleston, S. C. 

Alumnus Epsilon Norfolk, Va. 

Alumnus Zeta Dillon. S. C. 

Alumnus Eta New Orleans, La. 

Alumnus Theta Dallas. Texas. 

Alumnus Iota Knoxville, Tenn. 

Alumnus Kappa Charlottesville, \'a. 

Alumnus Lambda Opelika, Ala. 

Alumnus Mu For' Smith, Ark. 

Alumnus Nu Birmingham. Ala. 

Alumnus Xi Lynchburg, Va. 

Alumnus Omicron Spartanburg, S. C. 

Alumnus Pi Gainesville, Ga. 

Alumnus Rho Lexington, Ky. 

Alumnus Sigma Raleigh, N. C, 

Alumnus Tau Salisbury, N. C. 

Alumnus Upsilon Charlotte, N. C. 

Alumnus Phi Hattiesburg. Miss. 

Alumnus Chi Muskogee, Okla 

Alumnus Psi Pensacola, Florida. 

Alumnus Omega Nashville, Tenn. 



Page NinelD-eighl 




< 

X 



< 

a, 

D. 

< 




m <] 



\i\ 




9 




^Ipija Heta Cl)apter of 
l^appa :l[lpija 



(EslaklishcJ in 1890) 



Colors: Crimson and Old Gold. Flowers: Magnolia and Red Rose. 

Chapter Flower: Violel. 

YELL 



K. A. Kappa, 
K. A. Alpha, 
.Alpha Zela 
Kappa Alpha. 



FRATRES IN COLLEGIO 
Thomas Chapman Tilley 

John Davis Huffines. Jr. 

Harry Randall Van Horne 

Edward Macruder Tutwiler .Addison 
Richard Brownley Gayle 
John Alcer Flick 

William Benjamin Tilley 

Gerould McLean Rumble 

Samuel Hansford Hurt 

Laurie Collins Green 

PLEDGE 

Iames Frederick Carr 



fr.atre in URBE 

Spencer Lane 



f^uge One HunJreJ anj Two 



Ivappa iHlpfja Directory 



ACTIVE CHAPTERS. 

Alpha Wasliinglon and Lee Universily, Lexington, Va. 

Gamma University of Georgia. Athens, Ga. 

Epsilon Kraory College, Oxford, Ga. 

ZetA Randolph-Macon College, Ashland. Va. 

Eta Richmond College, Richmond. Va. 

Theta -Jniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky. 

Kappa Vlercer University, Macon. Ga. 

Lambda University of Virginia, Charlottesville. Va. 

Nu \Iabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. Ala. 

Xl Southwestern University, Georgetown, Texas. 

OmiCRON Universily of Texas, Austin. Texas. 

Pi University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Tenn. 

Sigma Davidson College, Davidson, N. C. 

Uhsilon University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. N. C. 

Phi Southern University. Greensboro, Ala. 

Chi Vanderbilt University. Nashvile. 1 enn, 

Psi Tulane University, New Orleans, La. 

Omega Central University of Kentucky, Danville. K.y. 

ApHA Alpha University of the South, Sewanee, Tenn. 

Alpha Beta University of Alabama. Tuscaloosa. Ala. 

Alpha Gamma Louisiana Stale University, Baton Rogue, La. 

Alpha Delta Willliam Jewell College, Liberty, Mo. 

Alpha Zeta William and Mary College, Williamsburg, \'a. 

Alpha Eta Westminster College. Fulton, Mo. 

Alpha Theta Translyvania University, Lexington, Ky. 

Alpha Kappa University of Missouri. Columbia. Mo. 

Alpha Mu Millsaps College. Jackson, Miss. 

Alpha Nu The George Washington Universily, Washington, D. C. 

Alpha Xi University of California. Berkley. Cal. 

Alpha OmiCRON University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. Ark. 

Alpha Pi Leland Stanford. Jr.. University. Palo Alto. Cal. 

Alpha Rho West Virginia University. Morganlown. W. Va. 

Alpha Sigma Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. 

Alpha Tau Hampden-Sidney College. Hampden-Sidney, V^a. 

Alpha Phi Trinity College. Durham. N. C. 

Alpha Omega North Carolina Agr. and Mech. College, Raleigh. N. C. 

Beta Alpha Missouri School of Mines, Rolla. Mo. 

Beta Beta Bethany College, Bethany. W. Va. 

Beta Gamma College of Charleston. Charleston, S. C. 

Beta Delta Georgetown College. Georgetown. Ky. 

Beta Epsilon Delaware College. Newark. Del. 

Beta Zeta University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 

Beta Eta ' 'niversity of Oklahoma. Norman. Okla. 

Beta Theta Washington University, Si. Louis, Mo. 

Beta Iota Orury College. Springfield, Mo. 



Pa"7c One HunJrctl and Three 




4} 




^appa iHlpija 



ALUMNI CHAPTERS AND SECRETARIES 

Alexandria, La Nauman Scolt. 

Anniston, Ala Walker Reynolds. 

Atlanta, Ca William Niller, 619 Equitable Building. 

Baltimore, Md E. R. Buracker, Jr., 2800 Calverl Street. 

Birmingham, Ala F. B. Laiade, Sterner Building. 

Boston, Mass Cyrus, W. Beale, 26 Garden Street, Cambridge, Mass. 

Canal Zone Dr. W. M. James. Ancon Hospital, Ancon, Canal Zone. 

Charleston. W. Va S C. Liiilepage. 

Chattanooga, Tenn John W. Evans. First National Bank. 

Columbia, S. C B. P. Barron, L. ^ E. Bank Building. 

Columbia University- Dr. Rupcri Taylor, Livingston Hall. 

Columbus, Ca Lyman Buitolph. 

Denver, Colo DeLos Walker, Fire and Police Commission. 

Fort Smith, Ark Dr. Clark Wood. 

Hampton, Newport News, Va H. H. Holt. 

Hattiesburc, Miss Stokes V. Robertson. 

Houston, Texas Ceorpe D. Sears. 

Huntington. W. Va E. W. Townsend. 

Ithaca. N. Y D. C. Reib. 

Knoxville, Tenn W. P. Toms. 

Lexington, Ky Harry C. Stucky. 

Little Rock, Ark A. W. Dobyns. 

Los Angeles, Cal Emerson L. Duff. 409 Lissner Building. 

Memphis, Tenn H. F. Daniels, Porter Building. 

Muskogee, Okla George A. Lcwrry. 

Nashville, Tenn Thomas G. Watkins, Stahlman Building. 

New Haven, Conn Paul Rider. 16 York Square. 

New Orleans, La Arthur Moreno, 606 Common Street. 

New York CiTi' Joseph D. Truxton. Essex Falls. N. J. 

Norfolk. Va R. W. Waldrop, Jr., 73 Boush Street. 

Paris, Tenn W. C. Jernigan. 

Raleigh. N. C A. T. Bcwler. Citizens' National Bank. 

Richmond, Va L. F. Blanton. 1108 East Main Street. 

Salt Lake City Henry J. Brothers. 71 Commercial Block. 

San Antonio, Texas Listen A. Casey, 5 1 9 Moore Building. 

San Francisco Roy G. Thompson. 40 Powell Street. 

Shreveport, La Newton B. Stoer. 

Springfield. Mo Vance Cnss. 

St. Louis, Mo E. W. Lewis, 5987 Page Avenue. 

Tampa, Fla J. M. Shackleford, Jr. 

Washington, D. C Charles B. Coflin. 1517 P. Street. N. W. 

Wilmington, Del A. T. Davenport, Y. M. C. A. Building. 



Page One Hundred and Four 




Abbol B. D. Peachy. Jr. 

Father Superior E. P. Wricht 

Ahholeu H. G. Parker 

Mother Superior Lewis Jones 

Keeper of the Cale Ed. Addison 

Keeper of the Cellar J. B. O'Neill 




MEMBERS 

R. M. Neuton 

R. M. GiLLIONS 

George Ben Gedoy 

J. L. Tucker 

A. P. Tucker 

P. L. WiTCHLEV 

W. B. TiLLEY 

Sam Hurt 



Page One llunjrej anj Ft^'C 



<1 




<] 




€c!jo election 



Most Eloquent Speaker H. L. Harris 

Most Popular Man "Pipe" WrigHT 

Most Intellectual Man FERGUSON 

Best Business Man J. L. TuCKER 

Best Atl 'Round College Man "PiPE" WrighT 

Best Football Placer Bertschey 

Handsomest Man JaCK Wright 

Ideal Professor RiTCHIE 

Best Poet Derring 

Best Prose Writer H. L. HARRIS 

Most Eccentric Man J. B. O'NEILL 

Best Political Boss J. L. TuCKER 

Most Refined Man "PeTE" CaLDWELL 

Anyl(n>ardest Man NORRIS SoMERS 

Biggest Calico Sport Brent Wells 

Misogynist Hamlin 

The Grind ShaNDS 

The Greenest Man Green 

Biggest Tobacco Bum Bill Brent 

Biggest Loafer Geo. Ben Geddy 

Busiest Man Max Blitzer 

Perfect Lady W. D. HARRIS 

"//" Nat Jennings — Brent Wells 

Most Reliable Man "Pipe" WrigHT 

Basketball HoWARD JONES 

Baseball "BuCK" TuCKER 



Pi'gc One Hundred and Six 




J. B. O'Neill 
Lewls Jones 



CHARTER MEMBERS 

A. P. Tucker 
J. L. Tucker 



H. G. Parker 
Ed. Addison 



J. R. Lawson 

H. S. Hutchison 

G. M. GooDE 

R. Howe 



MEMBERS 



O. W. Frey 

T. A. LupTON 

J. D. HUFFINES 

R. T. Caldwei l 

G. M. Rumble 



Page One Humlreil ar.J 5<r'cn 




cG 



n 



Z\)t (^orbonj^ope literarp Clut 

{Founded February 24. 1914) 

Xlotto: "An incurable ilch for scribbling seizes many, and grows invelerale in iheir insane breasts." 

Flomer: Wild Cherry Blossom. Colors: Green and While. 

Drinlf : Saturated Solution of Nectar. 



OFFICERS 

P. Lewis Witchley President. 

John W. Smith. Jr Vice-President. 

H. Lee Harris Secretary- Treasurer. 



CRITICS 



Mr. F. p. Ladd 



J. W. Stephe.vs 



MEMBERS 
P. Lewis Witchley 

John W. Smith. Jr. 

X'iCTOR E. G. Emerv 
H. Lee Harris 

Bathurst D. Peachy 
J. W. Stephe.ns 

Henry G. Parker 

H. R. VanHorne 

W. S. Shackelford 
R. E. P. Ham 

J. .4. Fuck 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Mr. Frederick P. Ladd 



Page One Hundred and Eight 




MW /I 





potgtooob Clut 

(Organized December, 1907) 
"Sic juvat transcenjere montei" 



Dr. J. S. Wilson 
Prof. J. W. Ritchie 
Prof. G. O. Ferguson 
Prof. F. D. Goodwin 
Prof. A. R. Koontz 
Prof. C. C. Snow 
Prof. John Tyler 

P. L. WiTCHLEY. 



13 



J. H. Wright, '13 



B. D. Peachy. '14 
H. A. Turner, '14 
H. G. Parker. 14 
E. L. Wright, '15 
V. E. G. Emery. -15 
J. W. Stephens, '16 
W. C. Ferguson, '16 
H. P. Williams, '16 
W. S. Shackelford, 



16 



Page One Hundred and A ine 




cCi 




Can Hou Smaginc 

Somers seeing an amoeba with the naiced eye? 

