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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 

S 

73 

E42 

no.ll5-156 

19A7..53 



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MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 115 DECEMBER, 1942 



Seed Inspection 

By F. A. McLaughlin 



This report, the fifteenth in seed control service, "is a record of work delegated 
to the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station during 1942, by authority 
of Chapter 94 as amended by Chapter 288 of the Acts of 1937 and Chapter 363 
of the Acts of 1938. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



L.8KARY 

^J^!n/FRp!Ty of 

.^_^rTTC ^NOUNGEMENT 



The Seed Testing Laboratory!will allow ten units of work free of charge, during 
^jiy calendar xear^,t»^y resident firm or citizen of Massachusetts. 

Units are rated as follows: ' 'Units 

Purity analysis (red clover, timothy, etc.) 1 

Purity analysis (bluegrass, orchard grass, etc.) 2 

Purity analysis of a mixture of seeds (depending upon the number 

of kinds in the mixture) 4-10 

Examination for noxious weeds (sample of 4 oz. or less) 2 

Identification of seed or plant >1 

Cleaning tobacco seed (4 oz. or less) 2 

Germination test (4 x 100 seeds of any seed not chaffy or requiring 

piu"ity analysis) 1 

Germination test (soil, 2 x 100 seeds) 1 

Germination test (chaffy grasses or seeds requiring purity analysis) 2 

Fees for work in excess of the ten free units allowed to a citizen or resident firm 
of Massachusetts are as follows: 

Germination test of all crop seeds except grasses $0.25 

Germination test of timothy 25 

Germination test of all other grasses 50 

Purity analysis of cereals 50 

Purity analysis of timothy 75 

Purity analysis of all other grasses 1.00 

Purity analysis of all other crop seeds 75 

Purity analysis of mixtures of not more than 2 kinds of agricultural 

seeds 1 .00 

Purity analysis of special mixtures, including lawn grasses and 
pasture mixtures — a charge sufficient to cover the actual cost 
of working the sample, depending entirely upon the character 
of the sample. Minimum charge 1.25 

In no case will the final report be rendered until all fees are paid. 

The minimum weights of samples to be submitted for analysis are : 

a. Two ounces of grass seed, white or alsike clover, or seeds not larger 
than these. 

b. Five ounces of red or crimson clover, alfalfa, ryegrasses, millet, rape, 
or seeds of similar size. 

c. One pound of cereal, vetches, or seeds of similar or larger size. 

The minimum number of seed of any one kind to be submitted for a germina- 
tion test is 400. 



SEED INSPECTION 

By F. A. McLaughlin^ 



MASSACHUSETTS VEGETABLE SEED STANDARDS FOR 1943 

Section 261D of the Seed Law requires that a set of standards for germination 
of vegetable seeds be determined each year by the Director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station and approved by the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture. The following set of standards for 1943 has been so determined and 
approved : 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 

STANDARD 

% 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 

STANDARD 

% 



Artichoke 60 

Asparagus *70 

Beans: 

Limas 70 

Other varieties than Limas . 80 

Beets 65 

Broccoli 75 

Brussels Sprouts 70 

Cabbage 75 

Carrot 55 

Cauliflower 75 

Celeriac 55 

Celery 55 

Chard, Swiss 65 

Chicory 65 

Chinese Cabbage 75 

Citron 65 

CoUards 80 

Corn, Sweet 75 

**Cress, Garden 40 

Cress, Water 25 

Cucumber 80 

Dandelion 45 

Egg Plant 60 

Endive 70 

Fetticus (Corn Salad) 70 

Kale 75 



Kohlrabi 75 

Leek 60 

Lettuce 80 

Melons: 

Muskmelon 75 

Watermelon 70 

Mustard 75 

Okra *50 

Onions 70 

Parsley 60 

Parsnip 60 

Peas 80 

Peppers 55 

Pumpkin 75 

Radish 75 

Rhubarb 60 

Rutabaga 75 

Salsify 75 

Sorrel 60 

Spinach: 

Common 60 

New Zealand 40 

Squash 75 

Tomato 75 

Tomato, Husk 50 

Turnip 80 



♦Including Hard Seeds. 
**Garden Cress {Lepidium sativum) is also called Pepper Grass and Curled Cress. Should not be 
confused with Upland Cress or Spring Cress (Campe verna) for which no standard has been adopted. 

The above set of standards is identical with the one adopted by the United 
States Department of Agriculture for administration of the Federal Seed Act. 

In the enforcement of the law, no tolerances will be allowed below the minimum 
standards adopted. 



in 'Assisted by Miss Jessie L. Anderson, Technical Assistant; Mrs. Merrill Mack, Laboratory 
O^ssistant from April to June, 1942; and Miss May J. Honnay, Clerk. ' 

CD 



CL. 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS 

From November 1, 1941 to November 1, 1942, the Seed Laboratory received 
and worked 4009 samples of seed, of which 968 were collected by the State 
Department of Agriculture and 3041 were sent in by seedsmen, farmers, and 
various state institutions. An additional lot of 233 samples of flower seeds, for 
field tests only, was also received from the State Commissioner of Agriculture. 

Classification of these samples with the total number of laboratory tests in- 
volved is shown in the following summary. It will be noted that the total number 
of tests required for the 4009 samples was 4620; 442 for purity and 4178 for 
germination. 

Number of number of tests 

Samples Purity Germination 

338 Field Crops for Purity and Germination 338 338 

1 Field Crops for Purity Only 1 — 

223 Field Crops for Germination Only — 223 

51 Lawn and Other Types of Mixtures for Purity; Ger- 

minations involving 237 ingredients 51 237 

52 Lawn Mixtures for Purity Only 52 — 

9 Lawn Mixtures for Germination Only; Germinations 

involving 45 ingredients — 45 

3129 Vegetables for Germination Only — 3129 

40 Herbs for Germination Only — 40 

43 Flower Seeds for Germination Only — 43 

5 Tree Seeds for Germination Only — 5 

91 Tobacco Seeds for Cleaning and Germination — 91 

27 Tobacco Seeds for Germination Only — 27 

4009 442 4178 

Field tests to determine trueness to type were conducted in cooperation with 
the Departments of Olericulture and Floriculture, which tested respectively 145 
samples of Vegetable seeds, 233 samples of Flower seeds. Results of the field 
tests are shown on pages 76-94. 

The Seed Laboratory cleaned 91 lots of Tobacco seed for Connecticut Valley 
farmers. The gross weight of the 91 lots of seed amounted to 109.69 lbs. with a 
net weight of cleaned seed 89.12 lbs. 

Explanation of Tables 

In these tables the seeds are listed in alphabetical order by groups, each group 
containing only those seeds, the sale of which is regulated by a definite section 
of the Massachusetts Seed Law. Section 261-A of the Acts and Resolves of 1937 
and 1938, Chapters 288 and 363, defines the group from Alfalfa to Wheat, in- 
clusive; Section 261-B, Mixtures; Section 261-C, Special Mixtures; and Section 
261-D, Vegetables. 

The number preceding each analysis is for identification and reference. The 
line to the right of the letter "L" gives information copied from the label; that 
to the right of "F" what was found in the laboratory analysis. 

Various symbols have been used to call attention to violations and irregularities 
and with certain tables a column is devoted to "Notes." Where symbols 
occur an explanation is given in footnotes at bottom of the page. 

All lots of seed included in this report were tested according to the Rules for 
Seed Testing adopted by the Association of Official Seed Analysts. 



SEED INSPECTION 



"Tolerance" is applied to both purity and germination, except for vegetable 
seed found below the minimum germination standards adopted, in which instance 
no tolerance is allowed. "Germination Tolerance" has been applied between 
a given germination and the result of the germination test as follows: 

GIVEN GERMINATION (PERCENT) TOLERANCE (PERCENT) 

96 or over 5 

90 or over, but less than 96 6 

80 or over, but less than 90 7 

70 or over, but less than 80 8 

60 or over, but less than 70 9 

Less than 60 10 

In the determination of the tolerance for the percentage of the distinguishable 
kind, type, or variety (pure seed), weed seeds, other crop seeds, and inert matter, 
the sample shall be first considered as made up of two parts: (a) The percentage 
of the component (pure seed, weed seed, crop seed or inert matter as the case 
may be) being considered, and (b) the difference between that percentage and 
100. The number represented by (a) is then multiplied by the number rep>- 
resented by (b) and the product is divided by 100. The resulting number is then 
multiplied by 0.2 (2/10) and the resulting product added to 0.2 or 0.6 as indicated 
in the following formulae : 

f a X b ) 

Pure seed tolerance = 0.6 + j 0-2 X > 

Weed seeds, other crop seeds, and v h ~» 

inert matter tolerance = 0.2 + i 0.2 X ?■ 

\ 100 f 

For Poa spp., Agrostis spp., Festuca spp., bromegrass, crested wheatgrass, or- 
chard grass, velvet grass, tall oatgrass, meadow foxtail, sweet vernalgrass, 
Rhodes grass, Dallis grass, carpet grass, and Bermuda grass, and mixtures con- 
taining these seeds singly or combined in excess of 50 percent, an additional 
tolerance shall be allowed. This is to be obtained by adding to the regiilar 
tolerance mentioned above the product obtained by multiplying the regular tol- 
erance by the lesser of "a" and "b" divided by 100. 



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13 




1® 

do 



ri 0000 
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g 030 



IJh 



CO M^ 



IMC^ 


(MN 


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14 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



GiOi di CJ 



NN •-'(N --IM 



MOO -H-* 



Oo OiOi 



Ooo <N 00 



a.2v 



88 


88 


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SEED INSPECTION 



15 



05 05 05 OS CiCi Oi Gi 05 05 05 OS OS OS 



Oscs 



»Jfe 



CO gu 



row rooo 



oo 


So 


oo 


OS OS 


OS 00 


OiO 

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r/i 


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16 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



w 
O 
a 

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a 

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o 

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oo oo oo 
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do do 



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SEED INSPECTION 



17 



--IM -HlM --IN N<N (N(M M(Nr-(lN MM 



9°. 



occ oo 
oo oo 



06 1^ 



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18 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



O 



»5 

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o 
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coo 
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05 0> 



O 

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SEED INSPECTION 



19 



oq.-< 



d 

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,o 



go 






05 Gi di 



99 

0«D 



oo 
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66 



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20 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



S3 

t 
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H 
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a d 



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88 


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O>00 


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pt(COT3 









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21 






qo 
0606 



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OOM 


1 1 


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w* 




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1-5 (i< 



2 ^ 






02 



22 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



3 

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a 
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CO 

Q 

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SEED INSPECTION 



23 



oqqq 



all 



CO 00 
cow 



bo <u^ 



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24 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



O 



CO 
CO 

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SEED INSPECTION 



25 



02 I* g 

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t^ O^CTl 00 



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26 



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27 



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28 



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30 



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32 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



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33 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distri butor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



ARTICHOKE 

Standard Germination 60% 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
205 Cardone, Italiano - 

ASPARAGUS 

Standard Germination 70% 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., Wethersfield. Conn. 

330 Mary Washington 90 12/1941 

Foster Farrar Co., Northampton 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

332 Mary Washington - 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 



— 42t May 



84-6 April 



— 24t April 



BEANS 

Standard Germinations: 

Beans (Except Limas) 80% 

Beans (Limas) 70% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

782 Asgrow Stringle-ss Green Pod 85 

Thornton & Crouch, Lawrence 

786 French Horticultural 77 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

1123 London Horticultural Pole 78 

R. P. Swan, Stoughton 

W. E. AUBUCHON CO., INC., Fitchburg, Mass. 

475 Golden Wax 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

1008 Dwarf Horticultural 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne Falls 

1 133 Pole Horticultural 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Leominster 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
23 Bountiful, No. C 109 

37 Tewksbury Dwarf Horticultural, No. C 106 . . . 

673 Dwarf Horticultural 

Church & Stowell Co., Wareham 

757 Kentucky Wonder Wax — 

Town Paint & Supply Co., Natick 

801 Horticultural Pole 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 

806 Stringless Green Pod 

L. B. Willis, East Bridgewater 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

228 Rustproof Golden Wax 85 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

846 French Horticultural Pole 

C. B. Coburn Co., Lowell 



10/1941 


90 


June 


1/1942 


69 1 


June 


10/1941 


40t 


June 


- 


73 1 


April 


— 


96 


June 


— 


.96 


June 


— 


95 


April 


— 


68t 


April 


— 


91 


June 


— 


74t 


June 


- 


76t 


June 


- 


94 


June 


2/1942 


81-1 


April 


— 


94 


June 



t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



34 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T,ab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



BEANS— Continued 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761.a Bountiful Early Bush - — 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

416 Pencil Pod Black Wax - — 

Adams & Co., Holliston 

611 Dwarf Horticultural - — 

R. W. Shattuck Co., Inc., Arlington 

767 Bountiful 6 Weeks ' - — 

H. Bruckman, Lawrence 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly. Mass. 

196 French Dwarf Horticultural - - — 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

381 Pencil Pod Black Wax - — 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

652 Golden Wax - — 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

754 Mammoth Horticultural Pole . . . ._ - — 

Goodman Hardware Co., Framingham 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

500 Pencil Pod Black Wax - — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

503 Golden Wax - — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
8 Bountiful - — 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

511 Dwarf Horticultural or Cranbero? ~ — 

Waite Hardware Co., Southbridge 

517 Brittle Wax - — 

Waite Hardware Co., Southbridge 

518 Golden Wax - — 

Waite Hardware Co., Southbridge 

532 Golden Wax - — 

Mendelsohn's, Waltham 

879 Kentucky Wonder - — 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

541 Horticultural Pole 88 — 

Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield 

819 French Horticultural 88 1/1942 

Parkers Farm Supply Co., Dan vers 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

904 Pencil Pod Black Wax, No. 3612 85+ 12/1941 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

924 Burpee's Stringless Green Pod - 

Snyder's Store, Hoosatonic 

t Below Standard, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year, 



23 1 


June 


96 


April 


95 


June 


93 


June 



97 



April 



75t May 

91 June 

93 June 

86 May 

74t(c) May 



83 



April 



94 


May 


90 


May 


76-2t 


May 


88-7 


May 


93 


June 


97 


May 


81 


June 



87 



— 83 



June 



June 



SEED INSPECTION 



35 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



BEANS— Concluded 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
60 Bountiful, No. 361 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

571 Golden Wax 96 

A. S. Tucker, Hardware, Warren 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

529 Pencil Pod Black Wax, No. 21536 

Winers Hardware Co., Inc., Whitman 

Approx. 

751 French Horticultural, No. 121258 77 

Boston Supply Co., Inc., Framingham 

752 London Horticultural Cranberry Pole, No. 1-9115 - 

808 French Horticultural, No. 1-21258 77 

Dan vers Hardware Co., Dan vers 

843 French Horticultural - 

Middlesex Supply Co., Lowell 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

533 Burpee's Stringless, No. 2594 80 

Swartz Hardware Co., Newton 

736 Striped Creaseback 87 

New Style Hardware Co., RosUndale 

812 Stringless Green Pod 

Dan vers Hardware Co., Danvers 

838 French Horticultural - 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

UNKNOWN 

756 Horticultural Pole 

The Fiske Corporation, Natick 

870 Longfellow Yellow 6 Weeks 90 

John S. Glennon, Hardware, Dalton 

873 Improved Golden Wax 90 

John S. Glennon, Hardware, Dalton 

BEETS 

Standard Germination 65% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC.. 
New Haven, Conn. 

170F Detroit Dark Red 81 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 

361F Crosby's Egyptian 79 

Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
21F Edmund's Blood Turnip, No. C 120 

86F Crosby's Egyptian, No. C 317 65 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

102F Detroit Dark Red 

L. Richmond & Co., Brockton 

229F Detroit Dark Red, No. 4025 91 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 



1/1942 



11/1941 



82 
91 

91 

79 



April 
June 

May 

June 



— 


92 


June 


12/1941 


78 


June 


- 


73t 


June 


1/1942 


82 


May 


12/1941 


93 


June 


1938 


58t(c) 


June 


- 


39t(c) 


Jime 


- 


69 1 


June 


- 


88 


June 


— 


91 


June 



2/1941 


82 


May 


1/1942 


85 


April 


— 


70 


April 


— 


76 


May 


- 


78 


April 


2/1941 


91 


April 



t Below Standard, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year. 



36 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 
VEGETABLES — Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


I,a,b. 


Dealer When Other I'han Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



BEETS— Continued 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO— Continued 
230F Boston Crosby or Early Wonder, No. 4025 .... 70 
Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

306F Crosby's Egyptian 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-b Crosby's Egyptian Early Sweet - 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

43F Detroit Dark Red 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

lllF Edmund's Early Blood 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 

174F Early Wonder 

J. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
East Rochester, N. Y. 

106F Crosby's Early Egyptian 65 

S. S. Kresge Co., Brockton 

762-b Detroit Dark Red 60 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

63F Crosby (Early Wonder), No. 312 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

151F Detroit, No. 612 75 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Brockton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
207F Early Wonder, No. 68 B 81 

224F Early Wonder Tall Top 

317F Detroit Dark Red 

Clark Hardware Co., Greenfield 

382F Extra Early Dark Egyptian 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, FrankUn 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

348F Early Blood Turnip 

Woodlawn Supply Co., So. Hadley 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

273F Detroit Dark Red, No. 66223 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

40F Detroit Dark Red 

J. H. Ogden & Co., New Bedford 

653F Early EcUpse 

BelUngham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
IF Crosby's Egyptian - 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

176F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 446 84 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 



12/1941 



90 April 

74 April 

90 June 



— 


87 


May 


— 


76 


April 


- 


73 


May 


- 


71 


May 


— 


84 


June 


1/1942 


94 


May 


1/1941 


83 


May 


2/1941 


86 


April 


- 


59t 


May 


— 


82 


April 


— 


47t 


April 





71 


April 



— 93 



April 



87 April 

85 May 

71 April 

80 May 



t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



37 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


I-ah. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



BEETS— Continued 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wether-sfield, Conn. 

114F Detroit Dark Red 75 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

115F Early Wonder 80 12/1941 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

285F Early Wonder 65 1/1942 

Raymond's, Inc., Boston 

344F Crosby's Egyptian - — 

J. Russell & Co., Holyoke 

374F Edmand's Blood Turnip 84 12/1941 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Medfield 

878 Early Blood Turnip 72 1/1941 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1077 Detroit Dark Red - — 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

HYGRADE SEED CO., INC., Fredonia, N. Y. 

93F Crosby's Egyptian - — 

Franklin School, Holbrook 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

288F Egyptian Extra Early, No. 110 76 1/1942 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester or Better 

289F Detroit Dark Red, No. 145 75 1/1942 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester or Better 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

258F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 28371 70 -f 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

405F Dark Red Egyptian, No. 28371X 75 12/1940 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

423F Leonard's Dark Red Egyptian - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 

471F Dark Red Egyptian, No. 21 70-f 1/1942 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

477F Improved Dark Red - — 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co., Amherst 

906 Detroit Dark Red, No. 2522 70 -t- 1/1942 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

13F Extra Early Flat Egyptian - Packed for 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 1942 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

161F Early Wonder D 20-4839 65 12/1941 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

523F Detroit Dark Red - — 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Webster 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
81F Crosby's Improved Egyptian, No. 1143 - — 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

77F Crosby's Egyptian 70 12/1941 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Weymouth 

t Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



53 1 


April 


91 


April 


93 


April 


67 


April 


81 


May 


88 


June 



78 



67 



June 



May 



85 


April 


69 


April 


75 


April 


67 


April 


65 


April 


72 


April 


85 


April 


82 


June 



April 



73 


May 


89 


May 


78 


May 


83 


May 



38 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, Wholesaler's 

Lab Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, Germination 

No and Place Collected % Date 



Germi- 
nation Month 
Found of Test 
% 1942 



BEETS— Concluded 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

129F Early Blood Turnip 80 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
300F Detroit Dark Red, No. 731 

SARGENT'S GRAIN & SUPPLY CO., Brockton 
246F Detroit Dark Red 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston 
199F Large Blood 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

88F Early Blood Turnip 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

F H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

127F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 18384 77 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Approx. 

128F Woodruff's Early Wonder, No. 2219 65 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Approx. 

156F Early Wonder, No. 1-223 81 

Jose D'Aruda, Fall River 

188F Detroit Dark Red, No. 18395 65 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

Approx. 

189F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 18354 74 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

Approx. 

366F Detroit Dark Red, No. 13428 87 

Farm Service Store, Middleboro 

465F Crosby's Egyptian 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 

Below Standard 

467F Earlv Red Chief, No. 1-318 61 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 

528F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 18451 

Winers Hardware Stores, Inc., Whitman 

534F Detroit Dark Red, No. 17992 

Agawam Public Market, Agawam 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

231F Early Wonder, No. 2168 70 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

232F Detroit Dark Red, No. 2325 70 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

832F Crosby's Early Egyptian, No. 2288 70 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 



11/1941 



11/1941 

12/1941 

12/1941 
12/1941 

12/1941 

12/1941 

12/1941 



79 



71 



— 83 



77 



82 
65 



72 



90 
69 



May 

May 
April 
April 
May 

May 



49t April 



May 
April 

April 

April 

May 



48t May 



— 


77 


May 


- 


81 


May 


12/1941 


85 


April 


12/1941 


88 


April 


12/1941 


67 


May 



J Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



39 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES — Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



BROCCOLI 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC.. 

Milford, Conn. 

974 Calabrese - 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Pittsfield 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

768 Calabrese 

H. Bruckman, Lawrence 

COMSTOCK. FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

1055 Italian Green Sprouting - 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

578 Italian Green Calabrese - 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

64 Calabrese, No. 612 90 12/1941 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

935 Italian Green Sprouts - — 

Ely's Market, Great Barrington 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

774 Calabrese - — 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
204 Calabrese - — 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS 

Standard Germination 70% 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

828 Improved Long Island — 

Essex County Cooperative Farming 
Association, Topsfield 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. Below Standard 

666 Improved Long Island 50 1/1942 

Buzzard's Bay Hardware Co., Buzzard's Bay 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center, Mass. 
743 Long Island Improved - — 

J. B. RICE, JR., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

135 Long Island 40 11/1941 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

1062 Improved Long Island — — 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 



79 June 



55t May 



93 June 



— 80 May 



98 April 



77 May 



80 May 



93 April 



— 71 May 



50 May 

37t May 

29t May 

63t(c) June 



t Below Standard. 

% Below Standard and below Guarantee, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year. 



40 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CABBAGE 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

483 Danish Railhead - — 78 May 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Amherst 

W. E. RARRETT CO., Providence, R. I. 

276 Improved American Savoy •. - — 67t May 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. Approx. 

398 Savoy (Perfection Drumhead) 80 1/1942 81 April 

Wm. H. Casey Store, Milford 

731 Charleston Wakefield - — 92 May 

The Fair, RosUndale 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
33 Danish Railhead Tall Stem, No. C 144 - — 92 April 

771 Savoy - — 55t May 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

101 Danish Ballhead - — 81 April 

' L. Richmond & Co., Brockton 

225 Copenhagen Market 81 12/1941 73t May 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

1116 Drumhead Savoy - — 75 June 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
East Rochester, N. Y. 

576 Crosman's Premium Late Flat Dark 80 1942 86 May 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

65 Penn. State B.-iUhead, No. 1101 80 12/1941 88 April 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverlv, Mass. 
214 Golden Acre, No. 1 - — 86 April 

380 Danish Ballhead - — 29t May 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

430 Winningstadt - — 21t April 

F. A. Gould, Milford 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. Below Standard 

536 Savoy 40 12/1941 48 April 

D. F. Mazzaferro, Springfield 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
12 Golden Acre - — 81 April 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

335 Copenhagen - — 77 April 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

336 Early Jersey Wakefield - — lit April 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 



t Below Standard. 

i Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



41 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T-ah . 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CABBAGE— Continued 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO.— Continued 

877 Danish Balhead 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

995 Premier Late Flat Dutch 

Burlingame & Darby.s Co., No. Adams 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1081 True Early Winningstadt 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

1082 Copenhagen Market 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 
97 Copenhagen Market - 

Franklin School, Holbrook 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

294 Danish Round Head Short Stem, No. 250 82 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

261 Danish Ball Head Short Stem, No. 9511 80 -|- 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

262 Golden Acre, No. 10511 80 + 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

263 Copenhagen Market, No. 9373 80-1- 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

419 Premium Late Flat Dutch 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Fitchburg 

1135 Danish Ballhead Imported - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Leominster 

1143 Early Jersey Wakefield - 

United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg 

1146 Danish Ball Head Short Stem, No. 9521 80 -t- 

United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. .\pprox. 

1160 Danish Ball Head, No. El. 7141 75 

Bengston Hardware Co., Gardner 

PERRY SEED CO,, Boston, Mass. 
56 Golden Acre, No. 1806 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

136 Danish Ballhead 70 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

574 Danish Ballhead - 

A. S. Tucker, Hardware, Warren 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

191 Golden Acre, No. 18783 90 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

464 Golden Acre, No. 14287 82 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 

530 Copenhagen Market - 

Winers Hardware Stores, Inc., Whitman 

t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



— 


65t 


May 


- 


32t 


June 


- 


75 


June 


- 


■It 


June 


_- 


92 


April 


1/1942 


64t 


April 


1/1942 


46i 


April 


1/1942 


39 1 


April 


1/1942 


20t 


April 


- 


43t 


April 


- 


24t 


June 


- 


76 


June 


1/1942 


89 


June 


12/1941 


78 


June 


- 


94 


April 


11/1941 


56t 


May 


- 


84 


May 


12/1941 


91 


April 


11/1940 


61t 


April 





81 


April 



42 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T,ah 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CABBAGE— Concluded 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS— Continued 

884 Mammoth Red Rock - 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 

1063 Copenhagen Market - 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

Below Stand. 

833 Danish Ballhead, No. 2323 62 1/1942 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Adams 

Below Stand. 

835 Jersey Wakefield, No. 1290 66 1/1942 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

UNKNOWN 

809 Charleston Wakefield - — 

Dan vers Hardware Co., Danvers 

810 Copenhagen Market - — 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

811 All Season - — 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

992 Early Winningstadt - — 

Burlingame & Darbys Co., No. Adams 

1000 Ea. Jersey Wakefield - — 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 

CARROT 

Standard Germination 55% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

New Haven, Conn. 

167F Imperator 75 11/1941 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 

312F Danvers Half Long 55 11/1941 

Clark Hardware Co., Greenfield 

362F Long Orange 61 1/1942 

ShurtlefT Hardware Co., Middleboro 

365F Danvers Half Long - — 

Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 

392F Danvers Half Long 55 2/1942 

Leon Zocchi, MiHord 

562F Danvers Half Long - — 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Palmer 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
20F Chantenay - — 

412F Danvers - — 

Charles A. Smith Co., Millis 

550F Breck's Hutchinson - — 

H. J. Croteau, Northampton 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

103F Chantenay - — 

F. Richmond & Co., Brockton 

t Below Standard. 



— 95 May 

— 91 June 

67 May 

74 May 

19t May 

84 May 

4t May 

Ot June 

Ot June 



81 


April 


64 


May 


69 


April 


73 


April 


78 


April 


55 


May 


88 


April 


77 


April 


73 


April 


69 


April 



SEED INSPECTION 



43 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CARROT— Continued 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO.— Continued Approx. 

307F Chantenay, No. 15636 55 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

308F Danvers Half Long. No. 23728 55 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-h Chantenay - 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

38F Improved Long Orange - 

J. H. Ogden & Co., New Bedford 

48F Danvers Half Long - 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

105F Hutchinson - 

F. Richmond & Co., Brockton 

327F Hutchinson 72 

Foster Farrar Co., Northampton 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
East Rochester, N. Y. 

107F Danvers Half Long 60 

S. S. Kresge Co., Brockton 

762-c Chantenay 60 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

62F Hutchinson, No. 14512 80 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

341F Imperator, No. 618 75 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Northampton 

342F Chantenay (Red Cored), No. 618 60 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Northampton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

187F Hutchinson 78 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

206F Red Cored Chantenay 

216F Early Scarlet Horn, No. 1 

384F Danvers Half Long 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

347F Chantenay 

Woodlawn Supply Co., South Hadley 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

271F Long Orange 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

272F Danvers Half Long 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

493F Red Cored Chantenay 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 



1/1942 
1/1942 



71 May 

76 May 



— 82 May 



— 


67 


May 


- 


78 


April 


- 


66 


April 


12/1941 


65 


May 


- 


71 


May 


- 


60 


May 


12/1941 


82 


April 


12/1941 


82 


May 


12/1941 


64 


May 


1/1942 


60 § 


April 


— 


73 


April 


- 


69 


May 


— 


87 


April 



— 58 May 

— 66 April 

— 87 May 

— 66 April 



44 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CARROT— Continued 

FRASER'S, Welleslev, Mass. 

613F Chantenay 80 

R. W. Shattuck Co., Inc., Arlington 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

546F Danvens Half Long - 

Morrison Hardware Co., Springfield 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
2F Early French Forcing - 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

177F Danvers Half Long, No. 507 72 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

178F Imperator, No. 505 _ 88 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

39F Imperator - 

J. H. Ogden & Co., New Bedford 

118F Danvers Half Long Stump Root 63 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

1 19F Danvers Imperator 74 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

284F Imperator 65 

Raymonds, Inc., Boston 

322F Hutchinson 65 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

331F Hutchinson 70 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

372F Hutchinson 70 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Medfield 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

324F Danvers Half Long 

Waskiewicz Bros., Hadley 

HYGRADE SEED CO., INC., Fredonia, N. Y. 

92F Chantenay Long Type 

Franklin School, Holbrook 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 
2G0F Chantenay Red Cored or Coreless Half Long, 

No. 250 70 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester or Better 

291F Orange Danvers Half Long or Rubicon, No. 250 71 
Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 

M. E. MANNING, Hadley, Mass. 
326F Hutchinson 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

253F Danvers, No. 15522 65 + 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

254F Chantenay Red Cored, No. 15321 65 + 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

270F Imperator, No. 16021 65 + 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 



1/1942 


65 § 


June 


- 


56 


April 


— 


69 


April 


— 


71 


April 


1942 


82 


April 


— 


73 


May 


1/1942 


56 


April 


12/1941 


73 


April 


1/1942 


77 


May 


1/1942 


73 


May 


12/1941 


58 § 


June 


12/1941 


55« 


June 


- - 


79 


May 


— 


75 


April 


1/1942 


64 


May 


1/1942 


83 


May 


- 


74 


May 


1/1942 


76 


April 


1/1942 


59 


April 


1/1942 


85 


April 



§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 
ij( Equal to Standard but below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



45 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


l>ab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CARROT— Continued 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO.— Continued 

402F Danvers 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

409F Improved Long Orange - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

418F Danvers 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 

472F Improved Long Orange, No. 16121 65 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

476F Hutchinson, No. .5921 65-1- 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co., Amherst 

1144 Chantenay Red Cored - 

United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

14F Chantenay 

F. W. Wool-worth Co., Boston 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

162F Danvers Half Long, No. F 11.8642 75 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SON, 
Pedricktown, N. J. 

440F Hutchinson 88 

The Continental Nurseries, Franklin 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston. Mass. 
49F Hutchinson, No. 2150 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

76F Chantenay 55 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
So. Weymouth 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

130F Improved Long Orange 52' 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

Approx. 

131F Danvers Half Long 75 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

252F Danvers Half Long 

A. I. Task Co., Brockton 

297F Chantenay, No. 734 

Ross Bros. Co., Worcester 

298F Hutchinson, No. 625 

SARGENT'S GRAIN & SUPPLY CO., Brockton 
245F Danvers Half Long 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
200F Long Orange 

STERLING SEED CO., MinneapoUs, Minn. 

89F Chantenay 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, Chicago, 111. 

645F Early Chantenay 

Harold Cogger, Reading 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

123F Improved Long Orange, No. 18544 67 

Waldron Hardware Co., "Taunton 



— 


67 


April 


- 


56 


May 


- 


76 


April 


1/1942 


58 


April 


1/1942 


65 


April 


— 


71 


June 


- 


60 


April 


12/1941 


81 


April 



12/1941 



92 May 



— 


82 


May 


12/1941 


72 


April 


12/1941 


56 


April 


12/1941 


85 


May 


- 


67 


May 


- 


92 


April 


— 


63 


April 


— 


67 


April 


— 


89 


April 


— 


66 


April 





69 


May 



10/1941 



62 



June 



46 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES — Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Uistributor, Kihd of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CARROT— Concluded 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS— Continued Approx. 

124F Danvers Half Long, No. 18964 87 , 12/1941 80 April 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Approx. 

157F Danvers Half Long, No. 1-3326 90 11/1941 95 April 

Jose J. D'Aruda, Fall River 

Approx. 

367F Danvers Half Long, No. 21516 69 1/1942 78 April 

Farm Service Co., Middleboro 

433F Chantenay - " — 79 April 

Milford Hardware, Inc., Milford 

466F Danvers Half Long, No. 8020 - — 55 April 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 

Approx. 

469F Danvers Half Long, No. 17988 53 2/1941 66 April 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc., 
Worcester 

816F Danvers Half Long, No. 17988 ; 51 10/1940 62 May 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

Below Stand. 

956 Perfection 46 11/1941 40t June 

E. A. Noble & Co., Stockbridge 

1064 Chantenay Red Cored, No. 1-182 - — 79(c) June 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

233F Hutchinson, No. 2319 68 12/1941 63 April 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

234F Danvers Half Long, No. 2178 70 12/1941 68 April 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

CAULIFLOWER 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

887 Early Snowball 90 9/1941 96 May 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. Packed 

575 Early Snowball 75 for 1942 82 May 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

66 Early Snowball, No. 5111 85 12/1941 92 April 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. Packed 

620 Early Snowball - for 1942 69t May 

Craigie Hardware Co., Somerville 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. Below Stand. 

963 Early Snowball 75 1/1942 54t June 

Berkshire Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year, 
t Below Standard. 
t Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



47 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Teat 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



— 76 June 



CAULIFLOWER— Concluded 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1173 Early Snowball - — 43t June 

Orange Hardware Co., Orange 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 

Cambridge, N. Y. 

787 Early SnowbaU 75 12/1941 77 June 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

748 Early Snowball 

Boston Supply Co., Framingham 

CELERY 

Standard Germination 55% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

886 Dwarf Golden Self Blanching 81 9/1941 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., Wethersfield. Conn. 

603 Pascal - — 

Central Hardware Co., Woburn ' 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 

Springfield, Mass. 

67 Pascal (Cal. Strain), No. 621 75 12/1941 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

429 White Plume - — 

F. A. Gould, Milford 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1172 New White Plume 

Orange Hardware Co., Orange 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago. 111. 

1153 Golden Self Blanching 

Central Hardware Co., Fitchburg 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

434 Easy Blanching - 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

UNKNOWN 

845 Boston Market 

Middlesex Supply Co., Lowell 

SWISS CHARD 

Standard Germination 65% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

364 Lucullus 69 10/1941 86 April 

Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
29 Dark Green White Ribbed, No. C 382 - — 85 April 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-k Large Ribbed - — 82 June 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

t Below Standard. 



81 May 

67 May 

80 April 

— 87 April 

— 17t June 

— 4t June 

— 76 April 

— 82 May 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



48_ 

1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS-Continued 

VEGETABLES— Con ti nued 



Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, Wholesaler's 

Lab. £tr men Other Than Wholesale Distributor. Germ:na^:on 

j^o. and Place Collected £o 

SWISS CHARD— Concluded 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

612 Giant Lucullus ^ ■■■■:;■■' 1 

R. W. Shattuck Co., Inc., Arhngton 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 

Springfield, Mass. _, 19/1041 

68 Ford Hook Giant, No. 711 . '^V..:— ^^ ^^^^^*' 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO.. Beverly, Mass. 19/1041 

223 Broad Rib Green, No. 90 78 l^/iy^i 

313 Lucullus A- ••>>■"■■ c i.i 

Clark Hardware Co.. Greenfield 

601 Lucullus X ■ " ■ ; "i". ■ ' ; 

Arhngton Hardware Co., Arhngton 

650 Swiss Chard* .... >,■•;,> IC 

Belhngham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. _ _ 

1097 Swiss Chard* - . . ■ ■ • 

Albert P. Wilson, Newburyport 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. ^^ 1/1942 

590 Lucullus ,4 • • •„■ ■, r,r Rpttpr 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem or Better 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. _ _ 

420 Silver a- • V • • • -i^-V LL 

W. E. Aubuchon Co.. Inc., Fitchburg 

481 Lucullus No. 3821 .' • • X • " ■; ' V ' " T ' ^""^ ^^^^^^ 

Mutual Plumbing & Heatmg Co.. Amherst 

F H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

549 Lucullus. No. 18952 »■* 1^/1^*^ 

H. J. Croteau. Northampton 

UNKNOWN _ _ 

985 Common Green v;/.,'..' ' " ' 1 

Phillips General Store. Wilhamstown 

CHICORY 

Standard Germination 65% 
EMPIRE SEED CO.. Fredonia. N. Y. ^ Below Stand. ^^^^^^^ 

Ely's Market. Great iSarrington 
F H WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford. Conn. Approx. 

750 Witloof or French Endive, No. 18529 oi 12/1941 

Boston Supply Co., Frammgham 

CORN 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. „„ in/iQ41 

395 Golden Bantam 8 Rowed «" iu/i»-n 

Leon Zocchi, Milford 

778 Whipple's Early Yellow, No. 26068 90 10/1941 

Thornton & Crouch, Lawrence 

972 Marcross ■■■ \-a v;-!! c 'ij 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Pittsfield 



Germi- 
nation 
Found 
% 



— 76 



80 



83 



90 



90 



26 



58 



96 



87 



— 86 



Month 

of Test 

1942 



May 



April 



90 


April 


81 


April 


91 


May 


80 


May 



June 

May 

April 
April 

May 

June 



May 
May 



April 
June 
June 



* Information required by law not given. 



SEED INSPECTION 



49 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 
Lab. Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 
No. and Place Collected 



Wholesaler's 

Germination 

% Date 



Germi- 
nation 
Found 
% 



Month 

of Test 

1942 



CORN— Continued 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
25 Golden Cross Bantam, No. 390 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

400 Sunshine 85 

Wm. H. Casey Store, Milford 

Appros. 

759 Golden Bantam, No. 301 85 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 

COBURN SEED & SUPPLY CO., 
Chelmsford, Mass. 
1032 Bantam Evergreen, No. 3623 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

46 Golden Bantam - 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

159 Marcross 13 x 6 - 

Jose J. D'Aruda, Fall River 

ARTHUR R. CONE, Buffalo, N. Y. 

1010 Stowell's Evergreen, No. .50-251 92 

Sunshine Feed Store, Westfield 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

1029 Golden Sunshine 

Concord Hardware Co., Concord 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

501 Whipple's Early Yellow - 

CarUsle Hardware Co., Springfield 

725 Golden Bantam, No. 69719 

ReUable Hardware Co., Mattapan 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
10 Golden Cross Bantam — 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

183 Golden Cross Bantam, No. 1267 99 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO.. 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

378 Whipple's Early Yellow 90 

Millis Coal & Grain Co., Millis 

784 Corn Hybrid Marcross 90 

H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence 

794 Early Golden Bantam 90 

Plymouth Supply Co., Plymouth 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

295 Golden Cross Bantam, No. 1630 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, III. 

1094 Golden Evergreen 87 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

521 Whipple's Early Yellow, No. B 31 141 85 

Harry Seder, Webster 



— 


72t 


April 


2/1942 


88 


April 


2/1941 


78 


June 



— 84 

— 93 

— 95 



3/1942 



1942 



1/1942 



12/1941 



12/1941 



97 



— 85 



87 



63 1 



June 

April 
April 

June 

June 



93 


April 


89 


June 


89 


April 


97 


April 



12/1941 


63J 


April 


1/1942 


88 


June 


1/1942 


79 § 


June 



April 



June 



May 



t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 

§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 



50 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CORN— Concluded 

THE PAGE SEED CO.— Continued 

522 Golden Bantam, No. B 7-142 90 

Harry Seder, Webster 

918 Stowell's Evergreen, No. B 18-5542 90 

Arthur W. Baldwin, West Stockbridge 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
61 Golden Cross Bantam, No. 2660 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

572 Golden Giant, No. 322 98 

A. R. Tucker, Hardware, Warren 

SARGENT'S GRAIN & SUPPLY CO., 

Brockton, Mass. 
247 Golden Hummer - 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, MiUord. Conn. 

197 Marcross 6 x 13, No. 20037 90 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

369 Golden Cross Bantam, No. 20102 97 

Farm Service Co., Middleboro 

958 Woodruff's Earligold, No. 21070 

E. A. Noble & Co., Stockbridge 

CRESS 

Standard Germination 40% 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-g Fine Curled 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

695 Curled or Pepper Grass - 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

CUCUMBER 

Standard Germination 80% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

484 Boston Pickling 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Amherst 

505 Improved Long Green - 

Methe's Checkerboard Store, Springfield 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
30 Straight Eight, No. C 196 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

396 Long Green 80 

Wm. H. Casey Store, Milford 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-d Early White Spine 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

764 Improved Long Green - 

H. Bruckmann, Lawrence 



2/1942 90 May 

1/1942 88 June 

— 89 April 
1/1942 89 § June 

— 95 April 
12/1941 97 April 

12/1941 96 April 

— 97 June 



90 May 



Packed 

for 1942 85 May 



— 96 April 

— 89 April 

— 91 April 
1/1942 86 April 

— 99 June 

— 74 t June 



§ Above Standard but below Guarantee, 
t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



51 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



CUCUMBER— Concluded 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
219 Straight Eight, No. 1 

648 Boston PickUng 

Stoneham Paint & Hardware Supply Co., 
Stoneham 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

345 Boston Pickling 90 

J. Russell & Co., Holyoke 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1085 Improved Long Green . - 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO.. Chicago, 111. 

260 A & C, No. 24211 84 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

269 Davis Perfect, No. 24522 84 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

408 Improved Long Green - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

421 Green Prolific or Boston Pickling - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 

938 Early Cluster, No. 23924 84 + 

Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene. N. Y. Approx. 

524 Long Green, No. 14.4141 80 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Webster 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
57 Arlington White Spine, No. 2863 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

984 White Spine 90 

Arthur E. Sherman, Lanesboro 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

320 Boston Pickling, No. 8-37 90 

James D. Splann Estate. So. Deerfield 

Approx. 

321 Black Diamond, 8-864 90 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange. Conn. 

240 White Spine, No. 2291 80 

Monroe's Seed Market. Attleboro 

266 Long Green, No. 1310 82 

Pierce Hardware Co.. Taunton 

831 Boston PickUng, No. 2293 90 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co.. Lowell 

840 Woodruff's A & C. No. 1551 82 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co.. Lowell 

UNKNOWN 

1002 Boston PickUng 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 



12/1941 



1/1942 



93 April 

96 April 



92 



— 81 



89 



80 



April 



June 



1/1942 


96 


April 


1/1942 


80 


April 


- 


92 


April 


- 


59 1 


April 


1/1942 


95 


June 



April 



— 


95 


April 


1/1942 


94 


June 


12/1941 


97 


April 


12/1941 


90 


April 


12/1941 


64 1 


April 


12/1941 


32t 


April 


12/1941 


93 


May 


12/1941 


80 


May 



June 



t Bfelow Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



52 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



DANDELION 

Standard Germination 45% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

1015 Iinproved Thick Leaf - 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Westfield 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

825 Improved Thick Leaf 

Essex County Cooperative Farming Asso- 
ciation, Topsfield 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

497 Improved Thick Leaved - — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 

Cambridge, N. Y. 

917 Improved Thick Leaf 70 12/1941 

N. R. Wheeler, Richmond 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

394 Catalogna 73 1/1942 

Leon Zocchi, Milford 

EGG PLANT 

Standard Germination 60% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS. INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

888 New York Spineless 90 1/1942 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

763 Black Beauty - — 

H. Bruckmann, Lawrence 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

69 Black Beauty, No. 2018 80 — 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

499 Inrproved Large Purple — — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. Approx. 

856 Black Beauty 65 1942 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, lU. 

1051 Improved New York Purple — — 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

983 New York Spineless 

Arthur E. Sherman, Lanesboro 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
55 New York Improved, No. 3090 

ENDIVE 

Standard Germination 70% 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 

795 Broad Leaved Escarole - 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 



— 80 June 

— 77 May 

— Ot April 

87 May 

76 May 

89 May 

76 May 

89 April 
88 April 

71 May 

— 71 June 

— 85 June 

— 96 April 

— 86 May 



t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



53 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



ENDIVE— Concluded 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

605 Broad Leaf 

Central Hardware Co., Woburn 

THE FISICE CORPORATION, Natick, Mass. 
755 Broad Leaf Batavian - 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

792 Large Green Curled 

G. Canovaro, Hardware & Paint Co., 
No. Plymouth 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1158 Green Curled or Giant Fringed Oyster - 

Bengston Hardware Co., Gardner 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

776 Broad Leaved Batavian - — ■ 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

404 Broad Leaved Bavarian, No. 28512 75 12/1940 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

1006 Broad Leaved Batavian - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne Falls 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

525 Broad Leaved Batavian, No. M 11 4-42 85 12/1941 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Webster 

KALE 

Standard Germination 75% 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. Below Stand. 

538 Dwarf Green Curled Scotch 35% 12/1941 

D. F. Mazzaferro, Springfield 

KOHL RABI 

Standard Germination 75% 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. Packed 

577 Early White Vienna 75 for 1942 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

EMPIRE SEED CO, Fredonia, N. Y. Below Stand. 

539 Early Purple Vienna 45 12/1941 

D. F. Mazzaferro, Springfield 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

937 Early White Vienna, No. 32101 80 1/1942 

Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

1155 Early White Vienna - — 

Central Hardware Co., Fitchburg 

LEEK 

Standard Germination 60% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

1014 London Flag 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Westfield 



— 89 May 

— 90 May 

— 84 May 

— 83 June 
— . 83 May 



80 April 

84 June 

91 April 



April 



90 May 

49 April 

71 1 June 

14t June 



— 43 t June 



t Below Standard and below Guarantee, 
t Below Standard. 



54 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Teat 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



LEEK — Concluded 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

173 American Broad Flag - — 72 April 

G. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
222 American Flag, No. 1 - — 31t April 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

1057 Large American Flag - — 12t June 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

1058 American Flag - — 53t(c) June 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 

LETTUCE 

Standard Germination 80% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

393 Black Seeded Simpson 90 1/1942 

Leon Zocchi, Milford ^ 

561 Iceberg - — 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Palmer 

973 Big Boston - — 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Pittsfield 

993 Early Curled Simpson 90 11/1941 

Burlingame & Darbys Co., No. Adams 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
28 N. Y. Special #12, No. C 189 - — 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

397 Dwarf White Heart Cos 80 1/1942 

Wm. H. Casey Store, Milford 

730 Imperial 847 - — 93 

The Fair, Roslindale 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-f Hanson Firm Heading - 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

766 Iceberg 

H. Bruckmann, Lawrence 

1119 Black Seeded Tennisball 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION. 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

762-a Grand Rapids, Leaf 80 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 

Springfield, Mass. 

70 N. Y. #12, No. 711 90 12/1941 96 April 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

t Below Standard, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year. 



96 


April 


98 


May 


98 


June 


95 


June 


95 


April 


98 


April 



May 

— 93 May 

— 98 May 

— 97 June 

— 83 May 



SEED INSPECTION 



55 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, Wholesaler's 

Lab. Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, Germination 

No. and Place Collected % Date 



Germi- 
nation Month 
Found of Test 
% 1942 



LETTUCE— Continued 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
215 Imperial S44, No. 1 - — 

379 Black Seeded Tennisball - — 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

649 Big Boston - — 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

1 171 Iceberg - — 

Orange Hardware Co., Orange 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. Below Stand. 

934 Early Prize Head Approx. 50 12/1911 

Ely's Market, Great Barrington 

Below Stand. 

951 Early Prize Head 50 12/1941 

H. C. Puffer Company, Huntington 

952 Paris White Cos - — 

H. C. Puffer Company, Huntington 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

496 New York - — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

ERASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. Approx. 

805 Black Seeded Tennisball 95 1/1942 

Plymouth Rock Hardware Co., Plymouth 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
11 Imperial "44" - — 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

182 White Boston, No. 675 99 — 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

334 N. Y. Head - — 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

785 Big Boston 78 1/1942 

H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence 

876 Simpson's Early Curled - — 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

979 May King 88 1/1942 

The Hardware Shop, Adams 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1096 Early Prize Head - — 

Albert P. Wilson, Newburyport 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

96 Black Seeded Simpson — — 

Frankhn School, Holbrook 

140 Grand Rapids - — 

Allen School, East Bridge water 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

293 Iceberg, No. 60 80 1/1942 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 

772 Black Seeded Tennisball - — 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 



99 April 

41 1 April 

85 May 

80 June 

61 May 

53 June 

93 June 

2t April 

98 May 

97 April 

98 April 

95 April 

58t May 

85 May 

94 June 



87 



June 



98 


April 


98 


April 


76t 


April 


6t 


May 



t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



56 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



LETTUCE— Continued 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO.— Continued 

818 N. Y. #12 82 

Parker's Farm Supply Store, Danvers 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center, Mass. 
744 Iceberg - — 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO.. Chicago, 111. 

264 Big Boston No. 33211 80-|- 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

265 Romaine Cos, No. 36412 80 + 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

403 Prizehead - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

417 Big Boston - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., HolUston 

422 Iceberg - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., HoUiston 

600 Iceberg 70 3/1942 

Winer Bros., Inc., Beverly 

1007 Big Boston - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne Falls 

1145 E.Trly Curled Simpson - — 

United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg 

1 154 Big Boston - — 

Central Hardware Co., Fitchburg 

1161 Iceberg - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Gardner 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

921 Imperial #44 90 12/1941 

Snyder's Store, Hoosatonic 

GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SONS, 
Pedricktown, N. J. 

443 Boston Market 90 1/1942 

The Continental Nurseries, Franklin 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
54 N. Y. or Wonderful #12, No. 3605 - — 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

977 Boston Prize Head - — 

Murphy's Pharmacy, Adams 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

137 Early Curled Simpson 60 11/1941 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
304 Prizehead, No. 718 - — 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE. Chicago. 111. 

647 Grand Rapids Forcing - 

Harold Cogger, Reading 

t Below Standard. 

} Below Standard and below Guarantee, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year 



— 97 May 



59t 


May 


43t 


April 


25 1 


April 


45t 


April 


ot 


April 


14t 


April 


76 


May 


Ot 


June 


19t 


June 


95 


June 


91 


June 



98 



May 



99 April 

93 April 

Ot(c) June 

53 1 April 

95 April 

92 May 



SEED INSPECTION 



57 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test • 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



LETTUCE— Concluded 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

192 White Boston, No. 1-3142 90 12/1941 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

438 N. Y. or Wonderful - — 

Milford Hardware, Inc., Milford 

631 Big Boston - — 

Winer's Hardware Stores, Inc., Whitman 

535 New York - — 

Agawam Public Market, Agawam 

Approx. 

929 Ea. Curled Silesia 95 12/1941 

Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 

UNKNOWN 

316 Big Boston - — 

Clark Hardware Co., Greenfield 

MUSKMELON 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

824 Bender's Surprise . . . . ^ 90 1 1/1941 

Essex County Cooperative Farming 
Association, Topsfield 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. Approx. 

857 Hale's Best 90 1942 

ONION 

Standard Germination 70% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS. INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

844 Yellow Globe Danvers — 

Middlesex Supply Co., Lowell 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
18 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. C 129 - — 

26 Danvers Yellow Globe, No. C 376 - — 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

149 Southport Yellow Globe 75 12/1941 

Brownell Hardware Co., Attleboro 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

47 Yellow Globe Danvers - — 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

112 Prizetaker - — 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 

175 Wethersfield Large Red - — 

G. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 

328 Japanese 92 12/1941 

Foster Farrar Co., Northampton 

329 White Portugal 91 1/1942 

Foster Farrar Co., Northampton 

t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee, 
(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year 



99 April 

53t(c) April 

59t(c) April 

4t(c) April 

100 May 

97 April 



June 



94 



— 74 



June 



May 



96 


April 


99 


April 


Sit 


April 


89 


April 


73 


April 


95 


April 


87 


April 


95 


April 



58 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



ONION— Continued 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO.— Continued 

606 Yellow Globe 

Central Hardware Co., Woburn 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
East Rochester, N. Y. 

108 Yellow Globe Danvers 75 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

340 Ebenezer, No. 2410 95 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Northampton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
208 Prizetaker, No. 1 

220 White Portugal. No. 1 

385 Yellow Globe Danvers 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

428 Red Globe 

F. A. Gould, Milford 

1028 Yellow Globe Danvers - 

Concord Hardware Co., Concord 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

490 Southport White Globe 

CarUsle Hardware Co., Springfield 

FREDONIA SEED CO.. Fredonia, N. Y. 

563 Yellow Globe Danvers 

Warren Cash Market, Warren 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
3 Yellow Globe Danvers - 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

179 Southport Red Globe, No. 802 92 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

319 Japanese or Ebenezer 81 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

343 Yellow Valencia 72 

J. Russell & Co., Holyoke 

350 Yellow Globe Danvers 78 

Woodlawn Supply Co., So. Hadley 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

323 Yellow Globe Danvers - 

John Waskiewicz, Hadley 

1095 Large Red Wethersfield 

Albert P. Wilson, Newburyport 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

292 Yellow Globe Danvers. No. 295 70 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co.. Worcester 

586 Yellow Globe Danvers 70 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem 



12/1941 



65t May 



63 1 April 



94 



April 



— 16t April 

— 86 April 

— 92 April 

— 2t April 

— 34t June 

— 20t April 

— 39 1 May 

— 81 April 
1942 98 April 

— 84 April 
12/1941 68t April 

1/1942 66t April 

— 43 1 April 

— 15t June 

1/1942 18t April 

1/1942 17t May 



t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



59 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



ONION— Continued 

M. E. MANNING, Hadley, Mass. 
325 Early Globe 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

117 Yellow Globe Dan vers. No. 50872 80 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

120 Southport Red Globe, No. 52111 80 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

268 White Portugal or Am. Silverskin, No. 52716 . . 80 + 
Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

410 Yellow Globe Danvers - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

470 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 11 70 + 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

598 Yellow Globe Danvers 70 

Winer Bros., Inc., Beverly 

872 Yellow Globe Danvers 

John S. Glennon, Hardware, Dalton 

907 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 50821 80 + 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

908 Large Red Wethersfield, No. 52314 50 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

1009 Yellow Globe Danvers 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne Falls 

1054 Southport Red Globe, No. 52111 50 + 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

1056 Southport White Globe 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

15 Yellow Globe Danvers — ' 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

42 Prizetaker 85 

Weld Square Hardware Co., New Bedford 

Approx. 

165 LargeRed Wethersfield, No. S 1.7541 80 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SONS, 
Pedricktown, N. J. 

441 Danvers Yellow 92 

The Continental Nurseries, Franklin 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
50 Danvers Yellow Globe, No. 3854 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
299 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 746 

570 Yellow Globe Danvers 80 

A. S. Tucker, Hardware, Warren 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

78 Yellow Globe Danvers 80 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Weymouth 

t Below Standard. 

X Below Standard and below Guarantee. 

§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 



— 


90 


April 


1/1942 


18t 


April 


1/1942 


411 


April 


1/1942 


48t 


April 


- 


82 


April 


12/1940 


87 


April 


3/1942 


19{ 


May 


- 


L5t 


May 


1/1942 


74 


May 


1/1942 


37 1 


May 


- 


12t 


June 


1/1942 


39 1 


June 


- 


88 


June 


- 


70 


April 


1941 


94 


April 


[2/1941 


93 


April 


2/1941 


78 § 


April 



1/1942 
12/1941 



88 April 

93 April 
41t May 

94 April 



60 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



ONION— Concluded 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

132 Yellow Globe Danvers 85 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
201 Prizetaker - 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

90 Lfirge Red Globe 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

Below Stand. 
318 Woodruff's Early Yellow Globe, No. 18913 Approx. 66 
James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

Approx. 

551 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 9-383 85 

H. J. Croteau, Northampton 

882 Southport White Globe 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 

1059 Red Wethersfield 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 

1060 Southport White Globe 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supplj' Co., 
Haverhill 

1061 Yellow Globe Danvers - 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Haverhill 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

235 Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 50 W 70 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

547 Japanese 70 

H. J. Croteau, Northa'mpton 

829 Yellow Globe 70 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

830 White Portugal, No. 2231 75 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

UNKNOWN 

506 Southport White Globe - 

Methe's Checkerboard Store, Springfield 

PARSLEY 

Standard Germination 60% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

504 Champion Moss Curled - 

Methe's Checkerboard Store, Springfield 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

765 Extra Curled Dwarf or Emerald 

H. Bruckmann, Lawrence 



11/1941 


88 


April 


- 


44t 


April 


- 


70 


April 


12/1941 


53t(x) 


April 


1/1942 


73 § 


April 


- 


65t 


May 


- 


.56 1 


June 


- 


40t 


June 


_ 


70 


June 



1/1942 


33 { 


April 


1/1942 


531: 


April 


12/1941 


23 J 


May 


12/1941 


45 1 


May 





ot 


April 



— 79 April 



— 80 May 



t Below Standard. 

X Below Standard and below Guarantee. 
§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 
(x) Wholesaler claims he sold this seed at risk of purchaser on account of germination at time 
tested. 



SEED INSPECTION 



61 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Band of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



— 82 May 



— 60 June 



PARSLE Y— Concluded 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

580 Extra Double Curled 70 1942 76 May 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

762-f Moss Curled Double 60 — 76 May 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

71 Paramount or Moss Curled, No. 711 65 12/1941 79 April 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

775 Double Curled 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., Lawrence 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

537 Plain Semplice 

D. F. Mazzaferro, Springfield 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

495 Champion Moss Curled - — 81 April 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

514 Moss Curled - 1942 82 May 

Waite Hardware Co., Webster 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

407 Champion Moss Curled - — 52t April 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
202 Italian - — 75 April 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, Chicago, 111. 

646 Champion Moss Curled - — 61 May 

Harold Cogger, Reading 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

437 Plain Leaf - — 80 April 

Milford Hardware Co., Inc., Milford 

881 Moss Curled - — 83 May 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 

UNKNOWN 

542 Hamburg Rooted 32 3/1942 32 June 

Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield 

PARSNIP 

Standard Germination 60% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

363 Hollow Crown 84 9/1941 94 May 

Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 

, JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
36 Short Full Crown Lot No. C 282 - — 74 April 

796 Long Smooth White - — 83 May 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 



t Below Standard. 



62 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



PARSNIP— Continued 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

848 Hollow Crown 

C. B. Coburn Co., Lowell 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

243 Hollow Crown 

Lawson Paint & Seed Co., Brockton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
213 Hollow Crown 

773 Hollow Crown 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

793 Hollow Crown 

G. Canovaro, Hardware & Paint Co., 
No. Plymouth 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

783 Champion Hollow Crown 74 

H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1098 Improved Hollow Crown - 

Albert P. Wilson, Newburj'port 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

587 Bloomsdale Reselected Hollow Crown 71 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem 

820 Sugar Cup or Hollow Crown 72 

Parker's Farm Supply Co., Danvers 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago. 111. 

401 Improved Hollow Crown, No. 55911 65 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., MiUord 

424 Improved Hollow Crown - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., HolUston 

473 Improved Hollow Crown, No. 55911 65 -f 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

478 Improved Hollow Crown, No. 55921 65 -f 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co., Amherst 

1134 Hollow Crown, No. 55922 65 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Leominster 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Appro.x. 

41 Hollow Crown 55 

Weld Hardware Co., New Bedford 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

160 All American, No. 9-352 90 

Jose J. D'Aruda, Fall River 

436 Hollow Crown 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

Approx. 

468 AH American, No. 1-0104 71 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 



— 60 May 

— 69 April 

— 65 April 

— It May 

— 62 May 



1/1942 


64 § 


May 


- 


26t 


June 


1/1942 


84 


May 


— 


88 


May 


12/1940 


52t 


May 


- 


8t 


April 


12/1940 


62 


April 


1/1942 


64 


April 


1/1942 


83 


June 


*/1941 


55 


April 


11/1941 


97 


April 


- 


95 


April 


11/1940 


29 1 


May 



* Information required by law not given, 
t Below Standard. 

j Below Standard and below Guarantee. 
§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 



SEED INSPECTION 



63 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



PARSNIP— Concluded 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS— Continued 

552 Hollow Crown, No. 18538 68 

H. J. Croteau, Northampton 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

Below Stand. 

836 Parsnip, No. SDN ** 29 

Ad.ims Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

UNKNOWN 

543 Hollow Crown 82 

Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield 

999 Parsnip ** 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 

PEAS 

Standard Germination 80% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

315 Thomas Laxton 85 

Clark Hardware Co., Greenfield 

485 American Wonder 85 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Amherst 

W. E. AUBUCHON CO., INC., 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

425 American Wonder - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 

1005 Gradus 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne Falls 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
24 Breck's Improved Telephone, No. C 172 

413 Nott's Excelsior - 

Charles A. Smith Co., Millis 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

309 Burpee's Blue Bantam, No. 23728 85 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

399 Extra Early Gradus 85 

Wm. H. Casey Store, Milford 

847 Tall Telephone 

C. B. Coburn Co., Lowell 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

244 World's Record 91 

Lawson Paint & Seed Co., Brockton 

1113 Tall Telephone 

Stoughton Hardware Co., Stoughton 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 

Springfield, Mass. 

75 Laxton's Progress, No. 2212 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

431 Little Marvel 

F. A. Gould, Milford 



11/1941 



12/1941 



3/1942 



84 May 

23 May 

8X May 

3t June 



8/1941 


95 


April 


10/1941 


95 


May 


- 


93 


April 


- 


92 


June 


— 


93 


April 


— 


89 


May 


1/1942 


86 


April 


1/1942 


96 


May 


- 


95 


June 


12/1941 


88 


April 


- 


91 


June 


12/1941 


94-1 


April 


_ 


40t 


April 



t Below Standard. 

t Below Standard and below Guarantee. 
** Variety required by law but not stated. 



64 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 
Lab. Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 
No. and Place Collected 



Wholesaler's 

Germination 

% Date 



Germi- 
nation Month 
Found of Test 
% 1942 



PEAS — Continued 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO.— Continued 

1045 Notts Excelsior ■ • 

Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

502 Laxtonian ■ ■ ■ 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Sprmgfield 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
9 Blue Bantam 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

184 Hundredfold, No. 944 96 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

337 Gradus 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

375 Tall Telephone.. ........... .■•■ 90 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Medfield 

513 Gradus "" 

Waite Hardware Co., Webster 

961 Dwarf Telephone • ■ 90 

Berkshire Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

158 World's Record, No. 468 ' 85 

Jose J. D'Aruda, Fall River or Better 

822 Gradus • ■ " 

Parker's Farm Supply Store, Dan vers 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

480 Telephone, No. 23021 x • ■ '. • ', ^''"^ 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co., Amherst 

905 Gradus, No. 23922 ■ 90 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
58 Laxton's Progress, No. 5727 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 
Cambridge, N. Y. 

790 Nott's Excelsior 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

916 Laxton's Progress 85 

N. R. Wheeler, Richmond 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
303 Alderman, No. 758 

919 Telephone ^- • ' v ; • .' ; 

Arthur R. Baldwin, West Stockbridge 

F H WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

370 "Gradus, No. 16005 96 

Farm Service Co., Middleboro 

439 Thomas Laxton, No. 18762 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

885 Nott's Excelsior ■.• •■•••■,• v^- ■ • ~ 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 



98 



June 



April 



— 


83 


April 


1942 


96 


April 


— 


93 


April 


1/1942 


84 


May 


- 


67t 


May 


1/1942 


90 


June 


1/1942 


94 


April 


- 


94 


June 


12/1941 


85 


April 


12/1941 


97 


June 



96-1 April 



— 


99 


June 


12/1941 


96 


June 


— 


89 


April 


— 


91 


June 


12/1941 


95 


May 


12/1941 


83 


May 





93 


June 



t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



65 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



PEAS— Concluded 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

296 Nott's Excelsior, No. 2198 - — 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 

737 Nott's Excelsior, No. 2192 - 12/1941 

New Style Hardware Co., RosUndale 

758 World's Record, No. 2416 80 1/1942 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 

Approx. 

867 Little Gem, No. 1859 90 11/1937 

John S. Glennon, Dalton 

868 Nott's Excelsior 90 1937 

John S. Glennon, Dalton 

UNKNOWN 

540 Telephone - — 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

869 Champion of England - — 

John S. Glennon, Dalton 

996 Nott's - — 

BurUngame & Darbys Co., No. Adams 

PEPPER 

Standard Germination 55% 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

171 CaUfornia Wonder 93 12/1941 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. Packed 

579 King of the North 60 for 1942 

S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

72 Waltham Beauty, No. 8411 80 12/1941 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly. Mass. 
21 1 CaUfornia, No. 1 - _ 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

494 Ruby King - 

CarUsle Hardware Co., Springfield 

HYGRADE SEED CO.. INC.. Fredonia. N. Y. 

94 California Wonder - 

Franklin School. Holbrook 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

267 Harris Early Giant, No. 57711 GO-f- 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co.. Taunton 

599 Bell or Bull Nose _ _ 

Winer Bros., Inc., Beverly 

JOSEPH SORDILLO & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
203 Hot Squash _ _ 



81-3 April 
93 June 

91 June 

72t(0) June 
7U(0) June 

93 May 

72t June 

Ot June 



92 April 

85 May 

97 April 

— 89 April 

— 58 April 

— 95 April 

48t April 

29t May 

81 April 



t Below Standard. 

t Below Standard and below Guarantee. 
(O) Old seed as shown by date of test. 



66 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 
Dealer When Otner Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T,fib 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



PEPPER— Concluded 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

435 Pimento 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

883 Long Red Cayenne — 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

834 Bull Nose 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

PUMPKIN 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC.. 
Milford, Conn. 

827 Conn. Field 90 9/1941 

Essex County Cooperative Farming Asso- 
ciation, Dan vers 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
35 Sweet or Sugar, No. C 386 - — 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

874 Small Sugar - — 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

941 Sugar or Pie, No. 61111 754- 1/1942 

Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

927 Conn. Field, No. 18896 90 12/1941 

Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 

RADISH 

Standard Germination 75% 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1076 Scarlet Globe 

Murry & Dugdale Co., Haverhill 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
31 Scarlet Globe Short Top, No. C 247 - — 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-e Early Scarlet Globe - — 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

804 Early Scarlet Globe - — 

Plymouth Rock Hardware Co., Plymouth 

1118 Early Scarlet Globe - — 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Roche.ster, N. Y. 

762-e Round Scarlet White Tipped 80 — 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

73 Early Scarlet Globe, No. 19012 95 12/1941 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 



— 59(c) April 

— 81 May 

— 93 May 



94 June 



96 April 



97 June 



91 June 



95 June 



— 80 June 

— 90 April 

— 98 May 

— 96 May 

— 90 June 

— 98 May 
96 April 



(c) Wholesaler claims seed not sold by him, at least not during current year. 