Bonney losing fifty pounds avoirdupois? 

Koontz preaching a sermon ? 

Gurley acting like a "Due?" 

G. Oscar Ferguson buying a gold brick? 

Dr. Tyler preparmg the fragrant H S? 

or 

Henry Billups lecturing on Prohibition? 

H. L. Harris with a correct opinion of his literary ability? 

Outland saying anything worth a listener's ear? 

Muncaster spending ten cents to see a game? 

Palmer with a limited vocabulary of profanity? 

Trice knocking Dr. Draper through the ropes? 

The Flat Hat filled with real news? 

Dr. Calhoun not dispensing his philosophy? 

Dr. Hall assisting Mr. Person as fire chief? 



Page One HunJretl and Ten 



«<1 





9 



^ttjleticg 

ANY account of athletics for such a publication as the present one mu t 
necessarily be inccmplete, owing to the fact that material must go to the 
press before the end of the basketball season. Football is now a memory, 
basketball occupies the spotlight at present, and whatever is said of base- 
ball and track work must be in the nature of a prediction. 

1 he memory of our grid.ron history is a peculiarly pleasant one. Com- 
mencing with four of last year's team as a nucleus. Coach Draper developed a 
machine that made a credtabie stand against its opponents in every contest. Cap- 
tain Wright was assisted in the back field by Tilley. a veteran of three years, and 
Bertschey, the best quarterback developed here in recent years. 1 his combinat.on 
possessed both speed and experience, but fell a trifle shoit in weight. The final 
game with Richmond College on the local gridiron will be held up, a shining light 
for future teams, as an example of what spirit and love for Alma Mater can 
accomplish. 

The basketball season is now in progress, and has not arrived at a stage where 
a retrospective view can be held. To date, the team, handicapped by the absence 
of Captain Turner, has defeated Hampden-Sldney and Richmond College, beside 
other teams outside the league. Whatever follows, the season must still be accounted 
a success by virtue of the victories already achieved. 

As for baseball, here we must take a dip into the future. The prospects are 
bright. Captain Peachy, Tucker. Addington. Jones. Shiers, Combs, all 'Vars:ty 
men, make the foundation for a formidable team, while the cream of last year s 
scrub team is available and will be of great aid in filling the vacant positions. 

Track work has been carried on throughout the year, except when the weather 
conditions prevented outdoor work. Captain McAllister and Manager Frey have 
had a good sized squad under their supervision in preparation for the annual spring 
meet. 

The session of 19! 3-' 14 witnessed the inauguration of a new system of financial 
management. By action of the Council, season tickets were sold carrying admis- 
sion to all athletic contests. This scheme bids fair to solve the problem of finances 
which has vexed the local athletic authorities for many years. 



Page One HanJreJ and Thirteen 



.n 




!W <1 





^tljletic Bircctorp 

OFFICERS 

P. Lewis Witchlev President. 

John H. Wright Vice-PresiJenl. 

Clarence Jennings Treasurer. 

Prof. John Ritchie Faculty Representative. 

p p f AYLOR Student Representative. 

Dr. D. W. Draper Athletic Director. 



Page One Hundred and Fourteen 




DEXTER WRIGHT DRAPER. M. D. 
Physician ami Physical Director 



A potent force in the success of the College alhtelics during the past year was the fact that the 
College authorities had procured a very competent athletic director in the person of Dr. D. W. Draper. 
Dr. Draper is a Pennsylvania man, and at this university played for four years at tackle on the eleven, 
and was four years chosen on Walter Camps All-American Football Team. From Medical School 
"Doc" went to the University of Texas, where he acted as football coach. Later he served as physical 
director in the New York high schools, and finally at Franklin and Marshall College, where he turned 
out a winnmg football team. From there he came to William and Mary. 



JfootljaU 



SCHEDULE 

October 4 William and Mary vs. Virginia Military Institute. 

October 11 — William and Mary vs. Richmond Blues. 

November I — William and Mary vs. Randolph-Macon (championship)- 

November 8 — William and Mary vs. Richmond College (exhibition). 

November 15 — William and Mary vs. Hampden-Sidney (championship). 

November 22 — William and Mary vs. Richmond College (championship). 



VARSITY 

Bertschey Qiarler Bacl(. 

"Jack" Wright Full Back. 

Howard Jones Right Half Bacl(. 

A"^°'^°N { Left Half Beck. 

NoURSE Ccnlcr. 

Wallace Right Tackle 

Stone | ^^,, 7-^^^,^. 

Jennings I 

HeDRICK \ r}„l 11^ ,1 

e, i l\toht ijuarJ. 

SOMERS I 

P. P. Taylor 1 1 ^,r- ,1 

,-, } Lcfti^uarJ. 

Page I 

5'LUAM 1 RightEml. 

Ferguson / 

Gayle Left EnJ. 



Addington 

Blitz ER 

Boyd 

Doss 

Gray 

Lewis, K,. S. 



SCRUBS 
Lewis, H. M. 

MoRRISSETTE 

Nebi.ett 

NoRRIS 

Outland 
Prillaman 



Rothwell 
Turner 
Wood 
Woods 

ZiON 



Pasti: One HunJreJ and Sc-eiilccii 




< 

H 

_: 
< 

< 



<1 




/ en 




n 



Combs Catcher 

Garnett Pitcher 

Peachy Shortstop 

Shiers First Base 

AddiNCTON Second Base 

Tucker Third Base 

Jones Right Field 

ROTHWELL . Center Field 

Newton Left Field 



SUBSTITUTFS 




Williams 


Brooks 


Shackelford 


Zehmer 



Page One Hundred and Nineteen 



^»fa. 




' ^^1 


1 '^ 


l^iil 




l^v^l 






Ui 



z 
o 

I- 
u 
< 



< 

i- 
_I 

< 

m 

en 
< 



^ 



-■Sjljyaap^ 



s_sli 




paskettiall 

CHAMPIONSHIP SCHEDULE 

February 13- William and Mary vs. Hampden-Sidney, at Hampden-Sidney. 
February 14 — William and Mary vs. Randolph-Macon, at Ashland. 
February 18 — William and Mary vs. Richmond College. ■\l Williamsburg. 
February 21 — William and Mary vs. Randolph-Macon, at Williamsburg. 
February 28 — William and Mary vs. Hampden-Sidney. at Williamsburg. 
March 7 — William and Mary vs. Richmond College, at Richmond. 

V.ARSIT^' 

Howard Jones R,g/,/ ForaarJ. 

S. L. Bertschey Left ForaarJ. 

"Dick" Gayle Center. 

G. B. Zehmer Right CuarJ. 

W. E. ZiON Left CuarJ. 

H. A. Turner. Captain, was unforlunalcly taken sick early in ihe season. 

Page One Hiinjrcl anJ Taent^-one 










'FOSTER' 



VAN' 



PIPE 




■'MeR. SWEENEY" 




EN6AGEMEnT5-191314. 


■PIPP! liAYtS STORE, - 


DEC,20. 


rN0V.2l-hAMPT0n. 


' ^^^ 


CLflREMOMT, - 


TEB. 10. 


MOV. 24,- W 1 LU fl ri <v-M ARY. 


B i-^ 


HEWPORTnEWS,- 


FEB. 20. 


rHOV.25,-OLD POIMT. 




LflnEXA, 


MAR, 25. 


nOV.26,-PflRK5LCY. 


K^^B 


BURKVILLE, - 


APR.l. 


nOV.27,-EA5TVlLLE. if ■■ 


AMCLia, 


APR. 2. 


nov.28.-omhCocK. uN— 


HEWPORT nCWSr 


APR. 24. 


nOV.29,-EXM0RE. iHMl' 5UKREY C.H. 


MAY 7 




^agesJ from tfje ©iarp of Samuel ^tp^i 

His Trip to Ashland 

November /, /9I3. Up this day betimes and by steam tram to Ashland 
Citty where was a great football match-contest wherein did eleven great fellowes 
and strong from Williamsburg contend with eleven from a college called Ran- 
dolphe-Macon. Had this day dinner in Ashland with an exceeding charming 
damosel whose charm I deemed no whit the less for that she did pray Randolphe- 
Macon might triumph. Came two fellowes to me saying they hath heard I was 
fain to wager many pounds on the outcome of the contest. The which I did 
deny, pleading that my lords, the faculty-masters do frown with misapproval upon 
the laying of moneys on a game. Whereat was great mirth among them, one 
asking if there were not other causes wherefore I did refuse to wager, which, God 
wot, there were. So out upon the field where was gathered a great multitude of 
people and as fair damosels as I have beheld this many days. Soon did blow a 
whistle whereon the play begun. Full sixty minutes did the twain teams struggle, 
and gallantly, but withal, not even, forsomuch as Randolphe-Macon did display 
greater prowess in especiall one Driver, a small fellowe, but withal exceeding 
active. Did hear a little churl to say, with great wit methought "What it doth 
take to hammer the line, Screw-Driver hath got it," which verily, he hath. Was 
also there one Bane, the which indeed was the bane of the Williamsburgh ladds. 
Sad tayle thought it be, Randolphe-Macon did triumph, what with their greater 
prowess. Yet I could not but think what gameness and great courage have 
William and Mary's ladds this day shewn; and I very proud thereat. What with 
this defeat I was fain to depart from Ashland citty, the which I did in a petroleom 
waggon, having not the patience to await the steam-tram. Arrived to Richmonde 
very cold what with the wind and the great swiftness of our waggon. So to an 
inn, where we did sup very grand and, me thought, somewhat greedy. Had there, 
too, a great beaker of corn-juice, albeit on this too do my faculty-masters frown. 
But so great was my sorrowe that I could not contain my appetite what with the 
importunings of the companie. Thence to a theatre where did divers play acktors 



Page One HattilreJ ami Taentvtiirec 



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disport themselves, but indifferent well methcught albeit some there did deem it 
very fine and laughed greatly, whereat I did meditate "foolish fellowes." Then 
to the street where was a chest-nutt monger and all had again a great feast, the 
which did cost but one shilling, cheap, methought. Again to the inn, exceedingly 
fatigued and low-spirited, and so to bed. 

His Trip to Eastern Shore 

November 25. Up this day betimes and busy all the day preparing against 
my departure to Eastern Shore with the Coledge Quartette. By steam-tram to 
Olde Poynt Comfort and heard the quaitette to sing for the solidery at Ft. 
Munrowe. Good, methcught, and I got there a cheque for the singing, good 
too. By omnibuss to Hampton and late to-bed. 

November 26. Rose this day with the sun and waited long for a steam- 
boate, and so to Cape Charles. And we saw the Atlantick ocean, which is a 
well-known ocean in these parts. By steam-tram to a citty Parksley where was 
this night a quartette-shew. Was with us a negro-fellowe, Elmore by name, 
a comickall churl and he did attire himself in a ministrel-singer's coate of red and 
greene, with white pants and a great yellowe hat and so out upon the streets to 
adveitize for the quartette. 1 he drollest sight, methought, I had beheld this 
many a day, albeit the school-children deemed him a monster and fled from him 
in great tenor. Had this day dinner of a turkey-bird but cooked with too much 
grease, and I sick thereat. What with the Turkey and Greace was within me a 
veritable Balkan war — and a great upheaval. Better presently, and out into the 
towne wearing a new great-ccate and gloves which yesterday I purchased. A 
great ram at shew-time and few did come to heare the quartette, even less than 
an hundred. Master Crawford, the basso, did out upon the stage and made 
merrie jest with the audience, saying, "I thank the both of you for your kind 
attention," and great laughter thereat. To an oyster-house, the quartette-singers 
and Elmore too and had many large and luscious oysters, not cooked. Sat late 
in the night and my host of the inn told many droll tayles. Very tired with my 
travels and so to-bed. 