SEED INSPECTION 



67 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T>a,b. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



RADISH— Concluded 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
221 Cavalier, No. 1 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

915 Early Scarlet White Tip 

Richard Schinowsky, West Pittsfield 

THOMAS J. GREY CO.. Boston, Mass. 
7 Early Scarlet Globe 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

87.5 White Icicle 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

980 Black 

The Hardware Shop, Adams 

991 French Breakfast 

Burlingame & Darbys Co., No. Adams 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1084 Early Scarlet Turnip 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

HYGRADE SEED CO., INC., Fredonia, N. Y. 

95 Early Scarlet Globe • - 

Franklin School, Holbrook 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

426 Early Scarlet Globe - — 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 

871 White Icicle - — 

John S. Glennon, Dalton 

939 Early Scarlet Globe, No. 62722 80 -h 1/1942 

Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

922 French Breakfast - — 

Snyder's Store, Hoosatonic 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 
Cambridge, N. Y. 

943 Early Scarlet Turnip White Top - — 

Bridge Market, Huntington 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

928 White Icicle 90 12/1941 

Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 

Approx. 

957 Early Scarlet Globe 90 12/1941 

E. A. Noble & Co., Stockbridge 

UNKNOWN 

1004 French Breakfast - — 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 



86 
90 



92 
75 



— 96 



95 



97 



95 



28t 



April 
May 

April 

May 
June 
June 

June 

April 



45t 


April 


86 


May 


91 


June 



May 



June 



May 



June 



June 



RUTABAGA 

Standard Germination 75% 



ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
New Haven, Conn. 

168F American Purple Top 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 



12/1941 



77 May 



t Below Standard. 



68 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Ihan Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



RUTABAGA— Continued 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
19F American Improved, No. C 230 

22F Sweet Perfection, No. C 366 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

150F Improved American Purple Top Yellow 80 

Brownell Hardware Co., Attleboro 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

45F Macomber — Improved White Rock — 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

lOOF American Purple Top - 

F. Richmond & Co., Brockton 

631F Improved Purple Top Yellow 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

IIOF American Purple Top 85 

S. S. Kresge & Co., Brockton 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 
154F Long Island Neckless Purple Top, No. 2412 ... 95 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Brockton 

155F Macomber, No. 10811 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Brockton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
210F Macomber, No. 1 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

349F American Purple Top 

Woodlawn Supply Co., So. Hadley 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

276F American Purple Top - 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

492F American Purple Top - 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

654F Improved American Purple Top — 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
5F Long Island Purple Top - 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

180F Improved Long Orange, No. .598 96 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

116F Macomber 85 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

121F Long Island Improved Neckless 82 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

512F American Purple Top Yellow - 

Waite's Hardware Co., Southbridge 



— 97 

— 80 



12/1941 



May 
May 

May 



— 89 May 

— 88 May 

— 51t(c) June 

— 76 § May 



12/1941 


99 


May 


12/1941 


98 


May 


- 


23t 


May 


- 


83 


May 


- 


94 


May 


— 


64t(c) 


May 



— 64 t June 

— 62t May 

— 94 May 

12/1941 98 May 

1/1942 82 May 

— 64t May 



t Below Standard. 

§ Above Standard but below Guarantee, 
(c) Wholesaler claims this seed not sold by him, at least not during current year. 



SEED INSPECTION 



69 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T,ah 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



RUT ABAGA— Concluded 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO.— Continued 

994 Long Island Yellow - 

Burlingame & Darbys Co., No. Adams 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 
1079 Improved Purple Top Yellow Hardy Swede ... - 
Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 
558F Landreth's Improved Yellow Fleshed Purple Top - 
Frank E. Whitcomb, Amherst 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center, Mass. 
745F American Purple Top - 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 
257F Improved American Purple Top, No. 84592 ... 80-1- 
Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

474F Improved American Purple Top - 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

17F American Purple Top — 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

164F Macomber Y17.6141 78 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

THE PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
51F Improved American Purple Top, No. 7135 .... - 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 
Cambridge, N. Y. 

80F Improved American Purple Top 80 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc., 
Weymouth 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan. N. Y. Approx. 

133F Yellow Purple Top 70 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
302F Long Island Improved #311 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

125F Macomber, No. 7669 89 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Approx. 

190F Long Island Improved 9-332 90 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

1065 American Purple Top, No. 18884 95 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Inc., Haverhill 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

238F White Rock, No. 2319R 80 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

239F Macomber, No. 2319 80 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

UNKNOWN 

1001 Yellow 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 



98 June 



— 82 June 



~ 


96 


May 


- 


99 


May 


1/1942 


88 


April 


- 


62t 


April 


- 


71t 


May 


12/1941 


40 1 


May 


- 


90 


May 


12/1941 


88 


May 


11/1941 


83 


May 


- 


88 


May 


11/1941 


90 


May 


12/1941 


99 


May 



1/1942 



98 June 



1/1942 


88 


April 


1/1942 


84 


April 





4t 


June 



t Below Standard. 

X Below Standard and below Guarantee. 



70 



CONTEOL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T-a,b. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



SALSIFY 

Standard Germination 75% 



EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

954 Mamrrioth Sandwich Island 

H. 0. Puffer Co., Huntington 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1159 Mammoth Sandwich Island 

Bengston Hardware Co., Gardner 



78 June 



Ot June 



SPINACH 

Standard Germination: 
Common 60% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

482 Bloomsdale Savoy - 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Amherst 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
32 Long Standing Bloomsdale, No. C 283 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-i Tendergreen - 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

1117 Giant Thick Leaf 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

762-d Bloomsdale 70 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
217 Old Dominion 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

346 New Long Standing Bloomsdale — 

J. Russell & Co., Holyoke 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1083 Am. Savoy Leaved or Long Standing - 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol. Pa. 

821 Bloomsdale Reselected D.G 70 

Parker's Farm Supply Store, Danvers 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago. 111. 
259 Short Leaved Bloomsdale Wilt Resistant, 

.No. 68721 80 -F 1/1942 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

479 Savoy Leaved Bloomsdale Wilt Resistant, 

No. 68794 87 1/1^42 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Co., Amherst 

1093 Giant Noble Thick Leaf, 67821 65 -|- 1/1942 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

527 Bloomsdale Savoy, No. V 1040 . . . 75 12/1941 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Welaster 



— 87 April 

— 84 April 

— 98 May 

— 32t June 

— 74 May 

— 89 April 

— 82 April 

— 79 June 

— 93 May 



92 April 

87 April 

68 June 

73 April 



t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



71 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


T-ab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



SPINACH— Concluded 

GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SON, 
Pedricktown, N. J. 

444 Giant Thick Leaved 70 

The Continental Nurseries, Franklin 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Approx. 

193 Bloomsdale Savoy Reselected, No. 18597 77 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

749 Round Thick Leaf, No. 18782 78 

Boston Supply Co., Inc., Framingham 

Below Stand. 

813 Bloomsdale Long Standing, No. 14590 . .Approx. 40 

Dan vers Hardware Co., Dan vers 

815 Round Thick Leaf, 18224 

Danvers Hardware Co., Dan vers 

817 Bloomsdale Long Standing Savoy, No. 14590 . . - 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

Approx. 
930 Harlem Market 95 

Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

548 Long Standing Savoy, No. 2347 87 

H. J. Croteau, Northampton 

Approx. 

814 Long Standing Savoy, No. 1746 76 

Danvers Hardware Company, Danvers 

SQUASH 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 

Milford, Conn. 

823 Blue Hubbard 

Essex County Cooperative Farming Asso- 
ciation, Danvers 

889 Improved Green Hubbard - 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
27 Blue Hubbard, No. C 217 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

311 Giant Golden Summer, No. 1020 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

242 Golden Summer Crookneck — 

Lawson Paint & Seed Co., Brockton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
218 Blue Hubbard, No. 1 

651 Giant Summer Crookneck - 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

498 Giant Summer Straight Neck - 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 



3/1942 


75 


April 


12/1941 


49 1 


April 


12/1941 


70 


June 


12/1941 


29t 


May 


- 


68 


May- 


— 


37t 


May 


12/1941 


95 


May 


2/1942 


73 § 


April 


1/1940 


62 § 


May 



— 83 June 

— 98 June 

— 99 April 

— 76 April 

— 94 April 

— 90 April 

— 9t June 

— 87 April 



t Below Standard. 

t Below Standard and below Guarantee. 

§ Above Standard but below Guarantee. 



72 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



SQUASH— Concluded 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

406 Crookneck, No. 70127 80 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

909 Leonard's Giant Straightneck, No. 70721 80 H- 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
59 Giant Summer Straight Neck, No. 6343 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., 
Cambridge, N. Y. 

986 Giant Summer Crookneck - 

Phillips General Store, Williamstown 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. Appro.x. 

194 Conn. Straight Neck, No. 1-140 88 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

553 Special Blue Hubbard - 

H. J. Croteau, Northampton 

UNKNOWN 

998 Giant Summer Crookneck - 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 

TOMATO 

Standard Germination 75% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

890 Certified Rutgers, No. 18 90 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
34 Marglobe, No. C 158 . 

411 Stone, No. 0220 F 

Economy Hardware Co., Milford 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-c Marglobe Wilt, Rust Resistant 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

826 Bonny Best 

Essex County Cooperative Farming Asso- 
ciation, Topsfield 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

286 Dwarf Stone 80 

Weisner Bros., Inc., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 
Springfield, Mass. 

74 Marglobe, No. 2016 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Waltham 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
212 Marglobe, No. 1 

1046 John Baer, No. 1 

Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO.. Detroit, Mich. 

277 Dwarf Champion 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

t Below Standard. 



1/1942 


96 


April 


1/1942 


94 


June 





98 


April 



12/1941 



11/1941 



87 June 

91 April 

99 May 

29t June 

95 June 

— 91 April 

— 84 April 

— 92 June 

— 77 May 

t42 98 April 



12/1941 



94 April 

92 April 

92 June 

75 April 



SEED INSPECTION 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



TOMATO— Concluded 



FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. Approx. 

858 Master Marglobe 85 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
6 Rutgers - 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

333 Bonny Best 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

338 John Baer 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1080 Budd's Selected Spark's Earliana - 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

HYGRADE SEED CO., INC., Fredonia. N. Y. 

139 Marglobe 

Allen School, East Bridge water 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

588 Bonny Best 

Salem Hardware Co., Inc., Salem 

777 Bonny Best - 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Lawrence 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

940 EarUana, No. 76521 804- 

Man Chester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. Approx. 

166 Bonny Best, No. X3-4-140 81 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
53 Bonny Best, No. 6916 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

138 EarUana 68 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, MiUord, Conn. 

880 Earliana _ 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Pittsfield 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS, Orange, Conn. 

241 Marglobe, No. 1949 77 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

837 Bonnie Best, No. 2344 85 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 



1942 92 May 

— 96 April 

— 85 April 

— 90 April 

— 75 June 

— 88 April 

— 82 May 

— 83 May 

95 June 

88 April 

91 April 

75 April 

76 June 

80 April 

86 May 



1/1942 



11/1941 



11/1941 



12/1941 
1/1942 



TURNIP 

Standard Germination 80% 

ASSOCIATED SEED GROWERS, INC., 
Milford, Conn. 

169F Purple Top White Globe 90 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 

314F Purple Top Strap Leaved 90 

Clark Hardware Co., Greenfield 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

104F Purple Top White Globe 

F. Richmond & Co., Brockton 



10/1941 
10/1941 



97 



94 



98 



May 
May 

May 



74 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Continued 

VEGETABLES— Continued 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



TURNIP- Continued 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO.— Continued 

1075 Purple Top Strap Leaf, No. 1157 

Murray & Dugdale Co., Haverhill 

CARMEL GIFT MAKERS, Carmel, Cal. 

761-j Early Purple Top White 

R. H. White Co., Boston 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

44F Purple Top Strap Leaf Flat 

A. E. Wordell, New Bedford 

113F Purple Top Flat 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 

226F Yellow Stone 95 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. .\ttleboro 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

109F Purple Top White Globe 80 

S. S. Kresge Co., Brockton 

762-g Purple Top White Globe 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

EASTERN STATES FARMERS' EXCHANGE, 

Springfield, Mass. 

1.52r Purple Top White Globe, No. 1 1011 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Brockton 

153F Amber Globe, No. 612 90 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, Brockton 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO.. Beverly, Mass. 
209F Purple Top White Globe 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

274F White Egg 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

49 IF Orange Jelly or Golden Ball . _ 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

655F Purple Top White Globe 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
4F White Egg 

JOSEPH HARRIS CO., INC., Rochester, N. Y. 

181F Purple Top White Globe, No. 597 96 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

BUDD D. HAWKINS, Reading, Vt. 

1078 New White Sweet German 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 
557F Large Early Red or Purple Top White Globe. . 
Frank L. Whitcomb, Amherst 

1022 Early Flat Red or Purple Top Strap Leaf 85 

City Grain Co., Marlboro 



— 95 June 

— 97 June 

— 98 May 

— 97 May 
12/1941 98 May 

— 94 May 

— 88 May 

12/1941 99 May 

12/1941 97 May 

— 87 May 

— 97 May 

— 6Gt April 

— 75t May 

— 91 May 
1942 93 May 

— 37t June 

— 90 May 
1/1942 93 June 



t Below Standard. 



SEED INSPECTION 



75 



1942 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS— Concluded 

VEGETABLES— Concluded 









Germi- 






Wholesale Distributor, Kind of Seed and Variety, 


Wholesaler's 


nation 


Month 


Lab. 


Dealer When Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 


Germination 


Found 


of Test 


No. 


and Place Collected 


% Date 


% 


1942 



TURNIP— Concluded 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago. 111. 

255F White Egg, No. 834-12 80 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

256F Purple Top Strap Leaf, No. 82111 80 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO.. Minneapolis, Minn. 

16F Purple Top White Globe 

F. W. Woolworth & Co., Boston 

THE PAGE SEED CO., Greene. N. Y. 

163F Purple Top Strap Leaf, No. Y2-7442 90 

Antonio M. Pires, Fall River 

526F White Egg, No. Y 10-4830 90 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Webster 

GEORGE R. PEDRICK & SONS, 
Pedricktown, N. J. 

442F Strap Leaf 90 

The Continental Nurseries. Franklin 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
.52F Purple Top White Globe. No. 7056 

ROSS BROS. CO.. Worcester. Mass. 
301F Purple Top White Globe, No. 634 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

79F Purple Top White Globe 80 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Weymouth 

J. B. RICE. jR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. Approx. 

134F Purple Top White Globe 85 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis. Minn. 

91F Purple Top White Globe 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS. Milford. Conn. 

126F. Seven Top. No. 9-1 6 90 

Waldron Hardware Co.. Taunton 

Approx. 

198F Purple Top White Globe. No. 1-179 90 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

Approx. 

368F Purple Top White Globe, No. 184554 90 

Farm Service Co., Middleboro 

S. D. WOODRUFF & SONS. Orange, Conn. 

122F Seven Top. No. 2405 80 

Pierce Hardware Co.. Taunton 

236F Purple Top Strap Leaf. No. 2351 85 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

237F White Egg, No. 2385 80 

Monroe's Seed Market. Attleboro 



1/1942 
1/1942 



12/1941 
12/1941 

1/1942 



12/1941 



97 
96 

80 

98 
95 



97 



April 
April 

May 

May 
May 

May 



— 


97 


May 


- 


95 


May 


12/1941 


91 


May 


11/1941 


97 


May 


- 


83 


May 


12/1941 


91 


May 


12/1941 


98 


May 



May 



1/1942 


88 


May 


1/1942 


o8t 


April 


1/1942 


73 1 


April 



% Below Standard and below Guarantee, 



76 CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



TYPE AND VARIETY STUDIES OF VEGETABLES 

Conducted in Conjunction with the Department of Olericulture, 
Grant B. Snyder, Professor 

Each year tests are conducted by the Experiment Station to determine the 
trueness to type of vegetable seeds which are offered for sale by the seedsmen in 
this State. Samples of seed of beets, carrots, turnips, and rutabagas were obtained 
by State Inspectors and sent to the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion at Amherst, where the Department of Olericulture sowed the seed in field 
test plots in order to compare plant characteristics with the labeled variety name. 

The soil of the test plot is a fine, sandy loam and is naturally fertile. The land 
was well prepared and a liberal quantity of fertilizer was applied broadcast. 
Frequent and timely rains provided an excellent growing season so that growth 
and development were generally satisfactory. 

Yield records were not taken because it was necessary to use small plots and 
the number of samples in the test made replication almost impossible. Con- 
formity to "type" has been the measure of comparison in these tests. "Type" in 
plants deals with many characteristics such as shape of the marketable part of 
the plant; relative smoothness, tallness, or dwarfness; different colors of flowers, 
fruits, or seeds; disease resistance or susceptibility; and many other well defined 
differences. 

Individual plants have been called "off-type" when they could not be classified 
in a group of plants ranging fairly close to the average for the particular strain or 
variety under consideration. 

In studying the comparative type characters and performance records, it is 
plainly evident that practically all the stocks were true to name and description 
and most of them were highly productive. In a few instances it appeared as 
though a slight mixture had occurred, but in no case was it plainly evident that 
the variety had been misnamed or misrepresented. 

The source of the seed and the laboratory germination records are to be found 
in the tables on pages 33-75, where the lots of seed used in the field tests are 
identified by the letter "F" added to the laboratory number. Those seeds tested 
in the field and not included in the following table were found 100% true to type. 



SEED INSPECTION 



77 



FIELD TESTS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS 



Lab. 
No. 



Kind of Seed and 
Variety 



True to Type 
Percent 



Remarks 



BEETS 

88 F Early Blood Turnip 92 

129 F Early Blood Turnip 94 

348 F Early Blood Turnip 94 

115 F Early Wonder 98 

156 F Early Wonder, No. 1-223 92 

161 F Early Wonder, No. D 20-4839 96 

174 F Early Wonder 90 

207 F Early Wonder 98 

224 F Early Wonder 96 

231 F Early Wonder, No. 2168 90 

285 F Early Wonder 96 

653 F Early Eclipse 94 

467 F Early Red Chief. No. 1-318 92 

288 F Egyptian Early 94 

382 F Egyptian, Early Dark 96 

21 F Edmand's Blood Turnip, No. C-120 94 

374 F Edmand's Blood Turnip 98 

111 F Edmand's Early Blood 92 

230 F Boston Crosby No. 4025 98 

63 F Crosby's Early Wonder, No. 312 98 

1 F Crosby's Egyptian 92 

77 F Crosby's Egyptian 88 

86 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. C 317 96 

93 F Crosby's Egyptian 86 

106 F Crosby's Egyptian 84 

127 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 18384 96 

176 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 446 90 

189 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 18354 86 

258 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 28371 86 

306 F Crosby's Egyptian 82 

344 F Crosby's Egyptian 92 

361 F Crosby's Egyptian 98 

465 F Crosby's Egyptian 96 

528 F Crosby's Egyptian 96 

832 F Crosby's Egyptian, No. 2288 92 

81 F Crosby's Improved Egyptian, No. 1143 90 

40 F Detroit Dark Red 94 

43 F Detroit Dark Red 96 

102 F Detroit Dark Red 88 

114 F Detroit Dark Red 92 

151 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 612 78 

170 F Detroit Dark Red 90 

188 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 18395 96 

229 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 4025 96 

232 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 2325 96 

246 F Detroit Dark Red 92 

273 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 66223 94 

289 F Detroit Dark Red 96 

300 F Detroit Dark Red, No. 731 90 

317 F Detroit Dark Red 96 



6% top shape — 2% globular 

4% light color — 2% globular 

4% light color — 2% very flat 

2% long top 

4% globular — 4% top shape 

4% light color 

2% oval — 6% globular — 2% top 

shape 
2% globular 
4% long top shape 
6% light color — 2% long — 2% 

globular 
4% top shape 

2% spindle shape — 4% long top 
8% long top 
6% globular 
4% long top 
6% light color 
2% globular 

4% light color — 4% long top 
2% globular 
2% top shape 

2% light color — 6% top shape 
6% Ught color — 2% very flat — 

4% globular 
4% oval — top shaped 
8% globular — 4% top shaped — 

2% long top 
4% light color — 8% globular — 4% 

top shape 
4% globular 

6% globular — 2% long — 2% oval 
8% light color — 4% globular — 2% 

ovate 
14% top shape 
16% long top — 2% globular 
8% long top 
2% globular 
4% long top 
4% long top 

6% globular — 2% long top 
2% light color — 4% globular — 4% 

spindle 
6% long type 
2% flat — 2% long top 
4% obovate — 4% flat — 4% long 

type 
6% flat — 2% obovate 
8% flat — 14% top shape 
2% flat — 8% top shape 
2% flat — 2% long top 
4% flat 
4% flat 

4% flat — 4% long top 
4% long top — 2% flat 
2% cylindrical — 2% flat 
2% light color — 8% flat 
4% flat 



78 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FIELD TESTS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS— Continued 



Lab. 
No. 



Kind of Seed and 
Variety 



True to Type 
Percent 



Remarks 



BEETS — Concluded 

523 F Detroit Dark Red 96 2% long — 2% flat 

405 F Dark Red Egyptian 92 8% long top 

471 F Dark Red Egyptian 88 2% light color — 8% long top — 2% 

oval 

477 F Improved Dark Red 90 4% long top — 6% flat 

199 F Large Blood 90 8% top shape — 2% light color 

423 F Leonard's Dark Red Egyptian 92 8% long top 

128 F Woodruff's Early Wonder, No. 2219 96 4% top shape 

CARROTS 

14 F Chantenay 94 2% cylindrical — 4% tapering 

20 F Chantenay, No. C-145 96 4% long tapering 

76 F Chantenay 90 10% long tapering 

89 F Chantenay 98 2% long tapering 

92 F Chantenay 94 4% cyUndrical — 2% long tapering 

103 F Chantenay 92 6% cyUndrical — 2% tapering 

254 F Chantenay 96 4% tapering 

290 F Chantenay, No. 250 94 6% long tapering 

297 F Chantenay 90 10% tapering 

307 F Chantenay 96 4% tapering 

347 F Chantenay 92 8% tapering 

433 F Chantenay 96 4% tapering 

493 F Chantenay 92 8% tapering 

613 F Chantenay 80 20% long tapering 

645 F Chantenay, Early 94 6% long tapering 

402 F Danvers 92 2% light colored — 6% stump 

rooted 

412 F Danvers 96 4% stump rooted 

418 F Danvers 94 6% stump rooted 

48 F Danvers Half Long 96 4% very broad shoulders 

107 F Danvers Half Long 96 4% stump rooted 

118 F Danvers Half Long-Stump root 94 6% tapering root 

124 F Danvers Half Long 96 4% stump rooted 

131 F Danvers Half Long 80 20% cylindrical 

157 F Danvers Half Long, No. 13326 90 2% light colored — 8% stump 

rooted 

234 F Danvers Half Long 94 2% hght colored — 4% stump 

rooted 

245 F Danvers Half Long 94 6% stump rooted 

252 F Danvers Half Long 98 2% stump rooted 

308 F Danvers Half Long 86 10% stump rooted — 4% cyUndrical 

312 F Danvers Half Long 92 2% Ught colored — 6% stump 

rooted 

324 F Danvers Half Long 80 20% stump rooted 

365 F Danvers Half Long 92 8% stump rooted 

367 F Danvers Half Long 92 2% Ught colored — 4% cyUndrical — 

2% stump 

384 F Danvers Half Long 92 8% stump rooted 

392 F Danvers Half Long 88 12% stump rooted 

466 F Danvers Half Long, No. 8020 98 2% yellow roots 

546 F Danvers Half Long 90 10% stump rooted 

562 F Danvers Half Long 92 8% stump rooted 

816 F Danvers Half Long 98 2% stump rooted 

2 F Early French Forcing 98 2% tapering 

49 F Hutchinson, No. 2150 92 6% very stump rooted — 2% very 

bulbous tapering 

62 F Hutchinson, No. 14512 94 2% Ught — 2% stump rooted — 2% 

oval 



SEED INSPECTION 



79 



FIELD TESTS OF VEGETABLE SEEDS— Concluded 



Lab. 

No. 



Kind of Seed and 
Variety 



True to Type 
Percent 



Remarks 



CARROT— Concluded 

187 F Hutchinson 98 

233 F Hutchinson 96 

298 F Hutchinson 90 

322 F Hutchinson 94 

326 F Hutchinson 98 

331 F Hutchinson 94 

372 F Hutchinson 88 

440 F Hutchinson 98 

550 F Hutchinson 96 

167 F Imperator 94 

284 F Imperator 94 

130 F Improved Long Orange 94 

409 F Improved Long Orange 96 



RUTABAGA 

1 10 F American Purple Top 94 

180 F *American Purple Top, No. 598 90 

349 F American Purple Top 98 

512 F American Purple Top, yellow 98 

51 F Improved American Purple Top, No. 7135 ... 92 
257 F Improved American Purple Top, No. 84592. . . 98 
558 F Landreths Improved Yellow Fleshed Purple 

Top 

116 F Macomber 

164 F Macomber, No. Y 17.6141 



2% cylindrical 

4% cylindrical 

8% stump rooted — 2% cylindrical 

6% stump rooted 

2% cylindrical 

6% light colored 

4% cylindrical — 2% light colored 

— 6% stump rooted 
2% cylindrical 
4% white roots 
6% very stump rooted 
4% cylindrical — 2% stump rooted 
4% light colored — 2% stump 

rooted 
2% light colored — 2% stump 

rooted 



2% Turnip — 4% necklesa 
10% long top shape 
2% Turnip 
2% white flesh 
8% long oval 
2% Turnip 



90 10% long top shaped 
98 2% long neck 
98 2% purple top 



TURNIP 



655 F 

16 F 

52 F 

79 F 

91 F 

104 F 

109 F 

134 F 

152 F 

169 F 

181 F 

198 F 

209 F 

301 F 

368 F 

557 F 

113 F 

44 F 

163 F 

236 F 

256 F 

442 F 

4 F 

255 F 

274 F 



Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Purple Top 
Strap Leaf. 
White Egg . 
White Egg, 
White Egg . 



te Globe 

te Globe 

te Globe. No. 7056 . 
te Globe 



Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh: 
Wh: 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 
Wh 

Flat 

Strap Leaf 

Strap Leaf, No. Y2-7442 
Strap Leaf, No. 2351 . . . 
Strap Leaf, No. 82111. . , 



te Globe 

te Globe 

te Globe 

te Globe 

te Globe, No. 11011 

te Globe 

te Globe, No. 597 

te Globe, No. 1-179 

te Globe 

te Globe, No. 634 

te Globe, No. 184554 

te Globe, Large Ea. Red . 



No. 834-12 92 



4% flat — 8% long top 

8% long top 

8% long top 

4% white 

4% white — 8% long top 

4% long top 

8% long top 

8% flat 

4% long top 

8% long top shape 

4% flat — 4% long top 

16% long top 

4% long top 

8% long top 

8% long top 

4% white — 4% flat — 4% long top 

4% white 

16% globe shaped — • 4% white 

8% white — 4% long top 

8% globe 

4% long top 

8% white — 4% long top 

12% long top 

8% long top 

12% long top 



* This was labeled "Improved Long Orange" but was found to be "American Purple Top." 



80 CONTROL SERIES No. T15 



STUDIES OF FLOWER SEEDS 

Conducted by the Department of Floriculture 
Clark L. Thayer, Professor 

For the seventh season the Department of Floriculture has cooperated with the 
Seed Laboratory in maintaining trials to determine the quality of flower seed 
offered for sale in retail seed stores, hardware stores, chain stores, schools, and 
other retail outlets. The seeds, which were collected by the State Seed Inspector, 
were tested for germination and performance under field conditions. 

See^s of 233 lots, representing 54 genera, packeted by 20 concerns, and obtained 
from 68 retailers, were distributed as follows: 

Ageratum 4 Kochia 5 

Alyssum 7 Linum 2 

Anchusa 2 Lobelia 1 

Antirrhinum 3 Lupinus 1 

Arctotis 1 Mathiola 3 

Brachycome 1 Mirabilis 3 

Calendula 9 Nemesia 1 

Callistephus 8 Nemophila 2 

Celosia 3 Nierembergia 1 

Centaurea 6 Nigella 4 

Chrysanthemum 3 Papaver 7 

Clarkia 2 Petunia 15 

Cleome 1 Phacelia 1 

Cosmos 11 Phlox 2 

Cynoglossum 1 Portulaca 6 

Delphinium 7 Reseda 3 

Dianthus 3 Rudbeckia 1 

Didiscus 2 Salpiglossis 3 

Diniorphotheca 1 Salvia 2 

Eschscholtzia 3 Scabiosa 7 

Gaillardia -1 Schizanthus 1 

Gamolepis 1 Tagetes 16 

Gypsophila 5 Tropaeolum . 9 

Helianthus 1 Venidium 1 

Helichrysum 2 Verbena 9 

Iberis 4 Zinnia 21 

Impatiens 4 

Ipomoea 7 TOTAL 233 

Germination tests were not made in the laboratory on any of the lots of seed. 
Where the number of seeds permitted, rows twelve feet in length were sown, but 
in many lots the number was insufficient. Results of germination were rated as 
"good" if seeds germinated in approximately two-thirds of the row; "fair" be- 
tween one-third and two-thirds; "poor" for less than one-third. Performance was 
designated as "satisfactory" if the varieties were true to name, producing only a 
low percentage of plants which were not true to form or color (one-third or less) ; 
"fair" between one-third and two-thirds not true; and "not satisfactory," if less 
than one-third was true to name or if the lot did not produce sufficient plants for 
providing satisfactory data. 

As far as possible trueness to type was determined. However, since many lots 
were described as mixtures or did not carry varietal names, a wide range in color 
and form was permissible. 



SEED INSPECTION 81 



All seeds were sown on June 22. The first killing frost occurred on September 29. 
Total rainfall for the months of June, July, August, and September in 1942 was 
15.45 inches, as compared with 14.84 inches in 1941, 10.24 inches in 1940, 12.73 
inches in 1939, and 32.49 inches in 1938.1 

Results of the tests on germination are summarized as follows: 





Number 


Pebcbnt 




OF Lots 


OF Total 


Good 


104 


45 


Fair 


54 


23 


Poor 


70 


30 


None 


5 


2 


Total 


233 


100 



1 Data on precipitation and frost were taken from the monthly bulletins, "Meteorological Ob- 
servations" of the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station. 



82 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



AGERATUM 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

624F Blue Good Satisfactory 

Teddy's Wall Paper & Paint Shop, 
Jamaica Plain 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
445F Dwarf Blue Redder Good Satisfactory 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

769F Blue Perfection Good Satisfactory 

Dean Hardware Co., Lawrence 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1067F Dwarf Blue Poor Not Satisfactory 

F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, Haverhill 

ALYSSUM 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 

630F Sweet Good Satisfactory 

Guy L. Harvey Hardware Stores, Inc., 
Jamaica Plain 

677F White Fleece Good Satisfactory 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

959F Little Gem Poor Not Satisfactory 

E. A. Noble & Co., Stockbridge 

959-aF Bentham's Sweet Fair Satisfactory 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

668F Snow Cloth Good Satisfactory 

Buzzard's Bay Hardware Co., Buzzard's Bay 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

671F White Good Satisfactory 

Onset Lumber Co., Onset 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
278F Violet Queen Fair Satisfactory 

ANCHUSA 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

798F Blue Bird Good Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

891F Blue Bird Poor Not Satisfactory 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

ANTIRRHINUM — Snapdragon 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1072F Giant Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Murray & Dugdale Co., Haverhill 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 

446F Reveille — Tall Giant Yellow Fair Not Satisfactory 

4 colors 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

990F All Colors Poor Not Satisfactory 

Phillips General Store, Williamstown 

ARCTOTIS 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, Framingham Center, 
Mass. 
74 IF Hybrids, Mixed Colors Poor Not Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



83 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



BRACHYCOME — Swan River Daisy 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

711-cF Swan River Daisy Good Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

CALENDULA 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

727F Yellow Colossal Fair Satisfactory 

The Fair, Rcslindale 

GENESEE VALLEY SEED CO., Dalton. N. Y. 

707F Campfire Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

616F Orange King Poor Not Satisfactory 

Clarendon Hill Hardware Co., Inc., Somerville 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

99F Exquisite Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory 

FrankUn School, Holbrook 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

637F Orange King Fair Satisfactory 

L. M. Johnson, Reading 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston. Mass. 
279F Sensation or Campfire Good Satisfactory 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
860F Ball's Gold Good Satisfactory 

THORNTON & CROUCH, Lawrence, Mass. 
781F Campfire Fair Satisfactory 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, Chicago, 111. 

642F Shaggy Poor Not Satisfactory 

Harold Cogger, Reading 

CALLISTEPHUS — Aster 

COBURN SEED & SUPPLY CO.. 

Chelmsford, Mass. 

1031F Azure Blue Good Had not bloomed 

September 25 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO.. Detroit. Mich. 

625F Giant Crego Crimson Good Satisfactory 

Teddy's Wall Paper & Paint Shop. 
Jamaica Plain 

GENESEE VALLEY SEED CO., Dalton. N. Y. 

708F El Monte Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center. Mass. 
740F Rose Marie Good Satisfactory 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., MinneapoUs, Minn. 

660F Ostrich Plume Red Poor Not Satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Weymouth 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

672F Ostrich Plume Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Onset Lumber Co., Onset 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

859F Super Giant El Monte Good Had not bloomed 

September 25 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis. Minn. 

608F Ostrich Plume Red Poor Not Satisfactory 

J. J. Newberry Co., Woburn 



84 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



CELOSIA — Cockscomb 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

797F Plumosa Mixed Good Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan. N. Y. 

914F Feather Mixed _. Good Satisfactory 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
861F Glasgow Prize Good Satisfactory 

CENTAUREA — (Including Bachelor's Button) 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
678F Americana Rosy Lilac Poor Not Satisfactory 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

690F Red Boy Fair Not Satisfactory 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston Included blue forms 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 
621 F Bachelor's Button — Double Blue Forest Strain .Fair Satisfactory 
Brigham Hardware Supply Co., Boston 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

638F Finest Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

L. M. Johnson, Reading 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

988F Double Blue Good Satisfactory 

PhiUips General Store, Williamstown 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

712F Double Blue Fair Satisfactory 

McLellan's Store, Boston 

CHRYSANTHEMUM 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

849F Annual, Single Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

C. B. Coburn Co., Lowell 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

894F Coronarium, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1068F Eastern Star Fair Satisfactory 

F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, HaverhiU 

CLARKIA 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit. Mich. 

691F Double Salmon Poor Not Satisfactory 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis. Minn. 

713F Double Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

McLellan's Store, Bo.ston 

CLEOME 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

692F Giant Rose Shades Fair Satisfactory 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

COSMOS 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
595F Orange Flare Poor Not Satisfactory 

GENESSE VALLEY SEED CO., Dalton, N. Y. 

703-aF Pink Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 



SEED INSPECTION 



85 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



COSMOS— Concluded 

GENESSE VALLEY SEED CO.— Continued 

703-bF Crimson Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

703-cF Rose Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

703-dF Best Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 2 colors only 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
447F Yellow Flare Klondyke Good Satisfactory 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

141F Sensation Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory 

Allen School, East Bridge water 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene, N. Y. 

1 106F Orange Flare Poor Not Satisfactory 

W. E. Fuller Co.. Mansfield 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
281F Sensation Purity i Good Satisfactory 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

913F Orange Flare Poor Not Satisfactory 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

944F Sensation Good Satisfactory 

Bridge Market, Huntington 

CYNOGLOSSUM 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

728F Blanche Burpee, Mixed Colors Fair Satisfactory 

The Fair, Roshndale 

DELPHINIUM — Larkspur 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 
East Rochester, N. Y. 

721-aF Lilac Spire Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Jamaica Plain 

721-bF Dark Blue Spire Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Jamaica Plain 

721-cF Empress Pink Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Jamaica Plain 

1020F Carmine King Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Roxbury 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
596F Rosamond None 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
448F Empress Rose Bud Poor Not Satisfactory 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

98ir Mixed Color.« Poor Not Satisfactory 

Arthur E. Sherman, Lanesboro 

DIANTHUS — Pinks 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
676F Breck's Geisha Girl Good Satisfactory 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

6.57F Heddewigi Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



DIANTHUS— Concluded 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

675r Annual, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Church & Stowell Co., Wareham 

DIDISCUS — Blue Lace Flower 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. 
853F Blue Lace Flower Good Satisfactory 

THORNTON & CROUCH, Lawrence, Mass. 
779F Blue Lace Flower Good Satisfactory 

DIMORPHOTHECA — African Daisy 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION. 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

711-aF African Daisy Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

ESCHSCHOLTZIA — California Poppy 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. 
855F Brilliant Shades, Selected Good Satisfactory 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

696F Golden Orange Fair Satisfactory 

F. W. Wool worth Co., Boston 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

975 Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Shaker's Store, Adams 

GAILLARDIA 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

802F Double Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. 
854F Picta Single, Finest Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

964F Indian Chief Poor Not Satisfactory 

Berkshire Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

893F Indian Chief Fair Satisfactory 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

GAMOLEPIS — Dahlborg Daisy 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
679F Dahlborg Daisy None 

GYPSOPHILA 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

711-bF Baby's Breath Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

1090F Rose Pink Good Not Satisfactory 

J. B. Keene, Amesbury Weak strain; poor growth 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

617F White Fair Satisfactory 

Clarendon Hill Hardware Co., Somerville 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
862F Elegans Grandiflora Alba Good Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



87 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Difii- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



G YPSOPHILA— Concluded 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

716F Annual White Paris Market Good Satisfactory 

McLellan's Store, Boston 

HELIANTHUS — Sunflower 

MICHAEL-LEONARD SEED CO., Chicago, 111. 

942F Mammoth Russian Good Satisfactory 

Manchester Forbes Co., EaPthampton 

HELICHRYSUM — Everlasting 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wether.sfield, Conn. 

623F Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

Brigham Hardware Supply Co., Boston 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1069F Monstrum Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, Haverhill 

IBERIS — Candytuft 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

946F Umbellata, Mixed Colors Poor Not Satisfactory 

Bridge Market, Huntington 

PERRY SEED CO.. Boston, Mass. 
280F Giant White Perfection Good Satisfactory 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

634r Finest Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

714F All Colors Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

McLellan's Store, Boston 

IMPATIENS — Balsam 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 

807F Double Mixed Good Satisfactory 

F. B. Willis, East Bridgewater 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1073F Double Camellia Flowered, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Murray & Dugdale Co., Haverhill 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

IIOIF Bush Double White Good Satisfactory 

Metro Paint & Supply Co., Brockton 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

715F Balsam or Lady SUpper Good Satisfactory 

McLellan's Store, Boston 

IPOMOEA — Morning Glory 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
682F Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N.Y. 

705F True Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Weymouth 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

945F Heavenly Blue Fair Had not bloomed on 

Bridge Market, Huntington September 25 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

019F Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

Da^^s Square Hardware Co., Weymouth 



88 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor. Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



IPOMOEA— Concluded 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

659F Mammoth Blue Fair Satisfactory 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
864F Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

633F Scarlett O'Hara Poor Not Satisfactory 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 

KOCHIA — Mexican Fire Bush 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

799 Giant Christmas Fair Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

1096F Mexican Fire Bush None 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

667F Mexican Fire Bush Poor Not Satisfactory 

Buzzard's Bay Hardware Co., Buzzard's Bay 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., MinneapoUs, Minn. 

982F Childsi Poor Not Satisfactory 

Arthur E. Sherman, Lanesboro 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO.. Cambridge, N.Y. 

892F Childsi Good Satisfactory 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

LINUM — Flax 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

1092F Scarlet Flax Good Had not bloomed on 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury September 25 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., MinneapoUs. Minn. 

699F Scarlet Flax Good Had not bloomed on 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston September 25 

LOBELIA 

PAGE SEED CO., Greene. N. Y. 

925F Bedding Queen Good Satisfactory 

Snyder's Store, Housatonic 

LUPINUS — Lupine 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

628F Texas Blue Bonnet — Lupin Texensis Poor Not Satisfactory 

Guy L. Harvey Hardware Stores, Inc., Two plants: both died 

Jamaica Plain 

MATHIOLA — Stock 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

694F Early Beauty of Nice, Carmine Rose Good Only 1 plant in bloom by 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston September 25 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

658F Finest Mixed Double Good Only 2 plants in bloom by 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth September 25 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO.. MinneapoUs, Minn. 

700F Evening Scented Mathiola bicornis Good Satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 



SEED INSPECTION 



89 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Die- 

No. tributor. Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Testa 



Performance 



MIRABILIS — Four O'clock 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

1089F Marvel of Peru Poor 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

717F Finest Mixed Fair 

Faneuil Hardware Co., Boston 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1070F Fine Mixed Poor 

F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, Haverhill 

NEMESIA 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

1 102F Triumph Mixed Fair 

Metro Paint & Supply Co., Inc., Brockton 

NEMOPHILA 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapohs, Minn. 

697F Blue Good 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

895F Baby Blue Eyes Fair 

Frank Howard, Inc., Pittsfield 

NIEREMBERGIA 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
454F Coerulea — Purple Robe Poor 

NIGELLA 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly. Mass. 
o93F Love-in-a-Mist Poor 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

698F Love-in-a-Mist Good 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

910F Love-in-a-Mist Fair 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

STERLING -SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

1071F Love-in-a-Mist Good 

F. & W. Grand Silver Stores, Haverhill 

PAPAVER — Poppy 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

693F Double Shirley Sweet Briar Good 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

GENESEE VALLEY SEED CO., Dalton, N. Y. 

706-aF Double Mixed Poor 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

706-bF Genesee Best Mixture Fair 

706-cF Single Mixed Good 

706-dF Shirley Mixed Fair 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

146F American Legion Good 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

1 103F American Legion Good 

Metro Paint & Supply Co., Inc., Brockton 



Not Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Not Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
9 colors 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Not Satisfactory 

Not Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 

I 

Not Satisfactory 

Satisfactory — Shirley 
and Opium types 

Satisfactory. Few double 
flowered forms 

Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 



90 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Die- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



PETUNIA 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
683F Balcony — Brilliant Rose Poor Not Satisfactory 

685F Glamour — Rich Salmon-Rose-RufiBed Poor Not Satisfactory 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION. 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

709-aF Bright Pink Poor Not Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

709-bF Velvety Red Good Satisfactory 

709-cF Velvety Purple Good Satisfactory 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
592F Hybrida violacea Poor Not Satisfactory 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 

455F Hybrida, Mars Poor Not Satisfactory 

4 colors 

4.56F Hybrida Nana Compacta, Pure White Good Not Satisfactory 

4 colors 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

145F Exquisite Hybrida Good Satisfactory 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 5 colors 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N.Y. 

582F Balcony Blue Good Satisfactory 

People's Hardware Co., Lynn 

669F Balcony Rose Fair Not Satisfactory 

Gallant Hardware Co., Onset 3 colors 

788F Rose of Heaven Fair Satisfactory 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
865F Rosy Morn Good Satisfactory 

STERLING SEED CO., MinneapoHs, Minn. 

610F Hybrida Blue Poor Not Satisfactory 

J. J. Newberry Co., Woburn 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, Chicago, 111. 

644F Rose of Heaven (Pink) Good Satisfactory 

Harold Cogger, Rending 

PHACELIA 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

1107F Bluebells of California, Gentian Blue Good Satisfactory 

W. C. Fuller Co., Mansfield 

PHLOX 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
458F Gigantea — Red Glory Fair Satisfactory 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester. N. Y. 

1027F Drummond — All colors Poor Not Satisfactory 

Concord Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Concord 

PORTULACA 

COMSTOCK, FERRE & CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

1120F Single Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

723F Double Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

Diamond Hardware Stores, Inc., Mattapan 

770F Single Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Dean Hardware Co., Lawrence 8 colors 



SEED INSPECTION 



91 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Die- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale JDistributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



PORTLTLACA— Concluded 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia. N. Y. 

791F Large Single Flowered Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory 

G. Canovaro Hardware & Paint Co., 
No. Plymouth 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

989F Single Mixed Colors Poor Not Satisfactory 

Phillips General Store, Williamstown 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

144r Double and Single Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 7 colors 

RESEDA — Mignonette 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

947F Sweet Odorata Grandiflora Poor Not Satisfactory 

Bridge Market, Huntington 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

622F Giant Machet Type Poor Satisfactory 

Brigham Hardware Svipply Co., Boston 

THORNTON & CROUCH, Lawrence, Mass. 
780F Golden Goliath Poor Not Satisfactory 

RUDBECKIA 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
684F Golden Sunset Fair Satisfactory 

SALPIGLOSSIS 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

147F Exquisite Mixed Colors Fair Satisfactory 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 6 colors 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
282F Emperor, Purple and Gold Fair Satisfactory 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

1 104F Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Metro Paint & Supply Co., Brockton 7 colors 

SALVIA 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 

594F Spendens Poor Not Satisfactory. Had not 

bloomed on September 25 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center, Mass. 

739F Bonfire Poor Not Satisfactory. Had not 

bloomed on September 25 

SCABIOSA 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

1074F Tall Double Mixed Poor Not Satisfactory. Had not 

Murray & Dugdale Co., Haverhill bloomed on September 25 

EMPIRE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

948F Mourning Bride — Tall Double, All Colors Poor Not Satisfactory. Had not 

Bridge Market, Huntington bloomed on September 25 

ERASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. 
852F Blue Cockade Fair First flower on September 25 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

670F Mourning Bride Mixed Fair Had not bloomed on 

Gallant Hardware Co., Onset September 25 



92 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



SCABIOSA— Concluded 

LITTLE TREE FARMS, 

Framingham Center, Mass. 
742F Blue Cockade Poor 

PERRY SEED CO., Boston, Mass. 
283F Grandiflora — Giant Flower Hybrids Good 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

912F Mourning Bride Mixed Poor 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

SCHIZANTHUS 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

976F Butterfly Flower Mixed Good 

Shaker's Store, Adams 

TAGETES — Marigold 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
680F Canary Bird — Single, French Fair 

681F Limelight, Chrysanthemum Flowered Good 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

729F Odorless FoUage, Special Mixture Good 

The Fair, Roslindale 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. n a 

720F Gigantea — Sunset Giants Good 

S. S. Kresge Co., Jamaica Plain 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
591F Guinea Gold Poor 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
449F Butterball — French Dwarf Double tiood 

450F Yellow Supreme Double African Carnation 

Flowered *-'Ood 

451F Melody — Golden Yellow French Dwarf Double 

Harmony ^ood 

452F Golden Bedder — Dwarf Chrysanthemum 

Flowered ^ood 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

98F Orbit ^o"'* 

Franklin School, Holbrook 

142F Sunset Giants and California Giants Mixed Good 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, NY. 

618F Burpee Gold ■ ■ '-'Ood 

Davis Hardware Co., SomerviUe 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

581F. Burpee Gold Good 

People's Hardware Co., Lynn 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 
863F Orange — All Double • *^ood 

STERLING SEED CO., MinneapoUs, Minn. 

609F Harmony — Dwarf French Good 

J. J. Newberry Co., Woburn 

VAUGHAN'S SEED STORE, Chicago, 111. 

643F Sunset Giants, Dahlia Flowered Good 

Harold Cogger, Reading 



Not Satisfactory. Had not 
bloomed on September 25 



First flower on September 25 



Not Satisfactory. Had not 
bloomed on September 25 



Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 

Not Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Had not bloomed on 
September 25 

Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Only 2 blooms on 
September 25 



Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 



Had not bloomed on 
September 25 



Satisfactory 



Only 1 bloom on 
September 25 



SEED INSPECTION 



93 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Continued 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor. Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



TROPAEOLUM — Nasturtium and Canary Vine 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 

800F Dwarf Good Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 8 colors 

THOMAS W. EMERSON CO., Beverly, Mass. 
597F Canary Vine — Bird Vine None 

602F Golden Gleam Poor Not Satisfactory 

Arlington Hardware, Inc., Arlington Chiefly single mixed 

ERASER'S, Welleslev, Mass. 

851F Dwarf Double Golden Globe Good Not Satisfactory 

Chiefly single mixed 

CHARLES C. HART SEED CO.. 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

632F Dwarf Mixed None 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

143F Nasturtium — Golden Gleam Good Satisfactory 

Allen School, East Bridgewater 

D. LANDRETH SEED CO., Bristol, Pa. 

589F Dwarf Mixed Good Not Satisfactory 

Salem Hardware Co., Inc., Salem Climbing type 

F. H. WOODRUFF & SONS, Milford, Conn. 

753F Double Golden Gleam Good Satisfactory 

Boston Supply Co., Framingham 

UNKNOWN 

997F Dwarf Good Satisfactory 

Burlingame & Darbys Co., North Adams 6 colors 

VENIDIUM 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

962F All Shades Fair Satisfactory 

Berkshire Hardware Co., Pittsfield 3 colors 

VERBENA 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

760F Giant Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

704-aF Defiance — Scarlet Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

704-bF Collosea — Pink Fair Satisfactory 

704-cF Blue Shades ' Good Satisfactory 

FERRY-MORSE SEED CO., Detroit, Mich. 

726F Scarlet Poor Not Satisfactory 

Reliable Hardware Co., Mattapan 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
453F Anapohs Blue Poor Not Satisfactory 

457F Hybrida Rose Glow Poor Not Satisfactory 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

662F Mammoth Flowering Blue Shades Poor Not Satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

J. B. RICE, JR., INC., Shushan, N. Y. 

911F Choice Mixed Fair Satisfactory 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 5 colors 



94 



CONTROL SERIES No. 115 



FLOWER SEED INSPECTION — Concluded 



Lab. Kind and Variety of Seed, Wholesale Dis- 

No. tributor, Dealer When Other Than Whole- 

sale Distributor, and Place Collected 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



ZINNIA 

JOSEPH BRECK & SONS, Boston, Mass. 
686F California Giant, Cerise Queen Good Satisfactory 

687F California Giant, Brightness Good Satisfactory 

688F California Giant, Golden Queen Good Satisfactory 

689F Cupid Goblin Poor Not Satisfactory 

W. ATLEE BURPEE CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

860F Navajo Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory 

C. B. Coburn Co., Lowell 9 colors 

CROSMAN SEED CORPORATION, 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

710-aF Canary Yellow Fair Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

710-bF Rose Pink Fair Satisfactory 

710-cF Salmon Fair Not Satisfactory — 

included yellow and orange 

DEERINGTON ZINNIA GARDENS, 
Bargersville, Ind. 

702F Dahlia Flowered Pride of Indiana Good Satisfactory 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

1019F Baby Bee, Double Bloom, Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory 

7 colors 

FRASER'S, Wellesley, Mass. 
614F Scarlet Flame, DahUa Flowered Good Satisfactory 

FREDONIA SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 

656F Dahlia Flowered, Red Fair Satisfactory 

BelUngham Hardware Co., Weymouth 

THOMAS J. GREY CO., Boston, Mass. 
459F Striata — Old Glory Good Satisfactory 

HYGRADE SEED CO., Fredonia, N. Y. 
148F Double Giant, Dahha Flowered, Mixed Colors. . .Good Satisfactory 
Allen School, East Bridgewater 6 colors 

MANDEVILLE & KING CO., Rochester, N. Y. 

629r Rosebud Pompon Fair Satisfactory 

Guy L. Harvey Hardware Stores, Inc., 
Jamaica Plain 

NORTHRUP, KING & CO., MinneapoUs, Minn. 

661F Giant Double Orange King Good Satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Weymouth 

JEROME B. RICE SEED CO., Cambridge, N. Y. 

674F Fantasy Good Satisfactory 

Church & Stowell, Wareham 7 colors 

789F Super Giant. Golden Dawn Good Satisfactory 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

ROSS BROS. CO., Worcester, Mass. 

866F Dahlia Flowered Oriole Good Not Satisfactory 

4 colors 

STERLING SEED CO., Minneapolis, Minn. 

607F Scarlet Flame, Dahlia Flowered Good Satisfactory 

J. J. Newberry Co., Woburn 

UNKNOWN 

1003F Assorted Poor Not Satisfactory 

Lev Hardware Co., No. Adams 

Publication of this Document Approved bt the Commission on Administration and Finance 
2500-1-43-11193 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

Control Series Bulletin No. 116 July 1943 



Twenty-third Annual Report of 

PuUorum Disease Eradication 

in Massachusetts 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory 



In comparison with the previous season there was a slight decrease in the 
number of flocks and birds tested and an increase in the percentage of positive 
tests. Although there were fewer non-reacting flocks, both the number and 
percentage of birds in these flocks showed a slight increase. On the whole, 
the results are encouraging when considered in connection with the conditions 
which confronted flock owners during the year. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



TWENTY-THIRD ANNUAL REPORT OF PULLORUM DISEASE 
ERADICATION IN MASSACHUSETTS 

1942-1943 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratoryi 



INTRODUCTION 

The poultry industry in ?]1 its phases has been directly and markedly affected 
by conditions brought on by the war. In pullorum disease testing, the demand 
for testing has increased in some states while in others no perceptible change or 
even a decrease has been observed. In Massachusetts, the demand for testing 
has decreased during the past season which is attributed in part to the shortage 
of labor and to the great demand for chicks regardless of whether or not they 
were from officially tested flocks. 

It is unfortunate that a state control and eradication program does not receive 
full emphasis in a time when increased production is requested. Some flocks, 
ordinarily used for meat and egg production, are now being mated for breeding 
purposes. The pullorum status of such flocks should first be determined. Like- 
wise, some flocks that have been used for breeding purposes on a small scale have 
increased their output and distribution of stock with littl§ or no regard for official 
pullorum testing. 

Massachusetts flock owners have built up an enviable reputation for freedom 
from pullorum disease during the past ten years. It is to be hoped that flock 
owners who have found it necessary to drop pullorum testing or flock owners 
who for the first time have had breeding flocks which were not tested, will realize 
that a sound program cannot be built on disease hazards. 

The increased demand for stock from other states, especially from the broiler 
growing centers, is in a great measure due to the fine quality of stock that has 
been developed through breeding and pullorum eradication by the stable breeders 
in the State. To them credit is due for the progress that has been made in pullo- 
rum disease eradication in Massachusetts. It is hoped that flock owners who 
have recently entered or plan to enter into a breeding program will not ignore 
official pullorum disease testing. In this manner pullorum disease dissemination 
will be further reduced and also give purchasers more sources from which to 
bu3' pullorum-free stock. The replacing of flocks with pullorum-free stock is an 
effective and in the riiajority of instances the most economical way of eliminating 
the disease. 

Appreciation is again extended to the various agencies that have given direct 
or indirect assistance to pullorum disease eradication. It should be emphasized 
that the necessity for the dissemination of reliable information at the appropriate 
time cannot be ignored in this program. Various agencies such as the Massachu- 
setts Department of Agriculture, State and County "Extension Services, feed 
dealers, and other service agencies that make direct or indirect contact with the 
flock owners, can be of great aid to the eradication program. The flock owner 
should be informed that the main burden of eradication rests on his shoulders 
but that this burden will be greatly lessened if certain effective measures are 
followed. 



^Poultry Disease Control Laboratory Staff: H. Van Roekel, Chief of Laboratory; K. L. Bullis, 
Assistant Vcteiinary Pathologist; O. S. Fhnt, Assistant Research Professor; Miriam K. Clarke, 
Research Assistant; Felicia Jewett, Laboratory Assistant. Appreciation is extended to Dr. J. B. 
Lentz, Head of the Department of Veterinary Science, for the assistance given to the testing work. 



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Summary of Service Rendered 

Applications received 377 

Applications cancelled 15 

Flocks tested 362 

Chicken flocks 323 

Chicken and turkey flocks 9 

Turkey flocks 30 

Number of tests •• • . 662,995 

Chickens: 

Routine 644,676 

Experimental 9,557* 

Fowl other than chickens: 

Routine 8,522 

Experimental 240** 

Owners receiving necropsy service 23 f 

Necropsies of reacting birds 47 f 

* Includes 5,096 paratyphoid tests. 
** Includes 232 paratyphoid tests, 
tincludes one turkey flock. 
t Includes three turkeys. 

Distribution of Tests and Reactors 

Table 1 gives the distribution of tests and reactors by counties and by breeds. 
A total of 649,137 chicken samples was submitted for test from 12 counties, and 
3,113 or 0.48 percent reactors were detected. Three counties revealed no reactors, 
six had less than one percent, and three had between one and two percent. Wor- 
cester, Middlesex, and Bristol Counties led in the number of samples tested. 

Of the total number of samples tested, 588,651 were obtained from females 
(hens 64,185 and pullets 524,466) and 60,486 from males. The percentages of 
the reactors were 0.05 among the hens, 0.48 among the pullets, arid 0.45 among 
the males. 

The following breeds and varieties were tested: Bantam, Barred Plymouth 
Rock, Black Langshan, Brahma, Columbian Plymouth Rock, Crosses, New 
Hampshire, Rhode Island Red, S'lver Laced Wyandotte, White American, White 
Cornish, White Leghorn, W'hite Plymouth Rock, and White Wyandotte. Rhode 
Island Red and Barred Plymouth Rock are the predommating breeds. Reactors 
were detected among the Barred Plymouth Rocks, Crosses, New Hampshires, 
Rhode Island Reds, and White Plymouth Rocks. 



Annual Testing of Flocks 

Table 2 shows the results among flocks tested for the first time, intermittently, 
for two consecutive ^-ears, and for three or more consecutive years. 

Flocks tested for the first time numbered 27, representing 22,938 birds which 
revealed 6.34 percent reactors. A considerable decrease in the number of flocks 
and number of birds was observed in comparison with the previous season. The 
amount of infection showed a considerable increase over the previous season 
' (1941-42, 0.04 percent; and 1942-43, 6.34 percent). The reactors were confined 
to three flocks. Twenty-four flocks representing 19,541 birds were found to be 
non-reacting. 

In the intermittent group, 19 flocks representing 18,363 birds, were tested. In 
comparison with the previous season, a marked decrease is noted in the number 
of flocks and birds tested. The percentage of infection, 1.05, was higher than 



that of the previous season. The reactors were confined to one flock which was 
heavily infected. Eighteen flocks were found to be non-reacting. 

The results for the flocks tested for two consecutive years reveal a considerable 
increase over the previous season in the number of flocks and birds tested A 
total of 62 flocks, representing 85,638 birds, was tested. The percentage of in- 
fection was 0.25. The reactors were confined to three flocks. A total of 59 
flocks, representing 82,193 birds, was non-reacting. 

In the group tested for three or more years, 224 flocks representing 510 727 
birds were tested. The percentage of reactors was 0.24 which is the lowest for 
all groups. A total of 216 non-reacting flocks, representing 481,826 birds was 
detected in this group. Only eight positive flocks were identified. The majority 
of reactors detected in this group was found in one flock. 

Considering the four groups as a whole, 295 flocks, representing 583,733 birds 
or 91 percent of the total birds tested, were 100 percent tested and non-reacting 
t IS encouraging to note that such a high percentage of the birds tested are in 
100 percent tested non-reacting flocks. However, one should not ignore the 
number of birds (37,059) in infected flocks nor the average percentage of infec- 
tion (8.4) for those flocks. It should be indicated that the bulk of this infection 
was limited to a few flocks. It is hoped that these heavily infected flocks will be 
replaced by pullorum clean stock. 



T.ABLE 2. Annu.^l Testing Versus Single and Intermittent Testing 





o 

o 


Birds 


H 

o 
H 


Positive 

Tests 


Negative 
Flocks 


Positive 
Flocks 


Classification 


E 

3 

z 

1,455 
192 
223 

1,243 


P 

Oh 


•T3 

h 

8 


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a; 

>. 

3 

0* 


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O 

8 


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V 

11 

H 

is 


Tested for the first time 


27 
19 
62 

224 


22.938 

18.363 

85,638 

510,727 


22,938 

18,363 

88,956 

518,880 


6.34 
1.05 
0.25 
0.24 


22 

12 

59 

202 


2 

6 



14 


3 
1 
3 
5 




Intermittent testing. . . . 





Two consecutive years 





Three or more consecutive years. . 




3 


Totals 


332 


637,666 


649,137 


3,113 


0.48 


295 


22 


12 






3 



The results in Table 2 indicate that flocks with two or more years of testing 
are apt to have a lower incidence of infected flocks as well as a lower percentage 
of reactors. Annual testing along with sound eradication and prevention meas- 
ures IS certain to produce successful results in establishing and maintaining 
pullorum-free flocks. It is unfortunate that some flock owners are unable or 
unwilling to follow a program of this sort. 



Appearance of Infection in Flocks Previously Negative 

Table 3 gives the testing results for flocks which had been non-reacting for 
one or more years but showed infection in 1942-43. Thirteen "breaks" are 
listed and in only two instances was the amount of infection above one percent. 



Table 3. Appearance of Infection in Flocks Previously Negative 





Number 




1942-43 Season 












Positive 




Flock 


of Years 


Flock 


Number 


Tests 


Explanation for Infection 




Negative 


Total 


Tested 


Percent 




1 


4 


546 


546 


0.18 


Unknown 


2 


1 


1,916 


1,916 


0.63 


Unknown 






1,331 


1,331* 


0.00 




3 


4 


2,051 


2,049 


0.05 


Unknown 






1,392 


1,392* 


0.00 




4 


9 


1,347 


1,347 


1.34 


Custom hatching 


5 


1 


2,443 


1,276 


3.21 


Custom hatching 






2,100 


452* 


2.43 








400 


22* 


0.00 




•6 


4 


788 


488 


0.61 


No information 


7 


14 


1,767 


1,766 


0.17 


Unknown 






1,512 


1,512* 


0.00 




8 


2 


652 


650 


0.15 


Introduced untested stock 


9 


1 


836 


836 


0.36 


Introduced doubtful stock 






798 


798* 


0.00 




10 


3 


10,956 


10,956 


0.06 


Contest birds 






10,900 


200* 


0.00 




11 


1 


1,018 


1,005 


0.20 


Unknown 






889 . 


139* 


0.00 




12 


3 


5,519 


5,519 


0.02 


Purchased new stock 






5,500 


522* 


0.00 




13 


6 


2,652 


2,652 


0.98 


Unknown 






2,600 


1.745* 


0.00 





♦Represents retests 



Four flocks had been negative for one year, one for two j^eairs, two for three 
years, three for four years, and three for six years or more. In seven cases the 
explanation for the infection was unknown, in two the infection was apparently 
introduced through custom hatching, in three flocks possibly through new stock, 
and in one flock through returned contest birds. 

The number of "breaks" was more than double that of the previous season. 
Whether this trend can be attributed to war conditions is difficult to determine. 
However with circumstances as they exist, flock owners are urged to become more 
vigilant in disease prevention and give greater attention to the following measures 
that are so essential in establishing and maintaining puUorum-free flocks. 

1. All the birds on the premises should be tested each year. 

2. If infection is present, the entire flock should be retested within four to 
six weeks until a negative leport is obtained, provided the value of the birds 
justifies the expenditure. 

3. Every reactor, regardless of its value, should be removed from the premises 
and sold for slaughter immediately upon receipt of the report. 

4. Offal from all birds dressed for market or home consumption as well as 
dead birds that are not fit for consumption should be burned. 

5. The poultry houses, runs, and equipment, should be thoroughly cleaned 
and disinfected immediately after removal of reactors. Provide an empty pen 
to each house to facilitate cleaning and disinfection during the winter months. 
Use disinfectants approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

6. Birds removed from the premises to egg-laying contests, exhibitions, etc., 
should be held in quarantine and determined free of disease before they are 
readmitted into the flock. 



7. Purchase of stock in the form of adults, chicks, and eggs should be from 
known puUorum-disease-free flocks. Consult your county agent regarding addi- 
tions or replacements in your flock. 

8. Eggs should not be saved for hatching until after a flock has. been tested 
and all the infected birds removed. Early pullet testing will permit early hatch- 
ing. 

9. Fresh and infertile eggs from unknown or infected sources should not be 
fed to chickens or exposed to animals such as crows, sparrows, and skunks that 
may carry or spread the infection. 

10. Poultrymen should not custom hatch for untested or infected flocks (in- 
cluding fowl other than chickens). 

11. Owners of pullorum-disease-free flocks should not have hatching done 
where infected eggs or stock may be found. 

12. Poultrymen should not buy feed in bags that have been used or exposed 
to infection. (Such bags if properly disinfected w-ll be safe for further use.) 

13. Poultrymen should regard fowl other than chickens as a possible source 
of pullorum infection unless tested and found free from pullorum disease. 

14. Poultrymen should not use equipment that has been exposed to or con- 
taminated with infective material unless it is properly cleaned and sterilized or 
disinfected. 



Testing of Fowl Other Than Chickens 

During the past season 8,522 turkeys, 6 pheasants, and 2 guinea fowl were 
tested for pullorum disease. No reactors were detected among the pheasants 
and guinea fowl. Eighty-four turkey reactors were detected, all of which were 
in one flock. The reactions observed were not very definite and conclusive but 
upon necropsy of a few of the reacting birds, the causative organism of pullorum 
disease was isolated. The flock history also revealed that pullorum infection 
had been found in the poults raised from the infected breeding flock. Aside from 
this one flock, pullorum disease appears to be of little or no significance in Massa- 
chusetts turkey flocks. Owners of turkey breeding flocks are cautioned about 
introducing new stock because pullorum disease can readily be introduced through 
such a practice. Also, avenues of infection must be considered such as raising 
chickens on the same premises and disregarding the pullorum status of the chick- 
ens. Custom hatching for infected or untested chicken and turkey flocks or 
having eggs hatched where infection may be present are in some instances re- 
sponsible for introducing infection into turkey breeding flocks. Massachusetts 
turkey breeders should exercise every precaution in protecting and safeguarding 
their flocks against pullorum infection. 

Only a small number of turkeys were tested for paratyphoid infection. A test 
fluid containing 5. typhi-nmrium was used. No paratyphoid reactors were de- 
tected. While in some instances the test may aid in partial control of the Infec- 
tion, for the most part the agglutination test cannot be relied upon to eliminate 
the infection from the flock. Turkey flock owners must recognize this fact and 
not be led astray by sales or advertising talk that stock tested for paratyphftid 
infection is free of such infection when no reactors have been found. There are 
many different types of organisms in the paratyphoid group and a test fluid 
prepared with one type might not be effective in detecting carriers of other types. 
If turke>' buyers wish to make an effort to avoid paratyphoid infection, the flock 
histor}- should serve as the niost reliable guide. The state diagnostic laboratories 
can usually give one the desired information that may be available. 



Non-Reacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 

Table 4 gives the distribution of non-reacting and positive flocks by counties. 
No reactors were found among 295 one hundred percent tested and 22 partially 
tested flocks. The total number of birds in the 100 percent tested non-reacting 
flocks was 583,733 and in the partially tested non-reacting group, 16,874. Wor- 
cester, Essex, Middlesex, Bristol, and Plymouth Counties led, in the order listed, 
in the number of non-reacting flocks and birds. In Barnstable, Berkshire, Dukes, 
and Franklin Counties all flocks were 100 percent tested. 

A total of 15 infected flocks which were distributed among eight counties was 
detected. Three counties had one infected flock each, three counties two each, 
and two counties three each. Norfolk County had the largest number of birds 
in infected flocks. Fewer infected flocks and birds in such flocks are listed than 
were listed in the previous report. 

The results in this table show that non-reacting stock is available in all of the 
counties listed. Flock owners with infected flock? should make every effort 
possible to eliminate their infected flocks or birds and replace them with puUorum- 
free stock. It is hoped that some day the number of infected flocks will be in- 
significant. This can be accomplished only through systematic, conscientious 
testing and the adoption of measures designed to eliminate the infection and to 
prevent the reintroduction of the disease. 



Table 4. Nonreacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 



Countv 



1007c Tested 



Flocks 



Partially Tested 



Birds Flocks 



Total 



?irds Flocks Birds 



Barnstable 2 

Berkshire 6 

Bristol 41 

Dukes 1 

Essex 44 

Franklin 26 

Hampden 18 

Hampshire 22 

Middlesex 40 

Norfolk 21 

Plymouth 25 

Worcester 49 

Totals 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Essex 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 

Totals 12 



Nonreacting Flocks 

3.764 — 

10,388 — 

86.344 4 

2,239 — 

78.620 3 

44.575 — 

20,354 1 

26,325 
90,727 
46,012 
65,513 
108,872 



3.756 

1.923 

112 
1,289 
2,487 
1,716 
3,868 
1,723 



2 
6 
45 
1 
47 
26 
20 
23 
43 
23 
29 
52 



3,764 
10,388 
90.100 
2,239 
80,543 
44,575 
20,466 
27.614 
93,214 
47,728 
69,381 
110,595 



295 


583,733 
Positive Flocks 


22 


16,874 


317 


600.607 


1 


1,164 


— 


— 


1 


1,164 


2 


2,623 


1 


633 


3 


3,256 


1 


709 


— 


— 


1 


709 


2 


1,493 


— 


— 


2 


1,493 


3 


4,083 


— 


— 


3 


4,083 


— 


— 


2 


22.450 


2 


22,450 


1 


1.114 


— 


— 


1 


1,114 


2 


2.790 


— 


— 


2 


2,790 



Comparison of 1941-42 and 1942-43 Testing 

Table 5 gives the comparison of the 1941-42 and 1942-43 testing results for 
the different counties. Fewer flocks, birds, and samples were tested during the 
past year than in 1941-42. Also, fewer non-reacting flocks were identified but 
fortunately the number of birds in non-reacting flocks was greater than in the 
previous season. The percentage of infection was higher during the 1942-43 
season. This is largely attributed to a few flocks with a high rate of infection. 

The trend in the pullorum eradication work does not appear as encouraging 
as in previous years. While the majority of flocks are being tested 100 percent 
annually with no reactors, yet a large number of flocks in the State are following 
a haphazard method of testing which does not contribute to a sound state-wide 
disease control and eradication program. Too many poultrymen, commercial, 
and non-commercial agencies have the "take a chance" attitude. This may 
bring apparent success for a while but sooner or later reverses begin to arise. In 
such instances, the person in trouble wants immediate help and relief which it 
may not be possible to render in spite of the urgency of the request. If a sound 
program is followed from year to year, one is less apt to encounter trouble than 
if one intermittently or never observes efTective measures for the control of pullo- 
rum disease. 



Table 5. Comparison of 1941-42 and 1942-43 Testing 



County 



Flocks 



Bird? 



Positive 

Tests 
Percent 



Non- 
Reacting 
Flocks 



Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol. . . . 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 
Norfolk. . . 
Plymouth. , 

Suffolk 

Worcester. 

Totals. 

Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol. . . . 
Dukes. . . . 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampden . . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 
Norfolk. . . 
Plymouth . 
Worcester. 

Tota's 





1941-42 Season 








2 


3.713 


3,713 


0.00 


2 


4 


7,472 


7,472 


0.31 


2 


52 


86,527 


86,527 


0.O03 


51 


2 


2,541 


2,541 


0.00 


2 


55 


82,020 


82,104 


0.006 


53 


33 


56,072 


56,072 


0.00 


33 


23 


18,462 


18,528 


0.03 


20 


31 


29,042 


30,892 


0.04 


31 


54 


106,191 


106.531 


0.07 


49 


29 


90,864 


98,159 


1.67 


27 


31 


66,421 


66,421 


0.00 


31 


1 


608 


608 


0.00 


1 


49 


103,147 


103,147 


0.002 


48 


366 


653,080 
1942-43 Season 


662,715 


0.27 


350 


2 


3,764 


3,764 


0.00 


2 


7 


11,552 


13,873 


1.44 


6 


48 


93.356 


95,744 


0.08 


45 


1 


2,239 


2,239 


0.00 


1 


48 


81,252 


81,252 


0.02 


47 


26 


44,575 


46,704 


0.03 


26 


20 


20,466 


20,466 


0.00 


20 


25 


29,107 


29.246 


0.02 


23 


46 


97,297 


100,075 


0.01 


43 


25 


70,178 


71,890 


1.64 


23 


30 


70,495 


70,499 


0.35 


29 


54 


113,385 


113,3^5 


1.20 


52 


332 


637,666 


649.137 


0.48 


317 



10 



Twenty-Three- Year Testing Summary 

Table 6 gives the testing results for a 23-year testing period. These data are 
presented to show that pullorum disease can be eradicated from flocks and that 
flocks can be maintained at such a status. The average individual cannot appre- 
ciate the full value of the outstanding progress which has been made in eliminating 
this disease from the majority of breeding flocks in the State. Similar accomplish- 
ments may be observed in other states where effective measures and high stand- 
ards of work have been adopted. 



Twenty-Three- Year Pullorum Disease Testing Summary 









Total 


Positive 


Non- 
reacting 
Flocks 


Birds in Non- 
reacting Flocks 


Season 


Flocks 


Birds 


Tests 


Percent 


Number 


Percen t 


1920-21 


108 


24,718 


24,718 


12.50 


25 


2,414 


9.77 


1921-22 


110 


29,875 


29,875 


12.65 


27 


4,032 


13.50 


1922-23 


121 


33,602 


33,602 


7.60 


29 


5,400 


16.07 


1923-24 


139 


59,635 


59,635 


6.53 


38 


11,082 


18.58 


1924-25 


156 


66,503 


66,503 


2.94 


79 


25,390 


38.18 


1925-26 


201 


67,919 


67,919 


2.31 


124 


33.615 


49.49 


1926-27 


249 


127,327 


127,327 


4.03 


114 


40,269 


31.63 


1927-28 


321 


190,658 


232,091 


6.52* 


138 


80.829 


42.39 


1928-29 


413 


254,512 


304,092 


4.25* 


228 


153,334 


60.25 


1929-30 


460 


331.314 


386,098 


2.17 


309 


203.038 


66.97 


1930-31 


447 


356,810 


402,983 


1.47 


328 


267,229 


74.89 


1931-32 


455 


377,191 


420,861 


0.90 


355 


298,534 


79.15 


1932-33 


335 


296,093 


300,714 


0.47 


276 


238,074 


80.41 


1933-34 


262 


263,241 


284.848 


0.53 


229 


212,782 


80.83 


1934-35 


244 


281,124 


301,887 


0.39 


213 


251,778 


89.56 


1935-36 


252 


329,659 


344.081 


0.30 


230 


315,215 


95.95 


1936-37 


307 


448,519 


561,762 


0.37 


281 


424,431 


94.63 


1937-38 


308 


480,227 


497,769 


0.17 


286 


457,466 


95.26 


1938-39 


355 


571,065 


615,205 


0.34 


327 


469,134 


82.15 


1939-40 


346 


573,000 


673,222 


0.51 


332 


497,356 


86.80 


1940-41 


309 


527,328 


538,589 


0.09 


299 


492,475 


93.39 


1941-42 


366 


653,080 


662,715 


0.27 


350 


591,628 


90.59 


1942-43 


332 


637,666 


649,137 


0.48 


317 


600,607 


94.19 



*Based on total birds tested: 1927-28, 190,658 birds; 1928-29, 254,512 birds. 



Comments and Suggestions 

Annual Testing: The subject of annual testing cannot be stressed too greatly 
because it is an apparent fact that one cannot be certain of a flock status if the 
birds are not tested annually. This statement is borne out by the discussion on 
the data in Table 3. Considering the scattered foci of pullorum infection in the 
State, the unrestricted traffic of diseased birds, and other possible factors that 
may play an important role in the dissemination of the disease, one cannot afford 
to operate a breeding flock without knowing the pullorum status. 

It is rather alarming to note that 21 percent of the poultrymen who had their 
flocks tested during the 1941-42 season failed to have a test during 1942-43. 
Very little can be gained by testing for only one year or testing every other year. 
Furthermore, official recognition by the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 
is not given unless a flock is tested and found free of infection. Official recognition 
is of distinct value when one sells hatching eggs, chicks, or mature stock. It 



11 

means that the stock has been officially certified as having met certain require- 
ments. Far too many flock owners fail to take advantage of this official grading 
service. 

Testing All Birds on Premises: The testing of all birds over five months of age 
on the premises is a time-tried practice which has proved effective in identifying 
pullorum-free flocks. One cannot be certain that a flock is free of pullorum disease 
by testing only part of the mature birds. This is especially true in flocks where 
the amount of infection is small, and may be confined to the untested part of the 
flock. Actual testing records show that one reactor has been detected in a flock 
and it so happened that the reactor was the last bird tested in the flock. It is 
true that in some flocks partial testing has been practiced with apparent success 
but for a general program in which flocks are officially graded, partial flock testing 
cannot be considered a safe and reliable procedure. It is hoped that more flock 
owners will adopt the 100 percent testing program so that their flocks will be 
eligible for official grading by the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture if 
no reactors are found. 

Prevention of PuUonini Infection: During the past year, it has been observed 
that some flock owners are not as careful in selecting their hatching eggs for 
custom hatching as they should be. In view of the great demand for hatching 
eggs, the careful selection of pullorum-free flocks has been somewhat neglected. 
Custom hatching is one of the easiest means of spreading pullorum infection, 
therefore hatcherymen and flock owners should exercise every possible precaution 
against selecting eggs from infected or untested stock. 

Likewise some breeders have taken chances on purchased males, especially 
when cross-bred stock was desired. Males can be infected with pullorum disease 
and should be considered a possible source of infection when introduced into a 
pullorum-free flock. 

In view of the shortage of equipment and materials, used poultry equipment 
is in great demand and is being purchased by flock owners and hatcherymen. 
Also, used equipment is sometimes being loaned among poultrymen without 
certiun precautionary measures. The purchase or loan of used equipment is not 
condemned, especially in war times, but if proper precautionary measures against 
disease transmission are not taken, flock owners and hatcherymen may invite 
trouble. 

With the shortage and high cost of labor, poultrymen are finding it very difficult 
to do their work as efficiently as they would like. With all the problems con- 
fronting the industry, it is natural that some practices have to be eliminated or 
modified. Some flock owners have eliminated pullorum disease testing, which 
cannot be regarded as sound procedure and a safeguard to the flock. It is hoped 
that breeding flocks will be tested even though war time conditions may seem to 
suggest otherwise. 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 117 SEPTEMBER 1943 



Inspection of Commercial 
Feedstuffs 



By the Feed Control Staff 



This is the forty-ninth report of feeding stuffs inspection. It contains in- 
formation relative to the carotene content of alfalfa meals, the riboflavin content 
of various products, and the protein quality index of fish and meat meals found 
on the Massachusetts markets. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 

By Philip H. Smithi 



The feed situation as it exists under war conditions is a matter of common 
knowledge and experience. Commercial feed formulas change almost from 
day to day as the manufacturer finds it necessary to alter his products on account 
of government directives or the shortage of vital material. For the greater 
part manufacturers are to be commended for the skill and ingenuity they have 
shown in sunrounting the problems with which they were conffonted. 

The Massachusetts feeding stuffs act requires that manufacturers register 
annually with Feed Control Service the guarantee of protein, fat, and fiber 
placed on their various products, together with a list of the ingredients from 
which they are made. Minor changes which did not materially affect the analysis 
of a feed have previously been allowed. In order not to restrict the free flow of 
such feeds as are availatle, the manufacturer is now allowed to make any change 
in his registered feed formulas made necessary by government directive or 
material shortage without re-registr£ tion provided his guarantee is corrected and 
he files with Control Service a notice of the change. It is believed that the user 
has the right to know at all times exactly what he must purchase even though he 
cannot get exactly what he wants. On the whole, cooperation on the part of 
manufacturers has been excellent, although in isolated cases guarantee tags have 
been found to bear only a slight relation to the material they purported to 
guarantee. 

The scarcity of certain materials ordinarily used in poultry and animal rations 
and the more general use of substitutes should lead to a somewhat broader 
examination of feeding stuffs than that required by the feeding stuffs act. This 
has particular application to the vitamins and mineral ingredients. Examina- 
tion of poultry feeds should be made to determine that the balance between 
calcium and phosphorus is not upset and that fluorine is not present in amount 
sufficient to be detrimental to the animals or poultry fed. 

While 1,340 samples of feeding stuffs have been officially collected and exam- 
ined, the results will not be published as it is believed that they will convey no 
useful information when compared with feeding stuffs now on the market, nor 
can the analyses form a sound basis for judgment in the selection for purchase of 
feeding stuffs offered at present. 

Considerable time has been spent in the examination of feed ingredients for 
carotene, riboflavin, and the protein quality index of meat and fish products. 
Such results should have a more permanent application. Tables of the analyses 
made and a discussion of the results are therefore presented. 

^The following staff members assisted in the inspection: John W. Kuzmeski, H. Robert DeRose. 
Albert F. Spelman, Leo V. Crowley, and C. Tyson Smith, chemists; Frederick A. McLaughlin, 
microscopist; James T. Howard, inspector; Joseph A. Martell, Laboratory Assistant; Cora B. 
Grover, clerk. 



4 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 117 

Carotene and Riboflavin Content of Alfalfa and Alfalfa Leaf Meal 

The samples are somewhat like those reported in Bulletin 113. In some in- 
stances the carotene content is so low that the product is practically valueless as 
a source of carotene in poultry feeds. In others the content is excellent. Opinion 
is that alfalfa products when used as a carotene source should contain at least 
50,000 International Units per pound expressed in terms of V'tamin A equivalent. 
Carotene is extremely unstable and is destroyed by high temperatures, aging, and 
dampness. If alfalfa is to be held for long periods, it should be under carefully 
controlled conditions. Some experimental work is being conducted in search 
of a stabilizer to be added to alfalfa meals to prevent loss of carotene. 

Alfalfa is a fairly satisfactory source of riboflavin. While it does not hold 
true 'n every instance, the riboflavin content is generally high where the carotene 
is also high. 

Many of the samples analyzed exceeded their maximum fiber guarantees, a 
condition that can easily be corrected by increasing the fiber guarantee to con- 
form to the product. 



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8 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 117 

Animal and Fish Products 

In these tables are presented not only the usual analyses but determinations 
of oleic acid, riboflavin and the protein quality index as well. 

Oleic acid is, within limits, a measure of decomposition and may indicate the 
condition of the material before it is processed. Some feed manufacturers place 
dependence on the test as the basis of acceptance of the products they purchase 
for use in their mixtures and reject any shipment containing 1% or more of oleic 
acid. With the present scarcity of meat and fish products it is quite possible 
that this organic acid test is not so generally used. 

Meat and fish products are only fair sources of riboflavin and with the pro- 
portion used in poultry mixtures cannot be depended upon to furnish an adequate 
supply. The exceptions are the fish and liver meals and possibly crab meal. 

Salt was not found in excessive amount in any of the samples analyzed. The 
higher percentages would not prove of serious consequence when diluted by the 
other ingredients of a mixed ration. 

The protein quality index indicates production value. It is determined by 
chemically breaking up the complex substance known as protein into several 
parts, all of which vary in nutritive value. The results obtained are subjected 
to a formula which gives the figures known as the protein quality index. The 
index does not show the actual value in terms of percentage, but is simply a 
comparative figure. However, it has been shown to correspond closely to the 
values obtained in feeding trials with chicks. It is stated on authority that a 
meat and bone scrap of excellent quality' should have an index value of 70 to 75. 
Highest grade fish meals should run as high as 80 to 87. 

The Index value is also given for several fish products not usually found in the 
market. These were obtained from private sources. All of them indicate value 
and they should receive favorable consideration as substitutes for the better 
grades of fish meal during the present scarcity. The index for shrimp meal is 
probably too low. It is an average figure obtained from several samples dried 
by different methods. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 13 

In the foregoing table are listed products sold primarily as riboflavin sources, 
others which furnish not only riboflavin but other vitamins as well, and a few 
examined merely to determine how much riboflavin might be present. Where 
the riboflavin content was guaranteed, the guarantee was in no instance over- 
stated. 



Directoiy of Manufacturers Who Registered Feeding Stuffs for Sale in Massachusetts in 1943 

Albers Milling Co., Seattle, Wash. 

Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago. 111. 

American Maize-Products Co., 100 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

A. P. Ames & Co., 10 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., Trust Company of Georgia Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

Atkinson Milling Co., 900 Flour Exchange Minneapolis, Minn. 

W. E. Atkinson Co., 27 Water St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Atlantic Supply Co., 1000 Hull St., Baltimore, Md 

Bay State Milling Co., Winona, Minn. 

Beacon Milling Co., Inc , Cayuga, N. Y. 

Best Foods, Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bisbee Linseed Co., Inc., Amsterdam. N. Y. 

Blatchford Calf Meal Co., Waukegan, 111. 

Borden Co., 350 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Borden Grain Co., West Water St., Taunton, Mass. 

A. H. Brown & Bros., Boston, Mass. (Registered by Mellin's Food Company of North America) 

George B. Brown Corporation, Ipswich, Mass. 

Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

A. B. Caple Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

Center Milk Products Co., Middlebury Center, Penn. (Registered also for Vita-Lac Co.) 

Central Soya Co., Inc., Decatur, Ind. 

S. J. Cherry & Sons, Ltd., Preston, Ont., Canada 

Clinton Co., Clinton, Iowa. 

Coatsworth and Cooper Ltd., 67 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Commander-Larabee Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Community Service, Inc., Canaan, Conn. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Continental Distilling Corporation, 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

O. A. Cooper Co., Humboldt, Neb. 

Corn Products Sales Co., 17 Battery Place, New York, N. Y. 

Nicolas Courcy, 12 Waverly St., Taunton, Mass. 

Cover Grain & Feed Co., 150 Middle St., Lowell, Mass. 

Chas. M. Cox Co., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

Dailey Mills, Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Dairymen's League Co-operative Association, Inc., 11 West 42nd St , New York, N. Y. 

Decatur Milling Co., Inc., Decatur, 111. 

Dehydrating Process Co., 60 Mt. Washington Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Delaware Mills, Inc., 88 Front St., Deposit, N. Y. 

Denver Alfalfa Milling & Products Co., Lamar, Col. 

Frank Diauto, 87 Warren St., Randolph, Mass. 

F. Diehl & Son, Inc., Wellesley, Mass. 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc., Frederick, Md. 

Drackett Products Co., 5020 Spring Grove Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Dreyer Commission Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Eagle Roller Mill Co., New Ulm, Minn. 

East Bridgewater Farmers Cooperative Exchange, East Bridgewater, Mass. 

Eastern Grain Co., Bridgewater, Mass. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, West Springfield, Mass. 

B. A. Eckhart Milling Co., 1300 Carroll Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Economy Grocery Stores Corporation, 393 D St., Boston, Mass. 

Egg-O-Milk Co., Baltimore, Md. (Registered by P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son) 

M. W. Ellis Estate, 19 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Elmore Milling Co., Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 



14 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 117 

John W. Eshelman & Sons, Lancaster, Penn. 

Essex County Cooperative Farming Association, Topsfield, Mass. 

Evans Milling Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Excelsior Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

George A. Fair, HoUiston, Mass. 

Farmers Feed Co., 532 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Farmers Service Bureau, Monument & Haven Streets, Baltimore, Md. 

Federal Mill, Inc., Lockport, N. Y. 

Ferneau Grain Co., Blanchester, Ohio 

Finger Lakes & Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., 7-9 Madison St , Troy, N. Y. 

First National Stores, Inc., 5 Middlesex Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

Flory Milling Co., Inc., Bangor, Penn. 

Fred A. Fountain, Taunton, Mass. 

Paul Fuller & Son, 8 Mooney Ave., Salem, Mass. 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc., 15 Grafton St., Worcester, Mass. 

General Foods Corporation, Battle Creek, Mich. 

General Foods Corporation, Corn Mill Division, Kankakee, 111. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. 

General Mills, Inc., Farm Serfvice Division, Fitchburg, Mass. 

General Mills, Inc., Larrowe Division, Detroit, Mich. 

Getek Industrial & Agricultural Supplies Corporation, 1270 Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Walpole, Mass. 

Gilster Milling Co., Chester, 111. 

GHdden Company Feed Mill Division, 1160 West 18th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Glidden Co., Soya Products, Division, 5165 West Moffat St., Chicago, lU. 

Gloucester Dehydrating Process Co., Gloucester, Mass. 

Goode Grain Co., 452 Broadway, Lowell, Mass. 

Gorton-Pew Fisheries Co., Ltd., 327 Main St., Gloucester, Mass. 

Grande Isle County Co-operative Creamery Association, Inc., Grand Isle, Vt. 

D. H. Grandin MiUing Co., Jamestown, N. Y. 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., New York, N. Y. 

Great Eastern Feed Mills, Phoenix Ave., Lowell, Mass., (Registered by Wilmington Packing Co.) 

Hales & Hunter Co., 166 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Wm. Hamilton & Son, Inc., Caledonia, N. Y. 

D. Ha;beck & Sons, New Bedford, Mass. 

Henkel Flour Mills, 323 East Atwater St., Detroit, Mich. 

Hercules Powder Co., Dairy Products Division, 332 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

D. B. Hodgkins' Sons, Gloucester, Mass. 

E. C. & W. L. Hopkins, Inc., Greenfield, N. H. 
Horton Grain Co., Ipswich, Mass. 

Horvitz Feed Co., New Bedford, Mass. 

Hubinger Co., Keokuk, Iowa 

Humphreys-Godwin Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

Illinois Cereal Mills, Inc., Paris, 111. 

Independent Tallow Co., Inc., 39 Cedar St., Woburn, Mass. 

International MiUing Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Ismert-Hincke Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Jaquith & Co., 305 Main St., Woburn, Mass. 

Kansas Flour Mills Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Kasco Mills, Inc., Waverly, N. Y. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

Spencer Kellogg and Sons, Inc., 98 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. N. Y. 

King Midas Flour Mills, 500 Flour Exchange, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Kinsey Distilling Corporation, 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Chas. A. Krause Milling Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Lake of the Woods Milling Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que., Canada 

J. T. Lampman & Co., Claverack, N. Y. 

Larabee Flour Mills Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

L. B. Lovitt & Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

Maine Fish Meal Co., Union Wharf, Portland, Maine 

Mansfield Milling Co., Mansfield, Mass. 

Maritime Milling Co., Inc,, Buffalo, N. Y. 

C. J. Martenis Grain Co., Produce Exchange Bldg., New York, N. Y. 

Meadow Brook Farms, Nazareth, Penn. 

Mellin's Food Company of North America, 41 Central Wharf, Boston, Mass. (Registered for 

A. H. Brown & Bros.) 
Merrimack Farmers' Exchange, Inc., Concord, N. H, 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 15 ] 

i 

Middlesex County Farm Buieau Ai^sociation, Waltham, Mass. , '| 
Miller Cereal Mills, Omaha, Neb. 

Miner-Hillard Milling Co., VVilkes-Barre, Penn. \ 

Geo. Q. Moon & Co., Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. i 

Moore-Lowry Flour Mills Co., 1065 Board of Trade Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. | 
Jas. F. Morse & Co., 11 Horace St., Somerville, Mass. 

National Biscuit Co., Shredded Wheat Bakeries, Niagara Falls, N. Y. j 

National Distillers Products Corporation, 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. i 

National Foods. Feed Division, Baltimore, Md. .j 

National Lead Co., Ill Broadway, New York, N. Y. ' 
National Milling Branch of National Biscuit Co., Toledo, Ohio 

Neumond Co., St. Louis, Mo. • j 
New England Dairies, Inc., Charlestown, Mass. 
New England Grain Co., 390 Commercial St., Portland, Maine. 

New England Rendering Co., Brighton, Mass. ' 

New England Retail Grain Dealers Cooperative Association, Inc., Springfield, Mass. J 

P. Fred'k. Obrecht & Son, 4101 East Monument St., Baltimore, Md. (Registered for Egg-O-Milk I 

Co.) 1 

Ogden Grain Co., Utica, N. Y. j 

Ogilvie Flour Mills Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que., Canada 1 

Pabst Brewing Co., Milwaukee, Wis. :! 

Palm Grain Co., 1081 Gorham St., Lowell, Mass. < 

Park & Pollard Co., Inc., 356 Hertel Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. ' 
George H. Parker Grain Co., 56 Water St., Danvers, Mass. 
Patent Cereals Co., Geneva, N. Y. 

Pillsbury Flour Mills Co., Minneapolis, Minn. j 
Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Linseed Oil Division, 2-10 Chester Ave., Newark, N. J. 

W. N. Potter Grain Stores, Inc., Greenfield, Mass. ' 

Pratt Food Co., Inc., 69 Leddy St,. Buffalo, N. Y. ' 

Publicker Commercial Alcohol Co., 1429 W^alnut St., Philadelphia, Penn. .; 

Publicker Inc., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Penn. * 

H. C. Puffer Co., Springfield, Mass (Business sold May 1) ■, 

Quaker Oats Co., 141 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. > 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. ^ 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., Cambridge, Mass. ! 

Rodney Milling Co., Kansas City, Mo. \ 

Russell-Miller Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. ! 

Ryther & Warren Co., Belchertown, Mass. < 

St. Lawrence Flour Mills Co., Ltd., 2110 Notre Dame Street West, Montreal, Que., Canada ' 

Saunders Mills, Inc., Box 1584 Central Station, Toledo, Ohio ■ 

Schenley Distilleries, Inc., 350 Fifth Ave., New York, N. Y. ! 

Schoeneck Farms, Inc., Nazareth, Penn. i 

Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., Louisville, Ky. ^ 

Shellabarger Mill & Elevator Co., Salina, Kan. 'i 

Sherwin-Williams Co., 101 Prospect .^ve., N. W., Cleveland, Ohio < 
W. J. Small Co., Inc.. Neodesha, Kan. 

A. E. Staley Manufacturing Co., Decatur, 111. .. 
Standard Milling Co., 309 West JacKson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Stratton & Co., Concord, N. H. - j 

Sunny Slope Farms, Nazareth, Penn. • 

Swift & Company, Finney St., Palmer, Mass. ', 

Swift & Company Soybean Mills, Champaign, 111. .- 

Toledo Soybean Products Co., Toledo, Ohio ,'' 

Jacob Trinley & Sons, Linfield, Penn. ' 

Union Sales Corporation, Columbus, Ind. (Distributor for Union Starch & Refining Co.) / 

1^ United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg, Mass. ' 

1^ United Farmers Cooperative Creamery Association, Inc., Charlestown, Mass. « 

United Mills Co., Inc., Grafton, Ohio 1 

Unity Feeds, Inc., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. .: 

^ Valier & Spies Milling Co., St. Louis, Mo. ! 

K_ Arthur Ventura Grain Co., 7 Purchase St., Taunton, Mass. ' 

HL Victor Flour Mills, Inc., Pittsford, N. Y. '■ 

^^B Vita-Lac Co., Middlebury Center, Penn. (Registered by Center Milk Products Co.) ' 

^^H Wakefield Sawdust & Shavings Co., Wakefield, Mass. 

^^B Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc., Foot of Edmund St., Peoria, 111. 

^^K Wamesit Co.. Wamesit (Tewksbury), Mass. (Registered by Wilmington Packing Co.) J 

^^K Ward Milk Products Division of Kraft Cheese Co., 500 Pestigo Ct., Chicago, 111. J 



16 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 117 

Wayne County Grangers Feed Corporation, Clyde, N. V. 

H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence, Mass. 

Western Condensing Co., Petaluma, Cal. 

Whitmoyer Laboratories, Inc., Myerstown, Penn. 

Williams Bros. Co., Kent, Ohio 

Est. M. G. Williams, Taunton, Mass., 

Wilmington Packing Co., New Boston St., Woburn, Mass. (Registered also for Great Eastern Feed 

Mills, and Wamesit Co.) 
Wilson & Co., Inc., 4100 South Ashland Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Stanley Wood Grain Co., Taunton, Mass. 
Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester, Mass. 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 118 SEPTEMBER 1943 



Inspection of Commercial 

Fertilizers 

and 

Agricultural Lime Products 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff 



This is the seventieth report of the Massachusetts Fertilizer Control made in 
accordance with Chapter 94, Section 250 to 261, inclusive, of Massachusetts 
General Laws 1920, as amended by Chapter 67, Acts of 1933. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



CONTENTS 



Pertinent facts relating to Massachusetts fertilizer law 
Manufacturers and brands .... 

Fertilizer tonnage ...... 



Mixed fertilizers: 

Deficiency statistics ........ 

-Average variation table ....... 

Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton 
Mixtures substantially complying with guarantees . 

Chemicals and raw products: 

Nitrogen compounds .... 

Phosphoric acid compounds 

Products supplying nitrogen and phosphoric acid 
Potash compounds ..... 
Pulverized animal manures 

Agr culture lime products: 

Manufacturers and brands .... 
Variations and deficiencies 
Hydrated or slaked lime .... 
Pulverized limestone (fine-ground limestone) . 
Ground limestone (coarse-ground limestone) 
Gypsum or land plaster .... 



Directory of manufacturers who registered fertilizers for sale 



in Massachusetts in 1943 



Page 
3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

11 

14 
15 
15 

17 
18 

20 
20 

22 
23 
24 
25 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission of Administkation and Fina.nce 
2500 10-43. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS 

AND AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1943 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff: 

I'hilip H. Smith. Official Chemist, in Charge James T. Howard, Inspector 

John W. Kuzmeski, Senior Chemist Louis A. Graves. Inspector 

*H. Robert DeRose, Assistant Chemist Joseph A. Bart, Inspector 

Albert F. Spelman. Assistant Chemist Joseph A. Martell, Laboratory 
C. Tvson Smith, Assistant Chemist Assistant 

Leo V. Crowley. Junior Chemist Cora B. Grover, Senior Clerk 
*On military leave of absence. 



PERTINENT FACTS RELATING TO MASSACHUSETTS 
FERTILIZER LAW 

Commercial Fertilizeis 

Registration is required annually on January 1. 

Registration fee is $8 for each element: nitrogen, phosphoric acid, potash, mag- 
nesia. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of fertilizer 
Name, brand or trade mark, and grade 
Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, water soluble 
potash. A guarantee of total phosphoric acid may be u.sed instead of 
availc ble phosphoric acid for bone, untreated phosph^ te rock, tankage, 
dried and pulverized manures, ground seeds, and wood ashes 
Tonnage reports are required semi-annually, on January 1 and July 1. 
Tonnage fee: 6 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Lime Products 

Registration is required annually on January 1. 
Registration fee: $12 for each brand. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of product 

Name, brand or trade mark, and form of lime 

Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, carbonates of calcium 
and magnesium, or calcium sulphate (in gypsum or land plaster) 



Make checks payable to Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station and 
send correspondence to 

PHILIP H. SMITH 

Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 

Amtierst, Mass. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 



Manufacturers and Brands 



Registrations have been perfected in Massachusetts during 1943 by 65 firms, 
covering 257 brands of mixed fertilizer and unmixed fertilizing materials. 

The following brands were not found on display by the sampling agent at any 
point in the state and therefore do not appear in the tables of analyses. 



Brands of Fertilizer Registered but Not Sampled 



Acme Guano Co. 

Acme 4-9-7 
Acme 4-12-4 

Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation 
The Barrett Division 

Sulphate of Ammonia (20.6-0-0) 

American Cyanamid Co. 

21% Aero Cyanamid Pulverized (21-0-0) 

American Potash & Chemical Corp. 

Trona Muriate of Potash (0-0-60) 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Liberty Fertilizer 0-14-14 
Cotton Hull Ashes (0-0-25) 
Muriate Potash 60% (0-0-60) 
Sulphate Potash (0-0-48) 
Sulphate Ammonia (20.5-0-0) 

Archer-Daniels- Midland Co. 

Archer Brand 32 Per Cent Protein Old 
Process Linseed Oil Meal (5-0-0) 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 3-10-10 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co. 

Fertihzer Compound (34-0-0) 

Baugh & Sons Co. 

Baugh's Premium Plant Food & Soil Builder 

3-12-6 
Baugh's Premium Plant Food & Soil Builder 

4-10-10 
Baugh's Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 
Baugh's 20% Superphosphate (0-20-0) 

Berkshire Chemical Co. 

Berkshire 0-14-14 

Buell Fertilizer Co. 

Buell Peat-Poultry Manure (3-3-1.5) 



Chilean Nitrate Sales Corporation 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Original 
Old Style (16-0-0) 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco 0-20-20 Hay & Pasture 
Corenco 4-16-20 Seeding Special 
Corenco 10-6-4 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States 5-10-10-1.5 
Eastern .States 5-17-0 
Eastern States 6-12-6-0.5 
Eastern States 8-8-8 

Hartney & Amalia, Inc. 

Vitafood 7-7-6 

Humphreys-Godwin Co. 

Di.xie Brand 41% Prime Cottonseed Meal 
(6.58-0-0) 

Hyper-Humus Co. 

Hyper-Humus (1-0-0) 

Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co. 

Red Seal Brand Ruhm's Phosphate Rock 
30% (0-30-0) 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co. 

Scotts Turf Builder 8-7-3 (2% organic 
nitrogen) 

Sears, Roebuck <S Co. 

Garden Master Plant Food 3-8-7 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 

Swift's Red Steer 3-12-6 
Swift's Red Steer 4-9-7 
Swift's Red Steer 4-10-10 
Swift's Red Steer Superphosphate (0-20-0) 
Swift's Pulverized Cattle Manure 
(1.85-0.75-1.50) 

Universal Chemical Co. 

Electra Plant Food 4-12-4 



Drawing of Samples 

Between April 1 and June 15, three sampling agents made a thorough canvass 
of the state: James T. Howard in Hampshire, Hampden, Franklin, and Berk- 
shire Counties; Louis A. Graves in Norfolk, Bristol, Plymouth, Barnstable, and 
Dukes Counties; and Joseph A. Bart in Essex, Middlesex, Suffolk, and Worcester 
Counties. They visited 151 towns, took 1,176 samples, representing 220 brands, 
from stock in the possessioii of 332 agents or owners, and called at 307 places 
where no samples were drawn because the agency had been discontinued, the 
stock was all sold out, or sufficient samples had already been taken of the brands 
found. They sampled 16,686 sacks, representing 8,739 tons of fertilizer. One 
ton was sampled to every eight and nine-tenths tons sold in the state. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 

FERTILIZER TONNAGE 
Tonnage of Mixed and Unmixed Fertilizers Sold in Massachusetts 





July 1, 1940, to 
July 1, 1941 


July 1, 1941, to 
July 1, 1942 


July 1, 1942, to 
July 1, 1943 


Mixed fertilizers ..... 
Fertilizer chemicals and materials unmixed 
Pulverized animal manures 


46,212 
18,613 a 
1,414 


53.602 
15,470 b 
1,508 


62,989 r. 

13.219 d 

1,596 


Totals 


66,239 


70,580 


77.804 



a Does not include 9.192 tons of 20% superphosphate distributed by the A. A. A. 

b Does not include 1.604 tons of 18% superphosphate and 8,394 tons of 20% superphosphate 

distributed by the A.A.A. 
c Does not include 2,916 tons of 0-14-14 distributed by the A.A.A. 
d Does not include 8,505 tons of 20% superphosphate distributed by the A.A.A. 



Tonnage of Mixed Fertilizers 


, July 1, 1942 to July 1, 1943, 




Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


4-9-7 


16,084 


19 


6-12-8 


47 




4-10-10 


15,476 


26 


4-8-7 


46 


— 


3-8-7 


11,128 


20 


7-7-7 


41 


— 


6-3-6 


5.966 


11 


3-10-6 


38 


— 


3-12-6 


3.769 


16 


4-1-2 


38 


— 


6-15-15 


2,693 


6 


10-6-4 


37 


— 


4-12-4 


2,551 


19 


3-10-4 


31 


— 


0-14-14 


862 


8 


3-10-10 


30 


— 


5-8-7 


809 


— 


8-5-2 


28 


— 


6-8-4 


350 


— 


5-8-10 


22 


— 


4-16-20 


342 


— 


8-6-6 


19 


— 


4-8-4 


328 


— 


10-10-10 


. 17 


— 


5-3-5 


317 


— 


8-16-16 


16 


— 


4-8-10 


226 


— 


6-12-12 


13 


— 


3-10-5 


223 


— 


7-5-3 


13 


— 


5-10-10 


163 


— 


7-7-5 


13 


— 


5-6-4 


154 


— 


7-7-6 


13 


— ■ 


4-9-3 


150 


— 


5-5-15 


12 


— 


3-10-3 


116 


. — . 


8-16-14 


12 


— 


8-4-8 


115 


— 


5-5-10 


11 


— 


5-5-5 


98 


— 


8-6-4 


11 


— 


5-10-5 


97 


— 


Miscellaneous 


106 


15 


5-10-4 
0-20-20 


93 

88 


— 


Special Mixtures 


96 


— 










8-6-2 


81 


— 


TOTALS 


62,989 


167 



*The grade represents the plant food guarantee and is expressed in the order of nitrogen, avail- 
able phosphoric acid, potash. 



Tonnage of Unmixed Fertilizing Materials, July 1, 1942, to July 1, 1943 



Material 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Nitrate of soda . 


3.144 




Superphosphate 20% 


2,785 


12 


Milorganite 


1,743 


— • 


Pulverized animal manures 


1,596 


23 


Superphosphate 18% 


t,577 


— 


Bone meal .... 


1,141 


14 


Cottonseed meal 


801 


. — . 


Muriate of potash 60% 


671 


8 


Cyanamid 


512 


— 


Sulfate of ammonia 


350 


6 


Muriate of potash 50% 


101 


— 


Bone and tankage 


72 


— 


Cotton hull ashes 


61 


— 



Material 



Linseed meal 
Superphosphate 16% 
Superphosphate 47% 
Rock phosphate 
Peat .... 
.Sulfate of potash 
Tankage 
Fish meal 
Castor pomace 
Urea . . 
Miscellaneous . 

TOTALS . 



Tonnage 



57 

56 

43 

30 

29 

10 

7 

6 

6 

5 

12 

14.815 



Brands 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 

MIXED FERTILIZERS 

Deficiency Statistics for Mixed, Fertilizers 



Manufacturer 



Number of 


Samples 




(U 


■V 


(,■ 


<v 


o d 


N 




>. 


-fi H 






a 

< 


^Q 



Number of Tests 



§ ■" '^ 
-c g c 

S S 3 



dOcj 
50, o 



^?2 



■S £ d 



4;0 






Acme Guano Co 

American Agricultural Chemical Co. 
Apothecaries Hall Co. .... 
Armour Fertilizer Works 

Ernest J. Bantle 

F. A. Bartlett Tree Expert Co. . . 

Baugh & Sons Co. 

Berkshire Chemical Co 

Joseph Breck & Sons 

Consolidated Rendering Co. . 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange . 
Thomas W. Emerson Co. 
Essex County Co-operative Farming 

Association 

Excell Laboratories 

H. L. Frost & Higgins Co. 

Goulard & Olena, Inc 

Grasalo Co. 

Greenlands Services. Inc. 
Henderson & Herndon Tree Co., Inc. 
Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. 
Hy-Trous Corporation .... 
International Minerals & Chemical 

Corporation 

Mechling Bros. Chemicals, Division of 

General Chemical Co. 
Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Olds & VVhipnle, Inc 

Plantabbs Co 

Rogers & Hubbard Co 

William H. Rorer. Inc 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co 

M. L. Shoemaker Division, Wilson & 

Co., Inc 

Smith-Dou.?lass Co., Inc. 

Standard Wholesale Phosphate & Acid 

Works, Inc. .... 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 
Tennessee Corporation .... 

C. P. Washburn Co 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works. Inc. . 

TOTALS 



3 


2 


82 


18 


19 


18 


30 


6 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


3 


14 


2 


5 


1 


38 


23 


24 


15 


4 





2 


2 


1 


1 


2 





1 





2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


35 


14 


2 


2 


24 


19 


16 


14 


46 


37 


1 


1 


4 


2 


1 


1 


1 





7 


1 


7 


3 


5 


3 


7 





4 


1 


400 


200 



9 
240 

57 

88 

6 

3 

9 

42 

15 

112 



7 
3 
6 
3 
6 
3 
3 
6 
6 

102 

6 

74 
48 

3 
137 

3 
12 

3 
3 

21 
21 
15 
21 
12 





41 


26 




10 
2 

10 




14 
1 
6 



4 
2 
5 
2 
1 













Serious Commercial Shortages in Mixed Fertilizers 



Amount of Shortage per Ton 


Number of Samples 




2 


Between $4 anrl $5 

Between $3 and .$4 

Between $2 and $3 • 

Between $1 and $2 


2 

2 

7 

29 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 7 

Average Variation from Guaranteed Analysis 

Twelve firms have registered five or more brands of mixed fertilizers. On the 
basis of composition found by analysis as well as of tonnage sold, the following 
table shows to what extent each manufacturer was successful in avoiding de- 
ficiencies in plant food guarantees in his mixtures. One of the twelve firms has 
an average deficiency in one plant food element. 



Manufacturer 



Average Percentage of Plant Food 
Above or Below the Minimum Guarantee 



Nitrogen 



Available 

Phosphoric 

Acid 



Water 
Soluble 
Potash 



American Agricultural Chemical Co 

Apothecaries Hall Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Baugh & Sons Co 

Berkshire Chemical Co 

Consolidated Rendering Co 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange . . . . 
International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 
Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. . . . 

Olds & Whipple. Inc 

Rogers & Hubbard Co 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works . . . . 



+ 
—.06 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



Explanation of Tables of Analyses 

Guarantee. The, plant food guarantee or the grade of each fertilizer is made 
a part of the trade name under the heading "Name of Manufacturer and Brand", 
and is expressed as nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, and water soluble potash 
and in that order. 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with tiie Guarantee. In addition to those 
fertilizers which meet their guarantees in every respect, this table includes also 
those mixtures which have one or more elements below the guaranteed percentage 
but have a shortage of less than $1 per ton. 

From the Control Official's viewpoint, the amount of overrun, within reason- 
able limits, found in any sample of fertilizer is not especially significant. Of 
main importance is the fact that the particular sample analyzed shows that the 
manufacturer of the brand represented by the sample is selling a product which 
is or is not substantially as guaranteed. The manufacturer whose 4-9-7 brand 
is found by the Control Official to be running 4.01-9.03-7.02 in every sample of 
the brand tested is meeting all requirements covering this part of the fertilizer 
control laws as fully as the manufacturer of another 4-9-7 brand found to run 
4.85-9.95-7.90 in each sample tested. 

Therefore this table, in addition to the data mentioned In the next paragraph, 
contains only results of analytical tests pertaining to the average amount of 
water insoluble nitrogen present In each brand, since this Information is of 
value to tobacco growers and other users of fertilizers containing a high per- 
centage of this form of nitrogen. 

Potash Forms. Tests for chlorine are made only on tobacco mixtures and on 
those fertilizers which carry a guarantee of potash in forms other than muriate. 
When the amount of chlorine present in any brand exceeds the tolerance allowed 
for that brand, this fact is indicated by a footnote. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 



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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



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CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 






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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 
Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees 



11 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Acme Guano Co. 

Acme Victory Garden 3-8-7 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

AA Market Garden Fertilizer 4-12-4 

AA Potato & Root Crop Fertilizer 4-10-10 

AA Potato & Vegetable Fertilizer 4-9-7 

AA Sure Crop Fertilizer 3-12-6 

AA XXX Mixture 0-14-14 

Agrico Alkaline 0-14-14 

Agrico for Commercial Growers 4-12-4 

Agrico for Corn 3-12-6 

Agrico for Lawns, Trees and Shrubs 3-10-5 

Agrico for New England 4-9-7 

Agrico for Potatoes & Vegetables 4-10-10 

Agrico for Seeding Down 4-16-20 

Agrico for Tobacco 6-3-6 

.\giico for Truck 4-12-4 

-Agrico Victory Garden Fertilizer "For Food Production Only" 3-8-7 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Liberty Victory Fertilizer 3-8-7 

Liberty Fertilizer 3-12-6 

Liberty Fertilizer 4-9-7 

Liberty Fertilizer 4-10-10 

Liberty Fertilizer 4-10-10 (with SuL Potash) 

Liberty Fertilizer 4-12-4 

Liberty Tobacco Mixture (with Cotton Hull Ashes) 6-3-6 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 0-20-20 . . ' . 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 3-12-6 

.'\rmour's Big Crop Fertilizer 4-9-7 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 4-10-10 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 4-12-4 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 4-16-20 

Armour's Big Crop Tobacco Special 5-3-5 

Armour's Big Crop Tobacco Special 6-3-6 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 6-15-15 

Armour's Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 

Ernest J. Bantle 

Potato 4-9-7 

Potato 4-10-10 



F. A. Bartlctl Tree Expert Co. 
Bartlett Green Tree Food 6-7-4 



Baugh & Sons Co. 

Baugh's Balanced Plant Food 4-12-4 
Baugh's Perfection Brand 3-12-6 
Baugh's 4-10-10 



Belmont Gardens 

Gardenia Fertilizer (Belgard) 6-15-4 

Berkshire Chemical Co. 

Berkshire Victory Garden (For Food Production Only) 3-8-7 

Berkshire 4-9-7 

Berkshire 4-10-10 

Berkshire 4-12-4 

Berkshire 6-3-6 



Joseph Breck & Sons 

Breck's Victory for Food Crops Only 3-8-7 . 
Brexone for Lawns and Gardens 5-10-4 
Brexone for Vegetables 4-10-10 . . . . 



Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco 0-14-14 Top Dresser 
Corenco 3-8-7 Victory Garden 
Corenco 3-10-3 Landscape 
Corenco 3-12-6 Animal Brand 
Corenco Landscape Fertilizer 4-7-3 
Corenco 4-9-7 General Crop Manure 
Corenco 4-10-10 Potato Grower 
Corenco 4-12-4 Complete Manure . 
Corenco 6-3-6 Special Tobacco Grower 
Corenco 6-15-15 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



Average 
Percentage 

of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 



9 a 


.30 


7 a 


.39 


5 


.37 


11 a 


.18 


3 


— 


3 


— 


2 


.38 


4 


.23 


4 


2.02 


4 


.29 


3 a 


.44 


3 


.09 


3 b 


4,10 


3 


.39 


3 a 


.04 


3 


1.43 


3 


.67 


3 


.52 


3 


.67 


1 b 


.53 


3 


.77 


3 b 


4.73 


1 a 





4 


.38 


4 a 


.43 


Sac 


.39 


3 


.36 


1 


.13 


1 b 


2.11 


1 b 


2.67 


3 


.26 


5 


.37 


1 


.71 


1 


1.02 



1.07 



3 


.15 


5 


.16 


2 


.16 


3 


.20 


1 b 


3.35 


1 


.21 


2 


3.74 


1 a 


3.21 


2 


_ 


5 


.24 


2 


2,77 


6 


.16 


2 


3.39 


6 a 


.06 


4 a 


,06 


4 


.07 


1 b 


3.10 


2 


.05 



a See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 

b Potash in forms other than muriate. 

c Potash in forms other than muriate in one sample. 



12 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 



Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Continued 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States 0-9-27 with .5% magnesium oxide 
Eastern States 0-14-14 with 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 3-8-7 

Eastern States 3-12-6 with 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 4-10-10 with 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 4-16-20 with .5% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 6-15-lS with 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 6-15-15 Low Chlorine with .5% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 8-4-8 Tobacco 

Thomas W. Emerson Co. 

Emseco 4-10-10 



Essex County Cooperative Farming Association 

S-X Brand 3-12-6 

S-X Brand (1% Magnesium Oxide) 4-10-10 

Excell Laboratories 

New Plant Life 2-1-2 



H. L. Frost & Higgins Co. 

Frosl's Lawn & Shrubbery Special 8-6-3 
Frost's Shade Tree Special 8-6-6 



Grasalo Co. 

Grasalo Chemical Fertilizer 3-8-7 



Creenlands Services, Inc. 

Rhododendrons and Evergreens 4-6-4 



Henderson & Herndon Tree Co., Inc. 

H. & H. Plant Food 5-5-10 . . 



Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. 

Hyponex 7-6-19 



Hy-Trous Corporation 

Hy-Trous 4-8-4 



International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 

International 0-14-14 

International 3-12-6 

International 4-9-7 

International 4-10-10 

International All Organic 4-10-10 

International 4-12-4 

International All Organic 5-6-4 

International 6-3-6 

International 6-15-15 

International Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 .... 

Mechling Bros. Chemicals, Division of General Chemical Co. 

Veget Aid 5-10-5 



Old Deertield Fertilizer Co.. Inc. 

Old Deerfield Victory 3-8-7 

Old Deerfield 3-12-6 Fertilizer 

Old Deerfield 4-9-7 

Old Deerfield 4-10-10 

Old Deerfield with Sulphate of Potash 4-10-10 with 2% mag- 
nesium oxide 

Old Deerfield 4-12-4 

Old Deerfield Lawnshrub 5-5-5 

Old Deerfield 6-3-6 Complete Tobacco Fertilizer .... 



Olds & Whipple, Inc. 

O & W 3-12-6 Fertilizer 

O & W 4-9-7 General Purpose Fertilizer 

O & W 4-9-7 General Purpose Fertilizer with Sulphate of Potash 

O & \V 4-10-10 Potato Fertilizer 

O & W 4-12-4 Market Garden Fertilizer 

O & W 5-3-5 Complete Tobacco Fertilizer 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Tobacco Fertilizer 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Tobacco Fertilizer Potash Derived from 
Cotton Hull Ash 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



1 
2 
4 
4 
4 
1 
5 
2 
1 6 



36 



Average 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 



.20 
.16 
.16 
.10 
.12 
.09 
2.32 



.24 
.15 



1 


3,67 


1 


4.15 


1 


.19 


1 


3.75 


1 


3.25 


2 


.02 


2 


- 


2 o 





3 


.23 


6 a 


.22 


4 


.33 


1 a 


2.91 


4 


.27 


3 


3.65 


2 ab 


2.73 


3 


.08 


3 


.16 



1 


.49 


1 


.14 


5 


.76 


4 


.46 


2 b 


.95 


2 


.71 


2 


3.94 


76 


3.73 


2 


.67 


3 


.65 


1 6 


.95 


3 c 


.68 


2 


.53 


1 6 


3.29 


1 6 


3.54 



a See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 

b Potash in forms other than muriate. 

c Potash in forms other than muriate in one sample. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



13 



Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Concluded 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Plantabbs Co. 

Fulton's "V" Plantabbs 4-12-18 



Rogers & Hubbard Co 

Carnation Special 3-10-4 

Gro-Fast Plant Food 4-8-4 

Hubbard All Soils Fertilizer 4-12-4 

Hubbard Climax Tobacco Fertilizer S-3-5 

Hubbard Corn & Grain Fertilizer 3-12-6 

Hubbard High Potash Fertilizer 4-10-10 

Hubbard Potato Fertilizer 4-9-7 

Hubbard Tobacco Grower 6-3-6 

Red H Brand 3-10-10 

Red H Brand 3-12-6 

Red H Brand 4-9-7 

Red H Brand 4-10-10 

Red H Brand 4-12-4 

Red H Brand 6-15-15 

Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 

Warrior Tobacco Fertilizer with Cotton Hull Ashes 6-3-6 

William H. Rorer, Inc. ^ 

Plant Dinner 5-7-5 



O. M. Scott & Sons Co. 

Scotts Turf Builder 6-8-4 

Scotts Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 

M. L. Shoemaker Division, Wilson & Co., Inc. 

Shoemaker's "Swift-Sure" Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 

Smith-Douglass Co., Inc. 

Smith Victory Garden 3-8-7 



Standard Wholesale Phosphate & Acid Works, Inc. 

Standard 4-9-7 

Standard 4-10-10 

Standard 4-12-4 



Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 

Vigoro Victory Garden Fertilizer for Food Production only 3-8-7 
Vigoro 3-12-6 

Tennessee Corporation 

Loma 4-12-4 

Victory Garden Fertilizer 3-8-7 

C. P. Washburn Co. 

Market Garden 4-9-7 

Special Potato 4-10-10 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc. 

Woodruff's 4-9-7 Fertilizer 

Woodruff's 4-10-10 Fertilizer 

Woodruff's 4-12-4 Fertilizer 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



2 


2.32 


2 


3.91 


2 


1.14 


2b 


3.57 


2 


.57 


3 a 


.92 


3 


1.06 


4ab 


4.18 


2 


.42 


5 


.47 


4 


.49 


4 


.48 


2 


.56 


1 


.14 


4 


1.28 


1 b 


2.06 



Average 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 



2.81 



.54 



5.32 
1.50 



.85 



.12 



1 a 

2 a 
1 a 


.45 
.17 
.19 


3 
2 a 


.20 
.15 


2 
3 


1.19 
.37 


2 a 
2 a 


.47 
.36 


2 

1 
1 


.59 
.64 

.74 



a See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 
b Potash in forms other than muriate. 



14 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 



NITROGEN COMPOUNDS 
Calcium Cyanamid, Nitrate of Soda, Sulfate of Ammonia, Synthetic Urea 





Nitrogen 


Manufacturer and Brand 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Allied Chemical and Dye Corp., The Barrett Division 

Arcadian the American Nitrate of Soda 

Arcadian Sulpliate of Ammonia 

American Cyanamid Co. 

20.6% Aero Cyanamid Granular 

Chilean Nitrate Sales Corp 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand . . . . 
Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co.. Inc. . 

Du Pont Uramon Fertilizer Compound 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States Sulphate of Ammonia 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 


16.25 
20.73 

21.52 

16.16 
16.26 

43.74 

20.98 

16.10 
21.43 


16.00 
20.60 

20.60 

16.00 
16.00 

42.00 

20,50 

16.00 




20.50 







Cottonseed Meal, Soybean Oil Meal 





Nitrogen 


Manufacturer and Brand 




Guaran- 




Found 


teed 


Archer-Daniels-Midland Co. 






Archer Brand 41% Protein Soybean Oil Meal 


7.38 


6.56 


Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co. 






Cow-Eta Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.51 


6.58 


Cow-Eta Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.60 


6.58 


Cow-Eta Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal .... 


6.56 


6.58 


Cow-Eta Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal .... 


6.70 


6.58 


Cow-Eta Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal . . . 


6.55 


6.58 


L. B. Lovitt & Co. 






Lovit Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.66 


6.56 


Lovit Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.65 


6.56 


Lovit Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.66 


6.56 


Lovit Brand 41% Protein Cottonseed Meal 


6.64 


6 56 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



15 



PHOSPHORIC ACID COMPOUNDS 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Total 
Phos- 
phoric 
Acid 



Available 
Phosphoric Acid 



Found 



Guaran- 
teed 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

18% Normal Superphosphate 

18% Normal Superphosphate 

18% Normal Superphosphate 

Apothecaries Hal! Co. 

Superphosphate 20% 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Superphosphate 20% 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Superphosphate 20% 

Superphosphate 20% 

Superphosphate 20% 

Davison Chemical Corporation 

Davco Granulated 20% Superphosphate 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States Superphosphate 20% 
Eastern States Superphosphate 20% 
Eastern States Superphosphate 47% 

Goulard & Olena, Inc. 

G & O Superphosphate 20% 

International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 

International Superphosphate 20% 
International Superphosphate 20% 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co.. Inc. 

Old Deerfield Superphosphate 20% 

Olds & Whipple, Inc. 

O & W Superphosphate 20% 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Hubbard Superphosphate 20% . . . . 
Hubbard Superphosphate 20% . . . . 



19.60 
20.25 
18.70 



20.63 



21.45 
20.40 
20.35 



21.60 



22.10 
21.20 
48.35 



22.05 



20.35 
21.60 



21.80 



20.95 
20.40 



18.80 
19.85 
18.66 



20.66 
19.58 



20.75 
20.40 
19.59 



21.34 
20.42 
47.83 



21.71 



19.85 
20.72 



20.21 
20.72 



20.79 
20.40 



18.00 
18.00 
18.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



20.00 



20.00 
20.00 
47.00 



20.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 



PRODUCTS SUPPLYING NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORIC ACID 
Dry Ground Fish, Animal Tankage, Bone and Tankage 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Dry Ground Fish 
N. Roy & Son 

Animal Tankage (a) 



Nitrogen 



Found 



9.85 



Guaran- 
teed 



To 

Phosphc 


tal 

ric Acid 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


7.00 


5.00 


12.60 


8.00 



Sample Showing Commercial Shortage of More than $1 per Ton 



Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Bone and Tankage 




a Degree of fineness: coarser than 1/50 inch, 66.2%. 
b Commercial shortage $1.91 per ton. 



16 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 
Ground Bone 



Manufacturer 



American Agricultural Ciiemical Co. 



Apothecaries Hall Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works .... 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc 

International Minerals & Chemical Corp. 

Olds & Whipple. Inc 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson 
& Co., Inc 



Rogers & Hubbard Co. 



Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 



Nitrogen 



Found 



3.23 



3.68 
2.69 
3.01 

'2.70 
,2.73 

3.74 



/3.53 

13.42 



2.03 
2.13 
2.86 
4.36 
4.29 
4.45 
3. 95 
4.01 
3.68 
4.03 
4.36 
3.96 
3.92 

2.75 



Guaran- 
teed 



2.47 
2.47 
2.47 
2.47 

2.25 

2.47 

2.47 
2.47 
2.47 

2.30 
2.30 

3.70 



2.47 

2.47 
2.47 

2.00 
2.00 
2.47 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 
3.70 

2.47 



Total 
Phosphoric Acid 



Found 



24.65 
23.65 
25.25 
23.95 

24.85 

27.30 

23.95 
24.00 
25.70 

26.75 
27.30 



25.70 

26.05 

24.30 
20.75 

26.25 
25.30 
26.25 
24.38 
24.18 
23.93 
22.45 
23.90 
22.20 
21.70 
23.70 
24.15 
20.85 

26.35 



Guaran- 
teed 



23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 

22.00 

23.00 

23.00 
23.00 
23.00 

23.00 
23.00 



23.00 



21.00 
21.00 

23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
24.70 
24.70 
24.70 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 

23.00 



Degree of 
Fineness 



Coarser 

than 1/50 

Inch 



33.8 
45.4 
46.1 
23.4 

39.9 



52.4 
42.8 
21.0 

28.9 
24.7 

63.4 



38.8 

41.8 
40.9 

10.2 
11.0 
33.4 
20.9 
12.7 
5.7 
26.7 
68.8 
35.7 
36.2 
10.9 
15.0 
44.1 

25.5 



Samples Showing Commercial Shortage of iVIore than $1 per Ton 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. . 



International Minerals & Chemical Corp. 



Rogers & Hubbard Co. . 



f3.80 


2.47 


1.996 


2.47 


2.28f 


2.47 


[2.nd 


2.47 


3.40 


2.47 


f2.19/ 


2.47 


1.79^ 


2.47 


2.25;? 


2.47 


2.32i 


2.47 


4.47 


3.70 


4.43 


3.70 



21.00a 

23.75 
25.85 
26.65 

21 . 30e 

30.35 

30.85 

29.65 

29.00 

23.75i 

23 . 85* 



23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 

23.00 

23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
24.70 
24.70 



55.5 
39.1 
26.0 

33.5 

32.1 



32.0 

45.2 

15.2 

4.4 

4 3 



Commercial shortage per ton: a $2.79; b $.S.67; 
H $1.84; t $1.24; j $1.24; k $1.05. 



.46; d $2.29; e $2.56; / $2.81; g $6.07; 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



17 



Milorganite 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Sewerage Commission of tlie City of Milwaukee 

Milorganite 

Milorganite 

Milorganite 



Nitrogen 



Found 



5.61 a 

5.83 6 
5.74 c 



Guaran- 
teed 



6.00 
6.00 
6.00 



Available 
Phosphfiric Acid 



Found 



2.28 
2.17 
2.46 



Guaran- 
teed 



2.00 
2.00 
2.00 



a Commercial shortage $2,93 per ton. 
b Commercial sliortage $1.28 per ton. 
c Commercial shortage $1.95 per ton 



POTASH COMPOUNDS 
Muriate and High Grade Sulfate of Potash 





Muriate of Potash 


High Grade Sulfate of Potash 


Manufacturer 


Water Soluble 
Potash 


Water Soluble 
Potash 


Chlorine 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 




American Agricultural Chemical Co. . 


[48.92 
^51. 16 
[50.16 


50.00 
50.00 
50.00 








Armour Fertilizer Works .... 


60.20 


60.00 








Consolidated Rendering Co. 


61.14 


60.00 








Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 


(59.84 
)59.12 
1 59.39 
[61.76 


60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 


52.16 


52.00 


1.12 


International Minerals & Clremical Corp. 


[49.64 
49 . 84 
151.70 


50.00 
50.00 
50.00 








Middlesex County Farm Bureau Ass'n. 


60.44 


60.00 








Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 


60.88 


60.00 








Rogers & Hubbard Co 


60.16 


60.00 









Samples Showing Commercial Shortage of More than $1 per Ton 



Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Goulard & Olena, Inc 

International Minerals & Chemical Corp. 
Rogers & Hubbard Co 



47.24 6 
48.58 c 



'58.37 d 
i58.54e 



50.00 
50.00 



60.00 
60.00 



49.94 a 



Commercial shortage per ton: a $1.85. b Since this material is sold in small packages a 
calculation of the shortage per ton is not feasible, c $1.20; d $1.31; e $1.18. 



18 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 





V 
3 

'o 


17.70 
7.35 
8.45 

15.40 

6.00 
5.68 
6.75 

6.65 

8.70 

5.25 
4.13 

3.93 

5.70 
7.10 




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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



19 





00 


001/1 
OJOv 


00 




2 


lo a 


VO 


>o-* 


r^ 


■* 


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tr, 


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O 


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20 CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 

AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers and Brands 

During 1943, 17 firms registered for sale in Massachusetts 39 brands of lime 
products, manufactured and sold for neutralizing acid soils, and one brand of 
gypsum. The products are grouped as follows: 

Hydrated or slaked lime 23 

Pulverized and ground limestone 15 

Lime ashes 1 

39 

Gypsum 1 

The analytical results which appear in this bulletin represent officially drawn 
samples secured by the same sampling agents who drew the samples of commer- 
cial fertilizer which served for the inspection of that commodity; the samples 
therefore came from every section of the state and are, we believe, representative 
of the lime products sold in Massachusetts as soil amendments. 

We were not successful in securing samples of the following brands: 

Brewer & Co., Inc., 45 Arctic Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Lime Kiln Ashes 

Producto Agricultural Lime 
Kelley Island Lime & Transport Co., 1122 Leader Building, Cleveland, Ohio 

Tiger All Purpose Hydrated Lime 
Lawrence PorUand Cement Co., Thomaston, Maine 

Dragon "Mainrok" Land Lime 
Limestone Products Corporation of America, Newton, N. J. 

"Lime Crest" Brand Calcite Hydrated Lime 

"Lime Crest" Brand Calcite Pulverized (Pulverized Limestone) 
New England Lime Co., Adams, Mass. 

Nelco Agricultural Hydrated Lime 

Nelco Agricultural Ground Limestone (Canaan, Conn.) 
Rockland-Rockport Lime Co., Inc., Rockland, Maine 

R-R Ground Limestone, Grade C 

R-R Land Lime, Grade C 
Solvay Process Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Solvay Pulverized Limestone 

Variations and Deficiencies Found in the Composition of Lime Products 

Of the lime products effective in neutralizing soil acidity, about 88 per cent 
of the samples analyzed fully met the minimum guarantee; of the 20 samples 
of ground limestone, 3 showed deficiencies. Most of the deficiencies were not 
of a serious nature as the companion ingredient was present in sufficient e.xcess 
to more than make up the full neutralizing value of the product as based on the 
stated guarantee. The same may be said of the hydrated lime products where 
one out of 17 samples showed a deficienc\-. The tables of analyses show the 
extent of variations from the guaranteed composition. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 21 

Explanation of Tables of Analyses 

Tables I, II, III, ''Neutralizing value expressed in terms of calcium oxide" 
represents the acid neutralizing value of both the magnesium and the calcium. 
The figures in the "per cent" column are obtained by a direct titration with 
standard acid. The "pounds in one ton" are secured by multiplying the figures 
in the "per cent" column by 20. 

"Insoluble matter" represents material which is insoluble in dilute hydro- 
chloric acid to which a few drops of nitric acid have been added, and is mainly 
sand. 

Tables II and III, "Carbonates of calcium and magnesium". The figures in 
this column are exclusive of the small amounts of calcium and magnesium com- 
bined as, basic silicates; these are readily soluble in mineral acid solutions but 
obviously should not be classed as carbonates. 

Under "Mechanical analysis" the figures represent in round numbers the per- 
centage of product that would pass or be retained by the meshed sieves mentioned. 

The limestone products have been published in two groups or grades (see 
tables II and III) according to fineness of grinding and to conform to definitions 
voted by the Association of Ofiicial Agricultural Chemists at their 1936 meeting. 



2? 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 



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1 




















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a a; 


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t^M 


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(NT)< 


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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 
Table IV . Gypsum or Land Plaster 



25 



Manufacturer and Brand 


Calcium Oxide 
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Calcium Sulfate 
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Moisture 


Found 


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United States Gypsum Co., 300 West 
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Ben Franklin Agricultural Gypsum 


33.6 30.0 


80.8 


64.5 


13.9 



26 CONTROL SERIES NO. 118 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS WHO REGISTERED FERTILIZERS FOR SALE 
IN MASSACHUSETTS IN 1943 

Acme Guano Co., 411 National Marine Bank Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 

Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation, The Barrett Division, 40 Rector St., New York, N. Y. 

American Agricultural Chemical Co., 285 River St., North Weymouth, Mass. 

American Cyanamid Co., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York, N. Y. 