November 27. Lay late abed albeit this is Thanks-giving day and I have 
much for the which to give thanks to my Lord God. By steam-tram to Eastville, 



Page One Hundred and Tiventy four 




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a fmall lowne. but nice. Met my good friend Kelly and with him to Woodside, 
driving. He hath a she-horse cleped Pearls, the finest ever I saw, fleet, hand- 
some and with great fire and mettle. Saw there Miss Mary, a sweet damosel and 
charming too. Thence to Mistress Costin's, a fine country estate with a most 
gracious hostess. Had there a great Thanlcs-giving-Day dinner, and a merrie 
companie; not too large. What with the tempting viands and the jolly companie 
I ate much, too much I fear. Had allso a piece of a cake that was of Miss Mary's 
baking, very fine, and more cause wherefore to give thanks. The quartette sang 
for our hostess, but indifferent well, they having eaten too heartily, but I blame 
them not. Again to Woodside, very quick what with the fleet Pear! and staid 
untill what time the quartette did sing again. Sang better methought, and to a 
great throng and enthusiastick, and made much moneys. So we dispersed, some 
to the inn, some to Mistress Holland's where was great feasting and dancing, but 
I to Woodside, and eating more, retired. 

November 28. Up early and with Buskey, Kelly and Elmore, we went 
thence to Onancock, part way by steam-tram, part by petroleum waggon. All 
very loathe to depart from Eastville, and I, misogynist though I be, do know the 
reason, and left my heart too. Came a fellowe and gave us a quart of stimulant, 
saying meanwhiles "I be the guy which hath put the quart in the quartette;'" which 
in sooth, he was. To an inn, but too late for dinner, so all to a grocerie store and 
had sandwiches of cheese and ham, all eating and it costing but two shillings 
threepence. Here Elmore again bedecked himself and the towne-folk could not 
but laugh to behold him, in especiall the ladyes. The quartette sang this night 
to a large audience, but of ordinarie intelligence. Master Crawford again essayed 
a droll speach, saying: "Ladyes and gentlemen, as a speaker I rank witii c?.o 
rankest," but heard no dissenting voice, nor yet a litter of laughter, forasmuch as 
the people did not comprehend the humour — dullards. Had more oysters, the 
finest ever I had and ate two dishes, and so to-bed. 

November 28, 29. Slept late and to Exmore afternoon. Was a tavern 
there, but so unkempt withal that Master Young bid us to his sister's. Mistress 
Ashby, and we very grateful thereat. Sang there and made much moneys. Early 
to-bed, rising ere four of the clock, very cold and drowsy, but we needs must 
catch the steam-tram and complained not. So home to Williamsburgh and slept. 
Slept again. Slept more. Still sleepy. 

Page One Hundred an J TTcnfy-five 



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^pt ©uotationsi 



"O that this too, too solid flesh would melt." — Wallace. 

"He loves not well whose love is bold." — Wells. 

"'Tis heaven alone that is given away, 
'Tis only God may be had for the asking." — "Parson" Jones. 

"Come forth unto the light of things, 
Let nature be your teacher." — Prof Ritchie. 

"Neatness in moderation, is a virtue; 
But when it is carried to excess 
It shows littleness of mind." — H. M. Leivis. 

"And with necessity. 
The tyrant's plea, excused his devilish deeds." — Wiichle]^. 

"Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin 
As self-neglecting." — Campbell. 

"What is spirit? No matter. What is matter? 
Never mind. What is mind? It is immaterial." — G. O. Ferguson. 

"Something is rotten in the State of Denmark." — Scheie. 

"But for mme own part it was Greek to me." — Prof. Clark. 

"I am no orator as Brutus is, 
I only speak right on." — Crimsley. 

"One Pinch, a hungry, lean-faced villain." — Davis. 

"This was the most unkindest cut of all." — John Tyler. 



Page One Hundred and Tivenfy-six 



9 



"A good mouth-filling oath." — "Dick" Palmer. 

"My salad days, when I was green." — Norris. 

" 'Tis impious in a good man to be sad." — Addison. 

"Who thinks too little and talks too much." — W. D. Harris. 

"Pains of love be sweeter far 
Than all other pleasures are." — "Pipe" Wright. 

"That old man eloquent." — Dr. Hall. 

"He's tough, man, tough is J. B., 
Tough and develish sly." — O'Neill. 

"Not a word. 
Not one to throw at a dog." — Snoiv. 

"1 do but sing because I must 
And pipe but as the linnets do." — Van Home. 

"~l he man that hath no music in himself, 
Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds. 
Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils."—/. F. Barnes. 

"Eyes that see not." — Somers. 

"O Amos Cottle! Phoebus! what a name!" — Schepn^oes and Scheie. 

"Had sighed to many, though he loved but one."--/. L. Tucker. 

"Two stars keep not their motion in one sphere." — H. H. Jones and Bertsche^. 

"He hath eaten me out of house and home." — Muncaster. 

"There's no art to find the mind's construction in the face." — Blitzer. 



Pa^e One HunJreJ ana Ttvenfy-seven 



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Cdjos from tlje Campus; 



"Could anyone be more handsome?" — H. L. Harris. 

"I am the Alpha and Omega of William and Mary." Gur/ei;. 

"Wh-wh-whell, wh-what do you think of it?" — John Tyler. 

"Dancing is a simple art." — W .E. Sonjcrs. 

"I know all about it." — IV. D. Harris. 

"It's vile to be soiled." — Caldrvell. 

"What's the hurry?" — Jack iVright. 

"Wouldn't that make the angels weep?" — Prof. Ritchie. 

"I approach Caruso every day." — /. F. Barnes. 

"Love is but a digression." — IViichlev. 

"There's a wealth of pleasure in a chew." — Blitzer. 

"Not laurels, but Laura." — /. L. Tucker. 

"Alas! my name gives me away." — Creen. 

"My power lies in my personality." — Crimsley. 

"Bah! away with debutants when there are plenty of old maids. 

"Well, I reckon I'm a logical genius." — G. O. Ferguson. 

"I play an important role." — Van Home. 

"Men coeur (cure) is my heart." — Coodnnn. 

"It's expensive to wear out one's clothes." — Schepmoes. 

"My head is far from my body." — Davis. 

"I'm the pride of Toano." — Nat Jennings. 

"Ich goworry, I should bibbel." — Addison. 

"There Was a time when I was young." — Womacl(. 

"It's bad to be fat, but look at Bonney." — Wallace. 

"It's unsightly to be thin, but look at Wallace." — Bonney. 



Holler. 



Page One Hurnired and Trvent^-eiohl 




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"Mickey" Boyd was seated in the rear of the district courtroom listening 
to an important cases being argued. Upon hearing some amusing testimony, 
he suddenly proceeded to enjoy the joke. 

Judge Tyler: "What is your name, you fellow on the back seat?" 

Boyd: "My name is James Grover Cleveland Boyd, but the boys call me 
"Mickey" for short." 

J. T. : "Two fifty for contempt of court." 

Dick Ham (meeting Dr. Draper upon his return to college for the second 
teim): "Why, howdy. Ham, you look as fat as a Smithfield." 

"Due" Gurley passes two of the fair kind upon the street. 
Mabel: "Who is that student, Martha?" 
Martha: "Oh, I believe his name is Gurley." 

Mabel: "Gee, it's sacriligious to call that fellow Gurley after seeing that 
beard." 

At a formal reception "Due" Green, having devoured all his mayonnaise 
dressing, suddenly exclaimed: "Where did you get this butter? It is the best 
I ever eat." 

Walter Nouise (to Johnny Corbell) : "Johnny, will you get into College 
ne.xt year?" 

Johnny: "Yes, Walter, with ease (E's), I hojie." 

Walter: "Judgmg by mp past experience you will have to make more 
than E's." 



"Due" Robinjcn (seeing Gurley with a lantern on night of the fire) : "Where 
are you going, Gurley?" 

Gurley: "To the fire of course." 
"Due" R.: "Damn!" 

Page One HunJret! and Thiry-one 




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Dr. Tyler (in Economics) : "It's too much trouble to write down all the 
names on my absent list; so, to facilitate matters, all those who are absent just 
drop their names m the box on the outside of the door." 

There's a great demand on the part of English students for a re-dramatiza- 
tion of the Tale of a Tub, given by Dr. Hall on the night of the fire 

Paul Elcan (having been pulled out of the icy James River to the deck of 
a launch on the night of Jan. 28, '14) suddenly asks: "How cold does water 
have to get before it freezes?" 

Dr. Hall (stating relation between ball and ballad in Eng. VIII.) : "Mr. 
Peachy, what kind of ball do you like?" 
"Bat": "Highball, Doctor." 

Tucker: "Come on, Wright, have a drink." 

"Pipe": "Can't do it ; I have to have my picture taken with ^ . M. C. A. 
cabinet." 

John Tyler: "Alas! I am happy." 
"Jack" Wright: "Why?" 

John Tyler: "Because the space in the annual devoted to jokes on my feet 
has been transferred to Dr. Draper." 

Dr. Hall: "Mr. Hamlin, who was Quintilian? A Reman emperor, or 
president of the United States?" 

Hamlin: "One of our first presidents, I think." 

Dr. Hall: "Ya-a-a-as, that's right, a Roman rhetorician." 

Dr. Hall: "What is a split infinitive, Mr. Drewry?" 

DrevkTy (opening his mouth somewhat sleepyly) : "It is . . . ." 

Dr. Hall: "Oh, no thanks, Mr. Drewry, I would rather stay on the 



Page One Hundred and Thirl\i-lwo 




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"Pete" Caldwell (becoming somewhat angered at being cut off while talk- 
ing to a certain party over the phone) : "Why did you ring me off central?" 
Central: "I didn't; the party hung up the receiver!" 

Roane (decidedly downcast upon hearing that the picture with which he 
is to grace his countenance is to be taken a day later) : "That means I've got to 
comb my hair again to-morrow." 

Dr. Draper (to Coffield, who is swinging vigorously at the ball) : "Great 
Scott, Cody, you need a tennis racket; I could do better than that with a tooth 
pick." 

Cody: "You must have played on a mosquito nine." 

The following are two notices which appeared on the bulletin board: 
Lost — Europe since 1815. 
Lost — Martin's Human Body. 

Pro. Jno. Tyler (in Math. XVII.): "Mr. Robinson, how many halves in 
a whole?" 

"Due" Robinson: "It depends on how big the (w)hole is. Prof." 

"Johnny" Corbell (looks for his pound jar of Prince Albert, the contents of 
which had been made to disappear rapidly by one Doss, the roommate of "Johnny." 
Doss: "What are you looking for, "Johnny?" 
"Johnny": "Aw, nuthin" at all; only imaginary sightseein'." 
Doss: "All right then, just imagine the Prince Albert jar to be full of tobacco 
and we'll both take another smoke." 

"Lovey" Elcan (to "Pipe" Wright) : " 'Pipe,' " somebody just told me some- 
thing I don't quite understand." 

"Pipe" (to "Lovey"): "What is it?" 

"Somebody said that married men make the best husbands; what do you 
think about it?" 



Page One Hundred and Thir^-lhree 




ca 




Holler (to Brown) : "Mr. Brown, some one awaits you at your studio." 
Brown: "Is it a student?" 
Holler: "No, a white man." 

Thorpe (in grocery store) : "Give me a bar of soap, please." 

Clerk: "Will you have it scented, sir?" 

Thorpe: "No, sir; that's all right. I will carry it myself." 