American Potash & Chemical Corporation, 122 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Apothecaries Hall Co., 8-28 Benedict St., Waterbury, Conn. 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., 600 Roanoke Bldg., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Armour Fertilizer Works, 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., 601 Trust Company of Georgia Bldg., .-Mlanta, Ga. 

Atkins & Durbrow, Inc., 165 John St., New York, N. Y. 

Ernest J. Bantle, 130 Griswold St., Glastonbury, Conn. 

F. A. Bartlett Tree Expeit Co., 60 Canal St., Stamford, Conn. 

Baugh & Sons Co., 20 South Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Belmont Gardens, W. E. Lenk, Proprietor, 170 Brighton St., Belmont, Mass. 

Berkshirei Chemical Co., 92 Howard Ave., Bridgeport, Conn. 

Joseph Breck & Sons, 85 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Buell Fertilizer Co., Exeter, N. H. 

Chilean Nitrate Sales Corporation, 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Davison Chemical Corporation, Rouse Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington, Del. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, West Springfield, Mass. 

Thomas W. Emerson Co., 70 Park St., Beverly, Mass. 

Essex County^Co-operative Farming Association, South Main St., Topsfield, Mass. 

Excell Laboratories, 2625 Indiana .A.ve., Chicago, 111. 

H. L. Frost & Higgins Co., 20 Mill St., Arlington, Mass. 

Glendale Poultry Farm, Somerset, Mass. 

Goulard & Olena, Inc., 140 Liberty St., New York, N. Y. 

Grasalo Co., 380 Main St., Wilmington, Mass. 

Greenlands Services, Inc., Eastman St., Concord, N. H. 

Hartney & Amalia, Inc., 581 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

Henderson & Herndon Tree Co., Inc., 9 Story Ave., Beverly, Mass. 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc., Landisville, Penn. 

Humphreys-Godwin Co., 81 South Front St., Memphis, Tenn. 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc., 315 West 39th St., New York, N. Y. 

Hyper-Humus Co., Box 263, Newton, N. J. 

Hy-Trous Corporation, 131 State St., Boston, Mass. 

International Minerals & Chemical Corporation, Woburn, Mass. 

L. B. Lovitt & Co., 1004 Falls Bldg , Memphis, Tenn. 

Mechling Bros. Chemicals, Division of General Chemical Co. 

12 South 12th St., Philadelphia, Penn. 
Middlesex County F"arm Bureau .Association, 155 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 
Norwood Brand Fertilizer Co., Wright St., North Reading, Mass. 
Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc., .South Deerfield, Mass. 
Olds & Whipple, Inc., 168 State St., Hartford, Conn. 

Plantabbs Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Pulverized Manure Co.. 503 Exchange Bldg., Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 111. 

Ramshorn Mills, Inc., West Millbury, Mass. 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., 51 Waverly St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Rogers & Hubbard Co., Portland, Conn. 

William H. Rorer, Inc., 254 South Fourth St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

N. Roy & Son, South Attleboro, Mass. 

Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co., Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co., Marysville, Ohio. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., 925 South Homan Ave,. Chicago, 111. 

Sewerage Commission of the City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wis. 

M. L. Shoemaker Division, Wilson & Co., Inc., 3600 North Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Smith-Douglass Co., Inc., 304 East Plume St., Norfolk, Va. 

Standard Wholesale Phosphate & Acid Works, Inc., Baltimore, Md. 

Stockdale Fertilizer Co., Morris, 111. 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works, 910 Court Square Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 

Tennessee Corporation, Lockland, Ohio 

Universal Chemical Co., 106 Ontario St., Lynn, Mass. 

Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co., Inc., Plainsboro, N. J, 

C. P. Washburn Co., Middleboro, Mass. 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc., North Haven, Conn. 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 119 NOVEMBER, 1943 



Seed Inspection 

By F. A. McLaughlin 



This report, the sixteenth in seed control service, is a record of work delegated 
to the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station during 1943, by authority 
of Chapter 94 as amended by Chapter 288 of the Acts of 1937 and Chapter 363 
of the Acts of 1938. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Seed Testing Laboratory will allow ten units of work free of charge, during 
any calendar year, to any resident firm or citizen of Massachusetts. 

Units are rated as follows: Units 

Purity analysis (red clover, timothy, etc.) 1 

Purity analysis (bluegrass, orchard grass, etc.) 2 

Purity analysis of a mixture of seeds (depending upon the number 

of kinds in the mixture) 4-10 

Examination for noxious weeds (sample of 4 oz. or less) 2 

Identification of seed or plant 1 

Cleaning tobacco seed (4,oz. or less) 2 

Germination test (4 x 100 seeds of any seed not chaffy or requiring 

purity analysis) 1 

Germination test (soil, 2 x 100 seeds) 1 

Germination test (chaffy grasses or seeds requiring purity analysis) 2 

Fees for work in excess of the ten free units allowed to a citizen or resident farm 
of Massachusetts are as follows: 

Germination test of all crop seeds except grasses $0.25 

Germination test of timothy .25 

Germination test of all other grasses .50 

Purity analysis of cereals 50 

Purity analysis of timothy 75 

Purity analysis of all other grasses 1.00 

Purit>- analysis of all other crop seeds 75 

Purity analysis of mixtures of not more than 2 kinds of agricultural 

seeds 1 .00 

Purity analysis of special mixtures, including lawn grasses and 
pasture mixtures — a charge sufficient to cover the actual cost 
of working the sample, depending entirely upon the character 
of the sample. Minimum charge 1.25 

In no case will the final report be rendered until all fees are paid. 

The minimum weights of samples to be submitted for analysis are: 

a. Two ounces of grass seed, white or alsike clover, or seeds not larger than 
these. 

b. Five ounces of red or crimson clover, alfalfa, r>egrasses, millet, rape, or 
seeds of similar size. 

c. One pound of cereal, vetches, or seeds of similar or larger size. 

The minimum number of seed of any one kind to be submitted for a germina- 
tion test is 400. 



SEED INSPECTION 

By F. A. McLaughlini 



MASSACHUSETTS VEGETABLE SEED STANDARDS FOR 1944 

Section 261 D of the Seed Law requires that a set of standards for germination 
of vegetable seeds be determined each year by the Director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station and approved by the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture. The following set of standards for 1944 has been so determined and 
approved. 



KIND OF SEED 



Artichoke 60 

Asparagus *70 

Beans: 

Limas 70 

Other varieties than Limas. . 80 

Beets 65 

Broccoli 75 

Brussels Sprouts 70 

Cabbage 75 

Carrot 55 

Cauliflower 75 

Celeriac 55 

Celery 55 

Chard, Swiss 65 

Chicory 65 

Chinese Cabbage 75 

Citron 65 

Collards 80 

Corn, Sweet 75 

**Cress, Garden 40 

Cress, Water 25 

Cucumber 80 

Dandelion 45 

Egg Plant 60 

Endive 70 

Fetticus (Corn Salad) 70 

Kale 75 



GERMINATION 




GERMINATION 


STANDARD 


KIND OF SEED 


STANDARD 


% 




% 



Kohlrabi 75 

Leek 60 

Lettuce 80 

Melons: 

Muskmelon 75 

Watermelon 70 

Mustard 75 

Okra *50 

Onions 70 

Parsley 60 

Parsnip 60 

Peas 80 

Peppers 55 

Pumpkin 75 

Radish 75 

Rhubarb 60 

Rutabaga 75 

Salsify 75 

Sorrel 60 

Spinach: 

Common 60 

New Zealand 40 

Squash 75 

Tomato 75 

Tomato, Husk 50 

Turnip 80 



*Including Hard Seeds. 
**Garden Cress {Lepidium sativum) is also called Pepper Grass and Curled Cress. Should not be 
confused with Upland Cress or Spring Cress {Campe ve.rnn) for which no standard has been adopted. 



The above set of standards is identical with the one adopted by the United 
States Department of Agriculture for administration of the Federal Seed Act. 



•Assisted by Miss Jessie L. Anderson, Technical Assistant; Miss Alice Slack, Laboratory Assistant 
from May to October, 1943; and Miss May J. Honnay, Clerk. 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



1943 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS 

From November 1, 1942, to November 1, 1943, the Seed Laboratory received 
'4825 samples of seed, of which 1137 were collected by the State Department of 
Agriculture and 3688 were sent in by seedsmen, farmers, and various state 
institutions. An additional lot of 225 samples of flower seeds, for field tests only, 
was received from the State Commissioner of Agriculture. Although 4825 
samples of seed were received, 333 of these had not been tested on November 1, 
1943, consequently the actual number of samples worked during the year is 4492. 

Classification of the samples for which tests were completed, with the total 
number of laboratory tests involved, is shown in the following summary. It 
will be noted that the total number of tests required for the 4492 samples was 
5162; 370 for purit}' and 4792 for germination. 



NUMBER OF 
SAMPLES 



NUMBER OF TESTS 
PURITY GERMINATION 



282 Field Crops for Purity and Germination 282 282 

287 Field Crops for Germination Only 287 

75 Lawn and Other Types of Mixtures for Purity; 

Germinations involving 347 ingredients 75 347 

13 Lawn Mixtures for Purity Only 13 

12 Lawn Mixtures for Germination Onh ; Germinations 

involving 53 ingredients 53 

3695 Vegetables for Germination Only 3695 

1 1 Herbs for Germination Only 11 

24 Flower Seeds for Germination Only 24 

7 Tree Seeds for Germination Onl}' 7 

68 Tobacco Seeds for Cleaning and Germination 68 

18 Tobacco Seeds for Germination Only 18 

4492 370 4792 



Field tests to determine trueness to type were conducted in cooperation with 
the Departments of Olericulture and Floriculture, which tested respectively 
299 samples of Vegetable seeds, 225 samples of Flower seeds. Results of the field 
tests are shown on pages 53-63. 

The Seed Laboratory cleaned 86 lots of Tobacco seed and 21 lots of Onion 
seed for Connecticut Valley farmers. The gross weight of the 86 lots of Tobacco 
seed amounted to 65.95 lbs. with a net weight of cleaned seed of 51.49 lbs. Onion 
seed received had a gross weight of 1195 lbs. which was cleaned to a net weight 
of 547.78 lbs. 



Explanation of Tables 

Each of the following tables contains seeds, the sale of which is regulated by a 
definite section of the Massachusetts Seed Law. Section 261-A of the Acts and 
Resolves of 1937 and 1938, Chapters 288 and 363, defines the group from Alfalfa 
to Wheat, inclusive; Section 261-B, Mixtures; Section 261-C, Special Mixtures; 
and Section 261-D, Vegetables. 

Within each table the wholesalers are listed in alphabetical order and the 
various kinds of seeds sold by them follow the same alphabetical arrangement. 

Misbranding and other irregularities are emphasized in the tables by boldface 
type and explained in the final column of the table or in footnotes. 



SEED INSPECTION 



The number preceding each analysis is for identification and reference. The 
line to the right of the letter "L" gives information copied from the label; that 
to the right of "F" what was found in the laboratory analysis. 

All lots of seed included in this report were tested according to the Rules for 
Seed Testing adopted by the Association of Official Seed Analysts. 

"Tolerance" is applied to both purity and germination, except for vegetable 
seed found below the minimum germination standards adopted, in which instance 
no tolerance is allowed. "Germination Tolerance" has been applied between 
a given germination and the result of the germination test as follows: 

GIVEN GERMINATION PERCENT TOLERANCE PERCENT 

96 or over 5 

90 or over, but less than 96 6 

80 or over, but less than 90 7 

70 or over, but less than 80 8 

60 or over, but less than 70 9 

Less than 60 10 

In the determination of the tolerance for the percentage of the distinguishable 
kind, type, or variety (pure seed), weed seeds, other crops seeds, and inert matter, 
the sample shall be first considered as made up of two parts: (a) The percentage 
of the component (pure seed, weed seed, crop seed or inert matter as the case 
may be) being considered, and (b) the difference between that percentage and 
100. The number represented by (a) is then multiplied by the number rep- 
resented by (b) and the product is divided by 100. The resulting number is then 
multiplied by 0.2 (2/10) and the resulting product added to 0.2 or 0.6 as indicated 
in the following formulae: 



I a X b 
Pure seed tolerance = 0.6 + I 0.2 X 



100 



Weed seeds, other crop seeds, and f ^ , 

inert matter tolerance = 0.2 4- { 0.2 X 

\ 100 

For Poa spp., Agrostis spp., Festuca spp., bromegrass, crested wheatgrass, 
orchard grass, velvet grass, tall oatgrass, meadow foxtail, sweet vernalgrass, 
Rhodes grass, Dallis grass, carpet grass, and Bermuda grass, and mixtures con- 
taining these seeds singly or combined in excess of 50 percent, an additional 
tolerance shall be allowed. This is to be obtained by adding to the regular 
tolerance mentioned above the product obtained by multiph'ing the regular 
tolerance by the lesser of "a" and"b" divided by 100. 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 






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m ^H »H '^ t^ ov 



oo oo oo 



oo 
— d 



oo oo 



CNOO '~<00 



l-H VO O O 

^ lA 5! 00 



-H OO 

d ' dd 



o ■* 

6d 



0)0 — O 

dd dd 



oo 
d d 



iZO 

Hd 



Otn o *^ fN ov 
"* If »-< cs -^o 

dd dd dd 



dd 



lO CN 00 00 O lO 



o \n 

do 



O-H 

dd 



00 cc 

dd 



O lO 

dd 



oo 
dd 



oo 
dd 



O'* 

dd 



Om 

drH 



00 o\ lom 

o— oo 
dd dd 



tSO ® o 

dd od 



Ov On 0\ O* O* On 



oo 

C> 00 



CnCn ^Os O^C^ ^^ 



(NO 

00 00 



"^ CTv O Ov 

-^. >-< ro O 

O lO 00 00 

0\ 0^ Ov 0^ 



— O OtC 

o ^ o o 



22 S'~® 



99 

0^0^ 



0^0\ 



Jfc Jfc Jfc Jtl, 



hJEx, ^JiL, i_)b ij;:^ I-)! 



Jfe Jfa 



-r Z 



o'lS 


u 


H 6 


=« 


(U 


es^ 


u 


"MS 


b 




u 

o 

E 



^2 

■ 1 *^r^ 






CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



U 






"(3 

c 
< 

c 



O^w 



,5;£n 



&<c« 



§ c 2 

■i; o 

>.0_C8 



Q-gQ 

goo 






jZ 



3 M 

O C 

Is 



do 



CO 



> 5)2 

o o" 

s >,-' 

o — = 
^ n o 

£u 
< 



> 



p*^ ro fS ro (N P^ 



o o 



r/; f^ f/5 (^ r*^ P^ f*^ <*0 



»Ht^ Ooo 



u^ in 



oo oo oo 



99 



oo — — 



oo 
oc d 



O ■<«■ "5 Tf 



O u^ CO ^ 
— r-" do 



»ho 

do 



Ooo CS PD 
■*10 — O 

do ©d 



o«r 
oox 



O fS 

do 



CO 

>. o 

3 - 

o c 
U g 

|o 
a 



1) — 



— CO --00 



oo O© O© ©o 



o© 
dx 



-It. Jt, Jfa Jfe -ifc Jfc. -! 



z 


S^ 


o 


6 m 


U > 






o 








CO 


> s 


& 


.^" 



q© 



oo IT) 00 

li^ OS r^ ^ 

Ov OS 00 00 

O- Os O- 0-. 



ooo 

«joO 
C- OS 



in — 

00 0\ 



O© u^X ■>1<00 '*"''' 
1/-, -< 'J- •* ^1 -< '^ PO 
do d— do dd 



m o 

od 



r»5q 
OS OS 



t. „'t. Jb -fc 









— r^ r^ 



— o 
dd 



Otn 

-^Os 
00 00 



T32 



SEED INSPECTION 



-a c 



^ rt E X 

o 5 '^ 

Xf 1 C <u 

O^ « o 






OJ u 



•On o „ 



•0 !<! 



•a 3 



•0-. 

^^ 

Sob 
o n 



5s 

<UQ5 
_rtrH 

"J e S 

c j3 N 

OjO. a 

III 

■79 



r^ (Ti f^ CO r^ (^ ro PO 






0-1 

do 



00 
00 06 



-^6 



00 00 00 

o_o 00 00 

do fN o d — 

II "oo 01 

t^O <N 

' ' d— d ' 



■^ r-> 


0- 


r^j C 


00 




00 X 


CO C^ 


C Tt 




00 


C C^ 


1 1 


00 


OC 


00 





10 c- 

dd 



00 

do 



dd 



dd 



— 6 r--, — O — 



-— OC 






dd 



dd 



00 ^ 
dd 



dd 



c -t -^o 



00 



00 06 



"2 00 00 IT) 00 O u^ 



O^ Ov C^ CO 



00 

IT) c^ 

a c^ 



Jfe 



Jfe JU, Jt, JU* 



H-lfa Jfe 






feZ 



O t^ 






. o 
«Z 
1^ . 

iC o 

caS 

d "o "^ 
o 

t/lTJ O 

•-•PS 






:■— ' — ; 



Z a 

H a 

5 ^^ 

6 y 
1^ 



c3- 

.5- 



U 00 



'SZ 



C/3 



10 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



CA) 






s 
< 

•a 
c 






0) O.T3 

5 2 J!^ 






3 "UvO 



T3 "O 






O K o 

- 0^1 



1^1 



a B V 



c 0) 



jz 



C^O\ C"0\ o«o^ ^O^ C^O* ^Ch O^On 



1§M 



■2cQ 
ISC ™ 

1^ j 



aw 



u rt w 
Ed 



)t~. «t^ CN 00 



CS 00 ^00 



t^ CN 


88 


CO 

qo 


oo 
P9 


§9 


88 


So 


88 


XTirri 


\0 t^ 


(No6 

(r^C^ 


r^ r^ 






(N't 


<N (N 

00 00 


dfo 


00 rs 
r-. 00 




lOOO 

^ o 


® 1 


1 1 


1/^ t^ 


o 1 


SI 


2S 


O — 
1*5 f«^ 


do 


do 


d ' 


1 1 


-'-' 


d 1 


d ' 


66 


dd 


Oro 


0\0 


q 00 


in o 


VOO 


OCO 


oo 


"1 rj 


2S 


do 


dd 


a a 


dd 


6<6 


— — 


66 


dd 


66 




2| 


52 


1 1 


om 

*^ o 


OO 


1 1 


oo 


lO o 


do 


d 1 


do 


1 1 


<6<6 


66 




66 


dd 


O-H 




rf ^ 


triO 


83 


Orri 


u^ O 

(M 00 


O 00 
\0 o 




§§^ 


0-' C^ 


w^ 00 




00 00 


oo'oo 


0^ Ov 


0^ c^ 





.Jb h-i'a H-Jb hJIx. 



jfe jfe Jfe 



^^ 



2 

i I 



-H i>4 



-H fS 



oO 
ojZ 



c. <u 



oq 
in-* 



OO 

dd 



00 «> 



JU. 



^r^e 



(d B 



SEED INSPECTION 



11 






3 

a n 






■3-3 


^J3 




V o 






i!^ 


^■^, 


0-3 


>. "! 






>.^ 


<P J2 


^ JD 


J? c 






.■§S 


Cfl >, 


rt! >> 


•n c 






Q-c 


Q-- 


* O 






cd 0- 
> rt 




*^5 






ror»5 


r^rri 


fO 


~> 






Tf^ 


"* I- 






o.o> 


OvOv 


?■ 0\ 


0^ Ov 


*2 





fO fO f^rT) 



CN 00 ,-^00 ^ t 



oo qp 



OO OO 
OO OO 



uO 
(UOCA 



O oiov 

00 00 



OO OO OO 



OO OO 



9° 

o o 



>P oO 

>o Xo 



OO 

oo 


OO 
OO 


Ot- 


OtJi 
OvOO 



O lO 



Tt CO 

OH 



o <^ 

od 



■* O IN —I 



irt 00 

do 



■* o 

^ CN 



OO -HO OO 



ot^ o^ 
do do 



0)0 

do 



do 



ro O 

do 



oocs irj O OO 

dd -^-^ d 



do 



O C; 



m c> o 00 



'D«!f f»5 O OO 



(~^00 

C^ On 



t^ 00 a\ Ov 






Jta 



Jfe Jfe J(x. Jta Jfcj-jtt, Jfe Jfc, 



^§ 






^5 



a o 
W a 



< 
w - 

W 3 

3 

C 

o E 



^^3 



t3 O 

.1 S 

flj D. 

S 4 



U 



^2>« 

-M CN 

52 S o 

t ■ 

065: 

c ""S 

•a,?' != 
Scu o 

C/JCQ m 

MO M 
fiU JiO, 

H 






a) > 



O 2 

CJ to 

"3 ^ 

0^0 

^ an ■ 



12 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



U 



m 



2 
fa 



a^t^ 



?i O si. 



'•^ 2 t 

OH — 

oj' c 



3 u = 

£Q5 



•5 =! " 

9 °'° 






jiz; 






w 



a. ^^ 



2|g 

< 



6d 



^2 



vO 



O 5 



o cc 

C I/) 
in — 

d — 



C vn 

dd 



3 oj iT 
"JS >, 

a; CO P 
. OJ •— o 

•p S c 



U 



C rt'^'-J 



a-' 
as 



dd 



u3 ^ 



6^ 

.03 m 



-"2 



•o S. 

C.S 



c n 

c 



Ono CvO C^O C'C^ OC^ C^C^ 



d in 



°9 
do 



c o 
din 



O in O in CO 1 j O r^ O Tf 

mm cc^ f^rn mt-- r<;c\ 

-^d "d o<£ ' ' mt^ dd 

O t^ O I O^ ^ rn O CO O t^ 

mr^ ^^ r^m ^h^- mrf cno 

od d ' d d dd dd d d 

O (rs Om O Cv O t^ O^ C r^ 

Om Ooo o-H moo r^w ms; 

OOtxD CCCs OO^ O^Cv ^t-^ C*. CO 

C>-0^ C^Ov ^O^ CvC' CvOO O^ 



Jfc Jfc Jfc. Jfc Jt. Jt- 



n ■- 

S 3 . 

3 Ki ,- 
Eu" 



s c 



SEED INSPECTION 



13 



> Z 



ai V 

Si CI 



£5 



^5 



O^C^ w^Cn OvC\ ^0> C^O\ 0\0v 



ro fO PC rn 



O4 00 



ro GO -f-^ 00 



J 00 por^ ^ CO 



oo o o 
-;— oo 

00 GO C^ C^ 



OO 



C^5) 



— — OO 



OCs m — 

do do 



O 00 i^, ■* 



p^O 

dd 



1/5 O 
t--* GO 



d d 



OO 



rf vO OO 
ri ^1 O ■- 

dd --d 



dd 



^ o o lo 
dd dd 



O r^ lO O 

"^d dd 



O M CS 0\ 
'^» CN C 

dd do 



O 00 C^ On 

GO 00 C-. CN 



[ 


tn-* 




oo 


8S 


00 Ov 


-o 


oo 


1 1 


o^a- 
—.in 




o© 


SS! 


2® 

O 00 




On 00 



^U. JU. JtL, 



•o'S . 
5 2; 

-2 ° 

-3 =^0i 

in CI ji 

t3.5 = 

*^ — c. 

o S^ 



CQ o 

rjT3 ro 
^-^ o in 

41 tl< O 



c K 5 






0] IT) 



2:^ 



r ■» I- ^ 



< 


r, 




?^ 






<■ 








7j 


(_■ 






•^u 




<1J 


U. 







c) cd 


^ c 


M C 




(J aJ 


:y-) 


_^o 



14 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



U 



c« 



(U 

C/5 



Q°H 



E.2ko 



OU^^" 









^ 






"S -a 



«» 


Scf^ 


c 
< 


•os: V 


SH^ 


c 




c 


>.o^ 


o 


OJ cCLi 






«^rf 


5 '"■« 


u 


>^S5 


c 


o.^ o' 



:2Qa 



Q-2G 
"g o'o 



t: Z o 



c 


^ c 




P"S 


O fl 


^ n 




c 


M n 








01 Cu 


ojri 






^j: 


^■c 














5 «c 




2 c 


o c 


xU 


xU 



Zrt Z^^ 



OS 



4J O O 

?)-^ E 






OJOO 


<N X 


-^ x> 


rr: t~* 


— 00 


(N 00 


c^so 


^00 


CS~M 


lOOO 


— X 


1^00 


C\t^ 


88 


C O 

oo 


§8 


88 


88 


00 ^ 


oo 
oo 


8i 


88 


OCX 


cc ?- 


o ■* 


O !N 

XX 


o- 


ClO 


or- 


00 r^ 




X X 




■*o 


o c 


ss 


O"; 

-o 


O 1 


S 1 


^t 


X t^ 


l§ 


-* 1 


oo 


oo 


OO 


o^ 


OO 


d 1 


o ' 


d = 


o o 


' d 


d ' 




I^Tf 


oo 


o — 




o^ 


C X 

oo 


ss 


■* — 
-* ^ 


<N O 


S:2 


oo 


oo 


"S -c 


Or~ 


oo 


' — 


CO 


c o 


o o 


oo 


oo 


sg 


•*00 


OvO 
re CN 


o 1 


5;§ 


oo- 


roO 


o — 




■*1^ 


^o 


oo 


oo 


oo 


d ' 


oo 


oo 


OO 


oo 


d 1 


-O 


OO 


00 •* 


Ot^ 


Ooo 
■*oo 


004 

CO-- 


0-. 


§5 


X t~. 
"1 00 


Ooc 


p^ t-» 




8Si 



.-](i. hJb i-]b 



Jfc Jfe 



0^^^ O-O^ 00» 0^0> 



Jfc, Jfc Jfe. Jfc 



?Z _- 



„^l 


-* 


52 




c 


1« 


•H?7 


z 


_m- 




c 


^X 




-*-• 




K c3 


o 


CU a^ 








i^x. 


o 


-^'m 


taM 




5< 








fc 




fc 



^ J;^ (L) 



> ^ = = 



SEED INSPECTION 



15 






CNr^ r-ico ^00 



O-H 


oo 


OO 


O '^ 


00 00 


OtN 




o-c 


1 2 


O '»5 


oo 




' d 


OO 


oc 


O 'M 




OvO 


Ol^ 
r^O 


no 


oo 


mir, 


OO 


CO 


SI 


Oio 


IT) f^ 

OO 


1 i 


c5 1 


OO 


OO 




s;q 


OvO 


OiO 

t^oo 


^n 


ONOV 

0> Ch 


CnOv 


0> Ov 





Jfc .Jb JtL, Jfe 



:: 2 



OO 

do' 



OO 

dd 



Jfe 



Se 



73 i" 

=^ 3, 



IS 



16 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



^ 

M 


(/I 


3 


<u £ 




<L> 


a 


CJ 


a w 


u. 


r£ 


W 




4_) -W 




>. 


(U 


^ 


tu 


n 


r; 




u & 


T1 








OJ 

<L> 


o 



c s :;2 







<u 


X 




S 


C 








p 
5, 

D. 


CJ 


e 
-^ 






° ^ 


o 


>. 


K 


3 




U5 U 


u 


OJ 


-n 


;2 


a! 




OJ OJ 


O, 

Oh 


c 

03 


••Si 


3 




OJ o 


-a 


CJ 
u 
3 


o 




3 

c 

CJ 




















C 


g 


CJ 
-3 


-C 




CO 

1— 1 




u 

3 


x; 







.2 ■ .y 3 



oc 



OS 



U 



O T! 5 



*.. ^ •— 



3 9- 



JJ j: 



J2 



o -o 



Clh -d 



5 CJ 



-3 .S; 



c3 

CJ 0) 



tx-^ y 






y a s -^ "! "d <" 



rt CJ S q3 



o _ _ 



n s 



- 2 
o 



£ ^ 



3= -3-3 



§:-^, 



a 

Si bO 3 J2 

«) W .2 -S 






.y 3 



rt Ji = ^ ■^ 



■3 ° 



^PQ -3 



_ ^* +3 0) 



U. g O 

3 (n -'-' 

-3 ■" Si 

.^^ ° 



CJ "^ 



3 rt 



O in nj M 



Q 'H 



Cu'' 



"S 





•o 












3 




O 


03 


te 


ps5 








11 






(« 




J 



CJ o y <y 



Of CJ j: cti -o _>. 



.^ Ji J=> 

<^ CJ 

TO _Q 



>> CJ 

rs CJ 



s s ^ s 



- e 



X .3 -S 
r^ 3 -M 



o j: 
U H 



bo 3 — ' 



CD VS 

" 3 vj (y 

rt *^ <u i; 



cs 



> c 



3 O i_ 

C Zi-t; c 

m C O 01 

.ii OJ 

ciH-i rr 
I? CO uC 

Q 






3 w C 
?; « 3 






Siu 


•a c^ 


C ■A 


rt S 




■*-' 3 


o're'g 


C 


c-s: c 


c-«-- 


-/^ « " 


ill 




■/)•§ 4) 


c c 5 


M tf! 




r^ro 


rOro 


•* Tf 


3'^ 


(3^ 0\ 


C^ Cn 



■^ 10 

CSO 



— 6 






qoc 



00 r^ 



.Co; 

50 s 

U m.S 

3 ca* 

•5 






10 »^ 

00 -< 

-co 






■O aJ ., 
4> o S> 

«X1-^. 

it"?' E 



SEED INSPECTION 



17 



rt C J- 



O _bjO c rt g 



0) <u 



5 OJ ^ 
.2 3 C 






p 


rt 










>< 


c 


u 




u 


rt 


a 


c 




0) 



o 



-c -t: 



"15 p •- "^ 

tn 2 i; t« 

in c 3 aj 

8 Si "S 'P 





J3 


-c 




.. 


c 


'X 




•- 






'3 
>> 


_c 


u 
OJ 

4-> 








OJ 




u 


o 


c 

en 


3 
tn 


2 
O 




c 




tH 


j: 


Sl 


(U 


O 


-d 








«c 


en 




u 


4_t 


tn 






•^' 




pq 


O 


<u 


a 




s 


<» 




n 
o 




c 




o 


-d 


.s 


cd 


to 






_o 


--; 


c 


c 




M 


s 




•d 




"C 


_o 


o 


13 


"o 


C 


e 




0,) 




(J 


O 


X 


4j 


OJ 


^ 




"E 




<Ji 


4-1 


o 


j= 


ly 




a 




Si 


J3 


c 
o 

a 


0) 


1 




1 

■•Si 




tn 




^ 




c 


>. 




i~ 




oT 




"S 


"3 


0) 

> 


_o 


^ 
^ 


C 


s 




p. 




§ 


tn 


u3 




bi) 


"d 


— 




0) 




o 




tn 

u 
u 


E 

bo 




OJ 

tn 
<U 
C 
O 


tn 

IS 




O 


K 


"(5 

c 




OJ 


"o 


CU 


"o 


C 

u 








< 


o 


■~ 




rt 


tn 
tn 




^ 


OJ 


c 


c^ 


3 

tn 
O 
;- 

a 


C 


s 


o 

X 


to 




tu 


CJ 


1 


_c 


O 

a 
a 


OJ 


S 

^ 

^ 






J2 




o 


■^ 


Cl 


rt 


■^ 


>- 


^^ 


tn 


_c 




15 


2 




p 
^ 


5 


"5 


J= 


-o 


1 


c 

Q. 
X 


X .5 

U X 

cC o 

o a, 

"5 +^ 


-d 
<u 
+-» 

<u 
in 


■M 

o 

o 

o 
>. 


tn 
tn 

a 




o 

bio 
C 

C 


a 

0; 


0!! 


t/T 




in 


■o 


_c 


tuO 


-2 


j2 


1z 




o 
o 


^ 


-a 


OJ 


'tn 

C 


J4 
O 


S 


tn 


O 




c/) 




en 


'0 


OJ 


3 


_c 




'i 






-^ 


'c3 


tn 

tu 


c 


'3 


3 




c^ 


ctJ 


0) 


tn 


u 


tu 


4~) 


Xl 


D 






4-» 


OJ 




a 


L. 


c 


J3 




3 


c 


^ 


1-1 


in 


03 


a 


c~ 






3 


<-*-( 


OJ 


-u 


tn 


a 


lU 


(-ta-i 




u. 


o 


>. 


o 


'd 




> 


O 




<J 


o 




tu 


<L> 


45 








Eb 


D. 

-t-J 


^ 


-a 
c 


tn 

"d 


(U 


tn 


'Be 


tn 

tn 

a; 




< 


_bJO 


rt 




tn 


Tij 


•- 


Tj 



Cd OJ 

S '^ 

'x >^ 

c ^ 

a J* 



.9 ^ » rt 



£-2^ 



^ (U ~ 



-ii '-^ — rt 



-?,;=" -r u ?, 



w 



^ a u 



^ y 



3 OJ ■:? 
O 43 c 



U H 



> ii bfl a c 



Q^H 



5 2Ji^ 



"I 



P life? 



eg? 
S 



■o =Q 

Q c ._ -a 
.,•5:5 ^ 
■^- ° 



.1Z 









<6<6 



oooc 

00 5-. C- C- 






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CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



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23 



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24 



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25 






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26 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



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SEED INSPECTION 



27 



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CJ OJ OJ b J^ o 

aWoSHUQ 



28 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D 

Each separate container of Vegetable Seeds must be labeled to plainly show 
the kind of seed and variety; the percentage of germination, with the month and 
year tested, provided the germination is below the Massachusetts Standard; 
and the name and address of the vendor, packer, or processor. 

Misbranding with respect to any of these requirements is indicated by boldface 
type, and the wholesaler's name is in boldface. 







Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 


Given Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind ot 


and Lot Number. Dealer when other 


Germination Germina- Stand- 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 


Date tion — Month ard 






Collected 


% of Test % of Test % 



Associated Seed Growers, Inc., 
Milford. Conn 

Burlingame & Darby's Co., No. Adams 

1025 Beet Eclipse 87 

Canton Supply Co., Canton 
555F Corn Golden Bantam 90 

Checkerboard Feed Store Am etst 

1061 Beet Crosby's Egyptian. . . — 

1059 Cabbage Danish Railhead or Hoi a ei — 

498 Carrot Danvers Half Long — 

1060 Lettuce Iceberg — 

1058 Squash Blue Hubbard — 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Franklin 

527F Beet Early Wonder 72 

528 Turnip Purple Top White Globe 80 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Greenfield 

316F Beans Burpee's Bush Lima 85 

317F Beet Detroit Dark Red 77 

321F Corn Golden Sunshine 89 

Checkerboard Feed Store, No. Adams 

1026 Beans Bush Lima, Burpee's No. 67797 — 

1029 Carrot Imperator 74 

1028 Cauliflower Early Snowball 90 

1027 Peas Gradus, No. 64257 85 

1031 Pumpkin Conn. Field — • 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Palmer 

1086 Lettuce Iceberg — 

1087 Turnip Purple Top White Globe — 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Pittsfield 

965 Beans Dwarf Horticultural — 

964 Pumpkin Conn. Field — 

966 Rutabaga American Purple Top — 

Faulkner Hardware Co., Palmer 

1081 Carrot Improved Long Orange 74 

1082 Squash Improved Hubbard 88 

Granite City Hardware Co., Quincy 
449F Carrot Improved Long Orange — 

Hamilton Hardware Co., Clinton 
1226 Squash Early Prolific Straightneck — 

Frank Howard, Inc.. Pittsfield 

1005 Beet Asgrow Wonder 72 

1004 Lettuce Prizehead — 

1003 Turnip Yellow Globe 88 

Methe's Checkerboard Store, Spfld. 

368F Beans Burpee's Stringless Green Pod 85 

367 Peas Laxtonian 85 

Methe's Checkerboard Store, Westfield 

879 Beet Detroit Dark Red 85 

877 Lettuce Big Boston — 

876 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers 90 



11/1942 82 June 



June 



July 



65 



2/1943 


90 


May 


75 


— 


80 
78 
66 
97 
68a 


June 
July 
June 
June 
June 


65 
75 
55 
80 
75 


12/1942 
8/1942 


80 
86 


June 
June 


65 
80 


12/1942 

10/1942 

1/1943 


87 
81 
94 


May 
May 
May 


70 
65 

75 


11/1942 

8/1942 

12/1942 

— /1943 


99 
74 
97 
90 
94 


July 
June 
July 
June 
June 


70 
55 
79 
80 

75 


— 


95 

88 


June 
July 


80 
80 


— 


86 
97 
83 


July 
June 
July 


80 
75 
75 


11/1942 
11/1942 


68 
95 


June 
June 


55 

75 



12/1942 
10/1942 
11/1942 


81 
97 

87 


June 
June 
June 


65 
80 
80 


10 1942 
10/1942 


80 
94 


May 
July 


80 
80 


10/1942 
1/1943 


68b 

99 

80b 


June 
June 
June 


65 
80 
70 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 



SEED INSPECTION 



29 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when o'ther 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test '/,;. of Test % 



1120 Beans 



263F Beet 
262 Spinach 



626 Lettuce 

627 Turnip 



501 Lettuce 



312F Corn 



87F Beet 
88F Carrot 

90F Corn 

94 Cucumber 

92 Peas 

95 Pepper 
89 Spinach 

96 Squash 

93 Tomato 

443 Peas 



482 Beet 

484 Radish 

483 Spinach 

485 Turnip 



426F Beet 
425F Carrot 



424F Beet 
441F Carrot 
442 F Carrot 

422 Cucumber 

423 Radish 



667F Beet 
668 Turnip 



1251 Endive 



514F Carrot 

515 Lettuce 

516 Onion 



1227 Corn 
490F Beans 



Associated Seed Growers, Inc. — Con. 

Wardsworth Howland & Co., Inc., Boston 
Asgrow Black Valentine — 

Leon Zocchi Co.. Milford 

Crosby's Egyptian 72 

Bloomsdale Reselected 85 

Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield, Mass. 

Simpson Early Curled 69 

Yellow Globe 56 

Joseph Breclc & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

Adams Hardware, Inc., Dorchester 

Green Leaved Big Boston — 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

Golden Bantam — 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston 

Improved Rust Proof Golden Wax, 

No. 13 — 

Arlington Strain-Crosby's Egyptian, 

No. 11 — 

Break's Market Garden-Danvers 

Half Long, No. B 198 — 

Tendergold, No. 13 — 

Straight 8, No. C 196 — 

Gradus or Prosperity, No. 12 — 

Harris Earliest, No. C 156 — 

Nobel Giant, No. C 460 — 

Blue Hubbard, No. 16 — 

Marglobe, No. C 158 — 

Campbell Hardware Co., Newton 

Improved Telephone — 

Centre Hardware Co., Roslindale 

Crosby's Egyptian — 

Scarlet Globe — 

Bloomsdale Long Standing Savoy. ... — 
Purple Top White Globe — 

The College Hardware Co., Wellseley 

Beats All — 

Chantenay. . — 

P. B. Corkum, Inc., Wellesley 

Crosby's Egyptian — 

Long Orange — 

Scarlet Horn — 

Improved Long Green — 

French Breakfast — • 

Farmers Cooperative Trading Asso- 
ciation, Hubbardston 

Dewing's Early Blood — 

Skirving's Purple Top — 

Fletcher Hardware Co., Inc., Watertown 
Green Curled — 

Franklin Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Franklin 

Hutchinson — 

N. Y. Imperial 847 — 

Yellow Globe Danvers — 

Hamilton Hardware Co., Clinton 

Carmelcross Hybrid, No. 5760 — 

E. J. Keelan, Dedham 

Black Wax — 



— 


75a 


July 


80 


11 1942 
10/1942 


83 

87 


June 
May 


65 
60 


2/1943 
2/1943 


69 
65 


May 
June 


80 
80 


— 


95 


June 


80 


- 


87 


May 


75 


— 


93-3( 


: May 


80 


— 


76 


May 


65 


— 


65 
90 
93 

85 
69 
S3 
96 
92 


May 

May 
May 
June 
May 
May 
May 
May 


55 
75 
80 
80 
55 
60 
75 
75 



June 



87 
89 
95 
97 


June 
May 
May 
June 


65 
75 
60 
80 


80 
68 


May 
June 


65 
55 


73 

71 

65 

58a 

84 


June 
June 
June 
May 
May 


65 
55 
55 
80 

75 


65 
97 


June 
June 


65 
80 


83 


July 


70 


63 
94 
91 


June 
May 
May 


55 
80 
70 


5.3a 


July 


75 


93 


May 


80 



a Below Standard 
c 39f Hard -Seed 



30 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination pf Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 







Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected 7o of Test % of Test % 



733 Lettuce 
499F Beans 
486 Peas 



538 Cucumber 
537 Squash 



494 Spinach 
492 Turnip 



376F Carrot 
378 Peas 
377 Radish 
380 Swiss Chard 



1175 Peas 



440 Cauliflower 



558 Peas 



1134a Beans 
1134b Beans 

1134c Beet 

1134d Broccoli 

1134e Carrot 
1134g Lettuce 
1134h Radish 
1134f Swiss Chard 
11341 Tomato 



310F Beans 
307F Beet 
308F Carrot 
311 Peas 
309 Scinach 



749 Peas 



392F Beet 

394F Corn 
393 Onion 
395 Peas 



730F Carrot 



438 Lettuce 



1266 Beans 
614F Beet 



Joseph Breck & Sons. — Con. 
Leavitt's Sport Shop, Haverhill 

Tennisball — — 84 June 80 

J. MacFarland & Son, Wollaston 

Lowe's Champion Cranberry — — 06 May 80 

New Style Hardware Co., Roslindale 

World's Record — — 82 July 80 

Norwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 

Davis Perfect — — 80 May 80 

Golden Summer Crookneck — — 99 May 75 

Frank W. Richardson, Waltham 

Bloomsdale or Savoy Leaved — — 83 May 60 

Red Top Strap Leaf — — 88 June 80 

Sanborn & Damon Co., Quincy 

Danvers Half Long — — 70 June 55 

Hundredfold — — 95 Julv 80 

Scarlet Globe — — 94 May 75 

Lucullus — — 87 June 65 

Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 

World's Record — — 87 July 80 

Skelton Hardware Co., Inc., Newton 
Centre 

Early Dwarf Erfurt — — 81 May 75 

Town Paint & Supply Co., West Newton 

Sutton's Excelsior — — 96 June 80 

Winer's Hardware Co., Whitman 

Bountiful, Green Pod, No. 5028 — — 93 July 80 

Kentucky Wonder-Old Homestead 

Green Pod, No. 5211 — — 88 July 80 

Beats All, No. 5279 — — 75 Augu.=!t 65 

Italian Breck's Selected Stock, No. 

5319 — — 97 July 75 

Chantenay, No. 5556 — — 86 July 55 

Big Boston Unrivalled, No. 6083 — — 94 July 80 

Scarlet Globe, No. 6764 — — 94 July 75 

Dark Green Curled, No. 6885 — — 97 July 65 

Bonny Best, N9. 7086 — — 85 July 75 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

S. Allen's Sons, Greenfield 

Pencil Pod Black Wax — — 87 May 80 

Crosby's Egyptian — — 65 May 65 

Danvers Half Long — — 72 May 55 

Laxton's Progress — — 83 July 80 

Bloomsdale — — 45a May 60 

I Brad's Hardware Co., Maynard 

li.. Telephone — — 87 June 80 

Brownell Hardware Co., Attleboro 

Detroit Dark Red 85 11/1942 79 May 65 

Approx. 

Marcross 13.6 85 111942 95 May 75 

White Portugal 75 111942 88 May 70 

Number 40 — — 92 June 80 

Bryant's Hardware Co., Haverhill 

Hutchinson — — 4a June 55 

J. H. Chandler & Son, Inc., Newton 
Centre 

N. Y. No. 12 — — 86 May 80 

Harding St. Grain Store, Worcester 

Dwarf Horticultural 1941 82 July 80 

Dewing's Early Blood Turnip — — 61a May 65 



a Below Standard 



SEED INSPECTION 



31 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than \^'holesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected % of Test % of Test % 

W. Atlee Burpee Co. — Con. 
Harding St. Grain Store — Con. 

1254 Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 69 July 55 

1267 Rutabaga Purple Top Yellow, No. 5-283 — — 98 July 75 

Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro .^pprox. 

1277 Turnip Purple Top White Globe 85 1 1943 94 July 80 

Raymond's Inc., Boston 

724 Beans Stringless Black Valentine — — 88 July 80 

719F Beets Early Wonder — — 78 June 65 

721 Lettuce Black Seeded Simpson — — 97 June 80 

722 Radish Scarlet Globe — — 71a June 75 

720 Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing — — 90 May 60 

723 Turnip Purple Top White Globe — — 98 June 80 

Harry Seder, Webster 

1111 Beans Rustproof Golden Wax — — 89 July 80 

Schofield Hardware Co., No. Attleboro Approx. 

385F Beet Detroit Dark Red 70 1/1943 73 May 65 

389 Cabbage Perfection Drumhead Savoy 80 1/1943 79 May 75 

387 Cucumber Improved White Spine 80 1/1943 95 May 80 

390 Squash Giant Golden Summer — — 69a May 75 

The Service Co., Foxboro 

557-a Beans Bush-Surecrop Stringless Wax, No. 49 — — ^85 July 80 

557-b Beans Burpee's Stringless Green Pod, No. 10 — — 94 July 80 

557-c Beans Bush Lima Burpee's Improved, No. 63 — — 79 July 70 

557-d Beet Burpee's Black-Red Ball — — 74 July 65 

557-e Carrot Goldinhart — — 80 July 55 

5S7-g Corn Burpee's Golden Bantam, No. 301 .. . — - ■ — 93 July 75 

557-h Cucumber Burpee's Fordhook White Spine — — 84 July 80 

557-i Lettuce Big Boston — — 90 July 80 

557-j Onion Sweet Spanish. — — - 81 July 70 

557-k Parsley Extra Curled Dwarf or Emerald — — 85 July 60 

557-! Radish. White Icicle — — 82 July 75 

557-m Radish Burpee's Rapid Red — — 91 July 75 

557-n Squash Early White Bush — — 81 July 75 

557-f Swiss Chard LucuUus — — 75 July 65 

557-0 Turnip Purple Top White Globe — — 97 July 80 

Victory Auto Supplies, Fitchburg 

669 BroccoH Calabrese 80 12/1942 75 June 75 

China World Trading Co., Medford, Mass. 

United Cooperative Society, Fitchburg 

671 Mung Bean New Green — — 88 July None 

Comstock, Ferre & Co., Wethersfield, 
Conn 

Bryan Hardware Co.. Westfield 

884 Endive Batavian Broad Leaf — — 74 June 70 

683 Kohlrabi Early Purple Vienna — — 85 July 75 

882 Swiss Chard Giant LucuUus — — 79 June 65 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 

523F Beet Edmand's Early Turnip — — 67 May 65 

524F Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 84 June 55 

526 Radish Early Scarlet Turnip — — 95 May 75 

525 Spinach Savoy Long Standing — — 91 May 60 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

381F Beet Early Wonder 80 12/1942 87 May 65 

383 Soy Beans Aoda— Edible 78 2/1943 78 August None 

Foster Farrar Co., Northampton 

345 Asparagus Mary Washington — — 82-13c May 70 

343F Beans Sure Crop Stringless Flat Pod Black 

Wax — — 92 May 80 

341F Beet Early Wonder — — 83 May 65 

342F Carrot Hutchinson — — 69 May 55 

344F Corn Golden Cross Bantam — — 86 May 75 

346 Onion Ebenezer .95 11/1942 90 May 70 

347 Squash Blue Hubbard (Special Strain) — — 98 May 75 



a Below Standard 
c 13% Hard Seed 



32 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued' 







Wholesale Distributor, \'ariety of Seed 


Given Found 


Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number, Dealer when other 


Germination Germina- 


Stand- 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 


Date tion — Month 


ard 






Collected 


% of Test % of Test 


% 



1245 

1244 


Egg Plant 
Tomato 


268 Cabbage 
267F Carrot 

269 Celery 

270 Onion 


160F Beet 
157F Carrot 


208F Beans 
211F Beets 
212F Carrot 
210F Corn 
214 Cucumber 
213 Lettuce 
209 Peas 


412 


Parsnip 


863 


Beans 


1240 


Turnip 


554 


Spinach 


44F Beans 
46F Corn 
50 Peas 


679 


Cucumber 


875 


Turnip 


770F Beans 
768F Beet 


767F Carrot 

77 IF Corn 

769 Cucumber 


510 
506 
508 
507 
509 


Cucumber 

Parsley 

Parsnip 

Radish 

Rutabaga 


18F Bean 
17F Beet 
21 Cabbage 
19F Carrot 
20F Corn 
24 Lettuce 



Comslock. Ferre <& Co. — Con. 
G. W. Gardiner & Son. Fall River 

Black Beauty 78 

John Baer 92 

F. A. Gould, Milford 

Copenhagen Market 83 

Hutchinson 69 

Giant Pascal 70 

Southport Red Globe 89 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 

Detroit Dark Red — 

Hutchinson 80 

New England Toro Co., Newton 

Bountiful — 

Crosby's Egyptian 69 

Chantenay, Half Long Red Cored. . . 79 

Whipple's Early 95 

Straight 8 88 

Black Seeded Tennisball — 

Laxton's Superb 92 

Palmer Hardware Co., Needham 

Hollow Crown 68 

The O. B. Parks Co., Westfield 

Improved Golden Wax 75 

C. S. Sawyer & Co., Fall River 

*Macomber (Rutabaga) 91 

Sawyer Hardware Co., Canton 

Early Giant Thick Leaf 65 

Joseph Sordillo & Sons, Boston 

Dwarf Horticultural • — 

Golden Bantam — 

Sutton's Excelsior — 

Arthur R. Cone, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Central Hardware Co., Fitchburg 

White Spine Improved 90 

Methe's Checkerboard Feed Store, 
Westfield 
Purple Top White Globe — 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 
Golden Wax Top Notch, Lot No. 16-30 90 
Early Wonder, No, 135-143 76 

Danvers Half Long — 

Improved Golden Bantam, No.50-266 90 
\\ hite Spine Improved, No. 150-43 . . 90 

Crosman Seed Corp., East Rochester, N.Y. 
S. S. Kresge Co., Dorchester 

Improved Long Green 80 

Extra Double Curled 60 

Improved Hollow Crown 60 

Early Long Scarlet 80 

American Purple Top 75 

S. S. Kresge Co., New Bedford 

Golden Wax 80 

Early Blood Turnip 70 

Early Jersey Wakefield 75 

Chantenay — Half Long 60 

Golden Bantam 80 

Black Seeded Simpson 85 



12/1942 
12/1942 


83 
91 


July 
July 


60 

75 


1/1943 

12/1942 

1/1Q43 

1/1943 


77 
83 
63 
86 


May 
May 

May 
May 


75 
55 
55 
70 


12/1942 


78 
75 


May 
May 


65 
55 


3/1943 
3/1943 
11/1942 
3/1943 

1/1943 


90 

5.5d 

91 

82b 
93 
95 

88 


May 
June 
May 
May 
May 
May 
June 


80 
65 
55 
75 
80 
80 
80 


1/1943 


66 


June 


60 


12/1942 


31d 


August 


80 


12/1942 


85 


July 


80 


12/1942 


77 


May 


60 


— 


86-3 

88 

91 


c May 
May 
June 


80 
75 
80 



June 



— 


93 


July 


80 


1943 
1/1943 


87 
62d 


May 
June 


80 
65 


3/1943 

2/1943 

1943 


69 
95 
89 


June 
May 
June 


55 
75 
80 


1943 
1943 
1943 
1943 
1/1943 


89 
73 
73 
86 
99 


May 
June 
June 
May 
June 


80 
60 
60 

75 
75 


1943 
1943 
1943 
1943 
1, 1943 
1943 


73-9aeMay 
77 June 
82 May 
61 May 
86 May 
94 Mav 


80 
65 
75 
55 
75 
80 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 

c i",'o Hard Seed 

d Below Standard and below given germination 

e 9% Hard Seed 

* A Rutabaga incorrectly labeled Turnip 



SEED INSPECTION 



33 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 







Wholesale Distributor. Variety of Seed Given 


Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination 


Germina- Stand- 


No. 


Seed 


than \\ holesale Distributor, and Place Date 


tion — Month ard 






Collected % of Test 


% of Test % 



Grossman Seed Corp. — Con. 

S. S. Kresge Co., New Bedford — Con. 

22 Onion Red Wethersfield 70 1043 85 May 

257 Spinach Giant Nobel 00 1943 85 May 

23 Tomato Earliana 80 1943 99 May 

S. S. Kresge Co., Springfield 

842-b Beet Detroit Dark Red 65 — 77 Jun? 

842-c Carrot Chantenay ftO — 57 June 

842-a Lettuce Grand Rapids .' 80 — 84 June 

842-f Parsley Moss Double Curled 60 — 66 June 

S42-e Radish Round Scarlet White Tipped 80 — 94 June 

842-d Spinach Bloomsdale 60 — 72 June 

842-g Turnip Purple Top White Globe 80 — 82 July 

Montgomery Ward Co.. Greenfield 

328 Broccoli Italian Green Calabrese 80 — 88 May 

327F Carrot Danvers Half Long '60 — 76 May 

329 Celery Paris Golden Self Blanchinp 60 — 66 May 

Tested for 

330 Swiss Chard Fordhook Giant 65 1943 81 June 

Tested for 

331 Tomato Earliana 80 1943 96 May 

Henry A. Dreer, Inc., Philadelphia Pa. 

First National Stores, Inc., Danvers 

573-a Beans Plentiful. No. 29 92 12/1942 89 July 

573-b Beet Early Red, No. 148 86 1/1943 80 July 

573-c Beet Eclipse, No. 155 65 1/1943 69 July 

or better 

573-d Carrot Chantenay, No. 231 85 2/1943 87 July 

573-f Corn Bantam Evergreen, No. 311 86 1/1943 84 July 

573-e Cucumber Straight S. No. 391 73 12/1942 97 July 

573-g Lettuce Unrivaled. No. 446 73 12/1942 95 July 

573-h Lettuce Iceberg, No. 464 80 1/1943 75a July 

573-i Onion Southport Yellow Globe, No. 586 90 12/1942 84 July 

573-j Parsley Dreer's Summer Green, No. 604 80 12/1942 78 July 

573-k Pea Alaska, No. 618 80 1/1943 93 July 

or better 

573-1 Radish Scarlet Globe, No. 813 90 12/1942 97 July 

573-m Spinach Re-selected Savoy, No. 851 86 12/1942 63b July 

573-n Swiss Chard Broad Rib Green, No. 169 75 2/1943 87 July 

573-0 Tomato Improved Stone, No. 943 80 12/1942 86 July 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exch., Montello 

141F Beans Fordhook, No. 2212 90 — 89 May 

139F Beans Sure Crop Wax. No. 2212 90 — 90 May 

142 Cabbage Mammoth Red Rock. No. 413 85 12/1942 84 May 

138F Carrot Imperator. No. 618 75 12/1942 79 May 

140F Corn Marcross 13.6, No. 14522 90 12/1942 95 May 

144 Cucumber A & C Special, No. 8113 85 2/1943 85 May 

148 Lettuce Imperial 847, No. 613 95 3/1943 96 May 

143 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 20813 ... 80 2/1943 84 May 

145 Peas Thomas Laxton, No. 311 85 12/1942 84 June 

146 Squash Early Prolific Straightneck, No. 613 . 90 12/1942 98 May 

147 Swiss Chard Lucullus, No. 713 80 12/1942 85 June 

Eastern States Farmers' Exch., Waltham 

221 Beet Crosby (Early Wonder), No. 313 .... 80 12 1942 88 June 

224 Parsnip Improved Hollow Crown, No. 613 70 1/1943 67 May 
223 Rutabaga L. I. Neckless Purple Top. No. 2422 90 12/1942 99 June 
222F Spinach Dark Green Bloomsdale, No. 11012. . 95 12/1942 94 May 

225 Turnip Purple Top White Globe, No. 11022 95 12/1942 98 May 

Templeton Farmers Cooperative Asso- 
ciation, Inc.. Templeton 

642F Beet Detroit (Late Market Globe), No. 4412 90 12/1942 80b June 

644F Carrot Bunching, No. 618 70 12/1942 68 June 

643 Peas l.axton's Progress, No. 313 90 12/1942 96 June 

Thomas W. Emerson Co., Beverly, Mass. 

Bellingham Hardware Co , Weymouth 

448F Corn Golden Bantam — — 84 May 

445 Cucumber White Spine — — 96 May 

446 Radish French Breakfast — — 90 May 

a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given Germination 



70 
60 
75 



65 
55 
80 
60 
75 
60 
80 



75 
55 

55 

65 

75 



80 
65 
65 

55 
75 
80 
80 
80 
70 
60 
80 

75 
60 
65 

75 



80 
80 
75 
55 
75 
80 
80 
70 
80 
75 
65 



65 
60 
75 
60 
80 



65 
55 
80 



75 
80 

75 



34 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test % of Test % 



447 Squash 



1151 Chicory 

1152 Kale 
1150 Rutabaga 



837 Beet 

839 Egg Plant 

840 Kale 

838 Lettuce 

841 Turnip 



248F Beans 

242 Brussels 
Sprouts 

243 Cabbage 

244 Lettuce 

245 Onion 

246 Pepper 

247 Tomato 



77F Beans 
73 F Beet 
74F Carrot 
76F Corn 

75 Spinach 



1107 Beans 



453F Beet 
456F Carrot 
455F Corn 
454 Endive 



1099 Peas 

1100 Peas 



1046 Beet 
1045 Celery 
1044 Leek 

1047 Onion 



632 Broccoli 
630F Carrot 
631 Lettuce 



351F Beet 
352F Carrot 



354 
355 
356 
353 



Celery 
Parsley 
Rutabaga 
Spinach 



361F Beet 
364F Corn 

362 Cucumber 
365 Dandelion 

363 Radish 



Thomas W. Emerson Co. — Con. 
Billingham Hardware Co. — Con. 

Great Straight Neck — — 85 May 75. 

Drive-In-Fruitland, Boston 

French Endive — — 48a June 65 

Dwarf Green Curled — — 56a July 75 

American Purple Top. . , — — 99 July 75 

J. B. Hunter Co., Boston 

Crosby's Egyptian — — 73 June 65 

New York — — 84 June 60 

Dwarf Green Curled — — 76 June 75 

N. Y. No. 12 — — 49a June 80 

White Egg — — 96 June 80 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

Bush Lima — — 92 May 70 

Improved Long Island — — 22a May 70 

Improved Savoy — — 91 May 75 

Big Boston — — 84 May 80 

Southport Red Globe — — 84 May 70 

Harris Giant — — 4.5a April 55 

John Baer — — 94 May 75 

F. B. Keene, Amesbury 

French Dwarf Horticultural — — 87 May 80 

Crosby's Egvptian — — 79 May 65 

Danvers Half Long — — 78 May 55 

Golden Bantam — — 76 May 75 

Round Leaved — — 67 May 60 

Perron & Company, Southbridge 

Golden Wax — — 80 July 80 

South Shore Hardware Co., Quincy 

Early Wonder — — 62a July 65 

Improved Long Orange — — 76 June 55 

Golden Sunrise — — 75 May 75 

Broad Leaf — — 73 June 70 

G. C. Winter Co.. Southbridge. 

World's Record — — 90 June 80 

Champion of England — — 93 June SO 

Yankee Maid Products, Inc., Boston 

Extra Early Dark Egyptian — — 44a July 65 

Boston Market — — 42a July 55 

Large American Flag — — 22a June 60 

Southport Red Globe — — 84 June 70 

Empire Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

S. Maggipinto, Springfield Below .Stand. 

Italian Green Sprouts 40 12/1942 42 May 75 

Chantenay — — 57 June 55 

Black Seeded Simpson — — 84 May SO 

Woodlawn Supply Co.. So. Hadley 

Early Blood Turnip — — 88 June 65 

Danvers Half Long — — 72 May 55 

Golden Self Blanching — — 60 May 55 

Champion — — 63 June 60 

American Purple Top — — 89 June 75 

Large Bloomsdale Savoy Leaved — — 61 May 60 

Ferry-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

Early Wonder 84 2/1943 77 June 65 

Whipple's Yellow Corn — — 85 May 75 

White Spine — — 86 May 80 

Improved Thick Leaved — — 77 June 45 

Early Scarlet Globe — — 76 May 75 



a Below Standard 



SEED INSPECTION 



35 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand - 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 

Collected % of Test % of Test % 

Ferry-Morse Seed Co. — Con. 

Concord Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Concord 

682F Beet Crosby's Egyptian — — 82 June 65 

681F Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 61 June 55 

Copeland Hardware Co., Taunton 

194F Beans Plentiful — — 94 May 80 

193F Carrot Long Orange — — 77 May 55 

195 Peas Telephone — — 90 June 80 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

112F Beet Detroit Dark Red — — 90 May 65 

113F Carrot Red Cored Chantenay — — 74 May 55 

115 Spinach Savoy Leaved or Bloomsdal? — • — 82 May 60 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

239F Carrot Long Orange — — 84 May 55 

240 Cauliflower Early Snowball — — 96 May 75 

241 Onion Southport Yellow Globe — — 76 May 70 

M. N. Landau Stores, Inc., Westfield 
886 Leek (*) — — 81 June 60 

Skelton Hardware Co., Newton Centre 
439F Beans Ferry's Golden Wax, No. 21034 — — 89 May SO 

Union Florist, Boston 

176F Beans Golden Wax — — 82 May 80 

177F Corn Golden Bantam — — 81 May 75 

178 Peas Nott's Excelsior — — 93 June 80 

Ben Franklin Stores, Chicago, III. 

Ben Franklin Stores. Lee 

902 Beet Crosby's Egyptian 70 1/1942 78 June 65 

903 Carrot Chantenay 60 1/1943 69 June 55 

911 Lettuce Big Boston. : 80 1/1943 87 June 80 

904 Radish Scarlet Globe 80 1/1943 77 June 75 

Fraser's Wellesley, Mass. 

J. H. Chandler & Son, Newton Centre Approx. 
433 Cucumber Improved White Spine 95 1/1943 93 May 80 

Fraser's Wellesley 
427F Beans Bountiful — — 96 May 80 

Approx. 
429F Beet Detroit Dark Red 80 1/1943 82 May 65 

Approx. 

430 Cabbage Golden Acre 85 1/1943 84 May 75 

428F Corn Golden Cross Bantam — — 91 May 75 

Approx. 

431 Parslev Moss Curled 80 1/1943 82 June 60 

432 Radish Special Early Scarlet Globe 90 1/1943 98 May 75 

A. L. Turner, North Quincy Approx. 

500 Parsnip All American Hollow Crown 75 1/1943 67 June 60 

R. H. White Co., Boston Approx. 

109 Broccoli Special Italian 65 1/1943 94 May 75 

Appro.x. 

107F Carrot Danvers Half Long 70 1/1943 75 May 55 

Approx. 

110 Lettuce Black Seeded Tennisball 90 1/1943 96 May 80 

Approx. 
108 Spinach Reselected Bloomsdale Savoy 85 1 1943 84 May 60 

Fredonia Seed Co , Fredonia, N. Y. 

Bellingham Hardware Co., Weymouth 
444 [^Cucumber Early White Spine — — 93 May 80 

Public Market, West Stockbridge 

995 Beans Golden Wax 90 1 /1943 91 July 80 

994 Corn Golden Bantam 85 1/1943 85 July 75 

Town Paint & Supply Co., West Newton 
S94F Carrot Oxheart — — 56 June 55 

♦Variety required but not given 



36 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 

Collected % of Test % of Test % 



.S95 


Parsley 


593 


Radish 


199F Beet 


198F Carrot 


200 


Turnip 


54F Beans 


63F Beet 


57 


Cabbage 


52F Carrot 


55F Corn 


60 


Cucumber 


61 


Lettuce 


56 


Peas 


58 


Pepper 


53 


Spinach 


62 


Squash 


59 


Tomato 


254F Beans 


249F 


Beet 


251 


Cabbage 


250F Carrot 


255 F 


Corn 


252 


Lettuce 


256 


Spinach 


253 


Tomato 



409 Tomato 



975 Beans 

976 Beet 

977 Egg Plant 



941 Soy Beans 
947 Turnip 



476F Beans 
478F Carrot 
477 Cucumber 

479 Radish 

480 Rutabaga 



664 Cucumber 

662 Lettuce 

663 Spinach 

665 Swiss Chard 



301 Asparagus 
295F Beet 
296F Carrot 

299 Celery 
298 Cucumber 
297 Spinach 

300 Squash 



Fredonia Seed Co. — Con. 

Town Paint & Supply Co. — Con. 

Plain Broad Leaved — 

Ea. Seal let Globe — • 

Weir Cash Market, Taunton 

Early Blood Turnip — 

Chantenay — 

Purple Top Flat Strap Leaf — 

Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston. Mass. 

Hendersons' Bush Lima — 

Early Wonder — 

Golden .-^cre — 

Danvers Half Long — 

Golden Early Market — 

Improved Long Green — 

Big Boston — 

Blue Bantam — 

Harris Early Giant — 

Reselected Savoy Bloomsdale — 

Giant Summer Crookneck — 

John Baer — 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Rochester, N. Y 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

Plentiful, No. 2321 99 

Detroit Dark Red 80 

Early Jersey Wakefield 88 

Danvers Half Long 68 

Golden Bantam, No. 1305 96 

(..rand Rapids 96 

Long Standing Bloomsdale, No. 523 . 92 
Dwarf Champion 88 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Wether sfield. Conn. 

Allen Hardware Co., Needham 

Hart's Improved New Stone 80 

Berkshire Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

Burpee's Bush Lima — 

Early Blood Turnip 90 

N. Y. Purple 60 

Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield. 

Edible Soy (*) 90 

Yellow Globe — 

R. E. Cobb Co., Weymouth 

Dwarf French Horticultural 90 

Improved Long Orange — ■ 

Early White Spine — 

Early Scarlet Globe - — 

American Purple Top Yellow — 

Davis Hardware Co., Gardner 

Long Green — 

Big Boston — 

Giant Thick Leaf — 

Dark Green — 

Federal Supply Co., Northampton 

Mary Washington — 

Detroit Dark Red — 

Hutchinson - 

Wonderful or Golden Plume 72 

Black Diamond 90 

Savoy — 

Blue Hubbard 90 



65 


June 


60 


96 


May 


75 


72 


June 


65 


68 


May 


55 


■;ba 


May 


80 


83-6c May 


70 


65 


May 


65 


V5 


May 


75 


73 


May 


55 


98 


May 


■/5 


83 


May 


80 


97 


May 


80 


92 


June 


80 


66 


May 


55 


61 


May 


60 


94 


May 


75 


89 


May 


80 


91 


May 


80 


68b 


June 


65 


85 


May 


75 


62 


May 


55 


91 


May 


75 


96 


May 


SO 


87 


May 


60 


94 


May 


SO 



May 



— 


89 


July 


70 


1 1943 


.50d 


June 


65 


1/1943 


71 


June 


60 


1/1943 


63 e 


July 


None 


— 


95 


June 


80 


1/1943 


93 


May 


80 


— 


60 


June 


55 


— 


69a 


May 


80 


— 


91 


May 


75 


— 


98 


May 


75 




96 


June 


80 


— 


86 


June 


80 


— 


65 


May 


60 


— 


91 


June 


65 


1 1943 


78 


May 


70 


1/1943 


81 


June 


55 


1943 


62 


May 


55 


1/1943 


49d 


May 


55 


1/1943 


94 


May 


SO 


— 


64 


May 


60 


1/1943 


63d 


May 


75 



a Below .Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 

c 6% Hard Seed 

d Below Standard and below given germination 

e Below given germination 

*Variety required but not given 



SEED INSPECTION 



37 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor. Variety of Seed Given 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date 

Collected % of Test 



Found Mass. 
Germina- Stand- 
tion — Month ard 
% of Test 7c 



384 
382 


Cabbage 
Onion 


1011 
1010 


Onion 
Rutabaga 


853 
852 


Rutabaga 
Turnip 


489F Corn 


1021 
1022 


Lettuce 
Radish 


219F Beet 
220 Lettuce 


349 
348 


Parsley 
Peas 


20SF Beans 
203F Beet 
202F Carrot 
206F Corn 
204 Peas 
207 Spinach 
201 Tomato 


493F Beans 


334F Carrot 
336 Squash 


930 


Beet 


775F Beans 
1113 Parsnip 


619 


Peas 



606 Celery 



793F Beans 
798F Corn 



78F Beet 

86 Broccoli 

79 Cabbage 

80 Cabbage 

81 Cauliflower 
85 Celery 

84 Dandelion 

82 Radish 

83 Turnin 



26 Beans 



Charles C. Hart Seed Co. — Con. 

Franklin Hardware Co.. No. Attleboro 

Mammoth Red Rock 80 

Large Red Wethersfield 70 

The Hardware Shop, Adams 

Large Wethersfield 79 

Laurentian or Victory Neckless — 

Jeffway-Hatch, Inc., Easthampton 

White Swede — 

White Egg — 

E. J. Keelan, Dedham 

Early Golden Bantam 90 

Lev Hardware Co., North Adams 

Simpson's Early Curled 84 

French Breakfast 84 

Mendelsohn's, Waltham 

Crosby's Egyptian 82 

Big Boston 85 

Osborne Hardware Corp., Holyoke 

Moss Curled — 

Nott's Excelsior — 

Pierce Hardware Co., Taunton 

Asgrow Stringless Valentine — 

Early Wonder — 

Danvers Half Long — 

Hybrid Tendergold — 

Little Marvel — 

Bloomsdale — Blight Resistant — 

Hart's Improved Stone 75 

Frank W. Richardson, Waltham 

Horticultural Bush 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

Hutchinson 80 

Blue Hubbard 90 

F. H. Turner & Co., Great Barrington 
Early Blood — 

Waite's Hardware Co., Worcester 

Unrivaled Wax — 

Hollow Crown — 

Wells Hardware Co., Holyoke 

Sutton's Excelsior 90 

Budd D Hawkins, Reading Vt. 

Elwood Adams Co., Worcester 

Giant Pascal — 

Irving B. Barrows & Co., Worcester 

Golden Wax — ■ 

Improved Golden Bantam — 

Herman F. Davis, Merrimac 

Crosby's Egyptian — 

Italian Green Sprouting — 

True Early Winningstadt — 

Copenhagen Market — 

Early Snowball — 

New White Plume — 

Improved Thick Leaved — ■ 

New French Breakfast — 

Orange Jelly or Yellow Globe — 

Francis Bros. Inc., Reading 

Improved Golden Wax 



1943 
1943 



56d 

73 



1 1943 90 
— 91 



89 
8a 



May 

May 



June 
July 



July 
July 



75 
70 



1/1943 86 May 



1/1943 87 
1 1943 91 



1/1943 93 
1/1943 93 



— 72 

— 93 



— 93 

— 73 

— 72 

— 58a 

— 88 

— 90 
11/1942 52d 



June 
June 



May 
May 



May 
May 



May 
May 
May 
May 
July 
May 
May 



— 1/1943 84 May 



1/1943 60b 
1/1943 98 



July 
May 



72 June 



— 44a 
1/1943 92 

— 66 



May 
June 



July 



July 



80 
75 



65 
80 



60 

80 



80 
65 
55 
75 
80 
60 
75 



80 

55 



80 
60 



— 62a 


May 


SO 


— 87 


May 


75 


— 72 


June 


65 


— 54a 


May 


/ 3 


— 68a 


May 


75 


— 34a 


May 


/3 


— 38a 


May 


75 


— 13a 


April 


55 


— 27a 


April 


45 


— 95 


April 


is 


— 37a 


May 


S(.) 



— — 86 May 



a Below Standard 

b .^bove Standard but below given germination 

d Below Standard and below given germination 



38 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand ■ 

Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test % of Test % 



27F Beet 

31 Cabbage 
28F Carrots 
29F Carrot 
30 Corn 

35 Cucumber 

32 Onion 

33 Parsnip 

34 Rutabaga 

25 Spinach 

36 Swiss Chard 

625 Lettuce 



640 Cabbage 



1276 Cabbage 



Cabbage 
Cucumber 

Endive 
Lettuce 
Onion 
Pepper 

Salsify 



396F Carrot 
397F Carrot 



163 Cabbage 
162F Carrot 

164 Lettuce 
Parsley 
Pepper 
Swiss Chard 
Tomato 



165 
166 
167 
168 



173F Beet 
174F Beet 
175 Radish 



340F Carrot 
339 Onions 



602F Carrot 
605 Peas 

603 Spinach 

604 Squash 



414F Beans 

597-a Beans 

597-b Beans 

597-c Beans 

597-d Beans 

597-e Beets 



Budd D. Hawkins— Con. 

Francis Bros., Inc. — Con. 

Detroit Dark Red — 

Premium Large Late Flat Dutch. ... — • 

Improved Long Orange — 

Red Cored Chantenay — 

Golden Bantam — 

Improved Long Green — • 

Large Red Wethersfield — 

Improved Hollow Crown — 

Improved Purple Top Yellow Hardy 

Swede — 

American Savoy Leaved or Long 

Standing — 

(*) — 

Franklin Hardware Corp., Springfield 
Extra Early Tennisball or Boston 
Market — 

Home Supply Co., Orange 

Mammoth Red Rock — 

Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro 

Glory of Enkhuizen — 

A. P. Wilson, Newburyport 

Hollander or Danish Ball Head — 

Improved White Spine-Arlington — 

Stock — 

Green Curled or Giant Fringed Oyster — 

Big Boston — 

Yellow Globe Danvers — 

Improved Large Bell or Bull Nose. . . — 
Mammoth Sandwich Island — 

Herbst Bros., New York 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

Chantenay, No. 3825 70 

Danvers Half Long, No. 3823 69 

Hygrade Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Abraham Lincoln School, East Braintree 

Copenhagen Market — 

Red Cored Chantenay — 

Black Seeded Simpson — 

Moss Curled — 

California Wonder — 

Fordhook Giant — 

Marglobe — 

Penniman School, Braintree 

Crosby's Egyptian — 

Detroit Dark Red — 

Early Scarlet Globe — 

Ernest W. Knight, Newburyport, Mass. 
A. J. Blyda, Hadley 

Hutchinson — 

Japanese — 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol, Pa 

Elhvood Adams Co., Worcester 

Long Orange or St. Vallery 70 

Little Marvel — 

Bloomsdale Long Standing — 

Summer Golden Crookneck — 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 

Unrivalled Wax 90 

Landreth's Stringless Green Pod — 

Black Valentine Stringless — 

Fordhook Lima — 

Golden Wax — 

Landreth's Best — 



75 


June 


65 


77 


May 


75 


56 


June 


55 


62 


May 


55 


77 


April 


75 


85 


April 


80 


37a 


May 


70 


57a 


April 


60 


87 


May 


75 


76 


April 


60 


69 


April 


65 


la 


May 


80 


28a 


June 


75 



la July 75 
69a May 75 



90 


April 


80 


85 


April 


70 


63a 


May 


80 


4.5a 


April 


70 


49a 


April 


55 


83 


April 


VS 


69 


June 


55 


80 


June 


55 


86 


May 


75 


73 


May 


65 


99 


May 


80 


92 


May 


60 


93 


May 


55 


85 


June 


65 


97 


May 


75 


66 


June 


65 


92 


June 


65 


95 


May 


75 


72 


May 


55 


79 


May 


70 


75 


June 


55 


81 


June 


80 


79 


May 


60 


48a 


May 


75 


97 


May 


80 


97 


July 


80 


50a 


July 


80 


96 


July 


VO 


86 


July 


80 


SO 


July 


65 



a Below Standard 

* Variety required but not given 



SEED INSPECTION 



39 







Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 


Given 


Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number, Dealer when other 


Germination 


Germina- Stand - 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 


Date 


tion — Month ard 






Collected 


% of Test 


7c of Test % 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Distributor, Vari 
Number, Dealer v\ 
ilesale Distributor 
Collected 

D. Landreth Seed Co. — Con. 
BaKer Hardware Co. — Con. 

417F Carrot Imperator 70 — 72 June 55 

597-f Carrot Chantenay Half Long Scarlet or Model — — 59 July 55 

597-g Corn Golden Colonel — — 94 July 75 

419 Lettuce Selected Big Boston — — 95 May 80 

597-h Lettuce Early Curled Silesian — — 95 July 80 

421 Onion Ebenezer — — 89 May 70 

597-i Onion Southport Yellow Globe — — 76 July 70 

597-j Parsley Champion Moss Curled — — 70 July 60 

597-k Radish Early Scarlet Globe — — 86 July 75 

597-1 Radish Icicle — — 96 July 75 

420 Rutabaga Landreth's Improved Yellow Fleshed 

Purple Top — — 75 June 75 

418 Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing 7S — 85 May 60 

597-m Squash Early White Bush — — 97 July 75 

597-n Tomato Marglobe-Certified — — 96 July 75 

597-0 Turnip Large Early Red or Purple Top White 

Globe — — 99 July 80 

Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield 

628F Corn Golden Evergreen 85 — 83 May 75 

or Better 
Community Grain Co., Worcester 

801 Swiss Chard Lucullus 80 — 84 June 65 

802 Turnip White Egg 85 — 99 June 80 

Dooley Hardware Co., Holyoke 

350F Corn Golden Bantam 85 — 84 May 75 

or Better 
Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Lawrence 
699 Kale Dwarf Curled Scotch 40 3/1943 40 June 75 

Leavitt's Sport Shop, Haverhill 

732F Beans Lima — Henderson's 90 — 87-lcMay 70 

or Better 
Frank P. Mills, Campello 

158F Beans Landreth's Stringless Green Pod — — 97 May 80 

161 Spinach Bloomsdale Reselerted 76 — 90 May 60 

or Better 
H. Newell & Co., Shelburne Falls 
1032 Parsnip Sugar or Cup or Hollow Crown 70 — 90 June 60 

Parker Farm & Supply Co., Danvers 
574F Beans Dwarf Horticultural 90 — 84 August 80 

or iBetter 
S75F Carrot Danvers Half Long 70 — 69 June 55 

or Better 
576F Corn Whipple's Early Yellow 85 — 77b May 75 

or Better 
577 Peas Tall Telephone 85 — 91 June 80 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem 

1 199 Cabbage Danish Ballhead — — 6a July 75 

1202 Carrot Hutchinson 70 — 69 July 55 

or Beettr 

.1200 Onion Danvers Yellow Globe 75 -— 87 July 70 

or Better 

1201 Turnip Purple Top Globe 85 — 99 July 80 

or Better 
United Co-Operative Society, Maynard 

754F Beans Bountiful 90 — 93 May 80 

or Better 

755F Carrot Danvers Half Long 70 — 67 June 55 

or Better 
Frank L. Whitcomb, Amherst 

357F Beet Detroit Dark Red 80 — 78 May 65 

or Better 
358F Carrot Hutchinson — — 63 May 55 

Little Tree Farms, Framingham Centre, 
Mass. 

582F Carrot Red Cored Chantenay — — 64 June 55 

583 Cucumber Arlington White Spine — — 90 May 80 

a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 

c \7c Hard Seed 



40 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected f; of Test % of Test % 



584 
585 


Lettuce 
Tomato 


437F 
436F 
435F 


Beans 

Beet 

Carrot 


366F 


Beet 


610-a 
610-b 
610-c 
610-d 
610-e 
610-f 
610-g 
610-h 
610-i 


Beet 

Carrot 

Cucumber 

Lettuce 

Onion 

Parsley 

Radish 

Tomato 

Turnip 


475 


Turnip 


434 


Tomato 


536 


Turnip 


302F 
303 
304 
305 


Beet 
Cabbage 
Onion 
Parsley 



388 Cucumber 



70F Carrot 
71 Spinach 



1052 Beans 

1053 Cabbage 

1054 Cabbage 

1055 Lettuce 

1056 Lettuce 

1057 Parsnip 



290F Beans 

292F Beet 

293 Cucumber 

294 Lettuce 
291 Radish 



1232 Beans 

1236 Lettuce 
1231 Peas 

1237 Rutabaga 



652 Peas 



Little Tree Farms — Con. 

Big Boston Head — — 86 

Bonny Best — — 93 

John D. Lyon, Inc., Belmont, Mass. 
J. H. Chandler >i; Son, Newton Centre 

Pencil Pod Black Wax — — 91 

Crosby's Egyptian — — 75 

Danvers Half Long — — 65 

Methe's Checkerboard Feed Store, 
Springfield 

Detroit Dark Red — — 65 

Mandeville & King Co.. Rochester, N. Y. 

Elwood Adams Co.. Worcester 

Detroit Dark Red — — 77 

Chantenay — — 65 

Long Green — - — 98 

Black Seeded Simpson — — 99 

White Portugal — — 76 

Moss Curled — — 85 

Scarlet Turnip White Tip ■ — — 97 

Marglobe — — 92 

Purple Top White Globe — — 99 

C. & D. Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Rockland 

Purple Top White Globe — — 96 

J. H. Chandler & Son, Newton Centre Approx. 

Bonny Best 85 — 84 

Cleveland Hardware Co., Walpole 

Purple Top White Globe 85 — 93 

Federal Supply Co.. Northampton 

Detroit Dark Red 80 — 86 

Danish Ballhead 80 — 86 

Southport Yellow Globe 80 — 75 

Moss Curled 75 — 87 

Schofield Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

White Spine 85 — 97 

A. P. Wilson, Newburyport 

Chantenay 75 — 74 

Bloomsdale Savoy Leaved 70 — 80 

Michael-Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, III 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 

Pole Horticultural — — 91 

Danish Ballhead Imported — — 56a 

Premium Late Flat Dutch — — 42a 

Big Boston — ^ — 98 

Iceberg — — • 84 

Improved Hollow Crown — — 71 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Barre 

Dwarf Horticultural — — 92 

Early Blood Turnip, No. 2132 78 12/1943 67b 

Early Improved White Spine — — 98 

Iceberg — — 76a 

White Tipped Scarlet Turnip — — 93 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Clinton 

Pole Horticultural — — 93 

Iceberg — — 81 

Gradus — — 89 

Improved American Purple Top — — ■ 83 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Gardner 

Telephone — — 91 



May 
May 



May 
June 
June 



July 



May 



80 
75 



80 
65 
55 



July 


65 


July 


55 


July 


80 


July 


80 


July 


VO 


July 


6U 


July 


V5 


July 


75 


July 


80 


June 


80 


May 


75 


June 


80 


May 


65 


May 


75 


May 


VO 


May 


60 



80 



May 


55 


April 


60 


July 


80 


Julv 


75 


July 


75 


June 


80 


June 


80 


June 


60 


May 


80 


June 


6b 


May 


80 


May 


80 


May 


80 


July 


80 


July 


80 


July 


80 


July 


75 



July 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 



SEED INSPECTION 



41 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 







Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 


Given Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number, Dealer when other 


Germination Germina- Stand - 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 


Date tion — Month ard 






Collected 


'o of Test % ofjTest % 



313 
515 
314 



Cabbage 

Peas 

Radish 



260 Beans 



1215 Beans 
1211 Cabbage 

1213 Lettuce 

1214 Radish 

1216 Rutabaga 



284F Beans 

285 Cabbage 
283F Carrots 
282 Lettuce 

286 Swiss Chard 



753 Cucumber 



Michael-Leonard Seed Co. — Con. 

\\'. E. .A^ubuchon Co., Inc., Greenfield 

Premium Late Flat Dutch 

Gradus 

Early Scarlet Globe 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Holliston 
Pole Horticultural 

W. E. .Aubuchon Co., Inc., Hudson 

Pole Horticultural 

Danish Ballhead Imported 

Big Boston 

Early Scarlet Globe 

Improved .American Purple Top 

W. E. .Aubuchon Co., Inc., Leominster 

Pencil Pod Black Wax 

Danish Ballhead 

Danvers 

Big Boston 

Silver 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Maynard 
Green Prolific or Boston Pickling. . . . 



276F 

279F 

281F 

278 

280 

277 


Beet 

Carrot 

Corn 

Endive 

Onion 

Parsnip 


639F 

636F 

638 

637 

634 


Beans 
Beet 

Rutabaga 
Squash 
Swiss Chard 


1035 
1033 


Beet 
Parsnip 


1073 


Beans 


1072 


Cabbage 


1271 
1275 
1273 
1272 
1274 


Cabbage 

Cabbage 

Cucumber 

Lettuce 

Parsley 


472 
473 
474 


Cabbage 

Lettuce 

Tomato 


1008 
1007 
1009 


Carrot 

Lettuce 

Radish 


891 
892 
893 


Lettuce 

Muskmelon 

Tomato 


857 


Muskmelon 



1943 8a May 75 

— 82 July 80 

— 93 May 75 



32a May 



90 


July 


80 


41a 


July 


75 


92 


July 


80 


82 


July 


75 


88 


July 


V5 


74-6ac May 


80 


63a 


May 


75 


89 


May 


55 


94 


May 


80 


91 


June 


65 



93 June 



W. E. .Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 31 78 12/1942 71 

Chantenay — — 90 

Golden Bantam — — 79 

Broad Leaf Batavian — — 71 

Yellow Globe Danvers — — 80 

Hollow Crown 70 12/1942 79 

W. E. .Aubuchon Co., Inc., Orange 

Sioux Stringless Wax — — 92 

Early Blood Turnip — — 84 

Improved American Purple Top — — 80 

Summer Crookneck — — 99 

Silvei — — 70 

W. E. .Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne 
Falls 

Ealy Blood Turnip Improved — ■ — 80 

Hollow Crown Improved — — 77 

W'. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Ware 

Horticultural Cranberry or London 

Pole Horticultural — — 96 

Danish Ballhead Imported — — 81 

W. E. .Aubuchon Co.. Inc., Worcester 

Danish Ballhead Imported — • — 45a 

Premium Late Flat Dutch — — 76 

Boston Pickling — — 97 

Big Boston — — 30a 

Champion Moss Curled — — ■ 60 

C & D Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Rockland 

Early Jersey Wakefield — — 75 

Big Boston — — 99 

Marglobe — — 97 

Glennon Hardware Co., Dalton 

Danvers — — 85 

Early Curled Simpson — — 93 

White Icicle — — 96 

Hamilton & Atwater, Inc., Hardware, Westfield 

Hanson — — 93 

Bender's Surprise — — 81 

Pritchard — — 86 



Manchester-Forbes Co., Easthampton 
Osage or Miller's Cream, No. 40431 



90 12/1942 



June 
May 
May 
May 
May 
May 



May 
June 
June 
June 
June 



June 
June 



July 
July 



July 
July 
July 
July 
July 



June 
May 
May 



June 
June 
June 



June 
June 
June 



June 



80 



65 
55 
75 
70 
70 
60 



80 
65 
75 
75 
65 



65 
60 



80 

75 



75 
75 
80 
80 
60 



75 
80 

75 



55 
80 
80 



80 

75 
75 



a Below Standard 
c 6% Hard Seed 



42 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 







Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 


Given Found Mass. 


Lab. 


Kind of 


and Lot Number. Dealer when other 


Germination Germina- Stand- 


No. 


Seed 


than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 


Date tion — Month ard 






Collected 


% of Test % of Test % 



858 Turnip 



159F Corn 



359F Carrot 
360F Corn 



703F Beet 
704 Broccoli 

701 Onion 

702 Peas 



39 IF Carrot 



677F Beans 
674F Carrot 

675 Cucumber 
678 Lettuce 

676 Peas 

672 Rutabaga 

673 Tomato 



184F Carrot 
190F Corn 



578F Beans 
580F Beans 
581 Spinach 
579 Turnip 



Michael Leonard Seed Co. — Con. 
Manchester Forbes Co. — Con. 

White Egg, No. 83412 90 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 

Tendergold, No. 71594 80 

Mutual Plumb. & Heating Co., Amherst 

Hutchinson, No. 35 70 

Alphagold, No. 35522 80 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

Early Wonder, No. 2731 75 

Green Italian Sprouting — 

Golden Globe, No. 57633 88 

Everbearing — 

Schoffield Hardware Co., North Adams 
Dan vers 70 

LTnited Cooperative Farmers, Inc., 
Fitchburg 

Burpee's Stringless Green Pod 85 

California Peerless 77 

Dark Green, No. 25531 83 

Improved Hanson, No. 34361 80 

World's Record 85 

Macomber, No. 85531 75 

Bonny Best, No. 77232 84 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Danvers, No. 15334 70 

Stowell's Evergreen 80 

Winer Bros., Beverly. 

Top Notch Golden Wax, No. 4331. . . 85 

Burpee's Bush Lima — 

King of Denmark, No. 67931 80 

Purple Top White Globe — 



12/1942 95 July 



Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Waltham Supply Co., Waltham 
491 Cucumber Improved White Spine or Early 

Fortune — — 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

IF Beet Detroit Dark Red — — 

7F Beet Early Wonder or Crosby's Egyptian — — 

6 Broccoli Green Sprouting or Calabrese — — 

9 Cabbage Early Jersey Wakefield — — 

15 Cabbage Copenhagen Market — — 

2F Carrot Improved Danvers Half Long — - — 

8F Carrot Chantenay — — 

Below Stand. 

4 Cauliflowerr Early Snowball 55 */* 

5 Leek American Flag — — 

14 Lettuce Paris White Cos or Romaine — — 

10 Onion Large Red Globe — — 

11 Pepper Large Bell or Bull Nose — — 

3 Spinach Bloomsdale or Savoy Leaved — — 

12 Tomato Bonny Best or John Baer — — 

F. W. Woolworth Co., New Bedford 

13 Brussels 

Sprouts Improved Dwarf — — 

16 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers — — 



993 Corn 
655F Beans 



The Page Seed Co., Greene, N. Y. 

Arthur W. Baldwin & Co., West Stock- 
bridge 
Stowell's Evergreen, B 18-143 



90 1/1943 87 



The Bengtson Hardware Co., Gardner 
Improved Golden Wax, .A-19-5243. . . 90 



July 
May 



80 



12/1942 


93 


May 


75 


12/1942 
12/1942 


89 
92 


May 
May 


55 
75 


12/1942 
12/1942 


79 
95 
94 
88 


June 
June 
June 
July 


65 
75 
70 
80 


12/1942 


89 


June 


55 


12/1942 
4/1943 
12/1942 
12/1942 
12/1942 
12/1942 
12/1942 


80 

88 

66d 

96 

95 

75 

85 


May 
June 
June 
June 
June 
July 
June 


80 
55 
80 
80 
80 
75 
75 


12/1942 
12/1942 


94 
82 


May 
May 


55 
75 


12/1942 64-lcd Aug. 

— 97 May 
12/1942 86 May 

— 95 June 


80 
70 
60 
80 



80 


May 


80 


86 


May- 


65 


83 


May 


65 


93 


May 


75 


84 


May 


75 


76 


May 


75 


85 


May 


55 


63 


May 


55 


45d 


May 


75 


71 


May 


60 


98 


May 


80 


«7a 


June 


70 


68 


May 


55 


86 


May 


60 


91 


May 


75 


64a 


May 


70 


73 


May 


70 



75 
80 



a Below Standard 

c 1% Hard Seed 

d Below Standard and below given germination 

*/* Date of test required but not given 



SEED INSPECTION 



43 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test % of Test % 



The Page Seed Co.— Con. 

The Bengston Hardware Co. — Con. 

Approx 

654F Beets Crosby's Egyptian. D- 18643 65 1/1943 76 June 65 

Approx. 
657F Carrot Danvers Half Long, F. H. 7543 75 1/1943 73 June 55 

Clifford Coal Co., Inc., Lenox 

981 Beans Burpee's Bush Lima — — - 97 July 70 

Approx. 

982 Beet Egyptian Blood 60 1942 69 June 65 

979 Peas Telephone — — 93 June 80 

Dresser-Hull Co., Lee 

914 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers — — 74 June 70 

913 Rutabaga Yellow Swede — — • 95 July 75 

John M. Fitzgerald Co., Taunton.. Approx. 

197 Cabbage Early Jersey Wakefield 75 1942 75 May 75 

Approx. 
196 Lettuce Grand Rapids 80 1942 87 May 80 

Harry Seder, Webster Approx. 

1110 Carrot Danvers Half Long, Fl-7543 75 1/1943 70 June 55 

The Snyder Store, Housatonic 

989 Cucumber Long Green 85 1/1943 91 June 80 

Approx. 

990 Swiss Chard Large Ribbed White, D 10-8643 70 1/1943 79 June 65 

Approx. 
988 Turnip Yellow Globe X3-7442 90 12/1942 99 June 80 

Stanley's Coal & Grain Co., Adams 
1017 Rutabaga Yellow — — 32a July 75 

Stone Hardware Co., Brockton 

150 Cabbage Jersey Wakefield — — 86 May 75 

Approx. 

149F Carrot Long Orange, F 3.7543 75 1/1943 67 May 55 

152F Corn Golden Bantam, B7.3943 90 2/1943 82b July 75 

151 Pepper California Wonder - - 90 May 55 

Perry Seed Co., Boston. Mass. 

121F Beans Fordhook Bush Lima, No. 741 — — 55a May 70 

118F Beet Early Wonder — — 75 June 65 

124 Cabbage Marion Market, No. 1682 — — 77 May 75 

119F Carrot Chantenay Half Long, No. 2052 — — 79 May 55 

122F Corn Perry's Golden Sunshine, No. 2392 . . — — 91 May 75 

123 Cucumber -Arlington White Spine, No. 2863. ... — — 94 May 80 

126 Lettuce Big Boston. No. 3625 — — 95 May SO 

125 Pepper California Wonder. No. 5024 — — 94 May 55 

127 Radish Perry's Scarlet Globe. No. 5826 — — 89 May 75 

120 Spinach Long Standing Savoy, No. 6184 — — 41a May 60 

130 Squash Summer Straightneck, No. 6343 — — 97 May 75 

129 Tomato Marglobe, No. 6926 — — 97 May 75 

128 Turnip Purple Top White Globe, No. 7056. — — 97 May 80 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis. Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Franklin 

530 Pepper World Beater — — 87 May 55 

529 Radish Early Scarlet Globe — — 88 May 75 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Greenfield 

318F Carrot Chantenay — — 76 May 55 

319 Lettuce Grand Rapids — — 92 May 80 

320 Tomato Marglobe — — 87 May 75 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co.. Cambridge. N.Y. 

H. J. Croteau Hardware Co.. North- 
ampton 

258F Beet Improved Early Blood Turnip 70 12/1942 79 May 65 

306F Carrot Danvers Half Long 55 12/1942 72 May 55 

Franklin Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Franklin 
518F Beans Asgrow Stringless Valentine — — 98 May 80 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 



44 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected % of Test 7c of Test % 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co. — Con. 
Shurtleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 
1176 Rutabaga Macomber — — 99 July 75 

J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc., Shushan N. Y 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading .'\pprox. 

37F Beet Detroit Dark Red 55 11/1942 68 June 65 

Approx. 
40F Beet Early Blood Turnip 65 11/1942 59a July 65 

Approx. 

42 Brussels Sprouts (*) 70 11/1942 55d May 70 

Approx. 

38F Carrot Chantenay Half Long 70 11/1942 78 May 78 

Approx, 

43 Caulifiowerr Early Snow Ball 80 11/1942 94 May 75 

.Approx. 
41 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers 80 11/1942 97 May 70 

Approx. 
39 Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing 80 11/1942 84 May 60 

Western .^uto .Associate Store, Marlboro .Approx. 

760 Cabbage Mammoth Red Rock 70 11/1942 66 June 75 

Approx. 

761 Lettuce Early Curled Simpson 85 11/1942 99 June 80 

Ross Bros. Co , Worcester, Mass 

Arthur W. Baldwin & Co., West Stock- 
bridge 
992 Beans Golden Wax 90 11/1942 80f July 80 

Economy Hardware Co., Milford 

266F Corn Golden Bantam 93 1/1943 94 May 75 

265 Peas Thomas Laxton 93 1 '1943 92 June 80 

Farm Service Co., West Berlin 
1219 Beet Early Wonder — — 79 July 65 

Franklin Hardware Corp., Springfield 
621 Cabbage Copenhagen Market — — 79 May 75 

Wm. T. Gove & Son, Walpole 

534 Peas Nott's Excelsior — — 94 June 80 

535F Beans Sure Crop Stringless — — 94 May 80 

P. .A. Richard Hardware Co., Spencer 

811 Cucumber Long Green — — 81 June 80 

812 Radish Early Scarlet Globe — — 90 June 75 

809 Rutabaga Long Island Improved — — 95 June 75 

810 Turnip Early Purple Top White Globe — — 93 June 80 

Spag's Hardware Co., Shrewsbury 
766F Soy Bean Bansei 86 1/1943 76e May None 

A. L Task Co., Inc., Brockton 
156F Beans Black Wax, No. 178106 90 1/1943 85 May 80 

Weld & Beck, Southbridge 
1103 Parsnip Hollow Crown — — 93 June 60 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 
772F Carrot Hutchinson — — 76 June 55 

Leon Zocrhi Co., Milford 

264F Beet Detroit Dark Red 73 1/1943 77 May 65 

261F Carrot Chantenay 63 1/1043 60 May 55 

Rudy Patrick Seed Co., Kansas City. Mo. 

Western .Auto Associate Store, Clinton 

1224 Cabbage Jersey Wakefield, No. G-793 75 1/1943 75 July 75 

1225 Onion Large Red Wethersfield G757 70 11943 84 July 70 

1223 Parsley Moss Curled, Nn. 2270 60 1/1943 67 July 60 

1222 Pepper Ruby Kine, No. S93 55 1/1943 49a July 55 

1221 Tomato Marglobe, No. 2356 75 1/1943 93 July 75 

a Below Standard 

d Below Standard and below given germination 

e Below given germination 

f Equal to Standard but below given germination 

* Variety required but not given 



SEED INSPECTIOX 



45 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number. Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected %. of Test % of Test % 



814F Beans 

813F Corn 
816 Lettuce 
815 Peas 



1065 Beet 

1066 Carrot 

1067 Cucumber 

1068 Parsnip 

1069 Turnip 



155F Beans 
153F Beets 
154F Carrots 



370F Beans 

371 Cucumber 

Parsley 

Peas 

Radish 

Squash 

Turnip 



373 
369 
372 
374 
375 



323F Beet 
322F Carrots 

325 Lettuce 

326 Onion 
324 Soinach 



450 Tomato 



546 


Tomato 


180 


Cabbage 


512 


Cabbage 


179 


Lettuce 


511 


Parsley 


182 


Pepper 


181 


Tomato 


45F Beet 


49 


Broccoli 


48 


Cabbage 


47F Carrot 


51 


Spinach 



337 Squash 



11 IF Beet 
114F Carrot 

116 Cauliflower 

117 Lettuce 



502 Parsley 



Rudy Patrick Seed Co.— Con. 

Western .Auto Associate Store, Spencer 
Stringless Green Pod, Burpee's, 

No. 2399 85 

Sunshine • — 

Grand Rapids. No. G-7S4 80 

Alaska or Earliest of All, No. 2561. . . 80 

Western Auto Associate Store. Ware 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 2130 65 

Danvers Half Long. No. 2653 55 

Early Cluster, No. 1288 80 

Hollow Crown — 

Purple Top White Globe, No. 2667. . 80 

Sargent's Grain & Supply Co., Brockton, 
Mass. 

Pencil Pod Black Wax — 

Edmond's Blood — • 

Long Orange — 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago III. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Boston 

Plentiful — 

Arlington White Spine 80 

Moss Curled 65 

Montana Monarch — ■ 

Early Scarlet Globe 80 

Yellow Crookneck 80 

Purple Top White Globe 80 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Greenfield 

Crosby's Egyptian 70 

Chantenay 55 

Big Boston 80 

Yellow Globe Danvers 75 

Bloomsdale Savoy Leaved 65 

Soilless Growers Guild, Barrytown. Mich.f 

Granite _City Hardware Co., Quincy 

Rutgers — 

Town Square Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 

Break-O-Day — 

F. W. Woolworth & Co., Boston 

Flat Dutch — 

Ball — 

(*) — 

(*) — 

Ruby King — • 

Marglobe — 

Joseph Sordillo & Sons, Boston 

Blood — 

Cavolo — 

Savoy — 

Improved Long Orange — 

Savoy — 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield, 
Mass. 

Blue Hubbard — 

Sterling Seed Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

W. T. Grant Co.. Boston 

Extra Early Flat Egyptian — 

Oxheart — 

Early Snowball — 

Black Seeded Simpson — 

W. T. Grant Co., Dorchester 

Dark Moss Curled — 



1/1943 


81 


May 


80 


— 


85 


May 


75 


1/1943 


96 


June 


80 


1/1943 


96 


June 


80 


1/1943 


79 


Julv 


65 


1/1943 


72 


June 


55 


1/1943 


98 


June 


80 


— ■ 


68 


June 


60 


1/1943 


97 


July 


80 




87 


May 


75 


— 


81 


May 


65 


~ 


77 


May 


55 




88 


May 


80 


12/1942 


89 


■ May 


80 


12/1942 


68 


June 


60 


— 


76a 


June 


80 


12/1942 


96 


May 


75 


12/1942 


91 


May 


75 


12/1942 


97 


June 


80 


12,1942 


76 


May 


65 


12 1942 


87 


May 


55 


12 1942 


96 


May 


80 


12/1942 


86 


May 


70 


12 1942 


92 


May 


60 



94 July 



— 87 July 



79 


July 


75 


VOa 


July 


75 


90 


July 


60 


62 


July 


80 


93 


July 


55 


S7 


July 


75 


77 


June 


65 


95 


May 


75 


83 


May 


75 


77 


May 


55 


ib 


May 


60 



— 59a May 



73 


June 


65 


76 


May 


55 


77 


May 


75 


82 


May 


SO 



67 June 



a Below Standard 

* Variety required hut not given 

■f All seed put up by this Concern under the brand "Phillips' Magical Soilless Plant Ball" 



46 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test 7c of Test % 



Sterling Seed Co. — Con. 
W. T. Grant Co. — Con. 

503 Radish Early Scarlet Turnip — - — 96 May 

504 Tomato Dwarf Champion or Tree — — - 79 May 

505 Turnip Purple Top Strap Leaved — — 98 June 

Stumpp & Walter Co., New York 

Hamlin's Service Station, Norwood 

547F Beet Detroit Dark Red — — 88 May 

548 Pepper Large Bell or Bull Nose — — 96 May 

549 Radish Scarlet Globe — — 95 May 

550 Turnip Purple Top — — 96 June 

Hennen's Soconv Service, Canton 

405 Cabbage Late Flat Dutch — — 91 May 

40.SF Carrot Selected Chantenay — — 84 June 

406 Lettuce Romaine or Cos — — 93 May 

404 Spinach Savoy Leaved — — 86 May 

The Templin Bradley Co., Cleveland, (t) 

Amity Street School, Amherst 

817F Beans *Improved Golden Wax 92 1/1943 80f Mav 

820F Beet Detroit Dark Red, No. 3576 — — 80 June 

822 Cabbage Danish Ballhead — — 92 June 

821F Carrot Chantenay, No. 3666 — — 70 June 

824 Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 35a June 

818F Corn Golden Bantam, No. 3700 92 1/1943 98 May 

826 Cucumber White Spine — — 95 June 

827 Lettuce Improved Hanson — — 97 June 

923 Onion Prizetaker — — 58a June 

828 Parsley Champion Moss Curled • — • — 82 June 

829 Parsnip Large Sugar or Hollow Crown — — 82 June 

830 Radish Scarlet Globe — — 86 June 

819 Spinach Longstanding Bloomsdale, No. 4047 . — — 3a May 

825 Spinach Victory or Bloomsdale — — Oa June 

831 Tomato New Stone — — 92 June 

John B. Varick Co., Manchester, N. H. 

Harlow Bros. Co., Sterling 

288F Beet Crosby's Egyptian — — 82 May 

289 Rutabaga Purple Top — — 85 June 

Vaughan Seed Store, New York 

Thomas & .'\nnie J. Cogger, Saugus 

560F Beet Crosby's Egyptian — — 75 June 

5S9F Carrot Early Chantenay — — 88 June 

562 Lettuce Oak Leaf — — 92 May 

561 Radish Early Scarlet — — 90 May 

Your Garden Mart, Framingham 

599 Cucumber Improved Long Green — . — 80 May 

600 Parsley Champion Moss Curled — — 66 June 

James Vicks, Seeds, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ben Franklin Store, Lee 

901-a Bean Stringless Green Pod Bush Bean 85 12/1942 89 July 

901-b Beet Detroit Dark Red 70 12/1942 79 July 

901-c Carrot Vick's Perfection Chantenay 60 12/1942 55 June 

906 Cauliflowerr Snowball — — 82 July 

901-d Lettuce Grand Rapids 80 12/1942 97 June 

901-e Onion Danvers Yellow Globe 75 12/1942 75 June 

901-f Radish White Icicle 80 12/1942 92 June 

901-g Radish Vick's Earlv Scarlet Globe 80 12/1942 78 June 

901-h Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing 65 12/1942 86 June 

905 Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing — — 84 June 

F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Miiford. Conn. 

Boston Supply, Inc., Framingham Approx. 

588F Beans French Horticultural 87 12/1942 93 May 

Approx. 

590 Lettuce Cos. Paris White, No. 1-3316 89 10/1942 93 May 

Approx. 

589 Onion White Portupal, No. 17654 90 12/1942 98 May 

591 Tomato Srecial Earliana ■ — — 83 May 

592 Turnip White Egg. . — — 85 June 

a Below Standard 

f Equal to Standard but below given germination 

* Not Improved Golden Wax; found to be Unrivalled Wax in held test 

t School Department of this company better known as "Children's Flower Mission." 



75 
75 
80 



65 
60 
75 
80 



75 
55 
80 
60 



80 
65 
75 
55 
55 
75 
80 
80 
70 
60 
60 
75 
60 
60 
75 



65 
55 
80 

75 



80 
60 



80 
65 
55 
75 
80 
70 
75 
75 
60 
60 



80 

80 

70 
75 
80 



SEED INSPECTION 



47 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor. Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 

Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
% of Test 7o of Test % 



F. H. Woodruff & Sons— Con. 
Carr Hardware Co., Pittsfield 
942 Beets For Greens, No. 17934 {*) 77 12/1942 67b July 65 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

566 Beans Fordhook Bush Lima, No. 1-2108 — — 81 May 70 

565F Beet Crosby's Egyptian — — 65 June 65 

567F Carrot Red Cored Chantenay, No. 2741 80 1/1943 85 June 55 

568 Onion Danvers Yellow Globe, No. 17553. .. 90 12/1942 94 May 70 

570 Spinach Round Thick Leaf, No. 181781 — — 63 May 60 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply 

Co., Lawrence Approx. 

696 Leek American Flag 85 12/1942 79 June 60 

Approx. 

700 Peas Easy Money. No. 22631 90 12/1942 93 June 80 

Approx. 

697 Turnip Ea. White Flat Dutch 90 10/1942 92 June 80 

Farm Service Co., West Berlin 

1218 Cabbage Danish Ballhead. No. 13443 — — 67a July 75 

1217 Rutabaga American Purple Top — — 95 July 75 

1220 Spinach Long Standing Savoy — — 92 July 60 

Franklin Hardware Corp., Springfield 

620F Carrot Long Orange 75 12/1942 64b June 55 

622F Corn Golden Sunshine — — 97 May 75 

623 Cucumber Boston Pickling, No. 8-71 — — 83 May 80 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Haverhill 
738 Beans Lima — King of the Garden — — 77 July 70 

D. J. Maloney, Haverhill Approx. 

725 Spinach Harlem Market, No. 9-4103 79 12/1942 95 May 60 

Marlboro Hardware & Supply Co., 

Marlboro Approx. 

759 Cucumber Woodruff's Ace, No. 8-481 80 12/1942 92 June 80 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Lowell 

693F Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 59 June 55 

694 Squash Conn. Straight Neck — — 84 June 75 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Waltham 

233F Beans Sure Crop Black Wax, No. 21896 90 12/1942 96 May 80 

232F Beet Woodruff's Early W'onder, No. 1-378 — 1943 60a June 65 

Approx. 

234F Beet Special Crosby Egyptian, No. 1-482 73 12/1942 78 June 65 

227 Cabbage Copenhagen Market 78 2/1943 75 May 75 

237 Cabbage Copenhagen Market, No. 22310 75 1/1943 89 May 75 

230F Carrot Hutchinson fi5 2/1943 84 May 55 

23SF Carrot Danvers Half Long, No. 19697 68 1/1943 77 May 55 

Approx. 

236F Carrot Morses Bunching, No. 22398 82 1/1943 91 May 55 

238F Corn Marcross 6.13, No. 21917 90 12/1942 95 May 75 

229 Lettuce N. Y. No. 12, No. 22017 96 2/1943 97 May 80 

228 Parsley Paramount, No. 13328 88 2/1943 88 May 60 

226 Spinach Va. Blight Resistant 75 2/1943 81 May 60 

231 Turnip Purple Top White Globe, No. 17299 90 2/1943 89 May 80 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 

South Weymouth Approx. 

1127 Squash Blue Hubbard, No. 1-4295 80 1/1943 87 June 75 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 
Worcester 
601 Peas Improved Telephone • — — 88 June 80 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

275 Parsnip Hollow Crown — — 80 May 60 

271 Spinach Reselected Bloomsdale or Savoy — — 83 May 60 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 

* Variety required but not given 



48 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected % of Test 7c of Test ' ; 

F. H. Woodruff & Sons— Con. 

E. A. Noble & Co.. Stockbridge 
987 Swiss Chard LucuUus. No. 22337 90 12/1942 72b June 65 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 

967 Carrot Chantenay 84 1943 73b June 55 

968 Lettuce Iceberg — — 95 June 80 

971 Radish French Breakfast — — 92 June 75 

970 Turnip White Globe — — 60a July 80 

Pittsfield Hardwaie & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Pittsfield 
949 Lettuce Dark Green Cos or Romaine — 3/1943 84 June 80 

Rome Bros. Hardware Co., Rockland Approx. 

467F Beet Ea. Wonder, No. 18708 77 12 1942 76 May 65 

470 Cantaloupe Honey Dew, No. 1-211 — — 82 June 75 

Approx. 

466F Corn Early Evergreen. No. 16148 90 12/1942 92 Mav 75 

468 Cucumber Woodruff's Hybrid 90 12/1942 97 May 80 

Approx. 

469 Radish Scarlet Globe 90 12 1942 94 May 75 

Sanborn & Damon Co., Quincy 
379F Corn Evergreen — — ■ 76 May 75 

Sanford Hardware Co., Fall River 

1250 Beet Crosby's Egyptian — — 60a .A.ug. 65 

1249 Carrot Oxheart — — Oa July 55 

1247 Lettuce Big Boston — — 81 July 80 

1248 Rutabaga Macomber — — 95 July 75 

J. B. Sibley & Son, Ware 

1075 Lettuce True Iceberg — — 97 June 80 

Approx. 
1074 Pumpkin Conn. Field, No. 22597 89 12 1942 94 June 75 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 

335F Beet Detroit Dark Red, Nn. 21890 65 1/1943 76 June 65 

338F Corn Golden Bantam 8 Row, No. 20061. . . — — - 95 May 75 

Town Sq. Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 

543F Beet Detroit Dark Red, No. 1-431 80 11/1942 59d June 65 

542F Carrot Chantenay 88 11/1942 86 June 55 

545 Lettuce Black Seeded Big Boston 90 11/1942 98 May 80 

ApDrox. 

541 Peas Giadus. No. 6-4202 90 12-1942 92 June 80 

Approx. 
544 Rutabaga Improved Long Island 90 10 1942 99 June 75 

Treat Hardware Co., Lawrence 

744F Beet Ea. Wonder Green Leafed, No. 1-440 79 10/1942 79 June 65 

741F Carrot Bagley 74 11/1942 76 June 55 

742F Corn Sencross, No. 15925 — — 96 Mav 75 

743F Corn Woodruff's Earligold, No. 20070 89 12/1942 96 May 75 

745 Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing Savoy, 

No. 9-4111 92 12/1942 92 May 60 

W'aldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

189F Beans Dwarf Horticultural. No. 2-735 — — 4.5a May 80 

183F Beet Early Wonder — — 92 June 65 

187 Cabbage Copenhagen Market — — 86 May 75 

192 Celery Giant Pascal — — 94 May 55 

191 Egg Plant Black Beauty — — 64 Alay 65 

186 Lettuce N. Y. No. 12, No. 20020 — — 94 May 80 

188 Pepper California Wonder — — 82 April 55 

S. D. Woodruff & Sons, Orange, Conn. 

.•\dams Hardware & Paint Co., Lowell 

687 Beet Crosby's Egyptian, No. 2288 70 12 1941 65 June 65 

689 Cabbage Jersey Wakefield — — 75 June 75 

686 Lettuce Big Boston 95 11/1942 97 June 80 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 

d Below standard and below given germination. Wholesaler claims this seed was shipped to 
retailer with tag stating "Below Stand. Germ. 59% — tested 11/1942." 



SEED INSPECTION 



49 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
)-ab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than \\'holesaIe Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Given Found Mass. 
Germination Germina- Stand- 
Date tion — Month ard 
':; of Test '''c of Test % 



40 7 F Beet 
408F Carrot 



653 Endive 



415F Beans 


598-b 


Beans 


598-c 


Beans 


598-d 


Beans 


416F 


Beet 


598-1? 


Beet 


598-h 


Carrot 


598-e 


Corn 


598-f 


Corn 


598-j 


Cticunrber 


598-k; 


Lettuce 


598-1 


Parsley 


59S-a 


Peas 


598-m 


Radish 


598-n 


Spinach 


598-0 


Squash 


598-i 


Swiss Chard 


598-p 


Turnip 


651F 


Beet 


650F 


Corn 


647 


Onion 


649 


Rutabaga 


488F Beet 


487F Corn 


569 


Broccoli 


572 


Squash 


895 


Kale 


894 


Lettuce 


896 


Swiss Chard 


897 


Squash 


1229 


Cabbage 


1228 


Radish 


1230 


Rutabaga 


596F Beans 


1243 


Carrot 



758 Beans 



399F Beet 
401 F Beans 
398F Carrot 
400F Corn 
402 Peas 



411 Peas 



S. D. Woodruff & Sons — Con. 
Allen Hardware Co., Needham 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 2612 73 2 1943 79 

Danvers Half Long, No. 2611 71 2 1943 76 

\V. E. Aubuchon Co.. Inc.. Gardner 

Broad Leaved Batavian — — 87 

Baker Hardware Co., Welleslev 

Fordhook Bush Lima, No. 2400 85 1 1943 89 

Strinc-less Black Valentine 87 12/1942 89 

Fordhook Bu-'h Lima 86 12 1942 88 

Improved Golden Wax 85 12 1942 75d 

Crosby's E-vptian, No. 2465 65 1/1943 65 

Earlv Wonder 80 11/1942 73 

Chantenav 55 11/1942 49a 

Earlv Spancros,s 75 12/1942 56d 

Stowell's Evergreen 85 1/1943 90 

Stay-Green 81 1/1943 94 

Big Boston 93 11/ 1942 93 

Moss Curled 76 11/1942 78 

Surprise Med. Early Sweet 81 12/1942 91 

Scarlet Globe 76 11/1942 81 

Bloomsdale Savoy 80 11/1942 82 

Summer Straightneck 93 11/1942 95 

Giant Ribbed 76 11/1942 75 

Purple Top White Globe 93 11/1942 89 

A. J. Bibeau Hardware Co., Gardner. . . 

Ea. Blood Turnip — — 71 

Woodruffs Extra Early Yellow — — 93 

Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 2701 .... 80 1-1943 92 

Am. Purple Top No. 2650 90 2/1943 97 

A. T. Chase Corp., Dedham 

Crosby's Egyptian, No. 2500 65 2/1943 ,57a 

Country Gentleman. No. 2725 83 1/1943 88 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

Calabrese. No. 2505 95 1/1943 98 

Below Stand. 

Warren Turban, No. 2681 72 1/1942 88 

Depping & Moore, Inc., Westfield 

Dwarf Siberian — — 41a 

Iceberg N. Y. Head — — 77a 

(*) — — 83 

Giant Crookneck, No. 2431 90 11 1942 35 

Felix's Hardware Co., Clinton 

Danisn Ballhead — — 84 

Early Scarlet Turnip White Tip — — 87 

Long Island — — 75 

The Fiske Corporation, Natick 

Golden Wax, No. 2522 84 2/1943 84 

G. W. Gardiner & Son, Fall River 

Danvers Half Long, No. 2750 67 5/1943 88 

Marlboro Hardware & Supply Co., 
Marlboro 

Bountiful, No. 3395 — — 87 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

Detroit Dark Red, No, 2501 65 11/1942 65 

Sure Crop Wax, No. 2626 90 12/1942 81b 

Danvers Half Long. No. 2178 57 2/1942 66 

Marcross 13.6, No. 2722 78 3/1943 71a 

Blue Bantam, No. 2567 86 2/1943 94 

Palmer Hardware Co., Needham 

Nott's Excelsior 85 2/1943 94 



May 
June 



June 



May 


70 


July 


80 


July 


70 


July 


80 


May 


65 


July 


65 


July 


55 


July 


75 


luly 


75 


July 


80 


July 


80 


lulv 


60 


July 


80 


July 


75 


July 


60 


July 


75 


July 


65 


July 


80 


June 


65 


May 


75 


June 


70 


June 


75 


June 


65 


May 


75 


May 


75 


May 


75 


July 


75 


June 


80 


June 


65 


June 


75 


Julv 


75 


July 


V5 


July 


V5 


May 


80 


July 


55 



June 



May 


65 


Mav 


80 


June 


55 


May 


75 


July 


80 



July 



80 



a Below Standard 

b Above Standard but below given germination 
d Below Standard and below given germination 
* Variety required but not given. 



50 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D— Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected % of Test % of Test % 



4S9F Beans 
460F Beet 
457F Carrot 
458 Cucumber 
462 Radish 
461 Rutabaga 



386 Parsnip 



481 Beans 



563 
564 



Cabbage 
Cabbage 



452 Peas 



S. D. Woodruff & Sons — Con. 
George Warren, Braintree 

French Horticultural 85 2/1943 98 May 80 

Early Wonder Beet, No. 2500 65 11/1942 57a June 65 

Morse's Bunching, No. 2622 70 3 1942 67 June 55 

A&C — — 80 May 80 

Early Scarlet Globe — — 84 May 75 

♦Rutabaga Turnip — — 70a June 80 

Woodworth Bradley, Inc., Providence, R. I. 

Schofield Hardware Co., No. .A.ttleboro 

Hollow Crown 75 1/1943 70 June 60 

Unl<nown 

Centre Hardware Co., Roslindale 

Pencil Pod Wax 61 4/1942 41d Aug. 80 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

Charleston Wakefield — — 10a May 75 

All Seasons — — 3a May 75 

Granite City Hardware Co., Quincy 

Sutton's Excelsior — — 87 June 80 

Harding St. Grain Store, Worcester 

Yellow Eye — — 3a May 80 

Eclipse — — 39a July 65 

Danish Ballhead — — la July 75 

Late Drumhead — — Oa July 75 

Golden Bantam — — 77 May 75 

Early Cluster — — 11a July 80 

Southport Yellow Globe — — Oa Mav 70 

Southport Yellow Globe — — Oa July 70 

Conn. Field — — 6a July 75 

Crimson Giant — — 72a July 75 

French Breakfast .' — — 17a July 75 

Bloomsdale Savoy 85 10/1937 Oa May 60 

Green Hubbard — — Oa July 75 

Giant Summer Crookneck — — 3a July 75 

Boston Marrow — — Oa July 75 

Norwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 

Yellow Globe . — — 14a June 75 

Perron & Company, Southbridge 

Nott's Excelsior — — 81 July 80 

**Wholesaler Not Given 

Adams Hardware & Paint Co.. Lowell . 

Copenhagen Market — — 21a June 7ii 

Danish Ballhead — — -563 June 75 

Yellow Globe, No. 30 W 70 12/1941 12d June 70 

White Portugal, No. 2231 75 12/1941 38d June 70 

Red Globe — — 88 June 80 

Allen Hardware Co., Needham 

Iceberg — — Oa May 80 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Clinton 

Hollander or Danish Ballhead — — 47a July 75 

Premium Late Flat Dutch — — 66a July 75 

Big Boston — — 68a July 80 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Hudson 

Premium Late Flat Dutch — — 21a July 75 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Orange 

Big Boston 85 12/1938 Oa June 80 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Shelburne 
Falls 

Danish Ballhead Imported — — 2a July 75 



613F Beans 


1255 


Beet 


1269 


Cabbage 


1270 


Cabbage 


612 


Corn 


1257 


Cucumber 


616 


Onion 


1268 


Onion 


1265 


Pumpkin 


1260 


Radish 


1261 


Radish 


617 


Spinach 


1262 


Squash 


1263 


Squash 


1264 


Squash 


539 


Turnip 


1108 


Peas 


688 


Cabbage 


690 


Cabbage 


684 


Onion 


685 


Onion 


692 


Turnip 


410 


Lettuce 


1234 


Cabbage 


1235 


Cabbage 


1233 


Lettuce 


1212 


Cabbage 


635 


Lettuce 



1034 Cabbage 



a Below Standard 

d Below Standard and below given germination 

* Variety required but not given. A Rutabaga incorrectly labeled turnip. 

**Wholesaler not named because retailer admits, or wholesaler claims, that the following lots 

of vegetable seeds were not purchased by the retailer during the current year. 



SEED INSPECTION 



51 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable 
Section 261-D — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, \'ariety of Seed Given 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date 

Collected % of Test 

Wholesaler Not Given — Con. 
W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Ware 
1071 Lettuce Prizehead W. S — — 

The Bengtson Hardware Co., Gardner 
656 Spinach Bloomsdale — — 

A. J. Bibeau Hardware Co., Gardner 
648F Carrot Woodruff's Bunching — — 

Bryant's Hardware Co., Haverhill 
729 Cabbage Danish Ballhead — — 

Burlingame & Darby's Co., No. Adams 
1024 Cabbage Early Winningstadt — — 

C & D Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Rockland 
471 Parsnip Hollow Crown — — 

Davis Hardware Co., Gardner 
661F Beet Edmond's Early Blood — — 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 
571 Lettuce Big Boston — — 

Dresser-Hull Co., Lee. . . 

912 Cabbage Early Winningstadt — — 

915 Peas Dwarf Champion — — 

Essex Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Lawrence 
698 Cabbage Savoy 43 3/194.3 

Franklin Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Franklin 
517 Celery Giant Pascal — — 

Harding Street Grain Store, Worcester 

615F Carrot Oxheart — — 

1253 Carrot Oxheart — — 

1256 Cucumber Early Fortune — — 

1258 Cucumber Boston Pickling — — 

1259 Cucumber Davis Perfect — — 

611 Peas Laxton's Progress — ■ — 

Harlow Bros. Sterling 
287F Carrot Danvers Half Long — — 

Haverhill Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Haverhill 
Brussels 

740 Sprouts Long Island Improved — — 

739 Celery Golden Plume — — 

737 Leek (*) — — 

735 Onion Southport White Globe — — 

736 Onion Red W'ethersfield — — 

Leavitt's Sport Shop, Haverhill 
734 Peas Laxton's Progress — — 

Methe's Checkerboard Feed Store, 
Westfield 
878 Melon **Cucumber — — 

Milford Hardware Co., Milford 

272 Cabbage Danish Ballhead — — 

273 Lettuce New York or Wonderful — — • 

274 Pepper Pimento — — 

Norwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 
540 Lettuce Big Boston — — 

a Below Standard 

* Variety required but not given 

** Seed found to be Melon — not Cucumber as labeled 



Seeds 



Found Mass. 
Germina- Stand- 
tion — Month ard 
% of Test % 



18a July 80 

57a May 60 

55 June 55 

43a June 75 

Oa July 75 

25a June 60 

50a June 65 

70a May 80 

48a July 75 

Oa June 80 

43a June 75 



43a 


July 


55 


3a 


June 


55 


4a 


July 


55 


38a 


July 


80 


16a 


July 


80 


48a 


July 


80 


67a 


July 


80 


32a 


May 


55 



54a 


June 


70 


b2a 


Aug. 


55 


4Sa 


June 


60 


49a 


June 


70 


28a 


June 


70 


76a 


June 


80 



82 June 



80 



62a May 75 

70a May 80 

3Ra May 55 



3a May 



52 



CONTROL SERIES No. 11 <) 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261-D — Continued 

\Miolesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given Found Mass. 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other Germination Germina- "Stand- 
No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Date tion — Month ard 
Collected 7o of Test % of Test % 

Wholesaler Not Given — Con 

The O. B. Parks Co., Westfield 

862 Onion Danvers Flat — — 7a June 70 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 

705 Celery Golden Self Blanching — — .5a July 55 

706 Egg Plant Leonard's New York Purple — — 62 June 60 

Sanford Hardware Co., Fall River 

1246 Beans Dwarf Horticultural — — 23a July SO 

C. S. Sawyer & Co., Fall River 

1241 Kale Tall Curled Scotch — — 25a July 75 

1239 Lettuce Early Curled Simpson — — 25a July 80 

1242 Lettuce Black Seeded Tennisball. . - — 73a July 80 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

185 Spinach Bloonisdale Long Standing Savoy. .. . — — 44a May 60 

Weld & Beck, Southbridse 

1102 Cabbage Early Savoy — — 83 July 75 

1101 Lettuce Romaine or Cos — — 7.Sa June 80 

a Below Standard 



SEED INSPECTION 53 



TYPE AND VARIETY STUDIES OF VEGETABLES 

Conducted in Conjunction with the Department of Olericulture 
Grant B. Snyder Professor 

Tests are conducted by the Experiment Station each year to determine the 
trueness to type of vegetable seeds which are offered for sale by seedsmen in 
this State. Seed samples of beans, sweet corn, carrots, beets and spinach were 
purchased from various stores and seed dealers by State Inspectors and sent to 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station at Amherst, where the De- 
partment of Olericulture sowed the seed in field test plots in order to compare 
plant characteristics with the labeled variety name. 

The soil of the test plot is a fine, sandy loam and is naturalh' fertile. The land 
was well prepared and a liberal quantit>- of fertilizer was applied broadcast 
and harrowed into the soil prior to seeding. Growth and development was gen- 
erally satisfactory except for the spinach trials the seed of which was planted 
during the late summer. This crop was a failure, hence no records are included 
in this report. 

Yields of the various crops were not measured because of the necessity of 
using small plots and also because replication of the plantings was not feasible 
due to the large number of strains and varieties that were compared. Conformity 
to type has been the measure of comparison in these tests and individual plants 
have been called off-type when they could not be classified in a group of plants 
ranging fairly close to the average for the particular strain or variety under 
consideration. 

In studying the comparative type characters and performance records it is 
plainly evident that all but a few of the stocks were true to name and description 
and most of them were highly productive. In a few instances it appeared that 
the variety had been misnamed or misrepresented. This was probably due to 
the seed shortage during 1943 as well as to inexperienced help that many seeds- 
men were forced to employ. 

The source of the seed and the laboratory germination records are to be found 
in the tables on pages 28-52, where the lots of seed used in the field tests are 
identified by the letter "F" added to the laboratory number. Those seeds tested 
in the field and not included in the following table were 100% true to type. 



54 




CONTROL SERIES No. 119 




Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds 


Lab. 
No. 


Kind of Seed and 
Variety 


True to Type 
Percent 


Remarks 



BEANS 

368F Burpee's Stringless Wax None 

176F Golden Wax 99 

81 7F Golden Wax Improved None 

284F Pencil Pod Black Wax 99 

310F Pencil Pod Black Wax None 

613F Yellow Eye None 

BEETS 

426F Beats All 98 

45F Blood 98 

78F Crosby's Egyptian 92 

87F Crosby's Egyptian 98 

1 73F Crosby's Egyptian 94 

219F Crosby's Egyptian 90 

263F Crosby's Egyptian 94 

307F Crosby's Egyptian 92 

323F Crosby's Egyptian 96 

416F Crosby's Egyptian 96 

422F Crosby's Egyptian 96 

436F Crosby's Egyptian 88 

488F Crosby's Egyptian 98 

560F Crosby's Egyptian 88 

565F Crosby's Egyptian 92 

654F Crosby's Egyptian 88 

682F Crosby's Egyptian 94 

174F Detroit Dark Red 94 

249F Detroit Dark Red 90 

317F Detroit Dark Red 94 

366F Detroit Dark Red 92 

385F Detroit Dark Red 96 

392F Detroit Dark Red 94 

399F Detroit Dark Red 94 

407F Detroit Dark Red 94 

429F Detroit Dark Red 98 

547F Detroit Dark Red 88 

642F Detroit Dark Red 98 

614F Dewing's Early Blood Turnip 90 

1 7F Early Blood Turnip 98 

199F Early Blood Turnip 92 

29F Early Blood Turnip 92 

351F Early Blood Turnip 98 

636F Early Blood Turnip 94 

651F Early Blood Turnip 92 

7F Early Wonder 96 

63F Early Wonder 98 

118F Early Wonder 88 

183F Early Wonder 94 

341F Early Wonder 92 

361F Early Wonder 96 

381F Early Wonder 96 

453F Early Wonder 98 

467F Early Wonder 92 

527F Early Wonder 92 

744F Early Wonder • 94 

153F Edmand's Blood 96 

523F Edmand's Blood 90 

661F Edmand's Blood 94 



Not a Wax Bean; appears to be 

Burpee's Stringless Green Pod 

1% vining habit 

Not Golden Wax appears to be 

Unrivalled Wax 

1% Flat pods 

Not a Pencil Pod Black Wax; 

100% Flat Podded 

None Germinated 



2% Oblong 

2% Light Color 

8% Top Shape 

2% Long 

4% Spindle — 2% Long 

10% Spindle 

6% Long Top 

8% Long Top 

4% Long Top 

4% Top Shape 

4% Spindle 

8% Spindle— 4% Top Shape 

2% Top Shape 

10% Long Top— 2% Light Color 

8% Long Top 

8% Long Top— 4% Blocky 

6% Spindle 

2% Long— 4% Flat 

10% Spindle 

6% Long Top 

8% Long Top 

2% Flat— 2% Long 

6% Obovate 

4% Flat— 2% Spindle 

2% Spindle— 2% Obovate— 2% Flat 

2% Long Top 

10% Flat— 2% Long Top 

2% Spindle 

10% Long Top 

2% Globe 

8% Long 

8% Long 

2% Long Top 

6% Long Top 

4% Long Top— 4% Spindle 

4% Globe 

2% Globe 

12% Long Top 

6% Long 

8% Globe 

4% Oblong 

4% Globe 

2% Globe 

8% Long Top 

8% Long Top 

6% Long Top 

4% Long Top 

10%, Long Top 

6% Spindle 



SEED INSPECTION 



55 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 



Lab. 
No. 



Kind of Seed and 
• Variety 



True to Type 
Percent 



Remarks 



741F 
648F 
674F 
8F 
70F 
396F 

38F 
119F 

29F 

283F 

391F 

2F 

74F 
107F 
202F 
308 F 
57SF 
681F 
693F 
296F 
340F 
342 F 
514F 
730F 
138F 

28F 

47F 
449F 
478F 
149F 

154F 
441F 
602F 
620F 
615F 



818F 
344F 



428F 
394F 



CARROTS 

Bunching — 

Bunching — 

California Peerless 99 

Chantenay 99 

Chantenay 99 

Chantenay — 

Chantenay Half Long 97 

Chantenay Half Long 96 

Chantenay Red Cored 98 

Danvers 96 

Danvers 98 

Danvers Half Long Improved 97 

Danvers Half Long 94 

Danvers Half Long 98 

Danvers Half Long — 

Danvers Half Long 90 

Danvers Half Long 98 

Danvers Half Long 98 

Danvers Half Long 99 

Hutchinson 98 

Hutchinson 96 

Hutchinson 96 

Hutchinson 98 

Hutchinson — • 

Imperator 98 

Improved Long Orange 94 

Improved Long Orange — 

Improved Long Orange 98 

Improved Long Orange — 

Long Orange 97 

Long Orange 98 

Long Orange 99 

Long Orange 96 

Long Orange 96 

Oxheart — 

CORN 

Golden Bantam — 

Golden Cross Bantam — 

Golden Cross Bantam 97 

Improved Golden Bantam — 



Very much like Hutchinson 

Very much like Hutchinson 

1 % very much light colored 

1% Long 

1% White roots 

This is a very poor strain 

Resembles Danvers closely 

3% Long Tapering 

4% Long Tapering 

2% Long Tapering 

4% Light lemon colored 

2% Light lemon color 

3% Long Hairy Roots 

6% very Stump Rooted 

2% Light Lemon Color 

This is a strain of Chantenay 

10% very Stump Rooted 

2% Light Lemon Color 

2% Light Lemon Color 

1% White Roots 

2% Light Lemon Color 

4% White Roots 

4% White Roots 

2% White Roots 

No germination 

2% very stump rooted 

1% white — 5% lemon yellow 

This is Hutchinson^not Long Orange 

2% very light colored 

This is a strain of Hutchinson 

2% Light Lemon Color — 1% long 

hairy root 
2% light Lemon Color 
1% light Lemon Color 
4% Very Thick Heavy Roots 
4% Light Colored 
No seed germinated 



This is definitely not Golden Bantam 
but is probably Marcross 13.6 
This is not Golden Cross Bantam 

but is Marcross 13.6 
3% Red Tassels 

This is Golden Cross Bantam — 
3% off-type — red tassels 



56 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



STUDIES OF FLOWER SEEDS 

Conducted by the Department of Floriculture 
Clark L. Thayer Professor 

For the eighth season the Department of Floriculture has cooperated with 
the Seed Laboratory in conducting trials to determine the quality of flower seeds 
oflfered for sale in retail seed stores, hardware stores, chain stores, schools, and 
other retail outlets. The seeds, collected by the State Seed Inspector, were 
tested for germination and performance under field conditions. 