"Due" Huffines (passing Moncaster on street) : "Say, Monk, do you know 
what time it is?" 

Monk (looking at his watch): "Yes, sir." (Monk passes hastily on). 

Prof. Bennet (after explaining several factors of drill lesson) : "Mr. Coffield, 
what else goes along to make drill?" 
Coffield: "Brace and bit." 

"Due" Tomlinson: "Say, 'Skip,' where are you going?" 
"Skip": "Oh, up to the campus." 

Tomlinson: "Gee, but I bet that's a fine place; we'll have to go up there 
some time, won't we?" 

"Due" Carr (seeing "Potthooks" Jones standing before a fire) : "Say, Jones, 
you had better look out; you are warping." 

Jones: "No, Carr, I can't help it; I was born that way." 

Dr. Hall (in English IX.) : "Mr. Parker, did you get a good taste of 
Bacon?" 

Parker: "Yes, sir, I had three pieces for breakfast." 



Page One Hundred and Thirty-four 



en 




OTiUlam anb jUarp Alumni in tijc Eebolution 

Richard Bland, student about 1725, the first to announce in a formal 
pamphlet that England and the different colonies of America were Co-ordinate 
Kingdoms united only by the common tie of the Crown. 

Dabney Cark, student in 1 762, patron of the resolution for the appoint- 
ment of the Committees of Correspondence, the first step looking toward united 
action on the part of the colonies. 

Peyton Randolph, student about 1735, first president of the Continental 
Congress. 

George Washington, County Surveyor (1749), appointed by the College, 
and chancellor in 1 789. Commander-in-Chief of the Armies of the United States, 
and first President of the United States. 

Thomas Jefferson, student 1760-1762, author of the Declaration of 
Independence. 

John Tyler, Sr., scholar of the Grammar School in 1754, author of the 
proposition for a convention of the States at Annapolis in I 786. 

Edmund Randolph, student in I 766, opened the proceedings in the Con- 
stitutional Convention at Philadelphia in 1787, by submitting "1 he Virginia Plan." 



Page One Hundred and Thirl\)-fi\'e 



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WaHiam anb Jllarp'si 3|art in ©etjelopmg 

tije ^nion 

I. Louisiana, Arkansas, Missouri, Indian Territory, Oklahoma, Iowa, Minne- 
sota, South Dakota, North Dakota, Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, Mon- 
tana, Wyoming, Kansas, Nebraska, Arizona, Washington, Oregon and 
California annexed to the Union chiefly through four Alumni of the College: 
Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, John Tyler, and General Winfield 
Scott, who conquered Mexico. 

II. The Constitution settled by the construction of Chief Justice John Marshall, 
student in I 780. 

III. The relation of foreign governments to this continent established by the Monroe 

Doctrine, by James Monroe, student in 1775. 

IV. The northeast boundary from New Brunswick to the Rocky Mountains, set- 

tled by John Tyler, student from 1802-7. 



Page One HunJreJ anj Thirl\)-six 



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/ ^r\ 




^rioriticg of Milliam anb M^vv College 

Chartered Fehuary 8, 1693, bv King William and Queen Marp. 

First College in the United States in its antecedents, which go back to the 
College proposed at Henrico (1619). 

First American College to receive its charter from the Crown, under the seal 
of the Privy Council, 1694. Hence it was known as "their Majesties' Royal Col- 
lege of William and Mary." 

First and only American College to receive a coat-of-arms from the Herald's 
College, 1694. 

First College in the United States to have a full faculty, consisting of a 
President, six masters, usher and writing master, 1 729. 

First College to confer medallic prizes; the medals donated by Lord Botetourt 
in 1771. 

First College to establish an inter-collegiate fraternity. The Phi Beta Kappa, 
December 5, 1776. 

First College to have the elective system of study, 1779. 

First College to have the HONOR SYSTEM. 1 779. 

First College to have a chair of Modern Languages, 1 779. 

First Colege to have a chair of Municipal Law, 1779. 

First College to teach Political Economy, 1 784. 

First College to have a chair of History, 1803. 



Page One HiintlrcJ anj Thirt\f-ieven 




3lt Moulb bt :lrgument for a Wnii, Haugl^ter 
for a illonti), anb a Jest Jforeber 



IF 



John Lewis Tucker turned mysogonist. 

Dr. Tyler attempted to write a love story. 

Gurley could see the fire without a ianiern. 

"Cap" Wood should drink at the fountain of wisdom. 

Dr. Draper became reticent. 

Grimsley should carry out his ideas. 

Prof. Koontz should speak at the Y. M. C. A. 

"Sweeney" Blitzer joined the choir at Bruton. 

Campbell asked for credit. 

Wallace became emaciated. 



TO 



See Somers assummg a graceful pose. 

See Dr. Calhoun doing the latest tango. 

See Gurley with an appropriate opinion of himself. 

Have meals a la carte at the boarding house. 

Witness Dr. Hall playing the role of Macbeth. 

Publish the poetic ebullitions of John Tyler. 

Hear a brand new joke in the English room. 

Catch Ferguson napping. 

Hide Blitzer's chewing tobacco. 

Sever "Skip" Witchley's affections from his work. 



Page One Hundred and Thirt\)-eight 




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(German Club 



OFFICERS 



B. D. Peachv 






... Preaiiletit. 


Lewis Jones 








H. R. Van Horne 






.... Secrelar}f. 


F. M. Barnes 












MEMBERS 




B. D. Peachy 


H. 


A. Campbell 


W. B. TlLLEY 


E. L. Wright 


W 


C. Ferguson 


R. B. Gayle 


P. L. WiTCHLEY 


11. 


P. Williams 


F.. M. T. Addison 


H. A. Turner 


H. 


R. Van Horne 


G. M. Rumble 


Lewis Jones 


A. 


P. Tucker 


J. F. Barnes 


T. C. TlLLEY 


C. 


S. HUTCHESON 


W. W. Winsbro 


J. L. Tucker 


F. 


M. Barnes 


H. L. Harris 


G. M. GooDE 


J. 


R. Lawson 


1 W. Smith 


E. B. Wells 


F. 


B. Tolson 


W. E. Somers 


R. O. Palmer 


C. 


P. Ladd 


S. H. Hurt 


G. B. Ceddv 


R. 


M. Gilliam 


Stuart Rothwell 



Proie^.sors Ferguson, Goodwin, Snow, Tyler. 



Page One HunJrcJ and Forl\)-onr 



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OFFICERS 

J. H. Wright .. President. 

E. L. Wright. I'ice-PresiJenl. 

S. L. Bertschey ■ Secrelar\). 

W. T. Stone Treasurer. 









MEMBERS 










Gilliam. R. M. 


SOMERS 


Addison 






Goodwin 


Stone 


Addincton 






Hedrick 


Taylor. P. P 


Bertschey 






Jennings. C. 


Tucker. A. P. 


Blitzer 






Jones. L. 


Wallace 


Bloxton 






Jones. H. H. 


Wright, E. L. 


Combs 






NOURSE 


Wright. j.H. 


Ferguson. 


G. 


O. 


Page 


Zehmer 


Ferguson. 


W 


C. 


Peachy 


ZlON 


Gayle 






Shiers 





Page One Hundred and Forfy-tTDo 



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FIRST-CLASS HO iEL 

"Pete" Caldwell and "Jackass" Harris, Proprietors and Managers. 
Latest Improvements. Baths for Dues. Rates on Application. 

Bucket emptied promptly the 15th of each month. 

Molto : "The more the merrier. 

EXECUTIVE STAFF 

Sister Jno. Smith Chamhermaiil. 

Walter Nourse SteuiarJ. 

"Billy" Ferguson Dcll-Hop. 

Gordon Goode House Detective. 

"Jack" Corbell Chef. 

FUndy Gilliam HeaJ Waiter. 

"Johnny" Tucker Resident Surgeon. 

BOARD BILL BEATERS 

"Beau Brummel" Strvker Lewis Jones 

"Ned" Spencer George Lane "Lanky Dick" Gayle 

The Geddy Brothers "Jim" Stephens Paul Elcan 

GUESTS OF HONOR 
"Sweeney" Blitzer "Cutie" Goodwin 

"Dr." Billups W. T. Brown 

inattention on the part or employees win. be appreciated 

Page One HunJrcJ anJ Forl\)-thrcc 




^1)E j8orti)ern Htgttg 

(Organized in 1909) 
"How far thai little candle throws his beams!" 

OFFICERS 

C^RL Wise Holler, Indiana PresiJenl. 

Oliver Walter Frey, Pennsylvania Vice-PresiJenl. 

Ray Rufus Addincton, Indiana Secretary. 

WiNFIELD Shiers, Massachusetts Treasurer. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Max "Sweeney" Blitzer. ..Ohio. John Brooks O'Neill Connecticui. 

Victor E. G. Emery New York. 



C. P. Ladd New York. 



R. R. Addincton Indiana. 

Max Blitzer New York. 

V. E. G. Emery Ohio. 

O. W. Frey Pennsvlvania 



ROLL 

C. W. Holler Indiana. 

C. P. Ladd New York. 

J. B. O'Neill Connecticut. 

W. Shiers Massacl usetts. 



P. L. WiTCHLEY New York. 

HONORARY MEMBER 
Dr. D. W. Draper Pennsylvania. 



Page One Hundred and Forty-Jour 



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iMantiolin Club 

Motto: Music hath charms to scothe ihe savage breast. 
Object: Pickling discords. Apartment!.: Castle Brown. 

MEMBERS 

W. S. SHACKEi.roRD yiolln 

B. D. Bennett 1 

G. B. GeDDY I jy 1 1- 

F. D. Goodwin ManJolm 

C. E. William-; J 
A. F. Beai.e 

V. M. Geddv ) . . Cuitar 

W. W. WlNSBRO I 

Page One Hundred and Forty-five 




)OUtljU)eSt Clulj 

Motto: Loyal lo duty. Colors: Navy Blue and White. 

Favorite Pastime: Sit back and sleep. 

Favorite Food: Anything that's Brown. Favorite Drinlf : Rays of the moon. 

Fondest Recollection: Mother and Home. Son§ : Home Sweet Home. 

OFFICERS 

W. M. Grimslev President. J. L. AcEE, Jr Secretarx/. 

C. C. Renick Vice-President. F. P. Early Treasurer. 

NoAN Shockley Chaplain. 

MEMBERS 

J. L. AcEE, Jr. W. M. Grimsley A. D. Ownbey W. B. Robinette 

B. D. Bennett H. L. Harris H. A. Prillaman Noan Shockley 
S. T. Davis J. W. Hedrick C. M. Quillen A. R. Smythe 
F. P. Early W. L. Joyce W. B. Ramey Vance Stedman 
W. R. Fletcher E. S. Lewis C. C. Renick W. C. West 

C. M. Gardner W. L. McCormick R. L. Rosenbalm B. W. Woods 
E. E. GivENs H. L. Mitchell I. W. Robertson W. E. Zion 

H. H. Young Faculty Protectorate. 

GUARDIAN ANGELS 
Miss Mary Emma Dressler Miss Josie Arthur Miss Lottie Renick Miss Louise Poff 

Page One Hundred and Fort^-six 



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Cibetuater Clulj 



OFFICERS 

R. M. Newton President. 

D. L. GiLLCONS Vice-PresiJenU 

W. R. Shands Secrelarf). 

O. S. Gray Treasurer. 

MEMBERS 
Barnett Mavnard 

BoNNEV NoRRIS 

BovD Norton 

Cooke Outland 

Drewrv Pierce 

Field Robinson, A. P. 

Jennings, C. Robinson, E. S. 