All seeds were sown on July 6, a rather late date for the sowing of many kinds 
of annuals. The first killing frost occurred on October 6, giving a growing 
season of 91 da>s. 

Seeds of 225 lots, representing 55 genera, packeted by 34 concerns, and obtained 
from 59 retailers, were distributed as follows: 



Adonis 

Ageratum 

Alyssum 

Amaranthus 

Anchusa 

Anoda 

Antirrhinum (Snapdragon) 

Aster tanacetifolius (Tahoka Daisy) . . 

Brachycome (Swan River Daisy) 

Calendula 7 

Callistephus (Aster) 14 



Cassia 

Celosia (Cockscomb) 

Centaurea (including Bachelor's Button) 

Chrysanthemum 

Cleome 

Cosmidium 

Cosmos 

Crotolaria (Golden Sweet Pea) 

Cynoglossum 

Delphinium (Larkspur) 

Dianthus (Carnations and Pinks) 

Didiscus (Blue Lace Flower) 

Dimorphotheca (African Daisy) 

Eschscholtzia (California Poppy) 

Euphorbia 

Gaillardia 

Geum 



Cilia 1 

Gypsophila 5 

Helianthus (Sunflower) 1 

Helichrysum (Strawfiower) 3 

Iberis (Candytuft) 6 

Inipatiens (Balsam) 4 

fpomoea (Morning Glory) 3 

Kochia (Mexican Fire Bush) 2 

Linum (Flax) 2 

Lobelia 2 

Lupinus (Lupine) 2 

Mathiola (Stock) i 

Mirabilis (Four-o'clock) 3 

Nemophila 1 

Nicotiana 1 

Papaver (Poppy) 3 

Petunia IS 

Phlox 2 

Reseda (Mignonette) 3 

Salpiglossis 2 

Scabiosa 7 

Tagetes (Marigold) 14 

Tropaeolum (Nasturtium) 4 

Verbena f- 

Vinca 2 

Viola 1 

Zinnia 24 

TOTAL 225 



Germination tests were not made in the laboratory on any of the lots of seed. 
Results of germination were rated as "good" if seeds germinated in approxi- 
mately two-thirds of the row; "fair", between one-third and two-thirds; "poor", 
for less than one-third. Performance was designated as "satisfactory" if the 
varieties were true to name, with only one-third or less of the plants not true 
to form or color; "fair", between one-third and two-thirds not true; and "not 
satisfactory" if less than one-third was true to name or if the lot did not produce 
sufificient plants for providing satisfactory data. 



SEED INSPECTION 



57 



As far as possible trueness to tj-pe was determined. However, since many 
lots were described as mixtures or did not carry varietal names, a wide range in 
color and form was permissible. 

Results of the test on germination are summarized as follows: 



Good 

Fair 

Poor 

None 

Total. 



NUMBER 


PERCENT 


OF LOTS 


OF TOTAL 


105 


46.67 


46 


20.44 


66 


29.33 


8 


3.56 



225 



100.00 



Flower Seed Inspection 



Lab. 


Kind of 


No. 


Seed 


lOOF 


Cassia 


97F 


Crotalaria 


105F 


Dianthus 


99F 


Nicotiana 


<)8F 


Petunia 


103F 


Petunia 


I04F 


Tagetes 


106F 


Tagetes 


lOlF 


Zinnia 


102F 


Zinnia 



750F 
751F 



519F 



n36F 
1137F 
1138F 
1139F 



756 F 
757F 

670F 



1116F 
1114F 
1117F 

1115F 
1118F 



Eschgcholtzia 
Helichrysum 



Zinnia 



Anchusa 
Celosia 
Cosmos 
Scabiosa 



Tagetes 
Zinnia 

Papaver 



Antirrhinum 

Centaurea 

Centaurea 

Scabiosa 
Verbena 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

Gold Coin Flower 

Retusa 

Breck's Geisha Girl, Single& Double 

Break's Snowstorm 

Flaming Velvet, Single Bedding. . . 

Igloo, Dwarf Bedding 

Double French, Sunkist 

Signata Pumila, Gold Dust-Single 

Fr 

Fantasy Melody 

Zulu Queen, Deep Maroon 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Brad's Hardware Co., Maynard 

Sunset Mixture 

Strawflower 



Franklin Hardware & Plumbing 
Supply Co., Franklin 
Burpee's Super Giants, Mixed 
Colors 

A. C. Freeman Hardware, Whitman 

Blue Bird 

Plumosa Mixed 

Early Flowering Burpee's Golden 
Tall Double Mixed 

United Cooperative Society, 
Maynard 
Marigolds on Parade 



Zinnias on Parade, Special 
Mixture of Giant Varieties 

V'ctory Auto Supplies, Fitchburg 
Fordhook Hybrids 

Waite Hardware Co., Webster 

Half Dwarf Mixed 

Jubilee Gem 

Sweet Sultan Mixed 

Tall Double Mixed 

Giant Mixed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Poor 
Poor 
Fair 

Poor 
Poor 
Poor 
Good 

Fair 

Good 

Good 



Poor 
Fair 



Good 



Good 
Good 
Good 
Poor 



Good 



Good 



Poor 
Fair 
Good 

Poor 
Poor 



Performance 



Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

7 colors 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 3 colors 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Incomplete; only 2 
plants in bloom 
October 4 

Satisfactory 8 colors 
Not satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete;had not 
bloomed October 4 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



58 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Lab. 

No. 



1097F 
1098F 
1096F 



843 F 
846F 
844F 

845F 

847F 

848F 
1039FA 
1039FB 
1039FC 
1039FD 
1039FE 

1039FF 



1036F 



8S1F 



1149F 
1145F 



1147F 
1148F 



1146F 



1042F 
1041F 
1043F 



1048F 
lOSOF 
1049F 
105 IF 



Kind of 
Seed 



849F 


Scabiosa 


1037F 


Zinnia 


953 F 


Antirrhinum 


952F 


Salpiglossis 


928F 
927F 


Calendula 
Helianthus 



Amaranthus 

Calendula 

Callistephus 



Alyssum 

Brachycome 

Didiscus 

Gaillardia 

Kochia 

Petunia 
Petunia 
Petunia 
Petunia 
Petunia 
Petunia 

Petunia 



Zinnia 



Zinnia 



Antirrhinum 
Gaillardia 



Gilia 
Lobelia 



Verbena 



Petunia 
Tagetes 
Zinnia 



Antirrhinum 
Centaurea 
Lobelia 
Verbena 



Eschscholtzia 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Chase Nursery, Winchendon, Mass. 
G. C. Winter Co., Southbridge 

Annual 

Pot Marigold 

Wilt Resistant 

Crosman Seed Corp. East Rochester, 
N. Y. 
S. S. Kresge Co., Springfield 

Dwarf, Pure White 

Daisy Brachycome, Mixed Colors 
Queen Anne's 



Double Blanket Flower, Mixed. 

Mexican Fire Bush or Summer 
Cypress 

General Dodds (Scarlet) 

No. 1 Snowball, Pure White. . . 

No. 2 Rosy Morn, Soft Pink. . . 

No. 3 General Dodds, Scarlet. . 

No. 4 Violacea, Deep Purple. . . 

No. 5 Striped and Blotched, 
Mixed Colors 

No. 6 Heavenly Blue (Light Sky 
Blue) . 



Field Tests 



Pincushion, Tall Double Mixed 

Mexican Zinnia Planned Garden 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing 
Supply Co., Pittsfield 
Giant Antirrhinum, Mixed Colors 

Mixed colors 

Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 

Mixed Colors and Types 

Double Imported Strain 

Deerington Zinnia Gardens, 
Bargersville, Ind. 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 
Deerington Special — Double 
Bloom — Mixed Colors 

S. S. Kresge Co., Springfield 

Deerington Special New Royal 
Golden-Orange 



Thomas W. Emerson Co., Beverly, 
IVIass. 

Drive-In-Fruitland, Boston 

Rust Resistant, Mixed 



Double Mixed. 



Mixed. . 
Annual. 



Royal Bouquet. 



Yankee Maid Products, Inc., Boston 
Ruffled Martha Washington. . . . 

Dwarf French Mixed 

Giant Flowering, Yellow 



Ferry-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Forbes & Wallace, Inc., Springfield 

Giant Bedding, White 

Jubilee Gem 

Celestial or True Blue 



Poor 
Good 
Poor 

Scarlet None 



Germi- 
nation 



Good 
Poor 
Poor 



Good 
Poor 
Good 

Good 



Good 

Poor 

Poor 

Fair 

Fair 

Poor 

Good 

Good 

Fair 

Good 



Fair 
Poor 



Good 
Good 



Good 



Good 



Fair 
Fair 



None 
Fair 



Poor 



None 
None 
Good 



A. C. Freeman Hardware, Whitman 
Extra Golden 



Fair 



Performance 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Not Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 
Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 

Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Not Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 6 colors 

Not satisfactory 

6 colors 
Incomplete;had not 

bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 6 colors 



Incomplete; 1 plant 
in bloom October 4 
Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
5 colors 



Not satisfactory 
3 colors 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



59 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Kind of 
Seed 



Dianthus 



Callistephus 



Cleome 
Geum 

Gypsophila 

Iberis 
Scabiosa 



Calendula 
Eschscholtzia 
Scabiosa 



Antirrhinum 
Cosmos 



Petunia 



Antirrhinum 
Gaillardia. . 

Gypsophila 



Zinnia 
Zinnia 
Zinnia 
Zinnia 
Zinnia 



Dianthus 

Anoda 
Anoda 
Aster 

Callistephus 

Cosmos 

Dimorphotheca 

Petunia 

Tagetes 

Verbena 
Viola 

Zinnia 
Zinnia 



Tropaeolum 



Lupinus 



Gypsophila 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Ferry-Morse Seed Co. — Con. 

M. N. Landau, Inc., Westfield 
Double, Carnation Shades. . 



Maynard Supply Co., Maynard 
Giant Crego Purple 



Union Florist Co., Boston 

Giant Pink Queen 

Double Scarlet 

Covent Garden Market Baby's 

Breath 

Umbellata Mixed 

Giant Annual Mixed 



Ben Franklin Stores, Chicago, III. 

Ben Franklin Store, Lee 

Yellow Collosal 

Mixed 

Tall Double Mixed 



Fraser's Wellesley, Mass. 

Winer's Hardware Co., Whitman 

Mixture 

True Early Mixed Mammoth 

Single 

Mixed 



Field Tests 



Fredonia Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Public Market, West Stockbridge 

Finest Mixed 

Finest Double Mixed 



Baby's Breath, Large Flowers. . . 
Genessee Valley Seed Co., Dalton 



Y. 

S. Kresge Co., Boston 

White 

Crimson 

Scarlet 

Yellow 

Rose. . 



S. S. Kresge Co., Springfield 
Laciniatus 



Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston, Mass. 
Opalcup Lavateroides (Lilac) . . . 
Snowcup — Glistening White. . . . 
Daisy Tahoka (Blue-Lavender, 

Golden Center) 

Early California Giant Mixed. . 

Giant Sensation Dazzler — Single 
Crimson 

(African Marguerite) 

Small Creamy White 

Dwarf Double French, Harmony 
Sunkist 

Spitfire — Deep Scarlet Rose. . . . 

Blue Elf 

Cactus Flowered Giants, Mixed 

Pumila Sunshine, Tints 



Charles C. Hart Seed Co., 
Wethersfield, Conn. 

Davis Hardware Co., Gardner 
Dwarf Mixed 



Jeffway Hatch, Inc., Easthampton 
Hartwegii, Mixed 



Manchester-Forbes Co., Easthamp- 
ton 
Baby's Breath, White 



Germi- 
nation 



Fair 



Good 



Good 
Poor 

Good 
Good 
Good 



Good 

Fair 

Poor 



Poor 



Good 
Poor 



Good 
Fair 



Good 



Good 
Good 
Good 
Good 
Good 



Fair 



Good 
Good 



Poor 

Fair 



Fair 
Poor 
Poor 

Good 
Poor 
Poor 
Good 
Good 



Good 



Fair 



Good 



Performance 



Satisfactory 7 colors 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 
Satisfactory S colors 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 6 colors 
Satisfactory 7 colors 



Satisfactory 5 colors 



Incomplete; only 1 
plant in bloom 
October 4 



Satisfactory 



60 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Lab. 
No, 


Kind of 
Seed 


Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 




Field Tests 




Germi- 
nation 


Performance 


929F 


Alyssum 


Charles C. Hart Seed Co.— Con. 
Piatt & Goslee, Great Barrington 
Saxatile — Basket of Gold 


Poor 


Not satisfactory 
1 plant of Sweet 
.Alyssum 


932F 
931F 


Gaillardia 
Impatiens 


F. H. Turner & Co., Hardware, 
Great Barrington 
Blanket Flower. Mixed Colors , . 

Choice Double, Mixed Colors. . . 


Fair 
Good 


Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 

Satisfactory 5 colors 


778F 


Helichrysum 

Impatiens 
Reseda 


Waite Hardware Co., Worcester 


Good 

Good 
Poor 




777F 
779F 


Choice Double. Mixed Colors. . . 


bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 6 colors 

Not satisfactory 


800F 


Adonis 
Helichrysum 


Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vt. 

Irving B. Barrows & Co., Worcester 


Poor 
None 




799F 


Everlasting or Strawflower 




607F 
609 F 


Celosia 
Cosmos 
Zinnia 

Papaver 
Petunia 
Tagetes 

Zinnia 


Elwood .Adams, Inc., Worcester 
Celosia, Fine Mixed Colors 


Good 
Poor 
Poor 

Poor 
Poor 
Good 
Good 


Satisfactory 6 colors 
Not satisfactory 


608F 




Not satisfactory 


171F 


Hygrade Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

.Abraham Lincoln School, East 
Braintree 


Not satisfactory 


170F 
169F 


Exquisite Hybrida. Mixed 

Orbit 


Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 


172F 


California Giants, Mixed 


Satisfactory 5 colors 


587F 
586F 


Calendula 
Calljstephus 


Little Tree Farms, Inc., 

Framingham Centre, Mass. 

Finest Dwarf Bedding Mixture . 
California Giant, Lt. Blue 

Mandeville & King Co., Rochester, 
N. Y. 

Berkshire. Hardware Co., Pittsfield 


Fair 
Poor 


Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 


978F 


Ageratum 

Centaurea 
Phlox 

Centaurea 


Poor 

Fair 
Poor 

Good 


Not satisfactory 


880F 


Bryan Hardware Co., Westfield 
Double Red Boy. . . 


Satisfactory 


881F 


Drummondi Gigantea, -Art 


Not satisfactory 


1012F 


The Hardware Shop. .Adams 

Sweet Sultan, .All Colors 


Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 


854F 


Ageratum 


Jeffway Hatch, Inc., Easthampton 
Floss Flower, Lavender Blue. 


Poor 


Not satisfactory 


726F 


Delphinium 
Tagetes 

Zinnia 


D. J. Mahoney, Haverhill 
Pink . 


Poor 
Good 

Good 


Not satisfactory 


727F 


Golden West (Improved Guinea 
Gold) 


Incomplete; only 2 


728F 


Indian Summer (Mixture) 


plants in bloom 
October 4 
Satisfactory 5 colors 


986F 


-Antirrhinum 


E. A. Noble & Co., Stockbridge 

Rust Proof, All Colors 


Fair 


Incomplete; had not 






bloomed October 4 


954F 


Mirabilis 


Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing 
Supply Co., Pittsfield 
Four O'Clocks, All Colors 


Good 


Satisfactory 4 colors 


1078F 


Iberis 
Linum 

Verbena 


J. B. Sibley & Son, Ware 


Good 
Good 

Poor 


Satisfactory 5 colors 


1079F 
1080F 


Scarlet 

All Colors 


Incomplete: had not 
bloomed October 4 
Not satisfactory 









SEED INSPECTION 



61 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Kind of 
Seed 



Tropaeolum 



Ageratum 
Calendula 
Callistephus 

Zinnia 



Impatiens 
Lupinus 



Cosmos 

Eschscholtzia 

Euphorbia 

Gypsophila 

Ipomoea 

Mirabilis 



Alyssum 
Callistephus 



Didiscus 



Antirrhinum 



Dimorphotheca 
Papaver 



Alyssum 
Celosia 



Calendula 
Callistephus 



Centaurea 
Gypsophila 
Iberis 
Tagetes 



Zinnia 



Petunia 
Tagetes 



Dimorphotheca 

Mathiola 

Vinca 



Alyssum 
Petunia 
Tagetes 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Michael-Leonard Seed Co., 
Chicago, III. 

W. E. Aubuchon Co.. Inc., Maynard 
Dwarf Mixed 

New England Toro Co., West 
Newton, Mass. 

Blue Cap 

Orange King 

Giants of California. Mi,xed. . . . 

Giant Orange 

Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis 
Minn. 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Brockton 

Balsam or Lady Slipper 

Annual Mixed 



Sweet Scented Reseda odorata. . 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Great 
Barrington 
Early Large Flowering Mixed . 

Golden Orange 

Snow on the Mountain 

Annual Crimson Baby's Breath 

Scarlet O'Hara 

Marvel of Peru. Mixed Colors . 

The Page Seed Co., Greene, N. Y. 

Community Grain Co., Worcester 

Sweet White 

Giant Comet Mixed 

Blue Lace Flower 

Clifford Coal Co., Inc., Leno.x 
Mixed Colors 

.'^.urantiaca 

Shirley, Mixed 

Dresser Hull Co., Lee 

Sweet White 

Plumosa and Cristata Mixed. . . 

Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 

Perry's Orange King 

Azure Blue, Wilt Resistant — 
Am. Branching 

Double Blue Boy 

Elegana Grandiflora Alba 

Giant White Perfection 

All Double African Lemon 



New Giant Crested, Mixed Colors 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Franklin 

Rosy Morn 

Crown of Gold 

Giants of California, Crimson. . . 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Palmer 

.African Mi.\ed 

Ten Weeks, Mixed 

Madagascar Periwinkle, Mixed. . 

J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc.. Shushan, N. Y. 

The Bengston Hardware Co., 
Gardner 

Sweet Little Gem, White 

Annual Snow Queen 

Tall African, Double Mixed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 



Good 



Poor 
Good 
Good 

Good 



Good 
Good 



Good 



Good 

Good 

Good 

Poor 

Fair 

Fair 



Good 
Good 



Fair 



Poor 
Fair 



Good 
Good 



Fair 

Good 

Fair 
Good 
Good 
Good 

Poor 



Fair 

Good 

Good 



Fair 
Poor 
Fair 



Poor 
Poor 
Poor 



Performance 



Satisfactory 4 colors 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 5 colors 
Incomplete; only 2 

plants in bloom 

October 4 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 
Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 



Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 

Not satisfactory 

Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 

Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Incompilete; only 1 
plant in bloom 
October 4 

Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 3 colors 



Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



62 



CONTROL SERIES No. 119 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Lab. 
Xo. 



Kind of 
Seed 



969F 

974F 
972F 
973F 



934F 
933F 



762F 



1083F 
1084F 
1085F 
1070F 



521F 
522F 
520F 



856F 



950F 
951F 



1119F 



763F 



781F 
780F 



783F 
782F 



785F 
784F 



956F 
957F 
955F 

9S8F 

959F 
960F 



788F 
790F 
791F 

789F 



Chrysanthemum 

Dianthus 

I.inum 

Scabiosa 



Impatiens 
Kochia 



Callistephus. . 



Cosmos 
Cynoglossum 
Euphorbia 
Mathiola 



Ageratum 
Centaurea 
Ipomoea 



Ageratum 



Iberis 
Tagetes 



Mathiola 



Verbena 



Calendula 
CaUistephus 



Celosia 
Centaurea. 



Ipomoea 
Tagetes 



Celosia 

Delphinium 

Dianthus 

Phlox 

Salpiglossis 
Vinca 



Callistephus 

Centaurea 
Nemophila 
Petunia 

Reseda 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



J. B. Rice, Jr.. Inc.— Con. 

Peirson Hardware Co., Pittsfield 
Tricolor Single Annual 

Marguerite Double Mixed 

Scarlet Flax, Annual 

Mourning Bride, Mixed Annual 

F. H. Turner & Co., Hardware, 
Great Harrington 
Tall Double Mixed, Annual. . . . 
Mexican Fire Bush 

W'estern Auto Association, 
Marlboro 
Heart of France 



Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., 
Cambridge, N. Y. 

Faulkner Hardware Co., Palmer 

Orange Flare 

Annual 

Snow on the Mountain 

Double Dwarf Mixed 



Franklin Hardware & Plumbing 
Supply Co., Franklin 

Blue Perfection 

Jubilee Gem 

Heavenly Blue 

Jeffway Hatch. Inc., Easthampton 
Blue Perfection 

Pittsfield Hardware & Plumbing 
Supply Co., Pittsfield 

Hyacinth Flowered 

Tagetes Signata Pumila 

Wadsworth Howland & Co., Boston 
Double Dwarf, Mixed 



Western Auto 
Marlboro 
Choice Mixed . 



Ross Bros. Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Chrysantha 

Super Giant El Monte 



Glasgow Prize. . . . 
Double Blue Boy. 



Heavenly Blue. 
Guinea Gold. . . 



Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, III. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Pittsfield 

Tall Feathered Mixed 

Carmine King 

Giant Margaret, Mixed 



Drummondi grandiflora. Annual 

Mixed 

Painted Tongue. Mixed 

Mixed (Periwinkle) 



Sears, Roebuck & Co., ^^'orcester 
Giant Branching Pink 



Double Mixed 

Baby Blue Eyes 

Balcony Blue (Purple) . 

Sweet Matchet Mixed. 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Fair 

Poor 
Poor 
Poor 



Good 
Fair 



Good 



Good 
Good 
Fair 
Fair 



Poor 
Fair 
Good 



Poor 



Good 
Fair 



Fair 



Poor 



Fair 
Good 



Good 
Good 



Poor 
Good 



Good 
Poor 
Good 



Poor 
None 
Fair 



Good 

Good 
Poor 
Good 

Good 



Performance 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 5 colors 
Satisfactory 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Not satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

blQomed October 4 
Not .satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 8 colors 
Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 3 colors 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 
Satisfactory 3 colors 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 

4 colors 
Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



63 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Lab. 
Xo. 



497F 
496F 



887F 
889F 

88SF 



551F 
553F 

552F 



832F 
S33F 
834F 
835F 
836F 



Kind of 
Seed 



Petunia 
Tagetes 

Zinnia 



Cosniidium 

Dianthus 

Iberis 



Centaurea 

Petunia 

Tagetes 



Callistephus 

Eschscholtzia 

Iberis 

Scabiosa 

Zinnia 



1095F 


Cynoglossum 


1092F 


Delphinium 


1091F 
1093F 
1094F 


Mirabilis 

Tropaeolum 

Zinnia 


907FA 


Callistephus 


907FB 


Callistephus 


907FC 


Callistephus 



Tropaeolum 



Wholesale Distributor. Dealer when 
other than Wholesale Distributor, 
Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Sherwin-Williams Co., Waltliam, 
Mass. 

Dwarf, Small Flowering, Special 

Mixture 

Treasure Chest 



Giant Curly. 



Sterling Seed Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

M. N. Landau, Inc., Westfield 

Orange. Yellow Brown 

Double Mixed Pinks 

All Colors Mi.xed 



Stumpp & Walter Co., New York. N.Y 

Hamlin's Service Station, Xorwood 

Double Blue Boy 

Improved Rosy Morn 

Guinea Gold 



The Templin Bradley Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio* 

Amity Street School, Amherst 

Extra Quality Mixed 

Eschscholtzia 

All Colors Mixed 

Mourning Bride 

Elegans — Youth and Old Age. . 

Vaughan's Seed Store, New York, 

N. Y. 
Palmer Flower Shop, Palmer 

Firmanent (Chinese Forget-me- 
not) 

Vaughan's Special Annual Mix- 
ture 

Marvel of Peru, Mixed 

Double Scarlet Gleam 

Dahlia-Flowered, Mixed 



James Vicks Seeds, Philadelphia, Pa, 

Ben Franklin Store, Lee 

Blackish Blue 



White 

Scarlet-Rose. 



F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford. 
Conn. 

J. B. Sibley & Son, Ware 

Golden Gleam 



Germi- 
nation 



Poor 
Good 



Good 



Good 
Good 
Fair 



Good 

Fair 

Good 



Fair 

Good 

Poor 

Poor 

Good 



Poor 

Poor 
Good 
Fair 
Good 



Good 

Fair 

None 

Poor 



Field Tests 



Performance 



Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; only 1 

plant in bloom 

October 4 
Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 6 colors 
Satisfactory 4 colors 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete: hod not 
bloomed October 4 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 6 colors 



Not satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 6 colors 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 

Incomplete; had not 
bloomed October 4 



Not satisfactory 



'School Department of this Company better known as Children's Flower Mission. 



Publication of this Document Approved bv Commission o.n Administration and Finance 
2-44-13715 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

Control Series Bulletin No. 120 July 1944 



Twenty-fourth Annual Report of 

PuUorum Disease Eradication 

in Massachusetts 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory 



Pullorum disease eradication is an essential and vital part of a profitable 
poultry industry. The season of 1943-44 established a new record for volume 
of testing and showed a decided decrease in the amount of infection found. So 
long as infected flocks are found, however, there should be no relaxation of the 
eradication program. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



TWENTY-FOURTH ANNUAL REPORT OF PULLORUM 

DISEASE ERADICATION IN MASSACHUSETTS 

1943-1944 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory i 



Introduction 

During tiie 1943-44 season a marked interest was shown in pullorum testing. 
This is largely attributed to the increased demand for poultry meat and eggs 
which must be supplied either directly or indirectly by the breeding flocks. With 
the expansion of the poultry industry through additional and larger flocks, the 
educational work has exerted a beneficial influence in helping to establish pullo- 
rum-free flocks. When the poultry industry readjusts itself to normal conditions, 
it is hoped that flock owners will continue to realize that a profitable industry can 
be maintained only with healthy stock. It should be recognized further that the 
development of pullorum disease-free stock is not an "overnight" accomplish- 
ment; and therefore, once a disease-free flock is established every effort should be 
made to maintain it in that condition over a period of years. It is hoped that 
the progress in reducing the percentage of infection during the twenty-four year 
period from 12.5 to 0.11 percent may continue. This will require the cooperative 
effort of all agencies interested in the poultry industry, including the individual 
flock owner. Pullorum disease eradication is an essential and vital part of a 
profitable industry. 

During the past season the task of meeting the large volume of testing was not 
easy. Laboratory facilities and personnel have been under a great strain. The 
flock owners also experienced difficulties in procuring help to assist with the 
collecting of the blood samples. In spite of these handicaps very few flock owners 
have had their testing delayed. Appreciation is extended to the flock owners for 
the fine cooperation given. 

Sununary of Service Rendered 

Applications received 474 

Applications cancelled 12 

Flocks tested 462 

Chicken flocks 403 

Chicken and turkey flocks 10 

Turkey flocks 49 

Number of tests 808,845 

Chickens: 

Routine 788,989 

Experimental 2,607 

Fowl other than chickens: 

Routine 13,186 

Experim.ental 4,063 

Owners receiving necropsy service 17* 

Necropsies of reacting birds 53** 

♦Includes 2 turkey flocks **Includes 3 turkeys 

^Poultry Disease Control Laboratory Staff: H. V^an Roekel, Chief of Laboratory; K. L. Bullis, 
Assistant Veterinary Pathologist; O. S. Flint, Assistant Research Professor; Miriam K. Clarke, 
Research Assistant; Felicia Jewett, Laboratory Assistant. Appreciation is extended to Dr. J. B, 
Lentz, Head of the Department of Veterinary Science, for the assistance given to the testing work. 



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Distribution of Tests and Reactors 

Table 1 gives the distribution of tests and reactors by counties. A total of 
791,596 chicken samples from 12 counties was submitted. Of this number, 871, 
or 0.11 percent, were detected as reactors. The percentages of positive tests for 
the various counties were very low, the highest being only 0.28 percent. Samples 
from two counties, Barnstable and Berkshire, revealed no reactors. Worcester, 
Middlesex, and Bristol Counties led in the number of samples tested. 

The following breeds and varieties were tested: Bantam, Barnevelders, 
Barred Plymouth Rock, Black Langshan, Brahma, Buff Orpington, Columbian 
Plymouth Rock, Crosses, Jersey White Giant, New Hampshire, Rhode Island 
Red, Silver Laced Wyandotte, White American, White Cornish, White Leghorn, 
White Plymouth Rock, and White Wyandotte. Reactors were detected among 
Barred Plj'mouth Rocks, New Hampshires, Rhode Island Reds, White Plymouth 
Rocks, and Crosses. 

Of the total number of samples tested, 716,421 were collected from females 
(73,476 hens and 642,945 pullets) and 75,175 from males. The percentages of 
reactors were .09 among the hens, .12 among the pullets, and .041 among the 
males. 

Annual Testing of Flocks 

Table 2 shows the results from flocks tested for the first time, intermittently, 
for two consecutive years, and for three or more consecutive years. 

Table 2. — Annual Testing Versus Single and Intermittent Testing 





Mi 
O 

E ■ 




H 
"a 
o 
H 


Positive 

Tests 


Negative 
Flocks 


Positive 
Flocks 


Classification 


J3 

B 

3 


n 


s 


•o 
0^ 


V 

8 


•a 

V 

H 
>> 

1 


Flocks tested — 


94 

30 

53 

256 


99.346 

43.734 

43,237 

575,749 


101,766 
43.734 
44,560 

601,536 


320 

207 

71 

273 


0.31 
0.47 
0.16 
0.05 


68 

24 

29 

233 


13 
3 
2 

14 


8 
2 
2 
6 


5 




1 


Two consecutive years 

Three o-- morfe consecutive years 



3 


Totals 


413 


762,066 


791,596 


871 


0.11 


354 


32 


18 


9 



In the group tested for the first time, the number of flocks and tests increased 
considerably over those of the previous season. A total of 94 flocks was tested, 
representing 101,766 tests of which 0.31 percent were positive. There were 81 
non-reacting flocks, representing 89,125 birds, and 13 positive flocks, representing 
10,151 birds. Special attention is called to the low percentage of positive tests, 
which indicates that new flocks can be established from pullorum-free sources. 

The intermittent group also showed a considerable increase over the previous 
season, 30 flocks, representing 43,734 samples, being tested. The percentage of 
positive tests was 0.47. Twenty-seven non-reacting flocks, representing 41,135 
birds, were identified in this group. 



In the group tested for two consectutive years, the number of flocks and tests 
was markedly smaller than in the previous season. The flocks numbered 33, 
representing 44,560 tests of which 0.16 percent were positive. Thirty-one non- 
reacting flocks, representing 41,651 birds, were identified. 

The group tested for three or more consecutive years showed a definite increase 
over the previous season, 256 flocks, representing 601,536 samples, being tested. 
The percentage of positive tests was only 0.05. A total of 247 non-reacting flocks, 
containing 549,248 birds, was detected. 

Considering the four groups as a whole, 413 flocks were tested, representing 
762,066 birds and 791,596 samples, of which only 0.11 percent were found to be 
positive. The 354 flocks which were 100 percent tested and non-reacting con- 
tained 692,556 birds, or 90.8 percent of all birds tested. These results are indeed 
encouraging, because the larger the number of birds in 100 percent non-reacting 
flocks, the more rapid will be the progress in establishing additional puUorum- 
free flocks. Massachusetts flock owners should have ample opportunity to buy 
good stock which is free of puUorum disease. 

The number of positive flocks was 27, representing 40,837 birds. Although 
this is a slight increase over the previous season, it is not significant when one 
considers the over-all increase in the total number of birds tested. It is hoped 
that these infected flocks will be disposed of and replaced with puUorum-free stock 
this year. 

The results indicate that flocks which are tested annually show a lower incidence 
of reactors than do flocks tested for the first time or intermittently. Annual 
testing is the only way to determine the pullorum status of a breeding flock. 
Failure to recognize this fact may lead one into considerable difficulty. 

Appearance of Infection in Flocks Previously Negative 

The matter of maintaining a flock free from pullorum disease is of great con- 
cern to the flock owner and the testing agency. Progress in eradication can not 
be expected if infection reappears as fast as it is eliminated from flocks. As long 
as free stock is exposed to pullorum infection, so-called "breaks" may be expected 
to occur. 

Table 3 gives the testing results for flocks which had been non-reacting for one 
or more years, but showed infection in 1943-44. Seventeen "breaks" are listed, 
which is four more than occurred the previous year. In four cases the amount 
of infection exceeded 1 percent. Two flocks had been negative for one year, 
three for two years, three for four years, two for five years, one each for seven 
and eight years, two for nine years, and one each for ten, eleven, and fourteen 
years; 

In nine cases the explanation for the "breaks" was unknown, in two the in- 
fection was introduced from an infected supply flock, in three through the pur- 
chase of questionable stock, in one possibly through inadequate preventive 
measures, in one through contest birds, and in one no information was obtained. 

In ten flocks a negative test was obtained through intensive retesting. In six 
flocks no retesting was carried out by the flock owner. 

The appearance of pullorum infection in a flock previously negative may be a 
very serious problem, especially in the larger breeding flocks and if the infection 
is detected late in the season. The majority of flock owners have no conception 
of the difificulties that may follow a "break" in a puUorum-free testing record. 
When infection is detected, at least four weeks are required before the next test 
can be applied. If the eggs from the flock are used for local hatching or sold to 



Table 


3. — Appearance 


OF Infection 


IN FlOC 


Ks Previously Negative 




Number 




1943-44 Season 












Positive 


Flock 


of Years 


Flock 


Number 


Tests 


Explanation for Infection 




Negative 


Total 


Tested 


Percent 




1 


1 


414 


414 


0.24 


Unknown 


2 


4 


2,627 


2,624 


0.15 


Unknown 


3 


10 


707 


706 


2.97 


Infected supply flock 






432 


432* 


0.00 




4 


2 


1,564 


1.564 


0.83 


Inadequate preventive measuies 






1,420 


1,420* 


0.14 








1,717 


1,717* 


0.00 




5 


4 


706 


705 


1.13 


Unknown 


6 


9 


1,166 


1,165 


0.26 


Infected supply flock 






1,153 


1,153* 


0.00 




7 


2 


1,062 


1,060 


3.02 


Purchase of questionable stock 


8 


8 


8,904 


8,901 


0.06 


Unknown 


9 


14 


1,086 


1,086 


0.28 


Unknown 






1,001 


1,001* 

45* 


1.70 
0.00 








831 


831* 


0.00 




10 


2 


2,685 


2,635 


0.27 


Unknown 






2,635 


135* 


0.00 




11 


4 


1,871 


1,859 


0.22 


Purchase of questionable stock 






1,836 


1,836* 


0.00 




12 


1 


9,283 


3,182 


0.06 


No information 


13 


9 


8,163 


8,161 


0.01 


Unknown 






6,713 


4,382* 


0.07 




14 


7 


538 


538 


0.19 


Unknown 






533 


532* 


0.00 




15 


11 


7,729 


7.727 


0.01 


Contest birds 






7,000 


908* 


0.00 




16 


5 


1,195 


1.195 


0.17 


Unknown 






1,168 


1.168* 


0.00 




17 


5 


5,055 


5,055 


0.20 


Purchase of questionable stock 






4,767 


4.767* 


0.02 








4,745 


804* 


0.00 





♦Represents retests 



a commercial hatchery and infection is detected in the breeding flock, the supply- 
ing of hatching eggs is immediately discontinued, according to official regulations. 
No fiock known to be infected should supply hatching eggs or chicks. If "breaks" 
are to be prevented or kept at a low level, every breeder should exercise the 
greatest vigilance in keeping out infection that may enter through the many 
possible channels. The following nteasufes should be put into practice by flock 
owners if they expect to establish and maintain pullorum-free flocks. 

1. All the birds on the premises should be tested each year. 

2. If infection is present, the entire flock should be retested within four to six 
weeks until a negative report is obtained, provided the value of the birds justifies 
the expenditure. 



3. Every reactor, regardless of its value, should be removed from the premises 
for slaughter immediately upon receipt of the report. 

4. Offal from all birds dressed for market or home consumption as well as 
dead birds that are not fit for consumption should be burned. 

5. The poultry houses, runs, and equipment, should be thoroughly cleaned 
and disinfected immediately after removal of reactors. Provide an empty pen 
to each house to facilitate cleaning and disinfection during the winter months. 
Use disinfectants approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

6. Birds removed from the premises to egg-laying contests, exhibitions, etc., 
should be held in quarantine and determined free of disease before they are re- 
admitted into the flock. 

7. Purchase of stock in the form of adults, chicks, and eggs should be from 
known pullorum-disease-free flocks. Consult your county agent regarding 
additions or replacements in your flock. 

8. Eggs should not be saved for hatching until after a flock has been tested 
and all the infected birds removed. Early pullet testing will permit early hatch- 
ing. 

9. Fresh and infertile eggs from unknown or infected sources should not be 
fed to chickens or exposed to animals such as crows, sparrows, and skunks that 
may carry or spread the infection. 

10. Poultrymen should not custom hatch for untested or injected flocks 
(including fowl other than chickens). 

11. Owners of pullorum-disease-free flocks should not have hatching done 
where infected eggs or stock may be found. 

12. Poultrymen should not buy feed in bags that have been used or exposed 
to infection. (Such bags if properly disinfected will be safe for further use.) 

13. Poultrymen should regard fowl other than chickens as a possible source of 
puUorum infection unless tested and found free from puUorum disease. 

14. Poultrymen should not use equipment that has been exposed to or con- 
taminated with infective material unless it is properly cleaned and sterilized or 
disinfected. 

Testing of Fowl Other Than Chickens 

A total of 17,249 samples collected from fowl other than chickens was tested 
during the past year. Turkey samples numbered 17,224, among which were 
1.56 percent reactors. The infection was confined to three out of the 59 flocks. 
These three flocks were retested and further reactors were detected. The per- 
centage of reactors detected among the retests was 1.68. One large infected flock 
was retested, which accounts for a higher percentage of reactors among the re- 
tests than among the total tests. 

The response of infected turkey flocks to retesting is different from that usually 
observed ampng chickens. Many doubtful reactions are encountered in in- 
fected turkey flocks which appear infrequently or not at all in non-infected flocks. 
However, puUorum infection in turkey breeding flocks can be controlled and 
eliminated through retesting, although more retests may be required than in the 
case of chickens. 

Turkey breeders should recognize the necessity of exercising every precaution 
in establishing and maintaining puUorum-free flocks. Some owners resort to the 
whole blood test for determining the puUorum status of a flock. Laboratory and 
field evidence to date has shown that the whole blood test is not reliable in the 
testing of turkeys for puUorum disease. 



Some turkey breeders and hatcherymen take little or no precaution against 
custom hatching. It has been definitely established that pullorum infection can 
be transmitted in the incubator even though only turkey eggs are hatched in the 
incubator. Hatcherymen should not accept eggs from breeding flocks that have 
not been tested or are known to be infected. 

Before new stock is introduced, a very careful check should be made with the 
official state agency as to the pullorum status of the flock. Only stock from 
officially recognized pullorum-free flocks should be introduced. 

Sonie turkey flock owners also maintain chickens on the premises. In such 
instances it is highly important that the chickens, as well as the turkeys, be 
'^pullorum-free. 

During the past year 25 samples from ducks, geese, guinea fowl, and pheasants 
were tested with no reactors. 



Table 4. — Nonreacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 



County 



100% Tested 



Flocks 



Partially Tested 



Total 



Flocks 



Birds 



Nonreacling Flocks 



Barnstable. . . 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden. , . . 
Hampshire. . . 
Middlesex . . 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . . . 
Worcester. . . 

Totals. 

Bristol 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden . . . . 
Hampshire. . . 
Middlesex. . . 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . . 
Worcester. . . 

Totals. 



45 
1 
43 
23 
20 
29 
55 
28 
34 
66 



3,807 
13,579 
94,340 
1,859 
85,708 
41,230 
22,474 
36,896 

119,170 
60,986 
79,819 

132,688 



1,198 

5,133 

4,577 
2,648 

827 
2,146 
3,968 
5,044 
2,367 

765 



692,556 



Positive Hocks 



8.161 

414 

3,069 

1,096 

16,324 

43 

2,624 

2,106 



28,673 



607 
493 

220 

17 
2,415 

2,715 
533 



3 


5,005 


8 


13,579 


53 


99,473 


1 


1,859 


49 


90,285 


24 


43,878 


21 


23,301 


32 


39,042 


60 


123,138 


31 


66,030 


36 


82,186 


68 


133,453 


86 


721,229 



8,768 

907 

3,069 

1,316 

17 

18,739 

43 

5.339 

2,639 



33,837 



7,000 



40,837 



Non-Reacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 

In Table 4 is given the distribution of non-reacting and positive flocks by 
counties. In the twelve counties in which testing was done, 354 non-reacting 
flocks (100 percent tested), representing 692,556 birds, were detected; and 32 



partially tested non-reacting flocks, representing 28,673 birds, were detected 
in ten counties. The flocks tested in Berkshire and Dukes counties were all 100 
percent tested and free of infection. Worcester, Middlesex, and Bristol counties 
had the largest number of flocks and birds in the non-reacting group. 

In ten counties, 27 flocks, representing 40,837 birds, gave positive tests. Of 
these 27 flocks, 18 were 100 percent and 9 partially tested. Middlesex County 
had 10 positive flocks; none of the other nine counties had more than three. 

These results show that, while Massachusetts has a considerable supply of 
pullorum-free stock, it also has more infected flocks than one would expect after 
24 years of testing. Of the 413 flocks tested, 6.5 percent, containing 5.2 percent 
of the birds tested, were classified as infected at the end of the season. 

A more concerted effort should be made, particularly on the part of flock 
owners, to eliminate the infection from their premises. After a clean flock has 
been established, every precaution should be taken against reinfection. With 
the amount of pullorum-free stock existing in Massachusetts today, it should be 
possible for any poultryman to have nothing but pullorum-free stock on his 
premises. 



Table S.— Comparison of 1942-43 and 1943-44 Testing 



County 



Flocks 



Birds 



Tests 



Positive Non- 

Tests Reacting 

Percent Flocks 



Barnstable 2 

Berkshire 7 

Bristol 48 

Dukes 1 

Essex 48 

Franklin 26 

Hampden 20 

Hampshire 25 

Middlesex 46 

Norfolk 25 

Plymouth 30 

Worcester 54 

Totals 

Barnstable 

Berkshire 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden 

Hampshire 

Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth 

Worcester 

Totals 413 



1942-43 Season 

3,764 
11,552 
93,356 

2,239 
81,252 
44,575 
20,466 
29,107 
97,297 
70.178 
70,495 
113,385 



3,764 
13,873 
95,744 
2,239 
81,252 
46,704 
20,466 
29,246 

100,075 
71,890 
70,499 

113,385 



0.00 
1.44 
0.08 
0.00 
0.02 
0.03 
0.00 
0,02 
0.01 
1.64 
0.35 
1.20 



2 

6 

45 

1 

47 
26 
20 
23 
43 
23 
29 
52 



332 


637,666 
1943-44 Season 


649,137 


0.48 


317 


3 


5,005 


5.005 


0.00 


3 


8 


13,579 


13,579 


0.00 


8 


55 


108,241 


115,263 


0.10 


53 • 


1 


1,859 


3,695 


0.11 


1 


51 


91,192 


91,280 


0.03 


49 


27 


46,947 


47,765 


0.13 


24 


24 


24,617 


25,528 


0.28 


21 


33 


39,059 


45,726 


0.08 


32 


70 


141,877 


142,012 


0.23 


60 


32 


66,073 


66,124 


0.002 


31 


38 


87,525 


93,325 


0.07 


36 


71 


136,092 


142,294 


0.11 


68 



762,066 



10 

Comparison of 1942-43 and 1943-44 Testing 

Table 5 gives the comparison of the 1942-43 and 1943-44 testing results for 
the different counties. An increase in the number of flocks was observed in all 
but one county, Dukes; an increase in tested birds in all but two counties, 
Dukes and Norfolk; and an increase in non-reacting flocks in all counties but 
Dukes and Franklin. 

For all counties combined, significant increases were observed as follows: 

1942-43 1943-44 Increase 

Tested flocks 332 413 81 

Tested birds 637,666 762,066 124,400 

Tests 649,137 791,596 142,459 

Non-reacting flocks 317 386 69 

100 percent tested, non-reacting flocks 295 354 59 

Birds in 100 percent tested, non-reacting flocks . 583,733 692,556 108,823 

Infected flocks 15 27 12 

"Breaks" 13 17 4 

The average percentage of reactors was reduced from 0.48 to 0.11. Of the 
total birds tested, 90.8 percent were in 100 percent tested non-reacting flocks. 
Sixty flocks tested in 1942-43 were not tested in 1943-44. 

These results show that the volume of work has increased tremendously during 
the past year. The laboratory, however, has put forth every effort to meet the 
requests for testing, and few flock owners have had their testing delayed at the 
request of the laboratory. If those owners whose flocks could be tested during 
late summer or early fall would notify the laboratory, it would help to relieve the 
testing load during November, December, and January, thus enabling the 
laboratory to carry on the work with less temporary help, which is difficult or 
impossible to obtain. 

Twenty-Four- Year Testing Summary 

Table 6 gives the testing results for a 24-year testing period. Progress in the 
establishment and maintenance of pullorum-free flocks is still evident. It is 
hoped that this trend may continue and that the disease will be eliminated further 
from poultry flocks in Massachusetts. 

Comments and Suggestions 

Annual Testhig: The majority of poultrymen recognize the importance of 
annual testing of flocks for pullorum disease. Testing results show that flocks 
are more apt to harbor infection if flock owners do not follow an annual testing 
program. Sixty, or 18 percent, of the 332 flocks tested in 1942-43 were not 
subjected to test in 1943-44. This past year the intermittently tested group of 
flocks was the highest of the four groups in percentage of infection. Progress in 
the elimination of the disease would be more rapid if flock owners would follow 
an annual testing program. It must be recognized that a certain percentage of 
flocks drop out from year to year for reasons such as discontinuance of the 
poultry business or change in type of management. On the other hand, there are 
certain flock owners who continue in breeding operations without subjecting 
their flocks to annual testing. Such a practice prevents their flocks from being 
ofificially recognized by the official state agency, as well as hindering the establish- 
ment and maintenance of pullorum-free flocks. 



11 



Table 6. — Twenty- Four- Year Pullorum Disease Testing Summary 















Birds 


in Non- 










Positive 


Non- 


reacting Flocks 








Total 


Tests 


reacting 












Season 


Flocks 


Birds 


Tests 


Percent 


Flocks 


Number 


Percent 


1920-21 


108 


24.718 


24.718 


12.50 


25 


2.414 


9.77 


1921-22 


110 


29.875 


29.875 


12.65 


27 


4,032 


13.50 


1922-23 


121 


33.602 


33.602 


7.60 


29 


5,400 


16.07 


1923-24 


139 


59.635 


59.635 


6.53 


38 


11,082 


18.58 


1924-25 


156 


66.503 


66,503 


2.94 


79 


25,390 


38.18 


1925-26 


201 


67.919 


67.919 


2.31 


124 


33,615 


49.49 


1926-27 


249 


127.327 


127.327 


4.03 


114 


40,269 


31.63 


1927-28 


321 


190.658 


232.091 


6.52* 


138 


80,829 


42.39 


1928-29 


413 


254.512 


304.092 


4.25* 


228 


153,334 


60.25 


1929-30 


460 


331.314 


386,098 


2.17 


309 


203,038 


66.97 


1930-31 


447 


356.810 


402.983 


1.47 


328 


267,229 


74.89 


1931-32 


455 


377,191 


420.861 


0,90 


355 


298,534 


79.15 


1932-33 


335 


296.093 


300.714 


0.47 


276 


238.074 


80.41 


1933-34 


262 


263.241 


284.848 


0.53 


229 


212.782 


80.83 


1934-35 


244 


281.124 


301.887 


0.39 


213 


251,778 


89.56 


1935-36 


252 


329.659 


344.081 


0.30 


230 


315,215 


95.95 


1936-37 


307 


448.519 


561.762 


0.37 


281 


424,431 


94.63 


1937-38 


308 


480.227 


497.769 


0.17 


286 


457,466 


95.26 


1938-39 


355 


571.065 


615.205 


0.34 


327 


469.134 


82.15 


1939-40 


346 


573.000 


673.222 


0.51 


332 


497.356 


86.80 


1940-41 


309 


527.328 


538,589 


0.09 


299 


492,475 


93.39 


1941-42 


366 


653.080 


662.715 


0.27 


350 


591.628 


90.59 


1942-43 


332 


637.666 


649.137 


0.48 


317 


600,607 


94.19 


1943-44 


413 


762.066 


791.596 


0.11 


386 


721.229 


94.64 



*Based on total birds tested: 1927-28, 190.658 birds; 1928-29. 254.512 birds. 



Testing All Birds on Premises: This past year 41 flock owners (9.92 percent) 
had only part of their flocks tested, compared with 7.53 percent the previous 
season. While no reactors were found in the majority of these partially tested 
flocks, they were not eligible for oflficlal recognition because it is impossible to 
determine the true pullorum status of all birds on the premises by testing only 
part of the flock. Flock owners, therefore, should strive to test their entire 
flock if any testing is to be done. This would enable them to determine the 
true status of the flocks, permit official recognition of the flocks if negative, and 
without question increase the sales possibilities of their stock. 

Early Testing: During the last three years the laboratory has had increasing 
difficulty in finding temporary help to assist with the field and laboratory work. 
It is exceedingly difficult to interest competent persons In short-term employ- 
ment. The bulk of the testing work comes In October, November, December, 
and January. The following summary will point out the situation more clearly. 



Month 


Tests 


Montti 


Tests 


April, 1943 


4,159 


October 


123,161 


May 


5,273 


November 


157,296 


June 


1,487 


December 


139,577 


July 


6,345 


January, 1944 


129,963 


August 


24,004 


February 


90,600 


September 


57,452 


March 


69,528 



12 

Flock owners who are in a position to test part or all of their flocks before 
October, can help to relieve the testing load during the peak months. Split- 
fiock testing is not recommended ordinarily because of the danger that untested 
birds may find their way into pens of tested birds. However, if the plant is so 
arranged and managed that this danger can be eliminated, it should be safe to 
test parts of the flock as they become eligible for the test. For official recognition 
birds should not be tested before five months of age. It is hoped that flock owners 
who are in position to test early will cooperate with the laboratory and test 
whatever birds can be safely tested. Early testing is especially indicated if in- 
fection is expected in the flock so that plans for eliminating the disease can be 
made ahead of the hatching season. 

Prevention of Pullorum Infection: The identification ot pullorum infection 
in stock from supposedly free sources has caused much concern this past year. 
It is apparent that there has been an increase in the spread of the disease this 
past year. The sources of infection are the same as we have always recognized; 
but the flock owner, hatcheryman, feed man, etc., have had too heavy a load to 
carry without getting into difificulty. Some of the fundamental disease prevention 
principles have had to be neglected or ignored with the result that infection was 
permitted to spread. It is appreciated that labor difificulties, scarcities of material 
and equipment, etc., have contributed to inadequate or faulty management 
which in turn has led to the introduction of infection. It is hoped that all agencies 
concerned with raising poultry will make an honest effort to help avoid the intro- 
duction of the disease. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
3m 7-44-14731 P 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 121 SEPTEMBER 1944 



Inspection of Commercial 
Feedstuffs 

By Feed Control Service Staff 



Ttiis, the fiftieth report of feeding stuffs inspection, contains in addition to 
information required by statute other data pertaining to the nutritive value of 
feedstuffs. The protein quality index of meat and fish products; the calcium, 
phosphorus, manganese, choline and riboflavin content of commercial feedstuffs; 
and the carotene content of alfalfa products are also included. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 
By Philip H. Smith' 



With this bulletin Control Service resumes the practice of publishing the results 
of the feed analyses discontinued two 3'ears ago. At that time it was believed 
that, because of the frequent changes in ration ingredients made necessary by 
shortages and Federal regulation, the anah-ses could be of little value in helping 
the customer to decide on the relative value of feeds which might be sold at a 
later date under revised and radically modified formulas. 

In retrospect it may be well to consider how well feed manufacturers have 
been able to meet this unusual situation. Conformance to a guarantee of anah- 
sis is to some extent a measure of the reliability of those who are responsible for 
it. On the whole guarantees have been well maintained except for fat. Whether 
or not the general lowering of the fat content of feeds affects their nutritive value 
is debatable. However, a statement of minimum fat content is required by 
statute and in many instances manufacturers would do well to lower fat guaran- 
tees to meet the enforced use of ingredients which do not carry a high fat per- 
centage. The restricted use of meat scrap, oil cakes and other high fat material 
and the increased use of wheat meal account for this condition, particularly as 
applied to poultry feeds. 

Up to the present animals and poultry have received a sufficient grain ration 
to satisfy body requirements. Whether or not it has always been of the sort to 
insure maximum production may be questioned. Production records indicate 
that grain rations have been both ample and of good quality even though differ- 
ing somewhat from accepted standards. 

The greater problem has been and will continue to be not so much a matter of 
protein, fat, and fiber as the furnishing of the more obscure elements of the ration, 
such as the essential vitamins and mineral elements. Regulations thus far 
adopted have had this in mind. 

As a contribution to a general knowledge of commercial rations and ration 
ingredients, particularly as applied to poultry feeds, considerable work has been 
done which lies outside the scope of the feeding stuffs act. The results form a 
part of this publication. No attempt is made to draw conclusions as to the 
application of these data — a function which belongs more properly to the feeding 
expert. 

In the following tables of the analyses of commercial feeds, wherever the brand 
name is in whole or a part of the firm name, the brand name has been omitted. 
This for the sake of brevity and simplification in printing. In every case identi- 
fication is complete without it. 



^The following staff members assisted in the inspection: John W. Kuzmeski, Albert F. Spelnian. 
Leo V. Crowley, C. Tyson Smith, and Henry T. Rodman, chemists; Frederick A. McLaughlin, 
microscopist; James T. Howard, inspector; Joseph A. Martell, laboratory assistant; Cora B. 
Grover, clerk. 



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10 



CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 



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c3 a> 

51 



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S\0 CN 00 X 



oooooooooooooooo 

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^-it^i/)VOI^O'*oOr^ 
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■*T(<00t^00<*)'^t^O^OOvOCSOlO 
iMOvOO-^OOOrS'rtC^OfO'HC^O 



vOOt-^i/^OfOU^OOOv 

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^^C^l^i-(CN»-»C^'-fCS^^i-<»HlOC^CS .-icswwcvt^-^T-^tN — 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



11 



-< O (N S\ 


^ ■* 


-H 


vO-^Os 


t^ -0 ■* a> o 


C^ 00 00 X-< 


X-Ct^'O 


vD lO 


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vot^ oa>— 1 






oo>o 
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lOioOiOul 

vO O t^ t^ t^ 



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oo^r^oOC\POoocNooi/:'>JP^ 



— fOrt rt 


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Tj< ^rf OM^ 


in O C^ On fO 


OO^ rs 


in ooo 00 


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mm m-^Tj" 


m ^ ^ rt 
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mOOO 


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inrji~5 


O OmO O 

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O CO o o 


rots 


o 


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■* to-* rc* 


in w i^ — ( 


t-rocNOooot^ts—'-'mm 
fO^'OfO'^CSrNlrOfN'^rO'^ 




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20.0 
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20.0 
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17.0 
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18.0 
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20.8 
18.1 
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18.6 


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17.1 
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CO 




■*Or^ 


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fN o ^2 o o 


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12 



CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 



vOtSOUlOCSCOulfJO-fOO 

♦Hooio»o»ovoooa\to^oot^ 









\0 \0 00 vO »o t>- 



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1^ (M NO CC 00 t~^ 



OscOOO^-^fNt^oOt^-^rC*^ C^OC^'tu^ociOfNCNCv 

^H\0'*0^0»o»0oor^r^io --t^tcioiOvCcoOOOi/5 



O lO CO 1/-, 



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o X ■* lo o lo 



<j <u li ,'; to 






> O "^, -H r^i ~5 Tf 00 >o : 






u 



C3 OJ 

OS 



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OiOioOiOOOOtOO 



O lOOO oo 

^ <^ iv^ rjf ■^ ^ 









Tt "^ ■^ f^ fO cs 



O 



u^Cii^ioOOOOOioOO 



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lO 00 sO r^ 



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00 CO -^ ooio ■^ 



^^l^/)rsO^O^O^OO^O^■^OC 



jvC^C^-^iOO — OnCO 

• r-sO00r<^00t--OC30 



o --c OiO 

\0 CO r 






-^0■^^^'*^00^0■^(N'^ 
P^OfNCNOC^^OC^OO-M 



C^i/;roou^Oior^'-^'^ 



r^ X o O 
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1; 



ca 
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u -' ii -r; M.S ^ M t; Q ir, ?? b 
« o p ^ ■- -^ >.o-r i: vo t -t^ 2 






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<U <U V 






c. a a n^^ ° 
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0) QJ (L> OJ 



j=feO 

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Soil is 

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« pa — n; ::: :3 rz: 

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-H .^ cscs ^ c 



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-Hcsrt^cscses'^w^ 



r»2 r/) wH>-i . 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



13 









'OOiOOOOiOlOO^t^'^OOO'OOt^ 



OOOOOOOOOOOiOOOOO 






ooooooooooo 

cor^O-ooooONOOoO'^u^irs 



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t^ivjOCi^Oi^oO'^'^ooor 



1 <N-)roO rC»0 On 



0\^ •^^mt 






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lOiOt^ioOiOiOOOOO 






rO fC fC <^ f^ CS fN fN r*^ PO <^ f^ f^ "^ fS fO f^ fO 









oocooooooooooooo 

r^COOCSOiOiOiOOcOcOOoCOoOO 



ooooooooooo 

Or^oOOOOt^OGOOO 



OOOiOiOOOiOioOOOu^O 






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'-^^0O'-'^^lO•^f00^(N0\O^O 
CO fs or 



coci^ii^o':'-oiri(M'^'^r^<NO'^"*0 



'"-cOiorTjiMOCvoO'-'ON"^ 
oo^f^CNOfnosONOCNO 



i/^Oi— •r^yOCSr^'-'CtOt^O^'^OO 
— OO'-'— '^r^'^O-^-^C^'-"'^ 



6 CQ 

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a. 



bo M 



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bo c J, A i^ 

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o o^ 



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j£ ccaaaaa aoo o a 'C ,R _j -^ . 

Q d, Oh dl P-l CLh P-l CLi CLi i^ -^ .^ Q„„ Jj ^ 
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"wtNro-ics^rqrH. 



14 



CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 



-hOoO t^ r/5-^ 


Oin 


00 CSl^ •* 


O PO 


OOa-HO 


lOOvfOOM^ 


Ov t^-< 00 


0\ •* rri xn t^ OO 


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lor^ t^i>- 


t~t>. 


r-iO00<O 


lOUIOOOt^ 


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<u 


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vi (u 


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>0 0\ 


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00 O 00 =c 


ooooo 

Ot^oO — w 


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E 






















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^\o CS t>" 


IT) Tj< ij< O lO 


r/5 lO f^ -^ 




o 
1^ 


t^ Tt -^ Tf IT) uo 


lO t^ 


lO C "1 lO 


O'* 


iOOiOtC 


r^ lO lO On »0 


vOf^-tiO 






0^ '-' t^ PO O fO 


00 lO 


0\ f^ r>j t^ 


r*>r^ 


to voo »o 


<N>0\COO 


lO rn 00 t^ 


in -H " o, ^c vo 

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f<10 ■* r^ 
1/^ inio in 


ID m 


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lO V0 1/5 10 



5s 



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lOul 


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imo 


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lOOOO 


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rf •<* 


Tj. Tt Tfl ^ 


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rri(f)rn^ 


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TjtTJIl/^-* 



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-*t^ 


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^^tNO'*-' 


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■*■* 


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OOOO >Al O 


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't r^ -^ 00 

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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



15 



0\0 






Tt l/l OO fS 

o^ c^ t^ oo 



I^ vO fO O 00 t^ vO 
lO CO t/^ t^ 00 C^ '^ 



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inOiOOOtOOiOiOOOOOOOOOO 



oooo 

O r^ t^ t^ 



OCOOOOO 
O w^ >o O r^ lo O 



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r^ O »0 O^ ro 00 0^ t^ (^ O 00 •?!< ^^ vO 00 -^ -^ Ov '-' 

•^ -^ \0 t^ -^ to t^ lO *o t^ f) w^ t^ *o t^ t-- cs (^ \o 



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t^ ^ I/; lo »o o r^ 



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in 1/)10 






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r»5r^ r-l 



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f^ fN CN 



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t^ — "* 00 



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55 



•*cSTj<rt-H!y5rt^,-iCS'*fOr'>-Ht^l-H(N. 



rt CS-H^CN ^OS— <tM^. 



16 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 

Alfalfa Products 

For several years a greater proportion of alfalfa meals have failed to meet 
guarantees than any other feed ingredient. In many instances there has been no 
relation between minimum protein and maximum fiber guarantees and actual 
content. It is generally believed that a satisfactory grade of alfalfa meal or leaf 
meal should carry at least 50 parts per million of carotene. Just how far certain 
brands have deviated, a study of the tables will indicate. Weather and other 
conditions have contributed to depressed production. The insistence of some feed 
mixers on having something that could be called alfalfa regardless of quality has 
led to the utilization of some products that added nothing to the feed but bulk 
and the mixtures would have been fully as satisfactory without them. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



17 



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00> <N 


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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



19 



Phosphorus, Calcium, Manganese and Choline Content 
of Commercial Poultry Feeds 

The mineral content of poultry mashes is, according to feediifg experts, of 
considerable importance. Evidently some diversity of opinion as to proper 
amounts exists, as indicated by the variations between brands made by different 
manufacturers whose reputation for making satisfactory feeds is well established. 
Much of course depends upon the supplementary feeds advocated. It is obvious 
that a complete mash, whether it be for chicks or mature fowls, should have 
recognized and uniform levels irrespective of brand if such levels have been 
satisfactorily established and accepted. 

As the choline content of poultry feeds has been of recent interest, it is reported 
in so far as there has been time to make the analyses. 



Choline Content of Feed Ingredients 



Number of 
Samples 



Material 



Choline 

% 



Number of 
Samples 



Material 



Choline 



1 Dehydrated alfalfa meal . . . 0.08 

1 Dried beet pulp 0.10 

3 Cottonseed meal 0.27 

2 Dry distillers grains 0.14 

4 Fish meal 0.32 

2 Shrimp meal 0.61 

1 Starfish meal 0.35 

1 Gluten meal 0.03 

2 Gluten feed 0.08 

1 Hominy feed 0.07 

1 Linseed meal 0.18 

4 Meat scrap, 50% protein. . . 0.13 



3 Meat and bone meal, 

45% protein 0.10 

2 Animal liver meal 0.38 

2 Ground oats 0.12 

2 Feed oats 0.08 

1 Oat feed 0.04 

4 Soy bean oil meal 0.28 

3 Wheat bran 0.12 

3 Standard wheat middlings 0.12 

1 Red dog flour middlings 0.11 

2 Dried whey 0.21 

2 Dried whey solids 0.17 



20 



CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 



Phosphorus ~ Calcium ~ Manganese ~ Choline Content 
of Commercial Poultry Feeds 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Allied Mills. Inc. 

Wayne All Mash Egg . 
Wayne Breeder Mash . 
Wayne Chick and Broiler Ration 



Phos- 
phorus 



Arcady Farms Milling Co. 

Egg and Breeder Mash . 

Beacon Milling Co.. Inc. 

Battery Growing Ration 
Battery Laying Mash 
Fleshing Pellets . 



Borden Grain Co. 

Laying Mash . . . . 

Community Service, Inc. 

Poultry Mash .... 
Starter and Grower Mash . 

Courcy Grain Co. 

Eastern Milk Laying Mash 



Chas. M. Cox 

Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 
Wirthmore 



Co. 

Complete Breeder Pellets 
Complete Egg Ration . 
Complete Growing Ration 
Laying Mash Pellets . 
Starter and Broiler Ration 
Turkey Starting Ration . 
Turkey Growing Ration . 
Turkey Growing Ration . 



Dailey Mills. Inc. 

Egg Producer Mash 
Emergency Mash .... 
Super Laying Mash .... 
Super Hatch Producer . 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

All Mash Developer 

All Mash Egg 

Egg Mash 



Elmore Milling Co., Inc. 

Complete Market Egg Mash 
Complete Market Egg Mash 
Complete Starter-Broiler 
Egg Mash .... 
Growing Mash 
Turkey Growing Mash . 
Turkey Growing Mash . 

George A. Fair 

Fair Square Growing Mash 

Fair Square Starting & Growing Mash 

Flory Milling Co., Inc. 

All-Mash Egg and Breeder Ration 

Egg and Breeder Mash Pellets 

169,: Growing Mash 

Fred A. Fountain 

Laying Mash 

Starter and Broiler Ration .... 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc. 

Complete Starting and Broiler Ration 
Growing Mash with Cod Liver Oil 
Laying Ma.sh with Cod Liver Oil 

General Mills, Inc., Larrowe Division 

Larro Chick Builder 

Larro Egg Mash 



0.52 
0.69 
0.67 



0.89 
0.71 
0.96 



Cal- 
cium 

% 



0.81 



0.64 
0.83 



0.87 



0.74 
0.62 
0.69 
0.92 
0.87 
0.70 
0.97 
0.81 



0.64 
0.55 
0.65 
0.55 



0.74 
0.82 
1.08 



0.72 
0.57 
0.72 
0.74 
0.82 
0.93 
0.53 



0.82 
0.66 



0.90 
0.99 
1.15 



0.80 
0.71 



0.73 
0.57 
0.59 



0.80 
0.71 



1.31 
1.55 
1.39 



1.90 
1.15 
2.05 



0.53 
2.15 



1.45 
1.37 
1.34 
1.66 
1.98 
1.77 
1.97 
2.30 



1.65 
1.38 
1.49 
1.75 



1.26 
1.93 
2.24 



1.86 
1.47 
1.62 
1.68 
1.45 
2.08 
1.78 



2.69 
2.63 



1.48 
1.45 



1.74 
1.19 
0.87 



1.50 
1.47 



Phosphorus 

Calcium 

Ratio 



2.5 
2.2 
2.1 



1 - 2.5 



2.1 
1.6 
2.1 



0.8 
2.6 



Manganese 

Parts per 

Million 



2.6 
2.5 
2.3 
3.2 



1.7 
2.4 
2.1 



1.8 
2.6 
2.1 



1.9 
2.0 



2.4 
2.1 

1:5 



1.9 

2.1 



159.3 
46.8 
83.3 



82.5 

82.0 

121.5 



29.3 
79.4 



70.4 
71.7 

43.8 
55.0 
83.1 
68.2 
45.6 



55.5 
66.2 
58.3 
75.5 



110.0 
56.0 



98.0 
56.6 
42.8 
93.5 

72.8 
94.7 



81.6 
52.5 



90.8 
124.0 
97.4 



77.4 
31.3 



104.7 
80.0 
62.5 



96.4 
96.5 



Choline 

% 



0.09 



0.11 
0.11 



0.11 
0.12 
0.11 
0.10 

0.16 
0.15 



0.11 



0.11 
0.14 
0.11 



0.15 



0.08 
0.08 
0.08 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



21 



Phosphorus ~ Calcium ~ Manganese ~ Choline Content 
of Commercial Poultry Feeds — Concluded 



Manufacturer and Brand 



D. H. Grandin Milling Co. 

Breeder Mash 
Emergency Poultry Mash 
Emergency Poultry Mash 
Growing Mash 
Start to Finish Mash 
Start to Finish Mash 
Turkey Grower . 