Jennings. N. H. Roane 

Jones, R. L. Tavlor. R. C. 

Lipscomb Webb, J. D. 

Mattox Weisel 

Wilson 

Page One HurulreJ and Fort\/-scvcn 




jHecklenburg Countp Clulj 

(CharkrcJ February, 9. 1914) 
Motlo: Slick to the Tarheels. Drinlf : Buffalo Llthia Water 





Murray 




L E WIS 




C HARLES 




TUC K ER 




TAY L OR 




ST E RLING 




JOHN 




•■ B UCK" 




••H U TCH" 




GORDON 




ELDRID G E 


OFFICERS 


CHARTER MEMBERS 


President 


Gordon M. Goode 


CM. GOODE 


Charles S. Hutcheson 


Vke-Prciideni 


Arthur P. Tucker 


J. L. Tucker 


John E. Taylor 


Secrelar)) 


G. Murray Goode 


C. S. HUTCHESON 


J. Lewis Tucker 


Treasurer 


C. Sterling Hutcheson 


A. P. Tucker 


A. Peoples Tucker 


Prophet 


J. Eldridce Taylor 


J. E. Taylor 





Page Or>e Hundred and Forl^-eighl 




^ 





]^RKP?ERTQI\ 



"May (he spirit ever linger 
In this wigwam of the blesl." 

Crcal H^eraivance ClarencE JennINCS 

Wcratvance of Bombastu JOHN E. Taylor 

IVeraHJance of Figaros Charles C. Renick 

IVcraivance of S\fcorax JoHN H. HeaLY 

Cronoctfoc of Bombaitu RoB Roy Doss 

Cronoc^oe of Figaros Paul N. Deerinc 

Cronockoe of Sycorax "Pete" Caldwell 

Oapiqueschiphotonombasse W. L. Drewry 

BRAVES 

Cooke Prillaman 

Davis Newton Redden 

Green Norton Spratlev 

Harris, "P. L." Palmer Stone 

James Womack 

/I I -I ) o ; r \ HuFFlNES 

AJoplcJ Pale Face.... f Wilkinson 

Captured hy Pale Face. } fIeld'""^' 

Cone to Happy HunlinQ Ground .... } o 

- - I OHOCKLEV 

Page One Hundred and Forl\)-nine 




^ 




S0UTH51DE CLUB 




Molto: Don't worry. 
Pastime: Smoking tobacco and chewing gum. 

OFFICERS 

J. L. Tucker PresiJenl. 

W. T. Stone Vke-PresuUm. 

H. L. WoMACK Treasurer. 

D. O. Rash Secretary). 

MEMBERS 

Barnes Jones J.^^*^ . „ 

Cheney King Tucker. A. P. 

GooDE Maddox Turner 

Gauldinc Mattox Wallace 

Harris Moore ^*'"'"-'- 

Harrison Neblett. C. B. Williams 

Hamlin Neblett. W. E. Wilkinson 

HuTCHESON Scott Zehmer 

Taylor 

Page One Hundred and Fift\) 







s^^°/^<^«)^ 



"MOVIE CLUB 



RcnJcz'i'ous : The Palace. 

Ccnefa/ Object: The acquisition of economic recreation from strenuous existence 

in the municipahty of Williamsburg. 

OFFICERS 

"Prex" Tyler. LL. D President. 

Lyon Gardner Tyler Vice-Prcsulcnl. 

L. Gardner Tyler- Sccrcforv. 

B. F. Wolfe Treasurer. 

L. G. Tyler Chaplain. 



R. M. Crawford 
J. C. Calhoun 
Van F. Garrett 
T. J. Stubbs 
H. E. Bennett 
G. O. Ferguson 
A. R. KooNTZ 
John Tyler 



MEMBERS 



Study art. 

Gather new jokes. 

Carry little \'an. 

Merely see the "movies." 

Gather material for next days lecture. 

Study socialism. 

Gel the romance. 

Study how to perfect "Talking movies." 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-one 




<n 





3t Clui) 



SUPER-SUPREME IT Nat Jennings 

Supreme IT Wells 

Lc granj IT MuNCASTER 

Moindre grand IT R. H. GuRLEY 

Cenautich IT OuTLAND 

Flesh IT R. P. Wallace 

Bashful IT Thorpe 

Brass IT H. L. Harris 

Booze IT J. F. Barnes 

Profane IT WoMACK 

Flunk IT Geo. Ben Geddy 

Buttit W. D. Harris 

Lale IT Campbell 

Balchelor IT O'Neill 

Fool IT Dr. Draper 

IVidoV) IT KOONTZ 

Tango IT J. W. Smith 

Thin IT BONNEV 

Supercilious IT FliCK 

Spotless IT Caldwell 

Laz]) IT , "Jack" Wright 

Pipet — Tuckii — St(ipil All Three 



Page One Hundred and Fift\)-livo 




Motto: Got a chaw? Let's puddle. 

Favorite Pastime: Bumming, chewmg and spithng. 

Office: Eagles Reshng Club. 

Complaint : The bucket is full. Favorite Flomcr : Sun cuied. 

OFFICERS 

"Sweeney" Bi.itzer Lor J High Maiticalor of Ihe Plug. 

George Booth Chief Dessicator of the Sun-cured. 

"Yank" Shiers Boa Caatigalor of Scrap. 

"Izaak" Walton Kale Cravely's Affinify. 

JUST CH EWERS 

O. W. Frev Apple. 

F. M. Crawford Malt-Pouch. 

Paul Elcan Homespun. 

"Skip" Witchlev Piper HeiJieik. 

Leslie Drewrv Maritana. 

"Pete" Caldwell DrummonJ's. 

Brent Wells An\/ Brand. 

"Bill" Duke Duke's Mixture. 

Page One HumlreJ and Fifl\f three 




A. 


S. 


G. 


c. 


R. 


L. 


O. 


S. 


P. 


B. 


M 


P. 


R. 


L. 


E. 


G. 


R. 


D. 


C. 


B. 



iHacon Clul) 

(Organized December 15, 1913) 
Motto : Failh in Epicurus. 

OFFICERS 

A. S. Forest President. 

G. C. OuTLAND Secretary. 

R. L. RosENBALM 7 reasurcr. 

MEMBERS 

Forest (Fals) Mama for Piano. 

OltlanD (Skinney) N:;ver Satisfied. 

RoSENBALM (Rosy) The Joker. 

Gray ( Baby) Stories ? Never Fini 

Hunt (Tow-head) Never Tells a Lie. 

Gilliam (Maxie) Midnight Comedian. 

Jones (Pot Hooks) Our Samson. 

Field (Guinea) Always Belting. 

Roane (Puss) Jester of tSe House. 

Smith (Mooker) Touch Me N-n-not. 

Chef "Uncle" John 



ihed. 



Pa^e One Hunilred and Fifty-four 




Ccnnisi Club 



OFFICERS 

G. C. OuTLAND President. 

J. F. Barnes Vice-Praident. 

S. T. Davis Secrelary-Treasurer. 

H. L. WoMACK Manager. 

J. E. Taylor Aahtant Manager. 





MEMBERS 




Bonnet 


Harris, W. D. 


Ren:ck 


Brown. W. T. 


Inman 


Robinette 


Caldwell 


Jenkins 


SoMERS, H. C. 


Cooke 


Jennings, C. 


Spratlev 


Drewrv 


Jennings, Nat 


Tavlor. R. C. 


Field 


Jones. R. R. 


Webb, J. D. 


Forbes 


King 


West 


Garnett 


Mattox 


WlNSBRO 


GlVENS 


McCoRMICK 


Wilkinson 


GuRLEV 


Pierce 


Wright, E. I.. 



Page One Hundred and Fift\/-fivc 




^ 




Motto: 

Never do to-day what 
you can pul off 
until to-morrow. 



Colors : 
WKite and Pink. 

Pastime : 

Rough-housing. 

Drink: 
Anythmk we can gel. 

FloJver: 
Daisy. 



YELL 

Hickory, dickory, dickory, dink! 
What's the matter with the white and pink? 
Who are we? What do you think? 
We're the boys who used the ink. 

OFFICERS 

D. P. LoHR PrcilJenl. 

W. C. West Vlce-PresiJenl. 

E. S. BuRFORD Secrelan. 

R. R. Jones Treasurer. 

MEMBERS 
Burt Lewis Simms King Edwards 

Carr Smith Trice Lohr Seekford Somers 

Tuck Farmer West B.H.Hudson 

Forbes Harrison 

Hamlin Fletcher 

MaTTOX ROBINETTE 

PuLLEN Carpenter 

Powers Taliaferro 

Taylor Robertson 

Weisel Crockett 

Wilson Gaulding 

Barney Robinson 

C R. Wood Burtord J.G.Hudson 

I. Q. Wood R- R- Jones 



Pa5e One HuntlreJ and Fifl\;-iix 



1^^^ \^^Ay ^y^ v\7-b^ 



'1913-14- 



H. R.Van Hornr 
First Tenor 

J. F. Barnes 
Second Tenor 






First Bus 



I m'i Vqcprqgram I 



m 



F. M, Crawford 
Second Bass 



I. 

"LAUGHING GAS" 

II. 

"LOVE'S OLD SWEET SONG" 

Mr. Van Horne 

111. 
"SAMS LETTER" 

IV. 
"CATASTROPHIES" 

V. 

•ME AND SI AT THE CIRCUS" 

VI. 
"LITTLE MISS MUFFIT" 

VII. 
SELECTION 

VIII. 
"LARBOARD WATCH" 

IX. 
"UNTIL THE DAWN" 

Sntrrmiseion 



X. 

"THE WANDERING SINGERS PATROL" 

XI. 
"LITTLE COTTON DOLLY" 

XII 

"A NEGRO SERMON" 

Mr. Barnes 

XIII. 
SELECTION 

XIV. 
"FLIRTS" 

XV. 

"A MEDLEY OF SOUTHERN SONGS" 

XVI, 
"BELIEVE ME IF ALL THOSE ENDEAR- 
ING YOUNG CHARMS" 

XVII. 

"CONFESSIONS" 

Mr. Van Horne 

XVIII. 

"PALE IN THE AMBER WEST" 

"Alma Mater" 



Page One HunJreJ and Flffy-seven 



<1 





Xfollo: Cut out ihe rough house. 

Colors: Garnelt and Grey. Favorite Drink- Milk. 

5ong: Hail, hail, the gang's all here. 



OFFICERS 



E. E. GivENS 




PreiiJent. 


\V E ZioN 




Vice-PresiJenl. 


















Chaplain. 




MEMBERS 




GiVENS 


Pierce 


Gayle 


Barnes. J. F. 


Shands 


Flick 


Grimsley 


Garnett 


Stephens 


ACEE 


MORRISSETTE 


Moss 


Ramey 


Z]ON 


Bertschey 


Scott 


GiLLlONS 


Boyd 


Own BEY 


COFFIELD 


RoTHWELL 


QUILLEN 


Guy 


Pace 


Rash 


Hedrick 
Woods 


Smith. J. F 



Page One Hundred and Fifl\)-eight 



a 



ON THE night of March 16, 1914, there met at the home of Mr. G. H. 
Newbury a group of students for the purpose of organizing a club, the 
purpose of which is given below. As yet no name has been given the 
organization, but the purpose has been definitely stated and a constitu- 
tion has been drawn up and adopted. 

The purpose is three-fold; 

1st. That we live a life of personal purity. 
2nd. That we uphold one standard of purity for both sexes. 
3rd. That we disseminate these standards among our fellow-students as far 
as possible. 

The constitution is not secret and may be read by any one wishing to do so. 