Hales & Hunter Co. 

Red Comb Breeder Mash . 

Red Comb Broiler Mash 

Red Comb Chick Starter 

Red Comb Egg Mash .... 

D. Harbeck & Sons 

Crusader All Purpose Mash 
Welcome Growing Mash 
Welcome Starter and Broiler Mash 

Mansfield Milling Co. 

Chick Growing Ration 

Dry Poultry Mash 



Geo. Q. Moon & Co.. Inc. 

Complete Laying Ration 
Complete Starter and Broiler Mash 
Special A Laying Mash 

Park & Pollard Co. 

Growing Feed 

Lay or Bust Dry Mash 
Layer and Breeder Pellets . 
Starter and Broiler Mash . 

Quaker Oats Co. 

Fu!-0-Pep Laying Mash 

Ralston Purina Co. 

Eggena (Complete Ration) 
Turkey Fatena Checkers 

Arthur Ventura Grain Co. 

Laying Mash 



O. B. Vunck & Co. 

Cortland Growing Mash . . . . 

Cortland Laying Mash 

Cortland Starting and Growing Mash 

Wayne County Grangers Feed Corp. 

Superior Laying Mash 



H. K. Webster Co. 

Blue Seal All Mash Egg Ration 
Blue Seal Chick Starter . . 
Blue Seal Egg Mash Pellets 
Blue Seal Growing Mash 
Blue Seal Growing Mash 

West-Nesbilt Inc. 

Pure Feed Egg Maker . 



Est. M. G. Williams 

Chick Starter 
Growing Mash 
Laying Mash 



Phos- 
phorus 



1.21 
0.91 
0.72 
0.89 
0.95 
0.79 
0.92 



0.79 
0.65 
0.70 

0.72 



0.86 
0.83 
93 



65 
0.80 



0.75 
0.67 
0.71 



0.52 
0.55 
0.53 
0.53 



0.73 



0.66 
0.45 



0.70 
0.81 
0.74 



0.72 
0.63 
0.76 
0.79 
0.93 



0.93 
0.81 
0.79 



Cal- 


cium 

% 


2.79 
2.10 
1.82 
2.71 
2.20 
1.82 
2.26 


2.30 
1.19 
1.13 
2.09 


1.62 
1.64 
1.76 


1.70 
1.62 


1.81 
1.30 

1.78 


1.50 
1.66 
1.10 
0.58 


0.68 


2.08 
0.77 


1.36 


1.27 
2.38 
1.72 


0.46 


1.32 
1.22 
1.65 
1.99 
2.47 


1.05 


2.18 
2.04 
2.31 



Phosphorus 

Calcium 

Ratio 



1 - 2 

1 - 2 

1 - 2 

1 - 3 

1 - 2 
1-2 

1 - 2 



1 - 2.9 

1 - 1.8 

1 - 1.6 

1 - 2.9 



1 - 1.9 
1 - 2.0 
1 - 1.9 



2.6 
2.0 



1 - 2.4 
1 - 1.9 
1 - 2.5 



1 - 2.9 

1 - 3.0 

1 - 2.1 

1 - 1.1 



1 - 0.9 



3.2 
1.7 



1 - 2.0 



- 1.8 

- 2.9 

- 2.3 



1.7 



1 - 2.3 
1 - 2.5 
1 - 2.9 



Manganese 

Parts per 

Million 



80.5 
75.0 
74.8 
80.6 
67.0 
70.0 
105.3 



82.9 
96.4 
89.5 
77.6 



68 
75.6 
61.2 



45.0 
■69.2 



41.1 
45.9 
50.2 



144.7 
146.9 
127.2 
139.6 



32.0 



107.0 
94.0 



48.1 
53.1 
48.2 



55.0 
70.0 
78.0 
88.1 
83.7 



102.5 
105.0 
122.4 



Choline 



0.11 
0.13 
0.12 



0.15 
0.13 
0.11 
0.12 



0.13 
0.10 



12 
0.10 
0.10 



22 



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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 23 

Animal and Fish Products 

Owing to scarcit\- and consequent restrictions upon the sale and use of fish 
and meat scrap, a smaller number of these products was found. The oleic acid 
content, an indication of decomposition or the condition of the scrap before 
rendering, did not average materially different from preceding years. It is pos- 
sible to make scrap from sound stock which does not carry over 1.0 percent of 
oleic acid, which is the standard of some feed mixers in selecting scrap as an 
ingredient of feeds. It is quite possible that some material used would under 
normal conditions have been made into fertilizer tankage. 

The protein quality index is determined by methods worked out by H. J. 
Almquist* of the University of California. The purpose of the method is to 
break up and determine the different components of what is analyzed as total 
protein and to assign to these components their proper value in promoting growth. 
Check tests made with chicks have proved the general accuracy of the method. 
Experiments indicate that a meat and bone scrap of excellent quality should 
have an index value of 70 to 75, one of good quality 65 to 70, and one of average 
quality 60 to 65. A product with an index value of less than 55 may be con- 
sidered low quality. Fish meal of highest grade may run as high as 80 to 87. 
Fish meal produced from market scrap may run as low as 58. 

The protein quality index found is not particularly disturbing. While some 
lots could have been of better quality, in the light of present shortages the samples 
with few exceptions should be considered acceptable. 



Products Usually Sold as Vitamin Supplements 

With the exception of dried milk and dried whey, the products listed in this 
table are added to rations primarily for the vitamins they furnish. It should be 
understood that, although riboflavin and, in some instances, choline and carotene 
are the only substances reported, they are not necessarily the only valuable consti- 
tuents of the products in question, many of which contain other vitamins or min- 
erals as well. Our examination was confined to those values that can be de- 
termined b\- chemical methods. 



♦Supplementary Values of Animal Protein Concentrates in Chick Rations: Journal of Animal 
Nutrition, Volume 10, July-December 1935. 



24 



CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 



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26 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 

Directory of Manufacturers Who Registered Feeding Stuffs for Sale in Massachusetts in 1944 

Abeijona Packing Division, Blue Points Co., Inc., New Boston St., Woburn, Mass. 

Albers Milling Co., Seattle, Wash. 

E. T. Allen Co., Atlanta, Cza. 

Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago. 111. 

American Maize-Products Co.. 100 East 42nd St., New York, N. V. 

A. P. Ames & Co., 10 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Arcady Farms Milling Co., 223 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, III. 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., Atlanta 3, Ga. 

W. E. Atkinson Co., 27 Water St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Atlantic Supply Co., Baltimore, Md. 

E. W. Bailey & Co., Montpelier, Vt. 
Barber & Bennett. Inc., .Mbany, N. Y. 
Bay State Milling Co., Winona, Minn. 
Beacon Milling Co., Inc., Cayuga, N. Y. 
Best Foods, Inc., 237 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Bisbee Linseed Co., Inc., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Bisbee Linseed Co., 2100 Lincoln-Liberty Bldg., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Blaine-Mackay-Lee Co., North East, Penn. 

Blatchford Calf Meal Co., Waukegan, 111. 

Blatchley & Ballard, Inc., 153 Russell St., Middletown, Conn. 

Borden Co., Special Products Div., 350 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Borden Grain Co., West Water St., Taunton, Mass. 

A. H. Brown & Bros., Boston, Mass. (Registered by Mellin's Food Company of North America) 

George B. Brown Corp., Ipswich, Mass. 

Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

A. B. Caple Co., Toledo 5, Ohio 
Central Soya Co., Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Checkerboard Feed Stores, Ralston Purina Co., Prop., St. Louis, Mo. 

Clinton Co., Clinton, Iowa 

Coatsworth and Cooper, Ltd., 67 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Commander-Larabee Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Community Service, Inc., Canaan, Conn. 

Consolidated Products Co., Danville, 111. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Continental Distilling Corp., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 

O. A. Cooper Co., Humboldt, Neb. 

Corn Products Sales Co., 17 Battery Place, New York 4, N. Y. 

Courcy Grain Co., 12 Waverly St., Taunton, Mass. 

Cover Grain & Feed Co., 150 Middle St., Lowell, Mass. 

Chas. M. Cox., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

Crawford Brothers, Inc., Walton, N. Y. 

Curley Grain & Fuel Co., 563 Main St., ^^'akef^eld, Mass. 

Dailey Mills. Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Dairy Farmers' Union Feeds, Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

Decatur Milling Co., Inc., Decatur, 111. 

Dehydrating Process Co., 60 Mt. Washington Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Delaware Mills, Inc., Deposit, N. Y. 

Denver Alfalfa Milling & Products Co., Lamar, Col. 

Frank Diauto, 87 Warren St., Randolph, Mass. 

F. Diehl & Son, Inc., Wellesley 81, Mass. 
Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc., Fredericks Md. 

Drackett Products Co., 5020 Spring Grove Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 
E^ I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington 98, Del. 
Eagle Roller Mill Co., New Ulm, Minn. 

East Bridgewater Farmer's Exchange, Inc., East Bridgewater, Mass. 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, West Springfield, Mass. 

B. A. Eckhart Milling Co., 1300 Carroll -Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Economy Grocery Stores Corp., 393 D. St., Boston, Mass. 
Egg-O-Milk Co., Baltimore. Md. (Registered by P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son) 
M. W. Ellis Estate, 19 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Elmore Milling Co., Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 

John W. Eshelman & Sons, Lancaster, Penn. 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Association, Topsfield, Mass. 

Evans Milling Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Excelsior Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 27 

George A. Fair. Holliston, Mass. 

Farmers Feed Co.. 532 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Federal Mill, Inc.. Lockport, N. Y. 

Finger Lakes and Hudson Flour Mills. Inc.. Geneva, N. Y. 

Finger Lakes & Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., 7 Madison St., Troy, N. Y. 

First National Stores, Inc.. 5 Middlesex Ave.. Somerville, Mass. 

Flory Milling Co.. Inc., Bangor, Penn. 

Fred A. Fountain. Taunton, Mass. 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc., Worcester. Mass. 

General Foods Corporation, Corn Mill Division, Kankakee, 111. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. 

General Mills, Inc.. Farm Service Division, Fitchburg, Mass. 

General Mills, Inc.. Larrowe Division. Box 68. North End Station, Detroit, Mich. 

Getek Industrial & Agricultural Supplies Corp., 1270 Sixth Ave., New York, N. Y. 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons. Inc., Walpole, Mass. 

Glidden Co.. Feed Mill Division, 1160 West l?th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Glidden Co., Soya Products Division, 5165 West Moffat St., Chicago, 111. 

Gloucester Dehydrating Process Co., Gloucester. Mass. 

Golden Eagle Milling Co., Petaluma. Cal. (Distributors for Western Condensing Co.) 

Goode Grain Co.. 452 Broadway, Lowell, Mass. 

Gorton-Pew Fisheries Co.. Ltd., Gloucester, Mass. 

D. H. Grandin Milling Co., Jamestown, N. Y. 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., New York, N. Y. 

Hales & Hunter Co . 166 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 

D. Harbeck & Sons New Bedford, Mass. 

Henkel F'our 'Mills. Division of International Milling Co., 323 East Atwater St., Detroit 26, Mich. 
Hercules Powder Co., Dairy Products Division, 332 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Hood Mills Co., Baltimore 5, Md. 

E. C. & W. L. Hopkins, Inc., Greenfield, N. H. 
Horton Grain Co., Ipswich, Mass. 
Hubinger Co., Keokuk, Iowa 
Humphreys-Godwin Co., Memphis, Tenn. 
Independent Tallow Co., Inc., 39 Cedar St., Woburn, Mass. 
International Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Jaquith & Co.. 305 Main St., Woburn, Mass. 

Kansas Flour Mills Co., 1000 New York Life Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 

Kasco Mills, Inc.. Waverly, N. Y. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek. Mich. 

Spencer Kellogg & Sons. Inc., 98 Delaware Ave.. Buffalo 5, N. Y. 

King Midas Flour Mills, Division of Van Dusen Harrington Co., 500 Flour Exchange, Minneapolis, 

Minn. 
Kraft Cheese Co., 500 Peshtigo Ct., Chicago, 111. 
Chas. A. Krause Milling Co., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Lake of the Woods Milling Co., Ltd., Montreal, Que., Canada 
Larabee Flour Mills Co., Kansas City, Mo. 
L. B. Lovitt & Co., Memphis 3, Tenn. 

A. S. MacDoriald Commission Co., 177 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. 
Mackenzie & Winslow, Inc., Fall River. Mass. 
Maine Fish Meal Co., Union Wharf, Portland, Maine 
Mansfield Milling Co.. 1 Samoset Ave., Mansfield, Mass. 
Maritime Milling Co., Inc.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
Meadow Brook Farms, Nazareth, Penn. 
Mellin's Food Co. of North America, 41 Central Wharf, Boston, Mass. (Registered for A. H. 

Brown & Bros.) 
Merrimack Farmers' Exchange, Inc., Concord, N. H. 
Middlesex County Farm Bureau Association, Waltham, Mass. 
Milktone Concentrate Co.. 1326 Baltimore Trust Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 
Miner-Hillard Milling Co., Wilkes-Barre, Penn. 
Geo. Q. Moon & Co., Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. 
Jas. F. Morse & Co., 11 Horace St., Somerville 43, Mass. 
National Biscuit Co., Shredded Wheat Bakeries, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
National Distillers Products Corp., 120 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
National Lead Co., Ill Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 
National Milling Branch of National Biscuit Co., Toledo, Ohio 
Neumond Co., 300 Merchants Exchange, St. Louis, Mo. 
New England Grain Co., 390 Commercial St., Portland, Maine 
P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son, 4101 East Monument St., Baltimore 5, Md. (Registered for Egg-O-Milk 

Co.) 



28 CONTROL BULLETIN No. 121 

Ogden Grain Co., Utica, N. Y. 
Omar, Inc., Omaha 2, Neb. 

Oswego Soy Products Corp., East Seneca St., Oswego, N. Y. 
Palm Grain Co., 1081 Gorham St.. Lowell. Mass. 
Park & Pollard Co., 356 Hertel Ave.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
George H. Parker Grain Co., 56 Water St., Danvers, Mass. 

Parrish & Heimbecker, Limited, Toronto, Ont., Canada (Registered by A. S. MacDonald Com- 
mission Co.) 
Pasco Packing Association, Dade City, Florida 
Patent Cereals Co., Geneva, N. Y. 
Pierce Grain Corp., 1035 Seneca St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Pillsbury Flour Mills Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Linseed Oil Division, 2-10 Chester Ave., Newark, N. J. 
W. N. Potter Grain Stores, Inc., Greenfield, Mass. (Registered by Chas. M. Cox Co.) 
Publicker Commercial Alcohol Co., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 
Quaker Oats Co., 141 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 
Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., Cambridge, Mass. 
Rex Grain & Milling Co., Inc., 95 Kentucky St.. Buffalo, N. Y. 
D. F. Riley, North Hatfield. Mass. 

Rio Grande Valley Citrus Exchange, Weslaco, Texas (Registered by Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co.) 
Rodney Milling Co., Kansas City 8, Mo. 
Russell-Miller Milling Co.. Minneapolis, Minn. 
Ryther & Warren Co., Belchertown, Mass. 

St. Lawrence Flour Mills Co., Ltd., 2110 Notre Dame St., West, Montreal, Que., Canada 
Saunders Mills, Inc., Toledo, Ohio 

Schenley Distilleries, Inc., 350 Fifth Ave., New York 1, N. Y. 
Schoeneck Farms, Inc., R. No. 3, Nazareth, Penn. 
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky 
Sherwin-Williams Co., 101 Prospect Ave., N. W., Cleveland, Ohio 
W. J. Small Co., Inc., Neodesha, Kan. 
A. E. Staley Manufacturing Co., Decatur, 111. 
Standard Milling Co., 309 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 
Stratton & Co., Concord, N. H. 

Swift & Company, Union Stock Yards, Chicago. 111. 
Swift & Co., Palmer, Mass. 

Swift & Company Soybean Mills, Champaign, 111. 
Toledo Soybean Products Co., Toledo, Ohio 
Jacob Trinley & Sons* Linfield, Penn. 

Union Sales Corporation, Columbus, Ind. (Distributor for Union Starch & Refining Co.) 
United Cooperative Farmers. Inc., Fitchburg, Mass. 
United Farmers Cooperative Creamery Assn., Inc., Charlestown, Mass. 
United Mills Co., Inc., Grafton, Ohio i 

Unity Feeds, Inc., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 
Arthur Ventura Grain Co., Longmeadow Road, Taunton, Mass. 
Vita- Vim Millers, 135 Scott St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Wakefield Sawdust & Shavings Co., Wakefield, Mass. 
Hiram Walker & Sons. Inc., Foot of Edmund St., Peoria 1, 111. 
C. P. Washburn Co., Middleboro, Mass. 
Wayne County Grangers Feed Corp., Clyde, N. Y. 
H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence, Mass. 
West-Nesbitt, Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 
Western Condensing Co., Petaluma, Cal. 
Whitmoyer Laboratories, Inc., Myerstown, Penn. 
Williams Bros. Co., Kent, Ohio 

Est. M. G. Williams, Taunton, Mass. ^ 

Wisconsin Milling Co., Menomonie, Wis. 
Stanley Wood Grain Co., Taunton, Mass. 
Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester, Mass. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
2m 8-44-14887P 



MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 122 SEPTEMBER 1944 



Inspection of Commercial 

Fertilizers 

and 

Agricultural Lime Products 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff 



This is the seventy-first report of the Massachusetts Fertilizer Control made 
in accordance with Chapter 94, Sections 250 to 261, inclusive, of Massachusetts 
General Laws 1920, as amended by Chapter 67, Acts of 1933. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS 

AND AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1944 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff: 

Philip H. Smith, Official Chemist, in Charge Henry B. Rodman, Junior Chemist 

fjohn W. Kuzmesici, Senior Chemist James T. Howard, Inspector 

*H. Robert DeRose, Assistant Chemist Louis A. Graves, Inspector 

Albert F. Spelman, Assistant Chemist Joseph Conlclin, Inspector 

C. Tyson Smith, Assistant Chemist Joseph A. Marte!!, Laboratory Assistant 

*Leo V. Crowley, Junior ChemiU Cora B. Grover, Senior Clerk 

*On military leave of absence. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Pertinent facts relating to Massachusetts fertilizer law 2 

Manufacturers and brands 3 

Fertilizer tonnage 4 

Mixed fertilizers: 

Deficiency statistics 5 

Average variation table 6 

Small paclcage fertilizers 6 

Calculation of shortages 8 

Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton 10 

Mixtures substantially complying with guarantees 14 

Chemicals and raw products: 

Unmixed materials showing a commercial shortage of SI or mo:e per ton 17 

Nitrogen compounds 18 ' 

Potash compounds 18 

Phosphoric Acid compounds 19 

Products supplying nitrogen and phosphoric acid 20 

Pulverized animal manures 21 

Agricultural Lime products: 

Manufacturers and brands 23 

Variations and deficiencies 23 

Hydrated or slaked lime 25 

Pulverized limestone (fine-ground limestone) 26 

Ground limestone (coarse-ground limestone) 27 

Directory of manufacturers who registered fertilizers in 1944 28 



PERTINENT FACTS RELATING TO MASSACHUSETTS 
FERTILIZER LAW 

Commercial Fertilizers 

Registration is required annually on January- 1. 

Registration fee is $8 for eacii element: nitrogen, phosphoric acid, potash, mag- 
nesia. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of fertilizer 
Name, brand or trade mark, and grade 
Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, water soluble 
potash. A guarantee of total phosphoric acid ma\- be used instead of 
available phosphoric acid for bone, untreated phosphate rock, tankage, 
dried and pulverized manures, ground seeds, and wood ashes. 
Tonnage reports are required semi-annually, on Januar\- 1 and Juh- 1. 
Tonnage fee: 6 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 






FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 3 

Lime Products 

Registration is required annually on January 1. 
Registration fee: $12 for each brand. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of product 

Name, brand or trade mark, and form of lime 

Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, carbonates of calcium 
and magnesium, or calcium sulphate (in gypsum or land plaster) 



Make checks payable to Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station and 
send correspondence to 

PHILIP H. SMITH 

Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 

Amherst, Mass. 



Manufacturers and Brands 

Registrations have been perfected in Massachusetts during 1944 by 61 firms, 
covering 219 brands of mixed fertilizer and unmixed fertilizing materials. 

The following brands were not found on display b}^ the sampling agent at any 
point in the state and therefore do not appear in the tables of analyses. 



Brands of Fertilizer Registered but Not Sampled 



Allied Chemical & Dye Corp., 


Eastern States Farmers' Exchange — Cont. 


The B.irrelt Division 


Eastern States 10-10-10-1 


Sulphate of .Ammonia 1,20.6-0-0) 


Eastern States Sulphate of Ammonia 




(20.5-0-0) 


American Agricultural Chemical Co. 


Eastern Stales Sulphate of Potash (O-C-52) 


Agrico Alkaline 0-14-14 




.Agrico for Seeding 4-12-16 


Thomas W. Emerson Co. 


Muriate of Potash (0-0-60) 


Emseco Fertilizer 7-7-7 


American Liquid Fertilizer Co., Inc. 


Excell Laboratories 


Liqua-Vita 6-9-7 


New Plant Life 2-1-2 


American Potash & Chemical Corp. 


Humphreys-Godwin Co. 


Trona Muriate of Potash (0-0-60) 


Dixie Brand 41% Protein Prime Cotton- 




seed Meal (6.58-0-0) 


Apothecaries Hall Co. 




Liberty Fertilizer 4-12-4 


International Minerals, & Chemical Corp. 


Liberty Tobacco Mixtu' e 5-3-5 


International Sul-Po-Mag (Sulphate of 


Liberty Fertilizer (Sulphate Potash) 5-8-7 


Potash Magnesia) 


Castor Pomace (4.5-0-0) 




Muriate Potash (0-0-60) 


L. B. Lovitt & Co. 




Lovit Brand 41 '^'c Protein Cottonseed 


Armour Fertilizer Works 


Meal (6.56-0-0) 


.Armour's Big Crop Tobacco Special 5-3-5 






Middlesex Couhty Farm Bureau Assn. 


Atkins & Durbrow, Inc. 


Sulphate of Ammonia (20.5-0-0) 


OK Manure (2-1-1) 






Olds & Whipple, Inc. 


F. A. Bartlett Tree Expert Co. 


O & \V 5-10-5 Fertilizer 


Bartlett Green Tree Food 4-8-6 






Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co. 


Joseph Breck & Sons Corp. 


Red Seal Brand Ruhm's Phosphate 


Brack's Ram's Head Sheep Manure (2-1-1) 


Rock (0-30-0) 


Buell Fertilizer Co. 


Tennessee Corp. 


Buell Peat-Poultry Manure (3-3-1.5) 


Es-Min-El 


Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 


Woodruff Fertilizer Works. Inc. 


Eastern States 0-10-20-2 with Borax 


Woodruff's 5-10-10 Fertilizer 


Eastern States 0-20-20-2 




Eastern States 5-15-20-1 





4 CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 

Drawing of Samples 

Between April 1 and June 15, three sampling agents made a thorough canvass 
of the state: Joseph Conklin in Hampshire, Hampden, Franklin, and Berkshire 
Counties: Louis A. Graves in Norfolk, Bristol, Plymouth, Barnstable, and Dukes 
Counties; and James T. Howard in Essex, Middlesex, Suffolk, and Worcester 
Counties. They visited 157 towns, took 1,098 samples, representing 187 brands, 
from stock in the possession of 335 agents or owners, and called at 353 places 
where no samples were drawn because the agenc}' had been discontinued, the 
stock was all sold out, or sufficient samples had already' been taken of the brands 
found. They sampled 16,375 sacks, representing 8,134 tons of fertilizer. One 
ton was sampled to every 9.2 tons sold in the state. 



FERTILIZER TONNAGE 
Tonnage of Mixed and Unmixed Fertilizers Sold in i^Iassachusetts 



Mixed fertilizers 

Fertilizer chemicals and materials unmixed 

Pulverized animal manures .... 

Totals 



July 1, 1941, to 
July 1, 1942 



53,602 
15.470 a. 
1,508 



70,580 



July 1, 1942. to 
July 1, 1943 



62,989 b. 

13,219 c. 

1,596 



77,804 



July 1, 1943, to 
July 1, 1944 



61,390 
11,648 d. 
1,581 



74.619 



a. Does not include 1,604 tons of 18% superphosphate and 8,394 tons of 20% superphosphate 

distributed by the A.A.A. 

b. Does not include 2.916 tons of 0-14-14 distributed by the A..-\..-\. 

c. Does not include 8,505 tons of 20% superphosphate distributed by the A..\.A. 

d. Does not include 15,218 tons of 20% superphosphate distributed by the A. A. .A.. 



Tonnage of Mixed Fertilizers, July 1, 1943, to July 1, 1944 



Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


5-8-7 


18,211 


2? 


5-10-5 


121 




5-10-10 


13,189 


21 


8-4-8 


117 


— 


5-10-5 


8,503 


23 


6-12-4 


90 


— 


6-3-6 


6,566 


13 


6-5-5 


76 


— 


7-7-7 


4,027 


11 


8-7-3 


13 


— 


3-12-6 


2,800 


. U 


.08-.16-.10 


11 


— 


8-16-16 


1.832 


— 


6-15-15 


70 


— 


5-17-0 


945 


— 


4-8-4 


46 




4-12-4 


847 


— 


4-16-20 


46 


— 


4-9-7 


829 


— 


3-12-3 


40 


— 


8-16-8 


406 


— 


4-8-6 


40 


— 


6-10-4 


361 


— 


3-10-5 


31 


— 


0-14-14 


353 


— 


3-10-3 


25 


— 


6-8-2 


338 


— 


5-8-5 


14 


— 


8-8-8 


337 


— 


0-20-20 


13 


— 


4-10-10 


328 


— 


5-7-4 


10 


— 


5-3-S 


309 
195 


— 


Miscellaneous 
Totals 


38 


— 


3-8-7 


61.390 


148 



*The grade represents the plant food guarantee and is expressed in the order of nitrogen, available 
phosphoric acid, potash. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 
Tonnage of Unmixed Materials, July 1, 1943, to July 1, 1944 



Material 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Material 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Nitrate of soda . 


3,203 





Cottonseed meal . 


264 





Superphosphate 20' ;, . 


2,807 


8 


Cyanamid .... 


203 


— 


Pulverized animal manures 


1,581 


22 


Castor pomace 


147 


— 


Superphosphate 18*^0 . 


1.474 


— 


Uramon .... 


138 


— 


Milorganite 


1,108 


— 


Bone and tankage 


70 


— • 


Ammonium nitrate 


689 


— 


Superphosphate 47% ■ 


32 


— 


Muriate of potash 60^^ 


632 


8 


Tankage .... 


11 


— 


Bone meal . ; . . 


526 


8 


Miscellaneous . 


39 


— 


Sulfate of ammonia 


305 


5 








Totals . . . 


13,229 


71 



MIXED FERTILIZERS 

Deficiency Statistics for Mixed Fertilizers 



Manufacturer 



Number of 




Number of Tests 


Samples 












& 


0) 

•3 Si 


V 

•o ':i 
















s 










•a 
_>. 


O C 

c V 


"a 


M V. S 


ft-** ^ 




< 


^Q 


H 


jolo 


M^m 








tSSc 



Acme Guano Co 

Agricultural Laboratories, Inc. 
American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

.Apothecaries Hall Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works . . . . 

Ernest J. Bantle 

Belmont Gardens 

Berkshire Chemical Co 

Joseph Breck & Sons Corp. 
Consolidated Rendering Co. . 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange . 
Thomas \V. Emerson Co. 
Essex County Co-operative Farming 

Association 

H. L. Frost & Higgins Co. 

Grasalo Co 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. . 

Hy-Trous Corp 

International Minerals & Chemical 

Corporation 

Kem-ical Corp 

National Plant Foods, Inc. 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Olds & Whipple, Inc 

Plantabbs Co 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corp 

Rogers & Hubbjwd Co 

William H. Rorer, Inc 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co 

Sears, Roebuck & Co 

Smith-Douglass Co., Inc. 
Standard Wholesale Phosphate & 

Acid Works, Inc 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works . 

Tennessee Corp 

C. P. Washburn Co 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc. . 

TOTALS 



5 





15 


4 


3 





1 





3 











57 


10 


171 


34 


21 


10 


21 


17 


62 


4 








30 


11 


90 


79 


2 





3 


2 


9 


1 








1 


1 


3 











20 


4 


60 


13 


4 


1 


6 





18 


2 


) 


1 


45 


14 


135 


24 


4 


10 


21 


13 


1 78 


5 


3 


1 


11 





1 33 


3 





2 


6 


3 


1 20 


4 


1 





1 





3 


1 








1 


1 


3 











2 





6 


f 


1 





3 


2 


1) 








1 


2 


2 


6 











40 


13 


123 


14 


13 


4 


1 


1 


3 











1 





3 


1 








16 


14 


50 


1 


1 





12 


11 


36 


1 








2 


2 


6 











1 





3 











31 


28 


91 


9 


1 





1 


1 


3 











7 





21 


4 


1 


3 


2 


1 


6 





2 





44 


8 


115 


21 


11 


2 


3 


1 


9 


1 


1 


1 


9 


7 


27 


1 


1 





3 


2 


9 


1 








4 





12 


3 


1 





3 


1 


9 


2 








416 


170 


1,250 


170 


73 


36 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 
Serious Commercial Shortages in Mixed Fertilizers 



Amount of Shortage per Ton 


Number of Samples 


More than $5 


Q 


Between $4 and $5 


4 


Between $3 and $4 


4 


Between S2 and S3 . . . ..... 


15 


Between SI and S2 .... 


39 







Average Variation from Guaranteed Analysis 

Seventeen firms have registered three or more brands of mixed fertilizers. 
On the basis of composition found by analysis as well as of tonnage sold, the 
following table shows to what extent each manufacturer was successful in a\'oid- 
ing deficiencies in plant food guarantees in his mixtures. Seven of the seventeen 
firms have an average deficiency in one or more plant food elements. 



Manufacturer 



Acme Guano Co 

American Agricultural Chemical Co 

Apothecaries Hall Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Berkshire Chemical Co 

Consolidated Rendering Co 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange .... 

Thomas W. Emerson Co 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Association 
International Minerals & Chemical Corpoiation 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co.. Inc 

Olds & Whipple, Inc 

Rogers & Hubbard Co 

Smith-Douglass Co., Inc 

Standard Wholesale Phosphate & Acid Works. Inc. 
Swift & Company Fertilizer Works .... 
Woodruff Fertilizer \\orks, Inc 



.\verage Percentage of Plant Food 
Above or Below the Minimum Guarantee 





Available 


Water 


Nitrogen 


Phosphoric 


Soluble 




Acid 


Potash 


-.29 


+ 


-.29 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


-.01 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


-.94 


-1.04 


+ 


+ 


-.14 


-}- 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


-.10 


+ 


-.005 


+ 


-.02 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


+ 


-.05 



Small Package Fertilizers 

During the past few years, the sale of fertilizers packaged in small containers 
has increased greatly. Because the growers of household potted plants find the 
one-pound or smaller packages very convenient to use, a large percentage of the 
fertilizer sold in small lots is contained in packages of one pound or less. How- 
ever, for small garden and lawn use, a considerable tonnage is also sold in ten- 
pound lots of solid fertilizer and one-gallon lots of liquid fertilizer. 

Since these fertilizers carry different guarantees and are sold in packages that 
vary a great deal in size, weight, and price, it was thought that the consumer 
might be interested in the comparative costs of the three major elements in each 
brand. It is realized that some of the fertilizers, especially those intended for 
hydroponic use as well as for use on soil, are claimed to contain all elements 
essential for plant growth; however, since practically all of the other mixed fer- 
tilizers manufactured from ordinary commercial fertilizer ingredients also con- 
tain all of the elements known to be necessary for plant growth, a comparison 
based on the content of only the three elements, nitrogen, phosphoric acid, and 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 7 

potash, is a fair one if the comparison is confined to fertilizers to be applied to 
soil. For hydroponic use, that is for growing plants in nutrient solutions or in 
sand, etc., it is advantageous to use mixtures made from chemically pure water- 
soluble ingredients. The cost of these ingredients is considerably higher than 
that of similar commercial-grade fertilizer materials ordinarily used in the manu- 
facture of solid fertilizers. This higher cost of raw materials must naturally be 
reflected by a higher price on the mixed products. 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Grade 



Weight 

of 
Package 



Retail 

Package 

Price 



Average Cost 
Per Pound of 

Plant Food 



Agricultural Laboratories, Inc. 
Stim-U-Plant .... 
Stim-U-Plant .... 



Thomas W. Emerson Co. 

Emseco Fertilizer . 



A. H. Hoffman, Inc. 

Hoffman's Victory Garden Fertilizer 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. 

Hyponex 

Hyponex 



Hy-Trous Corporation 

Hy-Trous 
Hy-Trous 



Kemical Corporation 

Kem-Liquid Plant Food 
Keni Liquid Plant Food 



Mechling Bros. Chemicals. Division of 
General Chemical Co. 

Veget-Aid 



National Plant Foods. Inc. 

Hy-Gro Plant Food 
Hy-Gro Plant Food 



F. G. Phillips Co. 

Ferti-Flora 



Plantabbs Co. 

Fulton's "V" Plantabbs 
Fulton's "V" Plantabbs 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corporation 

Ra-Pid-Gro . . . 
Ra-Pid-Gro . . . 



Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Gro-Fast Plant Food 
Gro-Fast Plant Food 

William H. Rorer, Inc. 

Plant Dinner 
Plant Dinner 



O. M. Scott & Sons Co. 

Scotts Garden Builder 
. Scotts Turf Builder 



Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 

Vigoro 

Vigoro 



Tennessee Corporation 

Loma .... 



4-12-8 
4-12-8 



5-10-5 
5-10-5 



7-6-19 
7-6-19 



4-8-4 
4-8-4 



.08-. 16-. 10 
.08-. 16-. 10 



13-26-13 
13-26-13 



4-12-18 
4-12-18 



23-27-17 
23-27-17 



5-8-5 
5-8-5 



5-7-5 
5-7-5 



5-10-5 

8-7-3 



4-12-4 
4-12-4 



260 grains 

(3.70 Dounds, 

(26,000 grains 



5 pounds 
5 pounds 



3 ounces 
10 pounds 



3 fluid ounces 
(10.1 pounds. 
(1 gallon 



4 ounces 
(8.44 pounds 
(1 gallon 



1 pound 



3 ounces 
10 pounds 



165 grains 
2 pounds 



1 pound 
10 pounds 



1 pound 
5 pounds 



6 ounces 
10 pounds 



10 pounds 
10 pounds 



1 pound 
10 pounds 



10 pounds 



$0.10 
3.50 

.20 

.25 



.25 
8 00 



.25 
5.95 

.10 
1.00 



.25 
4.00 



.10 

2,75 



1.25 
8.75 



.10 

.45 



.50 
8.50 



.75 
1.25 



.10 
.80 



S11.26 
3 94 

.20 

.25 



4.17 
2 50 



7.99 
3. 68 

117.64 

34 . 84 



.75 



2.61 

.77 



12.44 
4 04 



1.86 
1.30 



.56 
.50 



7.84 
5.00 



.37 
.69 



.50 
.40 



8 CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 

For the smallest size packages intended almost solely for use on small lots of 
potted plants, the total amount expended by any one individual is so small 
that the economic factor is hardly worth considering. In this case the convenience 
of handling a small package and the lack of odor or dust while applying the fer- 
tilizer to the plants probably far outweigh the extra cost, especially so far as most 
women are concerned. However, the amount spent for fertilizer for average 
outside garden use is large enough, especially if hydroponic fertilizer is purchased, 
to justify examination of the value the purchaser Is getting for his money. 

The preceding table lists the average price the consumer pays for each pound 
of plant food (nitrogen, phosphoric acid, and potash) in purchasing any of the 
brands listed. For example, in ten pounds of a 4-8-4 grade there are 4 tenths 
of a pound of nitrogen, 8 tenths of a pound of phosphoric acid, and 4 tenths of a 
pound of potash, or a total of 1.6 pounds of plant food, considering onh' the three 
major elements. If the ten pounds of fertilizer sells for $1.00, the average cost 
per pound of actual plant food is 1.00 divided by 1.6, or 62.5 cents a pound. It 
ma\' be said here that most of the minor elements are needed in such small quan- 
tities that their cost compared to that of the major elements is practically neg- 
ligible. 

Calculation of Shortages 

For calculating the approximate commercial shortages per ton the following 
figures were used: 

Retail Cost 
Per Unit 

Nitrogen: 

Water-soluble and synthetic organic $2.00 

Water-insoluble of good quality and 

Water-soluble amounting to one-eighth of the percentage of 
water-insoluble nitrogen found when the percentage of 
water-insoluble nitrogen exceeds .50 8.00 

Available phosphoric acid 1.40 

Potash : 

Muriate '. 85 

Sulfate 1.10 

From cotton hull and boll ashes and wood ashes 1.26 

These values represent the a\'erage retail cost to the consumer of the plant 
food elements In unmixed materials. This does not include mixing and overhead 
costs which increase the retail cost of these elements In mixed goods. 

To compensate for the Increased unit cost in mixed goods the commercial 
shortage as found by using our values is multiplied by the factor: Actual retail 
selling price divided by our calculated guaranteed value. 

Example: A 5-8-7 fertilizer selling for $39.00 a ton analyzes: 

Total nitrogen 4.67 

Water-insoluble nitrogen .88 

Available phosphoric acid 7.43 

Potash 7.13 

Shortage: Nitrogen 33, X$2.00 = $0.66 

Available phosphoric acid 57 X 1.40 = .80 

Total $1.46 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 

Our calculated guaranteed value: 

Water-insoluble nitrogen = .88 + -H = .99 X $8.00 = $7.92 

Water-soluble nitrogen = 5.00 - .99 = 4.01 X $2.00 = 8.02 

Available phosphoric acid = 8.00 X $1.40 = 11.20 

Potash = 7.00 X $0.85 = 5.95 

Total $33.09 

Approximate commercial shortage = 39.00 -^ 33.09 X 1.46 = $1.72 per ton. 



Explanation of Tables of Analyses 

Guarantee. The plant food guarantee or the grade of each fertilizer is made 
a part of the trade name under the heading "Name of Manufacturer and Brand", 
and is expressed as nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, and water soluble potash 
and in that order. 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with the Guarantee. In addition to those 
fertilizers which meet their guarantees in ever\- respect, this table includes also 
those mixtures which have one or more elements below the guaranteed percentage 
but have a shortage of less than $1 per ton. 

From the Control Official's viewpoint, the amount of overrun, within reason- 
able limits, found in any sample of fertilizer is not especially signifiaint. Of 
main importance is the fact that the particular sample analyzed shows that the 
manufacturer of the brand represented by the sample is selling a product which 
is or is not substantially as guaranteed. The manufacturer whose 4-9-7 brand 
is found by the Control Official to be running 4.01-9.03-7.02 in every sample of 
the brand tested is meeting all requirements covering this part of the fertilizer 
control laws as fully as the manufacturer of another 4-7-9 brand found to run 
4.85-9.95-7.90 in each sample tested. 

Therefore this table, in addition to the data mentioned in the next paragraph, 
contains only results of anahtical tests pertaining to the average amount of 
water insoluble nitrogen present in each brand, since this information is of value 
to tobacco growers and other users of fertilizers containing a high percentage of 
this form of nitrogen. 

Potash Forms. Tests for chlorine are made only on tobacco mixtures and on 
those fertilizers which carry a guarantee of potash in forms other than muriate. 
When the amount of chlorine present in any brand exceeds the tolerance allowed 
for that brand, this fact is indicated by a footnote. 



10 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 



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14 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 
Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Acme Guano Co. 

Acme 3-12-6 
Acme 5-8-7 . 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

AA Quality Fertilizer 5-8-7 

Agrico for Corn 3-12-6 

Agrico for Gardens (Victory Garden Fertilizer for Food Produc- 
tion Only) 5-10-5 

Agrico for Lawns Trees & Shrubs 6-10-4 

Agrico for New England 5-8-7 

Agrico for Potatoes 5-10-10 

Agrico for Tobacco 6-3-6 

Agrico for Top Dressing 7-7-7 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Liberty Fertilizer 0-14-14 

Liberty Fertilizer 3-12-6 

Liberty Fertilizer (Muriate Potash) 5-8-7 

Liberty Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 

Liberty Fertilizer (Muriate Potash) 5-10-10 

Liberty Fertilizer (Sulphate Potash) 5-10-10 

Liberty Fertilizer 6-3-6 

Liberty Fertilizer (with Cotton Hull Ashes) 6-3-6 . . . . 
Liberty Green Gro Fertilizer for Lawns, Flowers, Shrubs, 

Trees 6-7-4 

Liberty Fertilizer 7-7-7 



Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 3-12-6 
Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-8-7 . 
Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-10-5 
Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-10-10 
Armour's Big Crop Tobacco Special 6-3-6 . 
Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 7-7-7 . 
Armour's Special Ornamental Fertilizer 6-12- 
Armour's Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 . 



Ernest J. Bantle 

Bantle's 5-8-7 Potato & Vegetable 
Bantle's 6-3-6 Tobacco 



Belmont Gardens 

Gardenia Fertilizer (Belgard) 6-15-4 

Berkshire Chemical Co. 

Berkshire 3-12-6 

Berkshire 5-S-7 

Berkshire 5-10-5 

Berkshire Victory Garden 5-10-5 

Berkshire 5-10-10 

Berkshire 6-3-6 Tobacco . . . . 



Joseph Breck & Sens Corp. 

Breck's Victory Fertilizer 5-10-5 
Brexone for Gardens & Lawns 5-10-4 



Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco 3-12-6 Animal Brand 

Corenco 5-8-7 Potato and General Crop 

Corenco 5-10-5 \'ictory Garden Fertilizer 

Corenco 5-10-10 Peerless Potato 

Corenco 6-3-6 Special Tobacco Grower 

Corenco 6-S-2 Landscape Fertilizer 

Corenco 7-7-7 Complete Fruit & Top Dressing 

Eastern States Farmer^' Exchange 

Eastern States 5-10-5 Victory Garden with 2% magnesium oxide 
Eastern States 5-10-10 with 2% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 5-17-0 

Eastern States 8-4-8 Tobacco with .5"^, magnesium oxide 
Eastern States 8-8-8 with 1% magnesium oxide . 
Eastern States 8-16-8 with 1% magnesium oxide 
Eastern States 8-16-16 with 1% magnesium oxide 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



1 

1 a. 



4 

3 a. 

4 a. 

5 a. 
8 

6 a. 
2 b. 
5 a 



4 
5 
4 
5 
2 6. 

2 a. 
3 

3 a. 



1 
2 6. 



1 
9 

2 a. 
1 a. 
3 

1 h. 



1 a. 

2 a. 



9 a. 
ia 
5 
9 a. 

2 h. 



3 

3 

3 

2 6. 

3 

3 

3 



a. See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 

b. Potash in forms other than muriate. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 15 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Continued 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Thomas W. Emerson Co. 

Emseco Fertilizer 5-7-4 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Association 

S-X Brand 5-8-7 

S-X Brand (1% magnesium oxide) 5-10-10 

S-X Brand 7-7-7 

H. L. Frost and Higgins Co. 

Frost and Higgins Special Tree and Shrub Food 6-8-2 

Grasalo Co. 

Grasalo Clieniical Fertilizer 5-10-5 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc. 

Hoftman's Mctory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. 

Hyponex 7-6-19 

Hy-Trous Corp. 

Hy-Trous 4 8-4 . . . 

International Minerals & Chemical Corp. 

International 3-12-6 

International 5-8-7 

International 5-10-5 

International 5-10-10 

International 6-3-6 

International 7-7-7 

International 8-16-16 

International Caribee 5-10-10 with 2%. magnesium oxide 

International Specialty 3-12-3 (Lawn & Garden) 

International Victory Garden 5-10-5 

Kem-ical Corp. 

Kem Liquid Plant Food .08-. 16-. 10 

National PlanI Foods, Inc. 

Hy-Gro Plant Food 13-26-13 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield 3-12-6 

Old Deerfield 5-8-7 Onion & Truck Fertilizer 

Old Dee; field 5-8-7 (with 2% magnesium oxide) Set Onion & 

Potato Fertilizer (Potash other than muriate) . . . . 

Old Deerfield 5-10-5 Trucker's Special 

Old Deerfield 5-10-10 Potato Fertilizer 

Old Deerfield 5-10-10 (with 2% magnesium oxide) Potato 

Fertilizer (Potash other than muriate) 

Old Deerfield 6-3-6 Complete Tobacco Fertilizer 

Old Deerfield Lawnshrub 6-5-5 . . . ' 

Old Deerfield 7-7-7 Grass Top Dressing 

Old Deerfield 8-16-16 

Olds & Whipple. Inc. 

O & W 3-12-6 Corn Fertilizer 

O & \V 5-3-5 Complete Tobacco Fertilizer 

O & W 5-8-7 Potato & General Purpose Fertilizer .... 

O & \V 5-10-10 Potato Fertilizer 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Tobacco Fertilizer 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Fertilizer, Potash derived from Cotton 

Hull Ash 

- O & W 7-7-7 Top Dressing & Grass Fertilizer 

Plantabbs Co. 

Fulton's "V" Plantabbs 4-12-18 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Gro-Fast Plant Food 5-8-5 

Hubbard High Potash Fertilizer 5-10-10 

Hubbard Potato Fertilizer 5-8-7 

Hubbard Tobacco Grower 6-3-6 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



2 a. 
2 



2 
2 

1 b. 

2 

2 

1 b. 

2 b. 
1 

2 
1 



1 

1 b. 
2 

2 
3 b. 

2 6. 
1 



3 

3 b.il. 



3 


.10 


5 a. 


.19 


1 


.13 


4 


.13 


3 b.c. 


2.14 


3 


.10 


2 a. 


.17 


3 


.61 


3 


.56 


3 a. 


.26 



Ayerage 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 

Nitrogen 



.25 
.31 
.53 
.03 



.30 

.37 

.36 
.12 
.16 

.13 
2.67 
.66 
.58 
.08 



.57 

2.32 

.51 

.40 

2.98 

2 67 
.43 



2.68 



a- See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 

0. Potash in forms other than muriate. 

c. 1.10';^ Chlorine found in one sample: tolerance allowed, .85%. 

a. 1.20'' e Chlorine found in one sample: tolerance allowed, .82%. 



16 CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Concluded 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 


Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 


Average 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 


Rogers & Hubbard Co.— Concluded 

Hubbard Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 


4 

2 

3 

5 

4 

1 b. 

3 

1 

1 a. 

1 

14 a. 
1 c. 

If. 

2 

1<) 0. 

1 g. 

1 

1 

1 
5 
3 

3 

2 
2 

2 

1 b. 


72 


Red H Brand 0-14-14 




Red H Brand 3-12-6 


50 


Red H Brand 5-8-7 


.45 


Red H Brand 5-10-10 


44 


Red H Brand 5-10-10 with Sulphate of Potash 

Red H Brand 7-7-7 


.85 
.43 


William H. Rorer, Inc. 

Plant Dinner 5-7-5 


.56 


O. M. Scott & Sons Co. 

Scotts Turf Builder 8-7-3 


2.66 


Sears, Roebucl< & Co. 

Garden Master 3-8-7 

Smith-Douglass Co., Inc. 

Smith 0-14-14 Fertilizer 


.21 


Smith 3-12-6 Fertilizer 


31 


Smith 5-8-7 Fertilizer 


.53 


Smith 5-10-5 \'ictory Garden Fertilizer (For food production 
Smith 5-10-10 Fertilizer 


only) 


.27 
.21 


Smith 7-7-7 Fertilizer 


.19 


Standard Wholesale Phosphate & Acid Works, Inc. 

Standard 5-8-7 

Standard 5-10-5 


.46 
.47 


Swift & Company Fertilizer Works 

Swifts Red Steer 5-8-7 


.20 


Vigoro 4-12-4 


27 


Vigoro Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 for Food Production 

Tennessee Corp. 

Loma 5-10-5 


Only 


.21 
^O 


C. P. Washburn Co. 

Market Garden 5-8-7 ... 


25 


Special Potato 5-10-10 


.28 


Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc. 

Woodruff's 5-8-7 Fertilizer 


.71 


Woodruff's Tobacco Special Fertilizer 6-3-6 


2.26 



a. See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 

b. Potash in forms other than muriate. 
e. Composite of 21 samples. 

/. Composite of 15 samples. 
g. Composite of 13 samples. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



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18 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 



NITROGEN COMPOUNDS 

Ammonium Nitrate, Calcium Cyanamid, Nitrate of Soda, 

Sulphate of Ammonia, Synthetic Urea 





Nitrogen 


Manufacturer and Brand 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Allied Chemical & Dye Corp., The Barrett Division 

Arcadian the American Nitrate of Soda 

Arcadian the American Nitrate of Soda 

Arcadian Sulphate of Ammonia 

American Cyanamid Co. 

21% Aero Cyanamid Pulverized 

20.6% Aero Cyanamid Granular 

Ashcraft- Wilkinson Co. 

Nitrapril'.s Fertilizer Compound 

Nitraprilb Fertilizer Compound 

Nitraprills Fertilizer Compound 

Chilean Nitrate Sales Corp. 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Original Old Style 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda— Original Old Style 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. 

Du Pont Uramon Fertilizer Compound 

Du Pont Uramon Fertilizer Compound 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield Sulphate of Ammonia 


16.24 
15.<>2 

20 86 

21 .68 
20.60 

M . 80 
32.56 

32.')3 

15.XS 
15.1)5 
15.86 
15.86 

43.18 
43 56 

20.70 


16 00 
16.00 , 
20.60 

21.00 
20 60 

32 . 50 
32.50 
32.50 

16 00 
16.00 
16.00 
16 00 

42.00 
42 00 

20.00 



POTASH COMPOUNDS 
Muriate of Potash 



Manufacturer 



Water Soluble 
Potash 




Armour Fertilizer Works 
Consolidated Rendering Co. 



Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 
Middlesex County Farm Bureau Association 
Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 



60.00 
60.00 
60.00 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



19 



PHOSPHORIC ACID COMPOUNDS 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Total 
Phos- 
phoric 
Acid 



Available 
Phosphoric Acid 



Found 



Guaran- 
teed 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

IS'^ Normal Superphosphate 
IS''; Xornial Superphosphate 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Superphosphate 20' , 

Superphosphate 20'>'r 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Superphosphate 20'/^ 
Armour's Big Crop Superphosphate 20% 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenro Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20%, 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% 
Corenco Superphosphate 20% (a.) 

Davison Chemical Corp. 

Davco Granulated 20% Superphosphate 
Davco Granulated 20% Superphosphate 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States Superphosphate 20% 
Eastern States Superphosphate 20% 
Eastern States Superphosphate 47%i 

International Minerals & Chemical Corp. 

International 20% Superphosphate 
International 20''o Superpiiosphate 
International 20';( Superphosphate 
International 20% Superphosphate 
International 20'^'-f, Superphosphate 
International 20' ^ Superphosphate 
International 20% Superphosphate 
International 20% Superphosphate 
International 20% Superphosphate (a.) 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield 20'c, Superphosphate 

Rogers >£ Hubbard Co. 

Hubbard 20'~c Superphosphate (a.) 



18.28 
19.82 



21.46 
21.56 



21.19 
20.68 



20.07 
20.65 
20.75 
20.65 
20.47 
21.95 
20.49 
20.85 
19.95 



21.27 
21.47 



21.27 
22.54 
47.73 



20.50 
21.20 
21.32 
20.85 
20.27 
20.55 
21.40 
21.15 
20.68 



18.12 
18.70 



20.30 
20.54 



20.21 
19.78 



19.93 
20.15 
20.23 
20.45 
19.98 
20.93 
20.02 
20.37 
19 85 



20.05 
20.49 



20.09 
21.52 
47.53 



20.20 
20.80 
20.63 
20.37 
19.81 
20.04 
21.00 
20.85 
20 13 



20.31 
19.82 



18.00 
18.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



20.00 
20.00 



20 00 
20.00 
47.00 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



20.00 

20 . 00 



a. See table of "Unmixed materials showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 



20 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 



PRODUCTS SUPPLYING NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORIC ACID 
Bone and Tankage, Dry Ground Fish, Animal Tankage, Milorganite 









Total 
Phosphoric Acid 


Degree of 
Fineness 




Nitrogen 


Coarser 

than 1/50 

Inch 


Manufacturer 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Consolidated Renderin;^ Co. 

Raw Bone & Tankage 

Raw Bone & Tankage 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Hubbard's Dry Ground Fish Meal 

N. Roy & Son 

Animal Tankage 

Sewerage Commission of the City of 
Milwaukee 

Milorganite 


4.01 
4.01 

9.60 

7.82 

5.93 


4.00 
4.00 

9.46 

8.00 

6.00 


21.27 
21.17 

6.94 

10.29 

2.94 


20.00 
20.00 

5.00 

— a. 

— b. 


58.18 
57.34 

44.18 



\ 



a. Available phosphoric acid found 9.04'?J^; guaranteed 7.00%. 

b. Available phosphoric acid found, 2.63%; guaranteed 2.00%. 

See table of "Unmixed materials showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 





Ground Bone 












Nitrogen 


Total 
Phosphoric Acid 


DeRree 
Fineness 




Coar.ser 

than 1 50 

Inch 


Manufacturer 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Found 


Guaran- 
teed 


Apothecaries Hall Co 




2.65 


2.25 


25.76 


22 00 


26.5 


Armour Fertilizer Works . . . . 




2.62 


2.47 


26.66 


23.00 


29.9 


Consolidated Rendering Co. . 




[2.75 

\2.43 


2.47 
2.47 


24 31 
25.63 


23 . 00 
23.00 


29.3 
29.6 


Eastern States Farmers' E.xchange . 




2.23 


2.30 


23.80 


23.00 


31.9 


A. H. Hoffman, Inc. (a.) . . . . 




3.69 


3.70 


19.60 


20 00 


42.7 


Rogers & Hubbard Co 






3.70 
4.24 
2.82 
4.31 
4.44 
4.36 
4.27 
4.27 
4.33 


3.70 
3.70 
2.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 
4.00 


22.93 
22.64 
24.46 
23.96 
23.30 
23.52 
23.97 
23.52 
23.03 


20.00 
20.00 
25.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 
23.00 


36.6 

36.5 

18.6 

11.6 

5,5 

13.0 

15.0 

2.5 

2.8 



See table of "Unmi.xed materials showing a commercial shortage of SI or more per ton.' 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 23 

AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 
Manufacturers and Brands 

During 1944, 15 firms registered for sale in Massachusetts 30 brands of lime 
products, manufactured and sold for neutralizing acid soils, and one brand of 
agricultural talc. The products are grouped as follows: 

Hydrated or slaked lime 16 

Pulverized and ground limestone 14 

30 

Agricultural talc 1 

The analytical results which appear in this bulletin represent officially drawn 
samples secured by the same sampling agents who drew the samples of com- 
mercial fertilizer which served for the inspection of that commodity; the samples 
therefore came from every section of the state and are, we believe, representative 
of the lime products sold in Massachusetts as soil amendments. 

We were not successful in securing samples of the following brands: 

L. A. Howard & N. L. Howard, Proctorsville, Vt. 

Howard's Agricultural Talc 
Kelley Island Lime <& Transport Co., 1122 Leader Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Tiger All Purpose Hydrated Lime 
Limestone Products Corporation of America, Newton, N. J. 

"Lime Crest" Brand Calcite Hydrated Lime for Agriculture Use 

"Lime Crest" Brand Calcite Pulverized (Pulverized Limestone) 
Rockland-Rockport Lime Co., Inc., Rockland, Maine 

R-R Ground Limestone, Grade M 
Solvay Process Co., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Solvay Pulverized Limestone 
United States Gypsum Co., 300 West Adams St., Chicago, III. 

Red Top Hydrate Lime — Genoa, Ohio 

USG .Agricultural Limestone — Falls Village, Conn. 



Variations and Deficiencies Found in the Composition of Lime Products 

Of the lime products effective in neutralizing soil acidity, about 67 per cent 
of the samples analyzed fully met the minimum guarantee; of the 14 samples of 
ground limestone, 6 showed deficiencies. The deficiencies were not of a serious 
nature as the companion ingredient was present in sufficient excess in most cases 
to more than make up the full neutralizing value of the product as based on the 
stated guarantee. The same ma\- be said of the hydrated lime products where 
3 out of 12 samples showed a deficiency. The tables of analyses show the extent 
of variations from the guaranteed composition. 



24 CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 

Explanation of Table of Analyses 

Tables I, II, III, "Neutralizing value expressed in terms of calcium oxide" 
represents the acid neutralizing value of both the magnesium and the calcium. 
The figures in the "per cent" column are obtained by a direct titration with 
standard acid. The "pounds in one ton" are secured by multiplying the figures 
in the "per cent" column by 20. 

"Insoluble matter" represents material which is insoluble in dilute hydrochloric 
acid to which a few drops of nitric acid have been added, and is mainly sand. 

Table II and III, "Carbonates of calcium and magnesium". Some of the 
figures in this column include small amounts of calcium and magnesium com- 
bined as basic silicates: therefore in some cases the sum of the calcium and mag- 
nesium carbonates and the insoluble matter slightly exceeds 100 per cent. 

Under "Mechanical analysis" the figures represent in round numbers the 
percentage of product that would pass or be retained by the meshed sieves men- 
tioned. 

The limestone products have been published in two groups or grades (see 
tables II and III) according to fineness of grinding and to conform to definitions 
voted by the Association of Oflicial Agricultural Chemists at their 1936 meeting. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



27 




28 CONTROL SERIES NO. 122 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS WHO REGISTERED FERTILIZERS FOR SALE 
IN MASSACHUSETTS IN 1944 

Acme Guano Co., 411 National Marine Bank Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 

.Agricultural Laboratories, Inc., 1145 Chesapeake Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

.\llied Chemical & Dye Corporation, The Barrett Division, 40 Rector St., New York, N. Y. 

-American Agricultural Chemical Co., 285 River St., North Weymouth, Mass. 

American Cyanamid Co., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

-American Liquid Fertilizer Co., Inc., 2nd & St. Clair Sts., Marietta, Ohio 

American Potash & Chemical Corporation, 122 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. V. 

Apothecaries Hall Co., Waterbury, Conn. 

-Armour Fertilizer Works, 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

-Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., 601 Trust Company of Georgia Bldg., .Atlanta, Ga. 

Atkins & Durbrow, Inc., 165 John St., New York, N. Y. 

Ernest J. Bantle, 130 Griswold St., Glastonbury, Conn. 

F. A. Bartlett Tree Expert Co., 60 Canal St., Stamford, Conn. 

Belmont Gardens, W. E. Lenk, Proprietor, 170 Brighton St., Belmont. Mass. 

Berkshire Chemical Co., 92 Howard -Ave., Bridgeport 5, Conn. 

Joseph Breck & Sons Corporation, 85 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Buell Fertilizer Co., R.F.D. 2, Exeter, N. H. 

Chilean Nitrate Sales Corporation, 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston 10, Mass. 

Davison Chemical Corporation, 20 Hopkins Place, Baltimore, Md. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington 98, Del. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 95 Elm St., West Springfield, Mass. 

Thomas W. Emerson Co., 70 Park St., Beverly, Mass. 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Association, South Main St., Topsfield, Mass. 

Excell Laboratories, 2625 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 

H. L. Frost & Higgins Co., 20 Mill St.. Arlington. Mass. 

Glendale Poultry Farm, Somerset, Mass. 

Goulard & Olena, Inc., 140 Liberty St., New York. N. Y. 

Grasalo Co., Wilmington, Mass. 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc., Landisville, Penn. 

Humphreys-Godwin Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc., 315 West 39th St., New York IS, N. Y. 

Hy-Trous Corporation, 131 State St., Boston, Mass. 

International Minerals & Chemical Corporation, Wobiirn, Mass. 

Kem-ical Corporation, 21-23 Summit Ave., East Paterson, N. J. 

L. B. Lovitt & Co.. Memphis, Tenn. 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Association, 155 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 

National Plant Foods, Inc., Dunnellen. N. J. 

Norwood Brand Fertilizer Co., North Reading, ^lass. 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc., South Deerfield, Mass. 

Olds & Whipple, Inc., 168 State St., Hartford, Conn. 

Plantabbs Co., Baltimore 1, Md. 

Pulverized Manure Co., 603 Exchange Bldg., Union Stock Yards, Chicago 9, 111. 

Ramshorn Mills, Inc., West Millbury, Mass. 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corporation, Dansville, N. Y. 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., 51 Waverly St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Rogers & Hubbard Co.. Portland, Conn. 

William H. Rorer, Inc., 254 South Fourth St., Philadelphia, Penn. 

N. Roy & Son, South -Attleboro, Ma.^s. 

Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co., Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co.. Marysville, Ohio 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., 925 South Homan -Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Sewerage Commission of the City of Milwaukee, Milwaukee 1, Wis. 

Smith-Douglass Co.. Inc.. 304 East Plume St., Norfolk, Va. 

Standard Wholesale Phosphate & -Acid Works, Inc., Baltimore. Md. 

Stockdale Fertilizer Co., Morris. 111. 

Swift & Company Fertilizer Works. 910 Court Square Bldg.. Baltimore. Md. 

Tennessee Corporation. Lockland, Ohio 

Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co., Inc., Plainsboro, N. J. 

C. P. Washburn Co., Middleboro, Mass. 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc., North Haven. Conn. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administr.^tion and Finance 
2500-11-44-15242 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experlment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 123 DECEMBER 1944 



Seed Inspection 

By F. A. McLaughlin 



This report, the seventeenth in seed control service, is a record of work dele- 
gated to the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station during 1944, by 
authority of Chapter 94 as amended by Chapter 288 of the Acts of 1937 and 
Chapter 363 of the Acts of 1938. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The Seed Testing Laboratory will allow ten units of work free of charge, during 
any calendar year, to any resident firm or citizen of Massachusetts. 

Units are rated as follows: Units 

Purity analysis (red clover, timothy, etc.) 1 

Purity analysis (bluegrass, orchard grass, etc.) 2 

Purity analysis of a mixture of seeds (depending upon the number 

of kinds in the mixture) 4-10 

Examination for noxious weeds (sample of 4 oz. or less) 2 

Identification of seed or plant 1 

Cleaning tobacco seed (4 oz. or less) 2 

Germination test (4 x 100 seeds of any seed not chaffy or requiring 

purity analysis) 1 

Germination test (soil, 2 x 100 seeds) 1 

Germination test (chaffy grasses or seeds requiring purity analysis) 2 

Fees for work in excess of the ten free units allowed to a citizen or resident firm 
of Massachusetts are as follows: 

Germination test of all crop seeds except grasses $0.25 

Germination test of timothy 25 

Germination test of all other grasses 50 

Purity analysis of cereals 50 

Purity analysis of timothy 75 

Purity analysis of all other grasses 1 .00 

Purity analysis of all other crop seeds 75 

Purity analysis of mixtures of not more than 2 kinds of agricultural 

seeds 1>00 

Purity analysis of special mixtures, including lawn grasses and 
pasture mixtures — a charge sufficient to cover the actual cost 
of working the sample, depending entirely upon the character 
of the sample. Minimum charge 1.25 

In no case will the final report be rendered until all fees are paid. 

The minimum weights of samples to be submitted for analysis are: 

a. Two ounces of grass seed, white or alsike clover, or seeds not larger than 
these. 

b. Five ounces of red or crimson clover, alfalfa, ryegrasses, millet, rape, or 
seeds of similar size. 

c. One pound of cereal, vetches, or seeds of similar or larger size. 

The minimum number of seed of any one kind to be submitted for a germina- 
tion test is 400. 



SEED INSPECTION 

By F. A. McLaughlini 



MASSACHUSETTS VEGETABLE SEED STANDARDS FOR 1945 

Section 261 D of the Seed Law requires that a set of standards for germination 
of vegetable seeds be determined each year by the Director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station and approved by the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture. The following set of standards for 1945 has been so determined and 
approved. 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 
STANDARD 

% 



Artichoke 60 

Asparagus *70 

Beans; 

Limas 70 

Other varieties than Limas. . 80 

Beets 65 

Broccoli 75 

Brussels Sprouts 70 

Cabbage 75 

Carrot 55 

Cauliflower 75 

Celeriac 55 

Celery 55 

Chard, Swiss 65 

Chicory 65 

Chinese Cabbage 75 

Citron 65 

Collards 80 

Corn, Sweet 75 

**Cress, Garden 40 

Cress, Water 25 

Cucumber 80 

Dandelion 45 

Egg Plant 60 

Endive 70 

Fetticus (Corn Salad) 70 

Kale 75 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 
STANDARD 

% 



Kohlrabi 75 

Leek....' 60 

Lettuce 80 

Melons: 

Muskmelon 75 

Watermelon 70 

Mustard 75 

Okra *50 

Onions 70 

Parsley- 60 

Parsnip 60 

Peas 80 

Peppers 55 

Pumpkin 75 

Radish 75 

Rhubarb 60 

Rutabaga 75 

Salsify 75 

Sorrel 60 

Spinach: 

Common 60 

New Zealand 40 

Squash 75 

Tomato 75 

Tomato, Husk 50 

Turnip 80 



♦Including Hard Seeds. 
**Garden Cress (Lepidium sativum) is also called Pepper Grass and Curled Cress. Should not be 
confused with Upland Cress or Spring Cress {Campe verna) for which no standard has b*en adopted. 



The above set of standards is identical with the one adopted by the United 
States Department of Agriculture for administration of the Federal Seed Act. 