The founding of this organization is due most especially to the efforts of Mr. 
Newbury. 

In choosing the founders he selected one man from each of the fraternities and 
several student representatives. 

Following are the names of the men who placed their signatures after the 
purpose of the organization as charter members and founders: 

G. H. Newbury, O. W. Frey, F. W. Cook, J. F. Barnes, F. M. Ciawford, 
C. Jennings, E. L. Wright, F. D. Goodwin, H. L. Womack, E. E. Givens, 
R. H. Gurley, W. L. Drewry and G. B. Zehmer. 

Meetings are held every two weeks, and at the next meeting, Monday, 
April 20th, a name will be decided upon and various topics relative especially to 
the organization will be discussed. 



Page One HunJreJ anj Fifl\i-nlnc 



<1 




3n tije Valky 



I HAVE wandered in ihe Valley 
By its brooks; 
I have loved its very pebbles 
And its nooks: 
Bui for me ils great enchantment 

Is in the mystic spell it holds — 
As from mountain foot to mountain 
It rolls and rolls and rolls! 

I have wandered in the Valley — 

i have seen — 
Its every meadow covered 

O'er in green; 
But for me its greatest glory 

Is wrapped within its folds. 
As it lies there smiling, dreaming. 

And rolls and rolls and rolls! 

I have wandered in the Valley — 

I have roamed — 
Where the lovely Shenandoah 

Fell and foamed. 
But for me its sweetest message 

Is the song it sings to souls. 
As it lies there, verdant, happy. 

And rolls and rolls and rolls! 

1 have wandered in the Valley 

Where the heel— 
Of Sheridan's marauders 

Left its seal — 
But for me its proudest glory 

Is the peace within its folds. 
As it blossoms o'er with plenty. 

And rolls and rolls and rolls! 

I have wandered m tS; Valley — 

I have thrilled — 
When at golden hour of sunset 

All was stilled — 
But for me the dearest comfort 

Is its home for happy souls 
Whom I've loved there in the Vail 

As ever on it rolls and rolls! 



J. W. Smith, Jr., 



'15. 



Page One Hundred and Sixtxi 



<1 




<1 





^cabemp Jfacultp 

GEORGE OSCAR FERGUSON, M. A. 

Principal 

W. M. ASHBY BLOXTON. L. I.. A. B. 
Professor of English and Ccnnan 

AMOS RALPH KOONTZ. B. S.. M. A. 
Professor of Sanitation and Botan)j 

FRED G. GOODWIN. M. A. 

Professor of Latin and History 

CHARLES C. SNOW. B. S. 
Professor of Chemislr\) 

JOHN TYLER, M. A. 

Professor of Mathematics 



Pa^c One HunJrcil anJ Sixl\f-ihrcc 




>- 

Q 
O 

CO 

H 
Z 

UJ 

Q 

D 



UJ 

Q 
< 
U 

< 




:f\i ^ 




] 



Motto: The desire of the moth for the star. 
Colors: Pink and White. 



YELL 

Rah--Rah— Rah. Rah. Rah. 

K-a-y — K-a-y — K.-a-y. 

W. M. A.— W. M. .A.— W. M. A. 



Ballard. J. M. 
Barnette, R. D. 
burford. l. s. 
Burt. H. B. 
Calhoun. W. B. 
c*rpenter, f. a. 
Carr. J. F. 
Chanev. |. G. 
corbell. j. d. 
Crockett. C. C. 
Early. F. P. 
Edwards. H. H. 
Elcan, p. B. 
Farmer. W. W. 
Fentress. W B. 
Fletcher. W. R. 
Forbes. C. W. 
Gauldinc. H. M. 
Ceddv, v. M. 

GlLLIAIVI. M. P. 

Harrison, L. C. 
Hudson. B. H. 
Hudson, .1. G. 
Huffines. T. G. 
Hu.NT, P. B. 
Inman. H. C. 
Jackson. D. C. 



ROLL 

Jones, R. E. 
Jones, R. L. 
Jones, R. R. 
Joyce, W. L. 
King, K. B. 
Lane. G. J. 
Lewis, E. J. 
Lipscomb. H. T. 
LOHR. D. P. 
Maddox, a. L. 
Mattox, E. L. 
Maynard, L. H. 
Mitchell. H. L. 
Moore. O. F. 
Moore, R. A 
Neblett. C, B. 
Neblett. W. E. 
Norton, W. H. 
Nunnally. S. L. 
OzLiN. p. A. 
Pollard, W. G. 
Powell. ]. O. 
Powers. W. A. 
PULLEN. T. G 
Robertson, I W. 
Robinette, W B. 
Robinson, A. P. 
Robinson, E. S. 



Scott, E. L. 
Seekford, B. H. 
SiMMS. H. H. 
Smith, C. B. 
Smith, F. M. 
Smith, L. E. 
somers, h. c. 
Sothoron, G. M. 
Spencer, E. D. 
Stedman, V. 
Stryker. H. M. 
Taliaferro. P. A. 
Taylor. R. C. 

ToMLINSON, R. 

Tuck, W. M. 
Tucker. T. A. 
Turner, D. O. 
Wallace. B. F. 
Webb. I. D. 
Webb. N. J. 
Weisel. S. R. 
West. W. C. 
Williams. C. E 
Wilson. I. F. 
Wood, C. R. 
Wood. L Q. 
Woodson, I. II 



Pallc One IliiinlrcJ anj Sixly-fivc 




en 




^cabemp J^istorp 



II IS indeed a great pleasure to look back upon and record our past history, 
and with a list of deeds so large and illustrious as ours, the task of the his- 
torian must necessarily be an incomplete one, since to record separately each 

exploit would be impossible in this short space. 

This has been an epoch making year in the history of the Academy; records 
of which all are proud have been made in every phase of work. Yet with these 
attainments the past session must be characterized chiefly as an invaluable period 
of preparation for still greater achievements in the future. 

The welfare of athletics is something which the student body must jealously 
guard. Nothing is more capable of binding us together as a student body than the 
fact of being participants in or spectators together at an athletic game. 

Our esprit de corps demands nothing short of success, for a more loyal student 
body is not to be found. Through the excellent coaching of Prof. Goodwin and 
Dr. Draper, the football team won laurels for itself and for the Academy. 
Numerous Academies and High Schools, thinking they had o. "walk-over" when 
they met the W. M. A. team, suffered the humiliation of seeing their banners go 
down in defeat, while the Academy's floated out to the breeze in triumph. The 
basketball team is one of which any institution of our rank might well be proud, 
and from all present indications, we are going to turn out the best baseball team 
in the history of the Academy. 

In literary lines we have also been proficient. The Jefferson Literary Society, 
organized last year, has been a great success. We have arranged for dual debates 
with Richmond Academy and Maury High School, and the prospects for winning 
in both instances are very good. 

In parting, let me entreat you not to be content with past victories, nor to rest 
upon glories which are already yours, but to keep an eye for the goal and your 
accomplishments will be manifold. 

"Farewell ! a word that must be, and hath been — a sound which makes us 
linger, yet, farewell." 

Historian. 

Pa«e One Hundred and Slxfy-six 




^cabemp S>enior Clagg 



Motto : "Smcerily and Success." 

YELL 

Razzle. dazzle; razzle. dazzle 
Not a thread but wooh 

Into college, into college 

Next year we shall pull. 
Seniors! 



Colon: Wmc and Silver Blue. 



OFFICERS 

H. L. Mitchell PreaiJenl. F. P. Earlv Sccrclari). 

C. R. Wood Vice-President. P. B. Elcan Treasurer. 

W. R. Fletcher Historian. 



Calhoun, W. B. Hudson, J. G. 
Carr. J. F. Harrison. L. C 



corbell. j. d. 

Crockett, C. C. 

Edwards, H. H 

Fentress, W. B 

Gauldinc. H. M. Lane. Geo 

Hudson, B. H. Lewis, E. J. 



hufunes, t. g. 
Jones. R. L. 
Jones, R. R. 
OVCE, W. L. 



MEMBERS 

Lour, D. P. 
Maddox, .\. L. 
Mavnard. L. H. 

MONCLIRE. H. 

Neblett. C. B. 
Neblett, W. E. 



Norton. W. H. 
Powers. W. 
Pullen, T. G. 
robinette. w. b. 
Robinson. A. P. 
SiMMS, H. H. 



Smith, C. B. 
Spencer. E. 
Stryker. H. M. 
Tucker. T. A. 
West. W. C. 
Wilson. J. F. 
Wood. L Q. 
Woodson. L H. 



Page One Hundred and 5ix/J)-Je»cn 



Ilcabemp Senior Class Jlistorp 

IT IS with mingled feelings of pleasure and reluctance that your scribe takes 
up his pen and addresses himself to the momentous task of WTiting the history 
of the Senior Class of 1914; for while it is a pleasure to look back upon and 
record our great deeds of the past, yet we are filled with sorrow when we realize 
that we must sever our connection with the Academy forever. We have accom- 
plished so much in the past that it is impossible to mention all of our achievements 
in this short space, hence your present historian must content himself with men- 
tioning only the more important features, leaving completion and perfection to a 
future and more capable historian. 

It was on a bright September morning, three years ago, that we arrived in 
the city of Williamsburg. The weather was still quite warm and the atmosphere 
was filled with the fragrance of the last roses of summer. When we first beheld 
the College, in front of which stood the statue of Lord Botetourt, beckoning us to 
enter and drink at the fountain of knowledge where Jefferson and many other 
illustrious men had drunk in the past, there came to each of us a feeling of pride 
and satisfaction that even we were to be a part of such an institution. 

When we entered the Academy, three years seemed an infinite period of 
time, and a diploma seemed as distant as the North Star. But the time, well 
spent, passed swiftly, and now we are no longer "dues," but Seniors, reveling in 
the satisfaction that our course is at last completed. 

The historian would here fain dip his pen into the ink again and, guided by 
our brilliant past, prophesy for the Seniors a still brighter future in the College; 
but it is best to "trust no future, however pleasant." As the curtain falls on this, 
the last scene in the first act of the drama of education, we pause to pay a parting 
tribute to the Academy. 

Historian ex-officio. 



Page One Hundred and Sixfy-eight 




<1 



e^ii 





^cabemp Cxecutibe Committee 

W. C. West President. 

D. P. LOHR Vice-PreiiJetl. 

F. P. Early Secretary/. 

H. L. MiTCHELl Treasurer. 

W. L. Joyce Historian. 



Pa^c OiH- niituireJ anJ Sixt>;-nine 




Jefferson l^iterarp ^ocietp 

OFFICERS 

FIRST TERM SECOND TERM 

President W. C. West A. L. Maddox 

Vice-PresiJcnt H. L. MlTCHELL H. H. SlMMS 

Secretary) F. P. Earlv A. C. Taylor 

Treasurer D. P. LoHR W. R. Fletcher 

MEMBERS 

BuRFORD. E. S. Jones, R. R. Robinson. A. P. 

Early, F. P. Joyce, W. L. Seekford. B. H. 

Edwards, H. H. Lohr, D. P. Sjmms. H. H. 

Elcan, P. B. Maddox. A. L. Stryker. H. M. 

Farmer, W. ^X■. Mattox, E. L. Taylor, R. C. 

Fletcher, W. R. Mitchell, H. L. Webb, J. D. 

Forbes, C. '^■. Neblett, W. E. \X'ebb, N. J. 

Gauldinc, H. M. Nunnally, S. L. West. W. C. 

Geddy, V. M. Powers. W. A. Weisel. S. R. 

Harrison. L. C. Pullen, T. G. Wilson, J. F. 

Hudson, B. H. Robertson, I. W. Wood, C. R. 

Hudson, J. G. Robinette, W. B. Woodson, I. H. 

Page One Hundred and Sevenfy 



<1 




.... 1 ^ 

V 




M ^ 


r % ♦^ 



^cabemp !lltfjletic Council 

F. P. Early Prcsitlcnl. 

H. M. Stryker Vice-President. 

H. H. SiMMS Secrelarv Treasurer. 

D. C. Jackson Foolhatl Manager. 

A. L. MaDDOX Basehatl Manager. 

I. W. Robertson Baslielhatl Manager. 

Prof. F. D. Goodwin Coach. 

Prof. W. M. A. Bloxton Facully Represenlalive. 



Page One Hundred and Sevent^l-one 




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CQ 
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Q 
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< 



^cabemp Jf ootliall Ceam 

J. D. CORBELL Captain. 

D. C. Jackson Manager. 

S. L. NuNNALLY AssiilanI Manage 

Prof. F. D. Goodwin Coach. 

TEAM 

Carr Quarter Baclf. 

CoRBELL, Captain Full Dacl(. 

?"^ '^^D r I ^khi Half Back. 

Jones, K. L. J 6 < i 

^"3"^ j Lcit Half Back. 

Robertson Center. 

Fletcher Right Tackle. 

Robinson, A. P Left Tackle. 

BuRFORD \ r>„t,r j 

_ l\\gl\t L.uarcl. 

Tomlinson I 

^^Xl-Y 1 LeftCuarJ. 

Harrison I 

Maddox Right EnJ. 

Geddy I t ,4 i7„i 

- - ; Left nnd. 

MONCURE 



Page One Hundred and SeVent^-threc 




< 

H 

_J 
_J 
< 

UJ 

< 

CQ 



Q 

< 

< 




^ 




Geddy Catcher 

Spencer Pitcher and First Base 

Jones First Base and Pitcher 

Pollard Shortstop 

CORBELL First Base and Left Field 

Neblett Second Base 

MONCURE Third Base 

Crockett Right Field 

Jackson Center Field 

Smith Left Field 



Stryker 



SUBSTITUTES 



Lohr 



Fletcher 



Page One HunJrcJ anj Seventy-five 




/ <\ 




» 




ppf:\r\ 






^cabemp JBasfketball ^eam 

Maddox Captain. 

Robertson Manager. 

Dr. Draper Coach. 

TEAM 

Geddy Right For war J. 

Spencer Left ForaarJ. 

Lane Center. 

Jones, R. L Ri^ht Guard. 

Maddox Left CuarJ. 

"SUBS" 
Carr Gilliam Neblett 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-six 



<1 





^cabcmp JWonosram Club 



BURFORD 


Jones 


Carr 


Lane 


CORBELL 


LOHR 


Crockett 


Maddox 


Early 


MONCURE 


Elcan 


Robertson 


Fletcher 


Robinson 


Geddv 


Spencer 


Gjlliam 


Stryker 


Jackson 


Tomlinscn 



West 



Page One Hundred and Scvcntyscvcn 




^ 




^cabemp €ct)o election 

Most Eloquent Speaker JOYCE 

Most Popular Man WesT 

Most Intellectual Man MITCHELL 

Best Business Man EaRLY 

Best All 'Round College Man West 

Best Football Player LOHR 

Handsomest Man Geddy 

Ideal Professor GooDWiN 

Best Poet Fletcher 

Best Prose Writer Joyce 

Most Eccentric Man Seekford 

Best Political Boss West 

Most Refitted Man JONES. R. R. 

Au'kwardest Man FARMER 

Misogynist ROBINETTE 

Biggest Calico Sport JacKSON 

The Grind ." SiMMS 

The Greenest Man Neblett, W. E. 

Biggest Tobacco Bum ROBINSON, E. S. 

Biggest Loafer CaLHOUN 

Busiest Man Taylor 

Perfect Lady Elcan 

IT Smith. F. M. 

Most Reliable Man MITCHELL 

Best Baseball Player JONES, R. L. 

Best Basketball Player Geddy 

Best All 'Round Athlete Maddox 



Page One Hundred and SeVeni\;-eigbi 



^bbertisements 



222nd session BEGINS SEPTEMBER 21. 1914 

COLLEGE 

OTilliam anb jflarp 



WILLIAMSBURG. VIRGINIA 



I. Faculty and Equipment 
of the highest order. 

II. Through the generosity 
of the State, the courses are 
offered at more reasonable 
rates than other colleges 
can give. 

III. Located in a quiet city 
in the midst of innumerable 
points of historic interest and 
value; eighty-four feet above 
sea-level; healthful surround- 
ings; electric lights; pure 
artesian water. 



i^ 



FOR CATALOGUE AND PARTICULARS ADDRESS 

H. L. BRIDGES, Registrar. Williamsburg, Va. 



THE YOUNG MAN'S 
TAILORS 



<|Our line of Spring and Summer 
goods is now on display, and we 
cordially invite you to call and 
look at our large assortment of 
imported and fine domestic wool- 
lens, in exclusive patterns made 
onl^ for us by the largest mills in 
the country. Suits and Over- 
coats, $1 5.00 to $40.00. Pants 
to Order from $5.00 to $12.00 



SAMPLES FREE UPON REQUEST 



IV e Allow 10% Discount 
lo Students 



l^^sQi:^ 



The Baer Tailoring Company 



802 East Main Street 
Richmond, Va. 



E. J. WEYMOUTH 



O. A. MEISTER 



C. R. SMETHIE 



Weymouth, Meister & Smethie 
BOOKBINDERS 

Law Books. Magazines, Edition Binding 

Paper Ruler$, Blank Book Mfgs., Badge Stampers, Good Work, Fair Prices 
Cive us a trial 

105-107 Governor Street, Richmond, Va. 



VIRGINIA TRUST COMPANY 

Makes the Safest Executor and Trustee 
CAPITAL ONE MILLION 

U 

RICHMOND, VIRGINIA 




Virginia Blackboard Outline Map 

JUST FROM THE PUBLISHERS 

"LET THE CHALK TALK" 
Old Dominion Crayons — The Best yirgoplale Blackboards — The Best 

Write for comotete catalogue oj School Furniture and School Supplies 

VIRGINIA SCHOOL SUPPLY CO., Box 1177, Richmond, Virginia 



WHITTET AND 
SHEPPERSON 



College and Commercial 

Qriiiting 



College Annuals, Class Letters and 

all School Printing receive 

special care. 



'Prices quoted on request. 



11-15 North Eighth St., Richmond, Va. 



PLACE YOUR BANK 
ACCOUNT HERE 



ISJO MATTER HOW SMALL 
the account, we give it the same 
attention and care that we do our 
largest ones. Nothing that will pro- 
mote our customer's interest is ever over- 
looked. YOUR MONEY WITH 
US IS ABSOLUTELY SAFE and 
PROTECTED by the LARGEST 
SURPLUS and PROFITS of any 
NATIONAL BANK SOUTH OF 
WASHINGTON. D. C. Three per 
cent, interest paid on savings accounts 
from date of deposit, compounded semi- 
annually. Write for booklet, "How to 
Bank by Mail" 



1 



Capital 

Surplus and Profits . 



$ 300,000 
1,500,000 



THE PLANTERS NATIONAL BANK 

TWELFTH AND MAIN STREETS 
RICHMOND, VA. 



"Jusl Far Enough Soulh" 



American and European Plan 



i^ctuport i}eU)g, Va. 

Delightfully Located on the Banl^s of James 
River and Overloolfing Hampton Roads 



Curoptan $1.00 up ; ameritan $3.00 up. CxttUrnt aippointmrnts. 
Cuisine anb ^rrbice at iKrasionablt iRatrs. 



Write for Boolflet and Rales 



L. B. MANVILLE. Mgr. 




THE BLACKSTONE SCHOOL FOR GIRLS 



Has since 1894 (qven "Thorough Instruction under positively Christian 

Influences at the lowest possible cost." 

RESULT: It Is to-day with Its faculty of 32, a boarding patronage of 358 

Its student body of 412, and its plant worth $140,000 

THE LEADING TRAINING SCHOOL FOR GIRLS IN VIRGINIA 
$150 pays all charges for the year, including table board, room, lights, Rteam 

heat, laundry medical attention, physical culture, and tuition Snal subjects 

except music and elocution. For catalogue and application blank address, 

REV. THOMAS ROSSER REEVES, B. A., Principal, 
BLACKSTONE, VA. 



The best thin^ ever baked 

can be improved 
if it is flavored with-- 

SAUER'S 

[flavoring extracts 





WHY? 



Because Sauer's Extra Strong Flavor- 
ing Extracts are made by our own 
exclusive process that retains the 
natural flavor of fresh ripe fruits. By the use of Sauer's 
Extracts you can give your cakes a delicious, lasting flavor 
that will please the most critical member of your family. 
Order a trial bottle to-day, and you will be convinced 
that it is best by every test. 

Sold by Leading Grocers Everywhere. DO NOT AC- 
^nd25i^ CEPT A SUBSTITUTE, but insist on Sauer's. 
dOTTUy 



"For Qualify and Purify " 

'Ury us 

Montauk Ice Cream Company 

Norfolk, Virginia 



Prompt Delivery 



A. H. FETTING 

v^anu/acturer of 

Greel^ Letter Fraternity Jewelry 



OF THE LATEST DESIGN AND SUPERIOR WORKMANSHIP. MEMORANDUM 

PACKAGES SENT TO ALL MEMBERS OF 

GREEK LETTER FRATERNITIES 

ON APPLICATION 

213 N. LIBERTY STREET, BALTIMORE, MD. 



HAMMOND 

Flowers "Of Guaranteed Freshness" 

'Delivered Anywhere in Perfect Condition 

THEY COST NO MORE 
Telephone Madison 630 



109 EAST BROAD, RICHMOND, VA. 



THE WILLIAM BYRD PRESS. Inc. 



Printing, Embossing 
Designing, Engraving 



COLLEGE PRINTING A SPECIALTY 



TEN SOUTH FOURTEENTH STREET 
RICHMOND. VIRGINIA 



MADISON 3461 



C. F. SMITH 



R. FRANK WLLTON 



Smith & We It on 

Dry Goods and Ladies' 

Ready-to- Wear 

Garments 



1 25 lo 1 3 I Granby St. NORFOLK. VA. 



B. C. Creasy 



College Presser 
and Cleaner 



Work well done, promptly 

called for and delivered 



York 
Furniture Co. 

Furniture and 
Stoves 



\\ illianishurtr 



\'irLrinia 



Sa\e Systematically 

Open a Saviiiijs Aiiount with this H;inl; by 
Depositing $1.00 (n nu^ie l)\ in;iil 

SAVINGS BANK of NORFOLK 

239 Main Street, Norfolk, Virginia 



Geo. W. Dey 
R. P. Waller 
J.L. Belote 
J. Jetl McCormiclt 
Henry Kern, Jr. 
Walter H. Dey 



DIRECTORS 

Thos. H. Wilcox 
E. M. Baum 
R. D. Cooke 
Nathaniel Beaman 
I azewell Taylor 
W.H. Sterling, Jr. 



W. T. Douglas 

'Baker and 
Confectioner 



A full line of Fruits. Pies anj Calfes 
of rarest delicacy 

Everything in line that will make a student 
happy. All best of service rendered 



T. W. Wilkins 

Electrical Boot and 
Shoe Repairing 

1 am prefiared to do Repairing of .All Kinds 

at Reasonable Rates, and at 

Short Notice 

A/jl Shop is Just Opposite the College Cat; 

STUDENT WORK A SPECIALTY 
GIVE ME A TRIAL 



H. L. SCHMELZ F. W. DARLING NELSON S. GROOME 

PreiiJcni Vice-Preiidenl Cashier 

THE BANK of HAMPTON 

HAMPTON. VIRGINIA 

Is the Oldest and Largest Bank in either 
Hampton or Newport News 

Capita/ and Surplus - - $ 250,000.00 
Resources ------ 1,750,000.00 

Keep Your Account with a Wide-Avvake Progressive Hank 

YOU CAN BANK WITH US BY MAIL 
IVRITE US ABOUT IT 



Hoco Glasses 

are made in our own workshops from the finest materials procurable, by 
skilled experts 

Our Kodak Department 

i» thoroughly equipped lo handle promptly and satisfactorily developing and printing for amateurs. 

Mail orders solicited 

G. L. HALL OPTICAL COMPANY, Inc. 

" Eitnlaii iinit KoJiik Expert/" 

SORfOLK RICHMO\D LySCHBLRG 

141-111, Crjnh Slrtrl .'II f.in Unjd ,113 A/din Sirtil 



COLONIAL INN :: "'VfRG.mr*' 

DUKi: OF c;LOUCESTKR SfRKET 

Located in center of the city. Pure air. Good artesian water. 
Telegraph, telephone and express accommodations in the office. 
The parlors of the Inn arc filled with antiques. Good, plam 
N^rginia cooking. Special attention and moderate rates lo the 
parents of students visiting the town. Special prices to athletic 
organizations. Address 

J. IS. C. SPKNCKK. Proprietor and Manager 




HOTEL McGlNNIS 



Finest Hotel in the ^M^ost 
Ancient City of America 
WILLIAMSBURG 



Newly furnished throughout. All outside rooms. 

Fire-proof building. Service of the best. Garage 

connected. Automobiles furnished to tourists or 

parties on short notice. 

JNO. McGlNNIS, Proprietor 



We 


D. Lowenburg Boot & Shoe Co. 


Norfolk, Va. 

1 1 


L 1 

Sells all kinds of Shoes and Footwear. Shoes 


made to order if so desired. Orders taken in 


Room No. 7, Brafferton. 



Ferebee, Jones & Co. 



Incorporated 



Finest English Tailoring 

Hats and Haberdashery 

Mail orders given prompt 

and very careful 

attention 




NORFOLK ... - VIRGINIA 



THOMSON'S 



(^3^ 



Vy^HEN a corset is so con- 
structed as to control the 
fio;ure with a full degree of 
pli ability^ yet with firmness, 
the iDi corseted figure is pro- 
duced in its most charming 
form. As Thomson's 



GLOVE-FITTING' 



Corsets have always been 
constructed on these glove- 
fitting principles, 
they mould softly 
and comfortably, 
like a fine kid 
glove. 

At all dealers, 
$1.00 to $5.00 

GEORGE C. BATCHELLER & COMPANY 

New York Chicago San Francisco 

COPYRIGHT 



CORSETS 




THE PENINSULA BANK 

WILLIAMSBURG. VIRGINIA 

THE ROLL OF HONOR BANK 

ROBT. L. Spencer, President E. W. WarbuTON. V ice-President 

S. L. Graham, Cashier 

•I? 
Capital, Surplus and Profits, $70,000.00 

All business entiusted to us receives prompt and 
careful attention 

MAKE OUR BANK YOUR BANK 



ESTABLISHED 1872 EXCELLED BY NONE 

E. A. WRIGHT 

Engraver Printer Stationer 

Commencement Invitations. Dance 
Invitations, Programs, Fraternity 
Inserts and Stationery Class Pins, 
Menus, Visiting Cards, Wedding 
Announcements and Invitations, 
Photo Engraving and Halftone 
Work,Photocravure,Lithographing 

1 108 Chestnut Street PHILADELPHIA 



WILLIAMSBURG DRUG COMPANY 

Between College and Post Office 

I here is where we get our drugs; there is where we get our stationery, 

and there is where we drink our soda water. Coca-Cola 

and all latest drinks of the fountain 

U 
'^OUR TRADE SOLICITED 





The S. Galeski Optical Co. 
expert €>pticians! 

LcaJing and Largest Opticul Eilubltihmcnt South 

Tmcni^-fivc Years' Practical Experience of Furnishing Everything 

"GOOD FOR THE EYES" 

Also Kodak Headquarters. Supplies. Artistic DeveJoping. Printing. Etc. Mall Orders receive prompt attention- 

Main and Eighth— RICHMOND— Broad and Third 
120 Granby Street. NORFOLK 211 South Jefferson Street. RO.ANOK.E 



THE JEFFERSON 

RICHMOND, VA. 

The Most MACNiFrcENT Hotel in the South 



European Plan. 400 Rooms, 300 Baths, 
Rooms Single and En Suite, with and without 
private bath. Turkish and Roman Baths. Spa- 
cious Sample Rooms. Large Convention Hall 



CO TO 



G. W. Williams 

lOk IlKSr- CLASS 

'Bartering 

\i:.\ I UOOK IV) t ASIA'S 



Tower- Bin ford 
Electric &i Mfg. Co. 



Johb 



ers 



Kkctncal Appiirutiis 
lUid Supplies 

5 Governor Street RICHMO.\D. VA. 



DR. C. H. DAVMS 

Dentist 



Peninsula Bank Building 
Williamsburg, Va. 



h:,lahl,il),.l lM,o 



JA.\. MtdKAit, Jr., .\/.i/.jf,i 



"// \/ou can*t finti it, go to McCraUf's" 

James McGraw 

HarJware. Machiiu-ry 
and Supplies 

AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 
1440-42 i:. Mam St , Richmond. \'a. 



"Norfolk's Best Store" 

especially for young men 

Watt, Rettew & Clay, inc. 

Corner Main and (Jranh\ Streets 



The niftiest and most up-to-date furnishings for young men 

are shown in pleasing varieties the year end round 

and the prices are very moderate 



New ^'ork Connection 

JAMES McCKEERY & COMPANY 

Mail Orders Filled by Expert Male Shoppers 



ESTABLISHED IBIS 



"ctSTiHlTKl© 



y 



Ipntlfinrn's ^'^rniahing #oo£is, 

BROADWAY COR TWENTY- SECOND ST. 



N£M VORI\. 



CLOTHING FOR MEN AND BOYS 

SPORTING AND OUTING GARMENTS 

ENGLISH FURNISHINGS. HATS AND SHOES 

TRUNKS, BAGS AND TRAVELING KITS 

LI\ERIES FOR HOUSE. STABLE OR GARAGE 

MANY IMPORTED LEATHER AND SILVER NOVELTIES 



BOSTON BRANCH: 
149 TREMONT A\ENUE 



NEWPORT BRANCH: 
220 BELLE VUE AVENUE 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



ilurpfjp'S Hotel anb ^nnex 

Richmond, Virginia 
J^caliquarters for CoUrge iflen 



L 



TTiis new Hotel is now open to the public, and it 
is the largest and most modern house south of New 
York. This house is located on direct car lines to all 
railroad stations. And it is famous for its excellent 
Sun-bridge and Mezzanine Parlors. 



Curopean ^lan $1.00 Per Bap JHp 



Chesapeake & Ohio Railway 



10 LynchburiT, Norfolk 
and the West 



Ihe 


Merchants National 

OF HAMPTON 

HAMPTON'S LEADING NATIONAL BANK 
Special Allenlion lo Deposits Received by Mail 

Four Per Cent, on Savings Accounts 


Bank 


11 K B(H>KKR, 


Pres ROBT. 1 MASON, Vi^c-Pn-s. 1. M. \0\ 


SCHll-LINC, Cashin 



Ro. L. Spencer 

Dealer in 

General 
Merchandise 

Gents ' hum is/lings 

Agenii for SpaUing'i 
AlhUlic Coodi 



CoMPi FTt LiNF Of High Gradi Shoes 



R. D. Hollovvay 
& Company 

Brokers and 
Manufacturers ' 
Agents 

rr 

Hiiy, Grain, I'/oiir, 
I'ffil, Cttiiiini Cootl.i, 
Mftils tin,! l.iirJ 

u 

Newport News, Virginia 



College and Fraternity Jewelry 

^X e make a specially of manufacluring fine Plalinum, 
Gold, Silver and Bronze Class Pins. Rings. Medals and 
Jewels. College and Society Seals mounted on wood for 
wall decoralion. 

Exclusive designs in Fmc Gold and Gem Art Jewelry. 
Sterling Silverware, Art Gcods and Cut Glass for Wedding 
and Anniversary Gifts. Ecclesiastical Wares, Fine Stationery. 

If you desire something special in the jtwelry line write 
for estimates and designs. 



L 



C. LUMSDEN & SON 

Jewelers to ihi Sou'.hern People 
Catalogue upon application 731 E. Main St.. RICHMOND. VA 



GARNER & COMPANY 

NEWPORT NEWS, VA. 



Hatlers, Clothiers, Haberdashers, Tailors 

For i^en and Little JliCen 



THE HOME OF STEIN-BLOCH CLOTHES 



J 



AMES H. STONE 

Druggist and Stationer 



HEADQUARTERS FOR FINE CANDY 

Dealer in College Text Books, Box Paper with Seal and other College Stationery. 

Purest and Best Drinks at our Sanitary Soda Fountain, also 

"A'elvet Klmd" Ice Cream, fine line of 

Pipes, Tobaccos. Etc. 



Dr. A. Week 

Late of New ^ orit Cilv 

EYE SPECIALIST 

(With Paul, Gale, CrMnwood Co.) 



PRESCRIPTION WORK A SPEC1ALT"> 



General Offices 

68 and 70 Cranbr Sir^t. cor. City Hall Ave. 

NORFOLK. VA. 



DONT FORGET 


R. T. CASEY & SONS 


Only One Block East of W. & M. College 


When in need of 


Hats, Shoes, Clothing and 


Gents' Furnishings 


f|* 


Sole Agents for Korrect Shape Shoes 


for Men. $3.50. $5.00 



HOME 

oHhc 



Monogram Goods, Etc. 

E. A. Saunders 
Sons' Co. 



THE 



Norfolk Bank 



SAVINGS AND TRUSTS 

240 Main Street 



Capital $100,000 

Surplus $200,000 



4 PER CENT. INTEREST 
ON S.AVINGS DEPOSITS 



Caldwell Hardv. PraiJenl 

C. W. Grandy. Jr.. Vlce-PraiJcnl 
W. W. Vicar. CashUr 

A. W. Brock. Aal. Cashier 



WAAS dc SON 



Makers of 



Academic Caps and Gowns 

Estimates given on rental basis 

226 N. Eighth SI.-2I 7-19 Mildred St. 
PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Commercial Photograph Co. 

** "Business Photographs *' 



Salesman's Photographs of Stoves, Furniture. 
Trunks and Bags. Interior and txterior Views 
of All Kinds. We give special attention to mail 
orders for .Amateur Developing and Printing. 

Dealers in Photographic Supplies 
ENLARGEMESTS 



720 E.AST M.AIN STREET 



RICHMOND, V.A. 





S7&VH€R 
n^RAVind 



F\ICHM07VD,VA. 

■ 5113 E MAIN iT 

^ ILLUJTRATORJ" 0/ 
BOO^J■, 



[ (t)EJ'ld/^J-FORPRI/NTI/N<q) ) MAGAZINtJ", 

J'OUVENIRJ'. 
CATALOGUEJ" 



lA.'' 



>- •f^^'..,