■Assisted by Miss Jessie L. Anderson, Technical Assistant: Miss Phoebe Anne Wood, Laboratory 
Assistant from March to September. 1944; and Miss May J. Honnay, Clerk, 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



1944 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS 

From November 1, 1943, to No\cmber 1, 1944, the Seed Laboratory received 
5080 samples of seed, of which 1184 were collected by the State Department of 
Agriculture and 3896 were sent in by seedsmen, farmers, and various state insti- 
tutions. An additional lot of 261 samples of flower seeds, for field tests only 
was received from the State Commissioner of Agriculture. Although 5080 
samples of seed were received, 363 of these had not been tested on November 1, 
1944, consequently the actual number of samples worked during the year is 4717. 

Classification of the samples for which tests were com.pleted, with the total 
number of laboratory tests involved, is shown in the following summary. It 
will be noted that the total number of tests required for the 4717 samples was 
5236; 273 for purity and 4963 for germination. 

NUMBER OF NUMBER OF TESTS 

SAMPLES PURITY GERMINATIO^f 

194 Field Crops for Purity and Germination 194 194 

647 Field Crops for Germination Only 647 

1 Field Crop for Purity Only 1 

62 Lawn and Other Types of Mixtures for Purity; Ger- 
minations involving 211 ingredients 62 211 

16 Lawn Mixtures for Purity Only 16 

37 Lawn Mixtures for Germination Only, Germinations 

involving 151 ingredients 151 

3636 Vegetables for Germination Only 3636 

5 Herbs for Germination Only 5 

10 Tree Seeds for Germination Only 10 

64 Tobacco Seeds for Cleaning and Germination 64 

14 Tobacco Seeds for Germination Only 14 

31 Flower Seeds for Germination Only 31 

4717 273 4963 

Field tests to determine trueness to type were conducted in cooperation with 
the Departments of Olericulture and Floriculture, which tested respectively 453 
samples of Vegetable seeds and 261 samples of Flower seeds. Results of the field 
tests are shown on pages 29-41. 

The Seed Laboratory- cleaned 78 lots of Tobacco seed and 22 lots of Onion seed 
for Connecticut Valley farmers. The gross weight of the 78 lots of Tobacco seed 
amounted to 33 pounds with a net weight of cleaned seed of 25.50 pounds. Onion 
seed received had a gross weight of 1621 pounds which was cleaned to a net 
weight of 838 pounds. 

Explanation of Tables 

Each of the following tables contains seeds, the sale of which is regulated by a 
definite section of the Massachusetts Seed Law. The samples were taken by an 
inspector from the State Department of Agriculture and worked at the Seed 
Laboratory. Section 261A of the Acts and Resolves of 1937 and 1938, Chapters 
288 and 363, defines the group from Alfalfa to Wheat, inclusive; Section 261B, 
Mixtures; Section 261 C, Special Mixtures; and Section 261 D, Vegetables. 

The last table is a summary, by wholesalers, of the total number of samples 
tested under each of the above four sections and the number of samples found to 
be mislabeled. 



SEED INSPECTION 



Within each table the wholesalers are listed in alphabetical order and the 
various kinds of seeds sold by them follow the same alphabetical arrangement. 

Mislabeling and other irregularities are emphasized in the tables by boldface 
type and explained in the final column of the table or in footnotes. 

The number preceding each analysis is for identification and reference. The 
line to the right of the letter "L" gives information copied from the label; that 
lo the right of "F" what was found in the laboratory analysis. 

All lots of seed included in this report were tested according to the Rules for 
Seed Testing adopted by the Association of Official Seed Analysts. 

"Tolerance" is applied to both purity and germination, except for vegetable 
seed found below the minimum germination standards adopted, in which instance 
no tolerance is allowed. "Germination Tolerance" has been applied between 
a giv'en germination and the result of the germination test as follows: 

GIVEN GERMINATION PERCENT TOLERANCE PERCENT 

96 or over 5 

90 or over, but less than 96 6 

80 or over, but less than 90 7 

70 or over, but less than 80 8 

60 or over, but less than 70 9 

Less than 60 IP 

In the determination of the tolerance for the percentage of the distinguishable 
kind, type, or variety (pure seed), weed seeds, other crops seeds, and inert matter, 
the sample shall be first considered as made up of two parts: (a) The percentage 
of the component (pure seed, weed seed, crop seed or inert matter as the case 
may be) being considered, and (b) the difference between that percentage and 
100. The number represented bj' (a) is then multiplied by the number rep- 
resented by (b) and the product is divided by 100. The resulting number is then 
multiplied by 0.2 (2/10) and the resulting product added to 0.2 or 0.6 as indicated 
in the following formulae: 



a X b 

Pure seed tolerance = 0.6 -j- { 0.2 X 

100 



Weed seeds, other crop seeds, and f , 

inert matter tolerance = 0.2 -f 0.2 X ' 

100 



For Poa spp., Agrostis spp., Festuca spp., bromegrass, crested wheatgrass, 
orchard grass, velvet grass, tall oatgrass, meadow foxtail, sweet vernalgrass, 
Rhodes grass, Dallis grass, carpet grass, and Bermuda grass, and mixtures con- 
taining these seeds singly or combined in excess of 50 percent, an additional 
tolerance shall be allowed. This is to be obtained by adding to the regular 
tolerance mentioned above the product obtained by multiplying the regular 
tolerance b\- the lesser of "a" and"b" divided bv 100. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



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11 



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16 



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17 



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CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



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SEED INSPECTION 



19 






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20 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



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SEED INSPECTION 



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22 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D 

Each separate container of Vegetable Seeds must be labeled to plainly show 
the kind of seed and variety; the percentage of germination, with the month and 
year tested, provided the germination is below the Massachusetts Standard; and 
the name and address of the vendor, packer, or processor. 

Eight hundred and eighty-seven samples of vegetable seeds were received and 
tested in the laboratory; however, this table includes only such samples as were 
found to be mislabeled with respect to requirements of the law. Thirty samples, 
not shown in the table, were found to be above standard and thus complied with 
the law but were below the germination stated on the label. 

Mislabeling with respect to any of the requirements listed above is indicated 
by boldface type, and the wholesaler's name is in boldface type. "Wholesaler 
Unknown" is applied to samples of seed which were purchased for a previous 
season's sale but were offered for sale during the current season without having 
been retested. 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed — 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer When Other 

No. Seed Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place — 

Collected % 



Germination 

Mass. 

Found Stand- 

ard 

Date % Month % 
of Test of Test 



Given 



Associated Seed Growers, Inc., 
New Haven, Conn. 

Martin W. Dugan Co., Newburyport 
1409 Cauliflower Early Snowball 

Shurlleff Hardware Co., Middleboro 
671 Corn Hybrid Marcross 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

Franklin Hardware and Plumbing 
Supply Co., Franklin 
494F Turnip (a) Improved American Purple Top. 

T. L. McGrath, Hardware, Whitman 
1387 Parsnip Long Smooth White 

Comstock, Ferre & Co., Wethersfield, 
Conn. 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 
299F Beet Early Wonder 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 
1176 Pepper Bell or Bull Nose 50 

Arthur R. Cone, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro 
532 Cabbage Danish Ball Head, Short Stem. ... 85 

Crosman Seed Corp., East Rochester, N.Y. 
S. S. Kres£;e Co.. Brockton 
198 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers, No. 135 70 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Great Barrington 
1327 Parsnip Model, No. 814 75 

Thomas W. Emerson Co., Beverly, Mass. 
Barrett Hardware Co., Fall River 
325 Onion Red Globe — 

F. W. Carson Co., Quincy 
682 Kale Dwarf Curled Scotcli — 

Central Hardware Co., Hyannis 
1365 Turnip (a) Macomber — 

J. H. Chandler & Son, Inc., Newton 
Centre 

589 Chicory Witloof French Endive — 

588 Lettuce New York — 



48 



60 



— — 55 



12/1943 21 



1944 65 



1/1944 50 



July 75 

June 75 

June 80 

July 60 

May 65 

June 55 

May 75 

May 70 



1/1944 36 July 70 



— 


11 


May 


70 


— 


5 


May 


75 


— 


89 


July 


80 


- 


36 
40 


May 
May 


65 
80 



(a) A Rutabaga incorrectly labeled Turnip. 



SEED INSPECTION 



23 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer When Other 

No. Seed Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place 

Collected 



Germination 



Given 



Date 
of Test 



Found 

% Month 
of Test 



Mass. 
Stand- 
ard 

% 



Thomas W. Emerson Co., Continued 
Chittick's Farm Supply Store, So. 
Hamilton 

897 Lettuce New York — 

900 Pepper Pickling or Squash — 

G. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 
327 Leek (*) — 

J. B. Hunter Co., Inc., Boston 
59 Cauliflower Snowball — 

Jordan-Marsh Co., Boston 

46 Beet Extra Early Dark Egyptian - — 

47 Cabbage Red Dutch — 

48 Celery Boston Market — 

52 Lettuce New York — 

Liggett's Drug Store, Maiden 
259 Parsnip Hollow Crown — 

Liggett's Drug Store, Newton Corners 

363 Cabbage All Season — 

364 Celery Boston Market — 

365 Lettuce New York or Wonderful — 

Norfolk Paint & Varnish Co., Hyannis 

1369 Celery Boston Market — 

1370 Lettuce. . New York or Wonderful — 

Norwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Norwood 
795F Beans Burpee's Bush Lima — 

Poole & Blodgett Co., Danvers . 
229 Lettuce Black Seeded Tennisball — 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem 
868 Lettuce May King — 

The Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 
951 Spinach King of Denmark — 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

81 Cabbage All Season — 

82 Cabbage Early Jersey Wakefield — 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., W^orcester 
550F Beet Extra Early Dark Egyptian — 

Yankee Maid Products, Inc., Boston 

243 Cabbage Stone Mason Drumhead — 

248 Celery Golden Self Blanching — 

245 Pepper Harris Giant — 

Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston, Mass. 
109 Beans Round Pod Kidney Wax — 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Wethersfield. 
Conn. 

Downey & Howland Co., Fall River 
3S3F Beet Early Wonder 75 

Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vf. 

LB. Barrows, Worcester 

554 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers — 

555 Onion Large Red Wethersfield — 

Gruener Hardv/are Store, Inc., Fitchburg 

1 Broccoli Italian Green Sprouting — 

2 Cabbage True Early Winningstadt — 

3 Cabbage Hollander or Danish Ball Head — 

5 Celery New White Plume — 

6 Dandelion Improved Thick Leaved — 

8 Lettuce Extra Early Tennisball or Boston 

Market — 



38 June 80 
33 June 55 



64 May 



60 



— 61 May 75 



46 April 65 

52 May 75 

37 May 55 

42 May 80 



45 April 60 



49 May 75 
43 July 55 

51 April 80 



14 July 55 

37 July 80 



— 55 June 70 



67 


May 


80 


34 


June 


80 


49 


June 


60 


58 
63 


May 
May 


75 
75 


50 


May 


65 


28 
35 
32 


May 
June 
May 


75 
55 
55 



65 June 80 



1/1944 51 May 65 



27 


May 


70 


32 


May 


70 


47 


May 


75 


54 


May 


75 


53 


May 


75 


27 


May 


55 


22 


April 


45 



53 May 



80 



(*) Variety required but not given 



24 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D — Continued 

Germination 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed — Mass. 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer When Other Given Found Stand- 
No. Seed Than \\'holesale Distributor, and Place ard 

Collected % Date % Month % 
of Test of Test 

Budd D. Hawkins, Continued 

Gruener Hardware Store, Inc., Con. 

9 Onion Yellow Globe Danvers — — 36 April 70 

10 Onion Large Red- Wethersfield — — April 70 

11 Parsnip Improved Hollow Crown — — 46 April 60 

12 Turnip Orange Jelly or Golden Ball — — 12 May 80 

Home Supply Co., Orange 
776 Dandelion Improved Thick Leaved — — IS July 45 

Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro 
535F Turnip (a) New White Sweet German — — 61 June 80 

N. F. Spencer, So. Deerfield 
758 Lettuce Extra Early Tennisball or Boston 

Market — — 50 June 80 

Ward Paint Store, Fitchburg 

15 Beans Improved Golden Wax — — 61-8 May 80 

16 Cabbage Budd's Genuine Surehead — — 46 May 75 

17 Cabbage Mammoth Red Rock — — 53 May 75 

26 Turnip (a) New White Sweet German — — 58 May 80 

27 Turnip New White Egg — — ■ 14 June 80 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Brisfol, Pa. 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 
58SF Beans Black Valentine Stringless 90 3/1944 65 June 80 

Sunshine Feed Store, Bridgewater 

147F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 80 1/1944 47 May 65 

or better 

The Page Seed Co., Greene, N. Y. 

J. H. Fairbanks Co., Bridgewater 

657F Rutabaga (*) Yellow, No. ¥5-9044 85 1 1944 95 May 75 

658F Rutabaga (*) Lot No. V6-1344 85 1944 81 June 75 

Gatzke Hardware Co., Webster 

1295 Beans Improved Golden Wax — — 24 July 80 

1293 Parsley Hamburg Rooted No. C 13-7544. .. . 80 1 1944 18 June 60 

Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 
414 Onion Danvers Yellow Globe, No. 4585 ... . — — 51 May 70 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Parker Farm Supply Store, Danvers 
222F Beet Crosby's Early Egyptian — — 39 May 65 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Spencer 
1250 ilParsnip Hollow Crown — — 28 June 60 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridge, N. Y. 

Glendale Hardware Co., Everett 
527F f»Beet Crosby's Egyptian 65 12/1944 51 July 65 

J. B. Rice Jr., Inc., Shushan. N. Y. 

C. L. Cook's Hardware. Millers Falls 

773 Brussels Sorouts {*) App.-55 11/1943 61 June 70 

772 Cabbage Mammoth Red Rock 46 11/1943 30 June 75 

Ross Bros. Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Economy Hardware Co., Milford 

460 Beet Crosby's Egyptian 72 1/1944 36 May 65 

Hyannis Hardware Co., Hyannis 
1363 Beans Improved Golden Wax — — 65-4 July 80 

Rudy-Patrick Seed Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Western Auto Associated Store, 
Plymouth 
842 Lettuce Big Boston, No. 3258 80+ 1/1944 53 June 80 

(a) A Rutabaga incorrectly labeled Turnip. 
(*) Variety required but not given 



SEED INSPECTION 



25 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D — Continued 

Germination 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Mass. 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer When Other Given Found Stand- 
No. Seed Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place ard 

CoUerted % Date % Month % 

of Test of Test 

Joseph Sordillo & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

112 Cabbage Fottlets Improved Brunswick — — 51 May 75 

11.? Onion White Globe — — April 70 

The Temnlin Bradlev Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
(The Children's Flower Mission) 

Lincoln Junior H-gh School. Maiden 

509 Cabbage *Late — — 92 May 75 

502F Spinach Long Standing Bloomsdale, No. 4047 — — 1 May 60 

John B. Varick Co., Manchester, N. H. 

Amesbury Hardware Co., Amesbury 
1416 Lettuce Prizehead — — 66 July 80 

F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford, Conn. 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 
77 Lettuce Big Boston, No. 19896 C — — 69 May 80 

S. D. Woodruff & Sons, Orange. Conn. 

Monroe Seed Market, Attleboro 
309F Turnip (a) Macomber, No. 2621 90 11/1943 99 June 80 

**WholesaIer Unknown 

F. W. Carson Co., Quincy 
683F Turnip (a) Sweet German — — 80 June 80 

Central Hardv/are Co., Woburn 
610 Dandelion Thick Leaf — 9/1943 t1 June 45 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 
S93F Radish Scarlet Globe — — 63 June 75 

Depping & Moore, Inc., Westfield 
1341 Lettuce Iceberg — — 65 July 80 

Dresser-Hull Co., Lee 
1334 Onion Red Wethersfield — — 31 July 70 

Martin W. Dugan Co.. Newburyport 
1407 Cabbage Red Rock — — 50 July 75 

Franklin Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Franklin 
495 Cabbage Dwarf Flat Dutch — — 21 May 75 

John W. Goodhue Corp., Ipswich 
1401 Cabbage Fottler's Brunswick — — July 75 

B. F. Hill Co., Salem 
869 Lettuce Tennisball, Black Seeded, No. 1-4340C — — 44 June 80 

L. N. Jaque.-, Milford 
482F Cabbage Stone Mason — — 31 May 75 

T. L. McGrath, Hardware, Whitman 
1388 Lettuce Iceberg — — 20 July 80 

Charles A. Smith Co., Millis 
453 Peas Notts Excelsior — — 55 June 80 

George H. Taylor Co., Wakefield 

814 Cabbage Improved Savoy — — 50 July 75 

815 Turnip Purple Top Strap Leaf — — 51 June 80 

.\rthur S. Tucker, Warren 
1099 Turnip Yellow Globe — — 1 June 80 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 
79 Lettuce Paris White Cos Romaine — — 52 April 80 

Westwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Westwood 
447 Corn Golden Bantam — — 41 June 75 

(a) A Rutabaga incorrectly labeled Turnip. • 

* Variety required but not given. 

** Wholesaler not named because retailer admits, or wholesaler claims, that the following lots 
of vegetable seeds were not purchased by the retailer during the current year. 



26 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Summary of Inspection 

This table is a summary, b}- wholesalers, of the total number of inspection 
samples tested in the Seed Laboratory. Complete analysis and germination of 
those which are mislabeled are shown in the preceding tables. 





Vegetables 


Field Crops 


Mixtures 


Wholesale Distributors 


E ^ 


Correctly 

Labeled 

Mislabeled 


Samples 

Tested 

Correctly 

Labeled 

Mislabeled 


Samples 
Tested 
Correctly 
Labeled 


"5 
2 


Apothecaries Hall Co 






1 1 
3 1 2 






Waterbury, Conn. 


40 


38 2 






New Haven, Conn. 
Aubuchon, A. W., & Co 


1 


1 


Fitchburg, Mass. 
Bailey. E. W., & Co 






1 1 

2 2 
1 1 




Montpelier, Vt. 
Barber & Bennett, Inc.. . 










Albany. N. Y. 
Belt Seed Co., The 






1 
1 

1 

2 1 


1 


Baltimore, Md. 
Bigelow & Dowse Co 






1 


Boston, Mass. 
Boston Supply Co 








1 


Boston, Mass. 

Breck, Joseph, & Sons 

Boston, Mass. 


45 
1 


43 2 

1 

33 

58 2 
10 1 


18 14 4 


1 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Burpee, W. Atlee, & Co. . 


33 


1 1 





Philadelphia, Pa. 
Comstock, Ferre & Co. . . 


60 


4 3 1 
45 28 17 
1 10 
1 1 
7 6 1 




Wethersfield, Conn. 

Cone, Arthur R 

Buffalo, N. Y. 


11 


1 




Lowell, Mass. 
Cox, Charles M., Co., 










Boston, Mass. 










Chicago, 111. 
Crosman Seed Corp. 


15 


14 1 






East Rochester. N. Y. 




8 6 2 






Chicago, in. 


5 


5 






New York, N. Y. 
Duryea Seed Co. 


2 2 
20 19 1 






New York, N. Y. 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange . . . 

Springfield, Mass. 
Edgewood Farms, Inc. 


25 


24 1 


1 1 

1 1 

2 1 






Edgewood, N. J, 


. 93 

. 11 

Assoc. 

13 


64 29 
11 

13 




1 


Beverly, Mass. 
Empire Seed Co 

Fredonia, N. Y. 
Essex County Cooperative Farming 

Topsfield, Mass. 








1 


1 






Detroit. Mich. 









SEED INSPECTION 



27 



Summary of Inspection — Continued 



Vegetables 



Field Crops 



Mixtures 



Wholesale Distributors 



^ -O tj a! ^ 






E « t ^ 2 



Franklin, Ben, Stores 7 7 .v 

Chicago, 111. 
Fraser's 5 5 

Wellesley, Mass. 
Fredonia Seed Co 8 8 

Fredonia, N. Y. 
Garfield Williamson Co 

Jersey City, N. J. 
Grey, Thomas J.. & Co 15 14 1 

Boston, Mass. 
Harris, Joseph, & Co 10 10 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Hart, Charles C, Seed Co 66 65 1 4 1 3 

Wethersfield, Conn. 
Hawkins, Budd D 46 26 20 

Reading, Vt. 
Herbst Bros 1 1 • 

New York, N. Y. 
Holbrook Grocery Co -. 3 2 1 

Keene, N. H. 
Hygrade Seed Co 10 10 

Fredonia. N. Y. 
Johnson, J. Oliver, & Co 

Chicago, 111. 
Kingston Hardware Co 

Kingston, Mass. 
Knight, E. W 1 1 

Newburyport, Mass. 
Landreth, D., Seed Co 31 29 2 7 5 2 

Bristol, Pa. 
Larrowe Buckwheat Co 1 I 

Cohocton, N. Y. 
Lyon, John D., Inc 2 2 3 3 

Belmont, Mass. 
Mandeville & King Co 4 4 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Merrimac Valley Nurseries 2 2 

Merrimac, Mass. 
Michael-Leonard Seed Co 19 19 

Chicago, III. 
Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc 

Waltham, Mass 
Northrup, King & Co 14 14 1 1 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
O & M Seed Co 3 2 1 

Green Springs, Ohio 
Page Seed Co 37 33 4 12 11 1 

Greene, N. Y. 
Pedigreed Seed Co 1 1 

New York, N. Y. 
Perry Seed Co 16 15 1 

Boston, Mass. 
Philadelphia Seed Co 

Philadelphia, Pa. ' -' 

Ralston Purina Co 14 12 2 1 1 

St. Louis, Mo. 



1 
1 



28 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Summary of Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributors 



Vegetables 


Field Crops 


Mixtures 


Samples 

Tested 

Correctly 

Labeled 

Mislabeled 




62 


•s 

1 


Samples 

Tested 

Correctly 

Labeled 

Mislabeled 




2 


2 








15 



20 



Reist Seed Co 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Rice. J. B., Jr., Inc 8 

Shushan, N. Y. 
Rice. Jerome B., Seed Co 5 

Cambridge. N. Y. 
Ross Bros. Co 17 

Worcester, Mass. 
Rudy-Patrick Co 21 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Scarlett. Wm. G., & Co 

Baltimore, Md. 
Sears. Roebuck & Co 13 13 

Chicago, 111. 
Sordillo, Joseph, & Sons 6 4 

Boston. Mass. 
Stanford Seed Co 

Buffalo. N. Y. 
Templin Bradley Co 20 18 

Cleveland, Ohio 
Transcontinental Seed Co 

New York, N. Y. 
Varick, John B., Co 5 4 

Manchester, N. H. 
Vaughan Seed Stc re 2 2 

New York, N. Y. 
Western Auto Supply Co 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Whitmore Hardware Co 

Melrose, Mass. 
Whitney Seed Co . 

Buffalo, N. Y. 
Woodruff, F. H., & Sons 76 75 

Milford, Conn. 
Woodruff, S. D., & Sons .37 36 

Orange, Conn. 
Wood, T. W.. & Sons 

Richmond. Va. 
Unknown 17 



2 2 



21 16 5 
1 1 



29 20 9 



3 3 
1 1 



Totals 887 788 99 



39 23 16 

5 5 

3 2 1 

1 1 

5 2 3 

262 189 73 



1 1 



2 

1 1 



1 1 
1 1 



1 1 



J5 9 26 



SEED INSPECTION 29 



TYPE AND VARIETY STUDIES OF VEGETABLES 

Conducted in Conjunction with the Department of Olericulture 
Grant B. Snyder, Professor 

Again this year, as in previous years, tests were conducted by the Experiment 
Station to determine the trueness to type of vegetable seeds that are offered for 
sale by the seedsmen in Massachusetts. In the spring of 1944, 54 samples of 
Beans, 60 of Beets, 56 of Carrots, 47 of Corn, 54 of Onions, 46 of Radish, 43 of 
Rutabaga, 48 of Spinach and 45 of Turnip were purchased on the open market 
by state inspectors of the Department of Agriculture and sent to the Experiment 
Station at Amherst, where the Department of Olericulture planted the seed in 
field test plots in order to compare plant characteristics with the labeled variety 
name. 

The soil of the test plot is a fine, sandy loam and is in a high state of fertility. 
The land was well prepared and a 5-8-7 fertilizer at the rate of 1500 pounds per 
acre was applied broadcast and harrowed into the soil prior to seeding. Growth 
and development was very satisfactory except for the turnips, the foliage of 
which was severely infested by aphids, resulting in crop failure. Onion seed 
arrived too late in the season for this year's trials. 

Yields of the various crops were not determined because of the necessity of 
using small plots and also because so many strains and varieties were compared 
that replication of the plantings was not feasible. Conformity to type has been 
the measure of comparison in these tests and individual plants have been called 
ofT-type when they could not be classified in a group of plants ranging fairly 
close to the type generally accepted as typical for the particular variety under 
consideration. 

In studying the performance records it becomes evident that all but a few of 
the stocks were true to name and description and most of them were highly pro- 
ductive. A few of the lots germinated very poorly or not at all, resulting in few 
or no plants, so that records from these lots were impossible. In a few instances 
it appeared that the variety had been misnamed or misrepresented but fortunately 
they were reasonably good substitutions. 

The source of the seed and the laboratory germination is given together with 
remarks on conformity to type, except that those lots of seed which were tested 
in the field and were found 100% true-to-type are not included in this table. 



30 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 

and Lot Number, Dealer When Other to Remarks 

Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 
Collected % 

Associated Seed Growers, Inc., 
New Haven, Conn. 

Arlington Hardware Co., Arlington 

Danvers Half Long 98 2% Cylindrical 

Early Scarlet Globe 92 8% Long tapering 

Middlesex Supply Co., Lowell 
Chantenay 96 4% Stump rooted 

W. G. Pearse & Co., Fall River 

Imperator 96 4% Stump rooted 

Early Scarlet Globe 94 6% Long tapering 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston, Mass, 

Early Wonder, No. 5274-16 96 4% Flat 

Early Scarlet Globe, No. 6764 97 3% Long tapering 

Hutchinson Hardware Co., Lynn 
Stringless Green Pod 84 18% Flat podded 

John E. Jordan Co., Plymouth 
White Sweet German 98 2% American Purple Top 

Charles A. Smith, General Stores, Millis 
Crosby's Egyptian 94 4% Oblong - 2% spindle 

R. V. Yeoman, Wellesley Hills 

Improved American — This is a mixture of rutabaga 

and turnip. 
W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
W. H. Casey Store, Inc., Milford 
Bloomsdale Reselected 96 4% Thick leaved 

Harding Street Grain Store, Worcester 
Crosby's Egyptian 98 2% Spindle 

Schoffield Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 

Improved Blood Turnip 94 6% Long top 

Red Cored Chantenay 96 4% Half long 

Comstock Ferre & Co., Wethersfield, 
Conn. 

Bell Hardware Co., Stoneham 
Hutchinson 96 4% Short stump rooted 

W. F. Flynn & Sons, Attleboro 
Echpse— Blood Turnip 92 8% Spindle 

Franklin Hardware Co., No. Attleboro 
Early Wonder 94 6% Spindle 

G. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 

Crosby's Egyptian 96 2% Green tops - 2% spindle 

Savoy Leaved Long Standing 97 3% Thickleaved 

F. P. Mills, Campello 

Detroit Dark Red 97 3% Flat roots 

Early Scarlet Globe 95 5% Long tapering 

Arthur R. Cone, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro 
Detroit Dark Red Perfection 94 2% Long — 4% flat 

Crosman Seed Corp., East Rochester, N.Y. 

S. S. Kresge Co., Brockton 

Stringless Green Pod, No. 354 96 4% Flat podded 

Crosby's Eaily Egyptian, No. 102 H- 94 6% Top shaped 

Eastern Stales Farmers' Exchange, 
Springfield, Mass. 
Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 

Waltham „_ ^ . ,, 

Crosby (Early Wonder) No. 323 98 2% Spindle 

Early Scarlet Globe, No. 19013 98 2% Long tapering 



Lab. 
No. 



Kind of 
Seed 



355 F 
353 F 



Carrot 
Radish 



693 F Carrot 



333 F 
336 F 


Carrot 
Radish 


271 F 
273 F 


Beet 
Radish 


857 F 


Beans 


848 F 


Rutabaga 


452 F 


Beet 


586 F 


Rutabaga 


469 F 


Spinach 


539 F 


Beet 


290 F 

288 F 


Beet 
Carrot 



594 F Carrot 
305 F Beet 
299 F Beet 



331 F Beet 
329 F Spinach 



211 F Beet 
213 F Radish 



529 F Beet 



203 F Beans 
196 F Beet 



133 F Beet 
136 F Radish 



SEED INSPECTIOxN 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 

and Lot Number, Dealer \\he;i Other to Remarks 

Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 
Collected % 

Thomas W. Emerson Co., Beverly, Mass. 

Barrette Hardware Co., Fall River 
Early Blood Turnip 92 2% Long Top - 6% oblong 

Henry Patrick & Co., Hopedale 
Long Orange 96 4% Light lemon color 

Poole & Blodgett Co., Danvers 
Detroit Dark Red 96 4% Long tops 

Salem Hardware Co.. Salem 
Sweet German 98 2% American Purple Top 

Stoneham Paint & Hardware Co., 
Stoneham 
Early Wonder 98 2% Long tops 

The Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 
Scarlet Globe 98 2% Long tapering 

Yankee Maid Pri)ducts, Inc., Boston 

Early Eclipse 98 2% Flat 

French Breakfast 98 2% Long tapering white root 

Empire Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

John B. Carbone & Co., Gardner 
Chantenay 91 3% Long -2% medium cylin- 
drical - 4% med, half long 
Ferrv-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Dine Hardware Co., Inc., Hyde Park 
Detroit Dark Red - Ferry's Strain. . . 96 4% Spindle 

Westwood Hardware & Supply Co., 
Westwood 
Savoy Leaved or Bloomsdale 96 4% Thick leaved 

Ben Franklin Stores, Chicago, 111. 

Ben Franklin Store, Turners Falls 
Scarlet Globe, No. 56X-597 94 6% Long tapering 

Ben Franklin Store, Walpole 

Crosby's Egyptian, No. 56X-77 96 2% Long top - 2% spindle 

Chantenay 88 12% Half long 

Bloomsdale Long Standing 

No. 56X-623 98 2% Thick leaved 

Fredonia Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Sturgis Hardware Co., Middleboro 

Early Ecliose 88 12% Top shape 

Chantenay 96 4% Half long 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Wethersfield, 
Conn. 

H. H. Blye & Co., Inc., Woburn 
Crosby's Egyptian 92 6% Spindle - 2% obovate 

Cleveland Hardware Co., Walpole 
American Purple Top Yellow 96 4% White roots 

Dovsmey & Howland, Fall River. 
White Tipped Scarlet 96 4% Oblong 

Foxboro Supply Co., Foxboro 

Dewing's Extra Early 96 4% Spindle shape 

White Tipped Scarlet Turnip 98 2% Long tapering 

C. F. Jordan Hardware, Bridgewater 
Macomber 98 2% Purple Top 

Saunders Hardware & Paint Co., 
Middleboro 

Hybrid Marcross — This is not Marcross or elseit 

is an exceptionally poor strain 



Lab. 

No. 



Kind of 
Seed 



322 F 


Beet 


485 F 


Carrot 


226 F 


Beet 


865 F 


Rutabaga 


592 F 


Beet 


949 F 


Radish 


236 F 
239 F 


Beet 
Radish 



1014 F Carrot 



877 F Beet 



450 Fj. Spinach 



765 Fl Radish 



439 F 

440 F 
438 F 



662 F 

663 F 



Beet 

Carrot 

Spinach 



Beet 
Carrot 



600 F 


Beet 


441 F. 


Rutabaga 


386 F 


Radish 


284 F 
282 F 


Beet 
Radish. . . 


652 F 


Rutabaga 



61^8 F Corn 



32 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer When Other to 

No. Seed Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected % 



Remarks 



Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Continued 
Willis Hardware Store, Stoneham 
596 F Carrot Improved Long Orange 92 8% Light lemon color 

Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, VI. 

L B. Barrows & Co., Worcester 
552 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 92 8% Spindle 

Hygrade Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Union Street School, Middleboro 

155 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 4% Flat roots 

156 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 90 10% Long top shaped 

157 F Carrot Chantenay, Improved Type 92 8% Half long 

158 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 97 3% Long tapering 

160 F Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing 97 3% Thick leaved 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol, Pa. 

Baker Hardware Co., Wellesley 
584 F Beet Landreth's Best A-871 98 2% Long top 

Newton Corner Hardware Co., 
Newton Corner 
368 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 4% Long top 

Sunshine Feed Store, Bridgewater 

147 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 98 2% Long top 

149 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 94 4% Oblong-2% long tapering 

152 F Spinach Bloomsdale Long Standing 95 5% Thick leaved 

Mandeville & King Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Zilen's Department Store, Randolph 
251 F Spinach Bloomsdale Savoy Leaved , 98 2% Thick leaved 

Michael-Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, III. 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 
465 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 4% Flat 

Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Boston 

123 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 96 4% Long tapering 

234 F Radish Early Scarlet Turnip, White Tip 

Sparkler 96 4% Long tapering 

The Page Seed Co., Greene, N. Y. 

Lemlin Hardware Co., New Bedford 
396 F Radish Early Scarlet White Tipped 98 2% Oblong 

Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 

418 F Carrot Chantenay, No. 2056 96 4% Half long 

416 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe, No. 5826 94 6% Long tapering 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Parker Farm Supply Store, Danvers 
222 F Beet Crosby's Early Egyptian 92 8% Spindle 

J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc., Shushan, N. Y. 

The Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 
950 F Carrot Long Orange Improved, No. 157. .. . 97 4% Very light yellow 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridge, N.Y. 

Glendale Hardware Co., Everett 
527 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 94 4% Oblong 2% spindle 

Lake Hardware Co., Arlington 

351 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 94 2% Spindle - 2% top shape - 

2% oblong 
Ross Bros. Co., Worcester, Mass. 
Economy Hardware Co., Milford 

460 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 86 14% Flat 

461 F Carrot Chantenay — This is a bad mixture of ap- 

parently several varieties 
F. A. Gould Hardware Co., Milford 

481 F Corn Whipple's Early Yellow — This is not Whipple's but 

looks like a red tasseled 
strain of Golden Cross 



SEED INSPECTION 



33 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 

and Lot Number, Dealer When Other to Remarks 

Than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 
Collected % 

Rudy-Patrick Seed Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Western Auto Associate Store, Mans- 
field 
Chantenay or Model, No. G-995 .... 96 4% Half long 

Western Auto Associate Store. Walpole 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 2914 86 4% Oblong - 10% flat 

Danvers Half Long, No. 3123 — This variety is long Nantes 

Scarlet Globe, No. 2,So8 96 47c Long tapering 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, 111. 
Sears, Roebuck & Co., Boston 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 4037 96 2% Flat - 2% spindle shape 

Bloomsdale Savoy Leaved, No. 4290. 96 4% Thick leaved 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Gardner 
Giant Stringless Green Pod 92 S7c Flat podded 

The Templin Bradley Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
(The Children's Flower Mission) 

Lincoln Junior High School, Maiden 

Chantenay or Model 93 2% Long cylindrical 

• French Breakfast 98 2% Long tapering 

P. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford, Conn. 

Farm Service Co., Middleboro 

Detroit Dark Red No. 22458 90 6% Long top - 4% spindle 

Early Scarlet Globe, No. 1-4169 C. . . 94 6% Long tapering 

Granite City Hardware Co., Quincy 
Detroit Dark Red, 1-5116 96 2% Oblong — 2% spindle 

Middlesex Co. Farm Bureau .Assoc, 
Waltham 

Crosby's Egyptian, No. 1-557 94 2% Obovate - 4% Spindle 

Detroit Dark Red, No. 20405 A. 94 2% Flat - 4% oblong 

Sanborn & Damon Co., Quincy 
Woodruff's Early Wonder, No. 22460 94 27o Spindle - 2% top shape 

2% oblong 
Crosby's Egyptian, No. 1-570 88 10% Top shape - 2% spindle 

Sanford Hardware Co., Fall River. . . . 

Chantenay, No. 1-447 — This is not Chantenay, looks 

like bunching 
Nobel Giant Leaved, No. 20363 C. . . 93 2% Savoyed 

Frank Santos Co., New Bedford 
Detroit Dark Red, No. 19814 94 2% Long top - 2% spindle 

James D. Splann Estate, So. Deerfield 
Hutchinson, No. 1-5143 96 4% Light yellow roots 

Arthur E. Wills, Hardware, Medfield 
Woodruff's Early Wonder. No. 23855. 98 2% Long top 

S. D. Woodruff & Sons, Orange, Conn. 

Allen Hardware Co., Needliam 
Danvers Half Long, No. 2611 98 2% Light lemon yellow roots 

Monroe Seed Market. .\ttIeboro 

Chantenay, No. 2741 90 10% Half long 

Scarlet Globe, No. 2311 96 4% Oblong 

Daniel M. Murphy, Hardware, 
Cambridge 
Crosby's Egyptian, No. 2886 — Very variable and poor strain 

Sabourin Hardware Co., Fitchburg 
Sparkler White Tip, No. 3026 90 10%, Long tapering 

Woburn Hardware & Plumbing Supply Co., 
Woburn 
Long Orange, No. 2677 98 2% Light colored 

Wholesaler Unknown 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 
Scarlet Globe 94 4%, Oblong - 2%. long taper- 
ing 



Lab. 

No. 



Kind of 
Seed 



909 F Carrot 



442 F Beet 

443 F Carrot 

444 F Radish 



183 F Beet 
187 F Spinach 



1047 F Beans 



501 F Carrot 
497 F Radish. 



177 F Beet 
179 F Radish 



674 F Beet 



342 F Beet 
347 F Beet 



678 F Beet 

680 F Beet 

380 F Carrot 

378 F Spinach 

402 F Beet 

564 F Carrot 

428 F Beet 

577 F Carrot 



306 F Carrot 
310 F Radish 



358 F Beet 

1005 F Radish 

605 F Carrot 

893 F Radish 



34 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



STUDIES OF FLOWER SEEDS 

Conducted by the Department of Floriculture 

Clark L. Thayer, Professor 

and 

E. B. Risley, Student Assistant 

For the ninth season the Department of Floriculture has cooperated with the 
Seed Laboratory in conducting trials to determine the quality of flower seeds 
offered for sale in retail seed stores, hardware stores, chain stores, schools, and 
other retail outlets. The seeds, collected by the State Seed Inspector, were tested 
for germination and performance under field conditions. 

All seeds were sown on June 16, which is a late date for many kinds of annuals, 
in particular Larkspur which germinates best in cool temperatures. Although 
the soil was somewhat dry at the time of sowing, L8 inches of rain fell between 
June 19 and 23 which should have been sufficient to bring about satisfactory 
germination of many of the seeds. Therefore, dry soil cannot be entirely re- 
sponsible for the unsatisfactory germination obtained with many lots. 

Total rainfall for the months of June, July, August and September was 18.22 
inches. The normal rainfall for this period is 16.17 inches. The first frost 
occurred on September 21 but it was so slight that it affected only the most tender 
annuals. The first killing frost occurred on October 4. Thus, with the seeds 
sown on June 16, the growing season was 110 days.* 

Seeds of 261 lots, representing 63 genera, packeted by 31 concerns, and obtained 
from 65 retailers, were distributed as follows: 



Ageratum 6 

Alyssum 10 

Anagallis 1 

Anchusa 1 

Antirrhinum 1 

Arctotis 1 

Aster 1 

Brachycome 1 

Calendula 10 

Callistephus 13 

Celosia 5 

Centaurea 8 

Chrysanthemum 2 

Clarkia 2 

Cleome 1 

Coreopsis 5 

Cosmidium 1 

Cosmos 7 

Cynoglossum 1 

Delphinium 12 

Dianthus 7 

Didiscus 1 



Eschscholtzia 6 

Euphorbia 1 

Gaillardia 4 

Geum 1 

Gilia 2 

Godetia 2 

Gomphrena 1 

Gypsophila 7 

Helichrysum 5 

Iberis 7 

Impatiens 6 

Ipomoea 4 

Kochia 2 

Linaria 2 

Linum 1 

Lobelia 2 

Lupinus 2 

Malcomia 1 

Mathiola 4 

Mirabilis 3 

Nemophila 1 

Xicotiana 2 



Nigella 1 

Papaver 4 

Petunia 11 

Phacelia 1 

Phlox 2 

Portulaca 3 

Reseda 7 

Rudbeckia 1 

Salpiglossis 3 

Salvia 4 

Scabiosa 8 

Schizanthus I 

Tagetes *r 17 

Thunbergia 1 

Tilhonia 1 

Tropaeolum 9 

N'^erbena 7 

Xanthisma 1 

Zinnia 16 

Total 261 



Germination tests were not made in the laboratory on any of the lots of seed. 
Results of germination were rated as "good" if seeds germinated in approximately 
two-thirds of the row; "fair," between one-third and two-thirds; "poor" for 



*Data on weather are taken from the Meteorological Observations of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 



SEED INSPECTION 



35 



less than one-third. Performance was designated as "satisfactory" if the vari- 
eties were true to name, with only one-third or less of the plants not true to form 
or color; "fair," between one-third and two-thirds not true; and "not satisfac- 
tory" if less than one-third was true to name or if the lot did not produce suffi- 
cient plants for providing satisfactory data. 

As far as possible trueness to type was determined. However, since many 
lots were described as mixtures or did not carry varietal names, a wide range in 
color and form was permissible. 

Results of the test on germination are summarized as follows: 



Good 

Fair 

Poor 

None 

Total . 



NUMBER 


PERCENT 


OF LOTS 


OF TOTAL 


87 


33.34 


50 


19.15 


106 


4C.61 


18 


6.90 



?61 



100.00 



Flower Seed Inspection 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



624F 


Ageratum 


640F 


Alyssum 


627F 


Calendula 


626F 


Calendula 


625F 


Centaurea 


629F 


Cosmos 


634F 


Dianthus 


628F 


Iberis 


633 F 


Petunia 


635F 


Rudbeckia 


636F 


Scabiosa 


631F 


Tagetes 


630F 


Tagetes 


632F 


Tropaeolum 


639F 


Zinnia 


638F 


Zinnia 


637F 


Ziniria 


873F 


Ageratum 


n79F 


Portulaca 


1180F 


Salvia 


894F 


Gypsophila 


895F 


Impatiens 



n87F Reseda 



971F 
970F 



879F 
880F 



Calendula 
Cosmos 



Gaillardia 
Zinnia 



Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

Blueball Improved Poor Not satisfactory 

Violet Queen Poor Not satisfactory 

Breck's Giant Orange Poor' Not satisfactory 

Lemon Queen Improved Poor Not satisfactory 

Breck's Double Pinkie Poor Not satisfactory 

Sensation Mixed Good Satisfactory, 4 colors 

Geisha Girl Fair Satisfactory, 7 colors 

Breck's White Giant Good Satisfactory 

Glamour Poor Not satisfactory 

My Joy Poor Not satisfactory 

Dwarf Heavenly Blue Poor Not satisfactory 

Double French Scarlet Glow Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Tall Double African Sunset Giants . Good Incomplete; only 1 

plant in bloom 
Sept. 29 

Semi-double Golden Gleam Good Satisfactory 

California Giant Brightness Good Satisfactory 

California Giant Golden Queen Fair .Satisfactory 

California Giant Scarlet Queen Good .Satisfactory 

Adams Hardware Co., Dorchester 

Blue Perfection None 

Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 

Single Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Splendens Poor Not satisfactory 

Hamilton Hardware Co., Hamilton 

Breck's Giant White Good Satisfactory 

Camellia-flowered, Breck's Special 

Mixture Good Satisfactory 

The Welch Company, Inc., Scituate 

Old-Fashioned Sweet Scented Good Satisfactory 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Clinton Hardware & .'^uto Supply Co., 
Clinton 

Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Sensation Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Firestone Stores, Hyde Park 

Annual Double Mixed Good Satisfactory 

David Burpee Chrysanthemum-flow- 
ered Giants Good Satisfactory, 6 colors 



36 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



790F 


Arctotis 


785F 


Cynoglossum 


788F 


Gypsophila 


789F 


Reseda 


786F 


Scabiosa 


787F 


Tagetes 


1062F 


Brachycome 


1060F 


Centaurea 


1067F-2 


Delphinium 


1067F-3 


Delphinium 


1067F-1 


Delphinium 


1061F 


Eschscholtzia 


1063F 


Euphorbia 


1065F 


Gaillardia 


1064F 


Lupinus 


1066F 


Tagetes 


1059F 


Zinnia 



1068F Zinnia 



075F Zinnia 



1024F Celosia 

1025F Helichrysum 

1023F Reseda 

1022F Tropaeolum 



878F Salvia 

8S3F Antirrhinum 

8S2F Mathiola 

85 IF Papaver 

704F Callistephus 

87SF Salpiglossis 

673F Ipomoea 

1190F Tagetes 



1193F Calendula 

1194F Cosmos 

1196F Delphinium 

1195F Gaillardia 

1197F Verbena 

1198F Zinnia 



1181F Cosmos 



Crosman Seed Corp., E. Rochester, N. Y. 

McLellan Stores, Dedham 

Grandis, Mixed Poor N'ot satisfactory 

Dwarf Firmament Fair Satisfactory 

Annual White Good Satisfactory 

Large Flowering Sweet Good Satisfactory 

Tall Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Royal Scot. All Double Poor Not satisfactory 

Neisner's. Inc , Holyoke 

Swan River Daisy, Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Double Bachelor's Button, Pink Good Satisfactory 

Larkspur Dark Blue Spire Poor Not satisfactory 

Larkspur Empress Pink None 

Larkspur Lilac Spire Poor Not satisfactory 

California Poppy, Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory, 2 colors 

Snow-on-the-Mountain Fair Satisfactory 

Double Blanket Flower Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

Lupine. Annual Sorts Mixed Good Not satisfactory. 

White only 

Marigold gunset Giant Good Satisfactory 

Dwarf Pompon or Lilliput. Mixed 

Colors Good Satisfactory, 9 colors 

Mexican Fair Satisfactory, 12 colors 

Deerington Zinnia Gardens, Bargersville, 
Ind. 

J. J. Newbury & Co., Holyoke 

New Royal Golden Orange Dahlia - 

flowered Poor Not satisfactory, 

4 colors 
Empire Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 
John B. Carbone & Co., Gardner 

Cristata. Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

Stravi^ower. Mixed Colors None 

Sweet Odorata. Grandiflora Good Satisfactory 

Double Golden Globe None 

Ferry-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Mich. 
Dine's Hardware Co., Hyde Park 

Bonfire Poor Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

Giant Bedding, Rust Resistant Poor Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Stock Early Beauty of Nice. Carmine 

Rose Fair Incomplete; had aot 

flowered Sept. 29 

Double Shirley Sweet Briar Poor Not satisfactory 

Frank Harkins Hardware, East Milton 
Aster, Wilt Resistant. Giant Crego 

Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Hyde Park Supply Co., Hyde Park 

Large Flowered, Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

South Shore Hardware Co., Quincy 

Morning Glory, Heavenly Blue Poor Not satisfactory 

The Welch Company, Inc., Scituate 

African Double Tall, Guinea Gold . . . Good Satisfactory 

Ben Franklin Stores, Chicago, 111. 

Goddard's Sc to $L00 Store, Scituate 

Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Orange Flare Poor Not satisfactory 

Larkspur. Tall Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Annual Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Giant Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Dahlia-flowered Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 



Fraser's Weliesley, Mass. 

Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 
True Early-Mixed Mammoth-Single- 
Immunized 



Good Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



37 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed 



Germi- 
nation 



Field Tests 



Performance 



828F 


Callistephus 


829F 
83 OF 


Gypsophila 
Portulaca 


1238F 
1239F 


Alyssum 
Callistephus 


1236F 
1237F 
1240F 
1235F 


Eschscholtzia 
Gypsophila 
Helichrysum 
Mathiola 


1234F 
1233F 


Verbena 
Zinnia 


781F 


Impatiens 


623F 


Callistephus 


612F 


Callistephus 


617F 
621F 
6nF 


Cosmos 

Delphinium 

Gaillardia 


614F 


Impatiens 


622F 
615F 


Linaria 
Petunia 


616F 
620F 
613F 

619F 


Petunia 
.Salvia 
Tagetee 
TaRetes 


618F 


Zanthisma 


95F 


Callistephus 


94F 
93F 


Celosia 
Nicotiana 



847 F 


Ageratum 


686F 


Nicotiana 


1030F 


Centaurea 


1029F 


Tropaeolum 



831F 


Eschscholtzia 


1241F 


Delphinium 


1243F 


Mathiola 


1242F 


Scabiosa 


804F 


Tropaeolum 



Fraser's, Continued 
Plymouth Rock Hardware Co., 
Plymouth 
Aster, All Varieties Mixed. Wilt 

Resistant Poor 

London Market. Annual White Good 

Large Flowered Fair 

Fredonia Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

B. D. Rackliffe Hardware Co., Spfld. 

Bentham's Sweet Poor 

Aster, Tall Branching Mixed Fair 

California Poppy. Finest Mixed Good 

Baby's Breath. Large Flowers Good 

Strawflower, Mixed Fair 

Stock, Finest Mixed Double Good 

Finest Mixed Poor 

Giants Finest Mixed Poor 

G. E. Warren Hardware Co., Braintree 

Balsam, Finest Mixed Fair 

Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston, Mass. 

Aster, Early American Beauty, Wilt 

Resistant. Rose Poor 

.Aster, Early American Beauty. Wilt 

Resistant, White Poor 

Early Hybrida. Yellow Flare Klondyke Fair 

Larkspur. Mixed Cockade None 

Pinwheel. \\ ine Color Poor 

Balsam, Double Bush-flowered. Pink 

Ball Poor 

Maroccana, Excelsior Mixed Good 

Cheerful. Nana compacta, Clear 

Light Pink Poor 

Rosie, Dwarf Giants of California. . . Poor 

Microphylla None 

Marigold, Gold Crest, Dwarf Harmony Good 

Marigold, Mammoth "Mum". Lemon Fair 

Color 

Texanum. Star of Texas Poor 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Rochester, N.Y. 

Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 
Aster, Crego Variety Mixture. Wilt 

Resistant Poor 

Plumosa. Tall Plumed, Mixed Colors Fair 
New Hybrids, Mixed Colors Poor 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co.. Westherfield. 
Conn. 

Bliss Hardware Co., Plymouth 

Blue Perfection Poor 

Centre Hardware Co.. Roslindale 

Affinis Hybrids Fair 

Davis Hardware Co., Gardner 
Bachelor's Button, Double Blue 

Florist's Strain Good 

Nasturtium, Dwarf Semi-Double 

Golden Gleam Good 

Mansfield Lumber Co., Mansfield 
Candytuft, Dwarf Hybrids. Finest 

Mixed Colors Fair 

Plymouth Rock Hardware Co., Plymouth 
California Poppy mixed Good 

B. D. Rackliflfe, Hardware, Springfield 

Larkspur, Finest Mixed Poor 

Stock, Finest Mixed Dwarf Good 

Mourning Bride Mixed Poor 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 

Nasturtium, Dwarf Mixed None 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory, 8 colors 



Not .satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Satisfactory, 2 colors 
Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomp'pte; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 

.Satisfactory, 4 colors 



Not satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 

Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 

Satisfactory 
Incomplete; onlv 1 

plant in bloom 

Sept. 29 
Not satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 
.Satisfactory, 4 colors 
Not satisfactory 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 

Satisfactory, 4 colors 
Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Not satisfactory; 1 

plant 
Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Not satisfactory 



38 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



1130F 


Tagetes 


I130-AF 


Tagetes 


760F 


Tropaeolum 


165F 
169F 
170F 
172F 
167F 
166F 


Diantlius 

Papaver 

Petunia 

Salpiglossis 

Tagetes 

Tagetes 



168F Tropaeolum 
171F Zinnia 



8S0F Ipomoea 



1199F 
1201F 
1202F 
1200F 


Helichrysum 
Papaver 
Reseda 
Scabiosa 


649F 
650F 


Calendula 
Tagetes 


1164F 
1165F 
1163F 


Alyssum 

Dianthus 

Iberis 


864F 


Tropaeolum 


1081F 
1085F 
1083F 


Alyssum 

Callistephus 

Eschscholtzia 


1084F 
1082F 


Iberis 
Impatiens 



983F Tropaeolum 



874F 


Oleoma 


1159F 
1160F 


Linaria 
Lobelia 


1158F 
1161F 


Mirabilis 
Nemophila 



1186F E Anagallis 

1182F , Delphinium 
1187F Dianthus 
1183F Gilia 
1184F Tithonia 



860F I Malcomia 
8S9F Papaver 

SS8F Phaec-lia 



Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vt. 

Franklin Hardware Co., Springfield 

Marigold. New Crown of Gold None 

Marigold Choice, Double Mixed Colors None 



N. F. Spencer, So. Deerfield 

Nasturtium, Dwarf Mixed Colors. 



Fair 



Incomplete; only 1 
plant had flowered 
Sept. 29 



Hygrade Seed Co., Inc., Fredonia, N.Y. 

Union Street School, Middelboro 

Sweet Wivelsfield Good Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Poppy American Legion Fair Satisfactory 

Exquisite Hybrida Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Exquisite Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

Marigold, Orbit Fair Satisfactory 

Marigold Sunset Giants and Califor- 
nia Giants Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Nasturtium New Scarlet Gleam Double Good Satisfactory 

California Giants Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory 

John E. Jordan Co.. Plymouth, Mass. 

Morning Glory, Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol. Pa. 

C. & D. Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Rockland 

Straw^ower, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Poppy American Legion Fair Satisfactory 

Mignonette Large Flowering Mixed. . Good Satisfactory 

Bloomsdale Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

."Vrch C. Freeman, Whitman 

Orange King Poor Not satisfactory 

Marigold Guinea Gold All Double . . . Good Satisfactory 

Leavitt's Sport Shop, Haverhill 

Lilac Queen Improved Good Satisfactory 

Laciniatus Splendens Poor Not satisfactory 

Candytuft Hyacinth-flowered White. Good Satisfactory 

Salem Hardware Co., Salem 

Nasturtium, Dwarf Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Frank L. Whitcomb, .Amherst 

Benthami Procumbens Poor Not satisfactory 

Aster, Earlv Queen of Market Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

California Poppy, Mixed Good Not satisfactory, 2 

colors 

Candytuft, Umbellata Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Balsam, Rose-flowered. Double Mixed Good Satisfactory, 4 co i : 

Michael-Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, 111. 

W. E. .A.ubuchon Co.. Inc., Clinton 

Nasturtium Dwarf Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Mandeville & King Co.. Rochester. N. Y. 

Adams Hardware Co., Dorchester 

Spider Plant Pink Queen Good Not satisfactory. Not 

true to name 
Bryant Hardware Co., Bradford 

Fairy Bouquet. All Colors Good Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Crystal Place. Dwarf Poor Not satisfactory; 1 

plant 

Four O'Clocks. All Colors Good Satisfactory 

Love Grove. Blue and White Good Satisfactory 

Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 

Pimpernel, Scarlet and Other Colors. Good Satisfactory 

Larkspur, All Colors None 

Pinks, All Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

Capitata Queen Anne's Thimble Fair Satisfactory 

Mexican Sunflower, Orange Scarlet. . Good Satisfactory 

Hutchinson Hardware Co., Lynn 

Virginian Stock, All Colors Good Satisfactory 

Poppy Flanders Field, Single Shirley. Fair Satisfactory; some 

double present 

Bluebells of California Good Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



39 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



710F 
709F 


Aster 
Zinnia 


832F 


Anchusa 


I244F 


Phlox 


780F 


Tagetes 


887F 
886F 


Portulaca 
Thunbergia 


904F 
905 F 


Celosia 
Helichrysum 



820F Geum 



7.^9F Ageratum 



882F 
884F 
883F 



923F 
925F 



924F 
926F 



801F 
802 F 



016F 
917F 
918F 
919F 



Clarkia 
Cosmos 
Kochia 



Mandeville & King Co., Continued 
H. H. Newell Co., Shelburne Falls 

Tahoka Daisy, Lilac-blue Poor Not satisfactory 

Valencia, Burnt Orange Fair Not satisfactory, 5 

colors 
Plymouth Rock Hardware Co., Plymouth 

Blue Bird Poor Not satisfactory 

B. D. Rackliffe, Hardware, Springfield 
Art Shades, All Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

G. E. Warren, Hardware, Braintree 
Marigold Royal Scot. Mahogany & 

Gold Striped Dwarf Poor Not satisfactory 

West Roxbury Hardware Co., West 
Roxbury 

Double and Single. All Colors Poor Not Satisfactory 

Black-eyed Susan Vine, All Shades. . Fair Satisfactory 

Whitcomb Carter Co., Beverly 

Feathered, All Colors Good Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Strawflower, All Colors Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Whitinore Hardware Co., Melrose 

Mrs. Bradshaw, Scarlet None 

Northrup. King <fi Co., Minneapolis. 
Minn. 

J. J. Croteau & Co., Northampton 

Dwarf Blue Perfection None 

Economy 5c to SI. 00 Store, West Rox- 
bury 

Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Early Large Flowering Mixed Good Satisfactory, 4 colors 

Mexican Firebush or Summer Cypress Good Satisfactory 

Frank Harkins liardware Co., E. Milton 

Mourning Bride. Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

F. W. Wool worth & Co., Holyoke 

Larkspur, Los .Angeles Improved Not Satisfactory; 

Rosepink. . ; . Poor 1 plant 

Coeruleus, Blue Lace Flower Fair Satisfactory 

Aurantiaca, California Poppy, Golden 

Orange Good Satisfactory 

Globe Amaranth, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Annual Crimson Baby's Breath. .... Fair Satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth & Co , Northampton 

Aster, Crego or Ostrich Plume Purple Poor Not satisfactory 

Pinks, Double Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 7 colors 

Satin Flower. Tall Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Balsam, Tall Double Camellia- 
flowered Mixed Good Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Grandiflorum Rubrum. Scarlet Flax . Good Satisfactory 

Four O' Clocks. Fine Mixed Colors. . . Good Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Hybrida General Dodds, Red Poor Not satisfactory 

Mammoth Flowering Scarlet Spectrum 

Red Poor Not satisfactory 

The Page Seed Co., Greene. N. Y. 

Ben's 5c and $L00 Store, Brockton 
Callistephus .Aster, Pink Comet. Wilt Resistant. . . Fair Satisfactory 

Celosia Cockscomb, Plumosa and Cristata 

Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Clarkia All colors Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Dianthus Pinks, Single Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

L. M. Johnson. Reading 
Chrysanthemum Coronarium, Double Mixed Colors. . . Fair Satisfactory 
Petunia Rosy Morn Fair Satisfactory 

Robert A. Wait Hardware, No. Adams 

Alyssuni Sweet, White Poor Not satisfactory 

Coreopsis Calliopsis, Mixed Colors Fair Satisfactory, 4 colors 

Gypsophila Baby's Breath, Annual Good Satisfactory 

Lobelia Bedding Queen Poor Not satisfactory 



705F Scabiosa 



1072F 


Delphinium 


1070F 
1069F 


Didiscus 
Eschscholtzia 


1073F 
107 IF 


Gomphrena 
Gypsophila 


750F 
754F 
751F 
753F 


Callistephus 
Dianthus 
Godetia 
Impatiens 


756F 
752F 
755F 
757F 


Linum. 
Mirabilis 
Petunia 
Verbena 



40 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 123 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 

Field Tests 

Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 

Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, Germi- Performance 

Seed Place Collected and Variety of Seed nation 

Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 

Alyssum Carpet of Snow Good Satisfactory 

Calendula Perry's Double Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Cosmos Sensation Dazzler, Deep Velvety 

Crimson Good Satisfactory 

Delphinium Larkspur, Giant Imperial Poor Not satisfactory 

Petunia Igloo Poor Not satisfactory 

Tagetes Marigold Spry, Dwarf Double French Good Satisfactory 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Milford 

Petunia Rosy Morn Good Satisfactory 

Tagetes Crown of Gold Poor Not satisfactory 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridge, 
N. Y. 

H. J. Croteau & Co., Northampton 

Chrysanthemum Single Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Verbena Gloradale Beauty Fair Not satisfactory, 4 

colors 
Zinnia Zinnigold, Mexican Zinnia, Mixed 

Colors Fair Satisfactory, 12 colors 

Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 

Ageratum Blue Perfection Poor Not satisfactory 

Gypsophila Covent Garden Market Good Satisfactory 

Kingston Hardware Co., Kingston 

Centaurea Dusty Miller Fair Satisfactory 

Mirabilis Four O'Clock, Mixed Good Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Middlesex Supply Co., Lowell 
Salvia Bonfire None 

Plymouth Supply Co., Plymouth 
Zinnia Dahlia-Flowered, Mixed Good Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Western Auto .Associate Store, Mansfield 
Coreopsis. Calliopsis, Tall Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Whitmore Hardware Co., Melrose 

Gilia Capitata, Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Godetia Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc., Sushan, N. Y. 

Bengston Hardware Co., Gardner 

Calendula Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Centaurea Bachelor's Button, Double Blue Good Satisfactory 

C. F. Jordan Hardware Co., Bridgewater 

Callistephus Aster, Annual Branching Mixed None 

Petunia Rosy Morn Poor Not satisfactory 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 
Callistephus Aster, Giant Crego Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Thompson Hardware Co., Lowell 

Iberis Candytuft, Finest Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Reseda Mignonette, Machet Good Satisfactory 

Scabiosa Mourning Bride, Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Schizanthus Annual Butterfly Flower Mixed Good Satisfactory, 4 colors 

Ross Bros., Co., Worcester, Mass. 

Bengston Hardware Co., Gardner 
Centaurea Bachelor's Button, Single and Double 

Mixed Good Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Celosia Cockscomb Choice Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Concord Hardware & Plumbing Supply 
Co., Concord 
Tropaeolum Nasturtium, Double Golden Gleam. . Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Scabiosa Mourning Bride, Mixed Colors None 



Lab. 
No. 



646F 
641F 
642F 

644F 
645 F 
643 F 



490F 
489F 



737F 
736F 



7,i8F 



89 IF 
892F 



825F 
824F 



698F 
S35F 
910F 



818F 
819F 



1035F 
1036F 



653 F 
654F 



808F 



953F 
952F 
954F 
955F 



I037F 
1034F 



990F 
989F 



SEED INSPECTION 



41 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



1226F 
1228F 
1227F 
1223F 
1229F 
1224F 
1222F 
1225F 



105 IF 
1048F 
1050F 
1049F 
1052F 



743F 
744F 
746F 
742F" 
745 F 
747F 

748F 
749F 



840F 
838F 
836F 
837F 
839F 



1078F 
107 7 F 
1076F 
1074F 



520F 
516F 
517F 
519F 
S18F 
521F 



1203F 
1205F 
1204F 

1206F 
1210F 

1208F 
1209F 
1207F 
1211F 
1212F 



Ross Bros. Co., Continued 
Franklin Hardware Co., Springfield 

Alyssum Sweet Fair Satisfactory 

Calendula Choice Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Coreopsis Calliopsis, Choice Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Dianthus Pinks, Choice Mixed Fair Satisfactory. 10 colors 

Nigella Blue and White Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Phlox Drummondii, Choice Mixed None 

Tagetes African Double Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Verbena Choice Mi.xed Poor Not satisfactory 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, III. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Gardner 

Alyssum Sweet, White Fair Satisfactory 

Helichrysum Strawflowers, Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Impatiens Balsam, Double Mixed Good Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Mathiola Stock, Large Flowered Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Verbena Large Flowered Mixture Fair Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Northampton 

Callistephus Aster, Giant Ostrich Plume Mixed. . , Poor Not satisfactory 

Centaurea Bachelor's Button, Double Blue Good Satisfactory 

Delphinium Larkspur, Tall Double Blue None 

Eschscholtzia Aurantiaca, California Poppy, Orange Good Satisfactory 

Kochia Mexican Fire Bush Fair Satisfactory 

Ipomoea Moonfiower, White Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Ipomoea Morning Glory, Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

Zinnia Giant Dahlia-ilowered, Mixed Good Satisfactory, 6 colors 

Sterling Seed Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

McClellan Stores, Plymouth 

Alyssum Sweet Fair Satisfactory 

Coreopsis Calliopsis, Fine Mixed Good Satisfactory, 3 colors 

Cosmidium Poor Not satisfactory 

Delphinium Larkspur, Lustrous Carmine Poor Not satisfactory 

Iberis Candytuft, Umbellata, Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

J. J. Newberry Co., Holyoke 

Coreopsis Calliopsis, Fine Mixed Good Satisfactory, 4 colors 

Lupinus Subcarnosus. Blue Bonnet Poor Not satisfactory 

Reseda Mignonette, Sweet Scented! Good Satisfactory 

Salpiglossi3 Painted Tongue, Large Flowered 

Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Templin-Bradley Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
(Children's Flower Mission) 

Lincoln Junior High School, Maiden 

Alyssum Sweet, Pure White Good Satisfactory 

Calendula Scotch Marigold Poor Not satisfactory 

Iberis All Colors. Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Petunia Hybrids Mixed Fair Satisfactory, 5 colors 

Reseda Mixed Varieties Good Satisfactory 

Zinnia Little Red Riding Hood Good Satisfactory 

Vaughan's Seed Store, New York, N. Y. 

Arnold-Fisher Co., Boston 

Ageratum Blue Perfection Poor Not satisfactory 

Calendula Shaggy, Orange Poor Not satisfactory 

Callistephus Aster, Giant Branching, Wilt Resis- 
tant Mixed None 

Centaurea Cyanus, Blue Boy Good Satisfactory 

Delphinium Larkspur Vaughan's Special Annual 

Mixture Poor Not satisfactory 

Petunia Single Dwarf Flowering Rose of Heaven Poor Not satisfactory 

Scabiosa Vaughan's Special Mixture Poor Not satisfactory 

Tagetes Marigold Giant Mixture Poor Not satisfactory 

Verbena Mammoth Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Zinnia Fantasy Mixture Poor Not satisfactory 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on .Administration and Finance 
2500-1-45-15589 



Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 124 JULY, 1945 



Twenty-fifth Annual Report of 

PuUorum Disease Eradication 

in Massachusetts 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory 



The value of puUorum-free stock has been recognized for many years by the 
Massachusetts poultry industry. During the 1944-45 season, a record number 
of flocks (529) and samples (975,041) have been tested in this State. The 
percentage of reactors detected among chickens was 0.12. A most encouraging 
fact is that 93 percent of all birds tested are in 100 percent tested non-reacting 
flocks. The majority of flock owners recognize the importance of sound eradica- 
tion and prevention measures in a successful disease eradication program. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



TWENTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT OF PULLORUM 

DISEASE ERADICATION IN MASSACHUSETTS 

1944-1945 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory^ 



INTRODUCTION 

During the 1944-45 season, there was a considerable increase in volume of 
testing, due, no doubt, to a definite increase in the chicken and turkey population 
in Massachusetts. It is gratifying that, as the chicken population increases and 
the testing work grows, the pullorum status of flocks also improves. 

However, one should not fail to recognize that there are still reservoirs of in- 
fection within the boundaries of Massachusetts and that no definite restrictions 
are in force to prohibit the sale and distribution of infected stock originating 
either within or without the State. It is hoped that persons raising chickens 
and turkeys will become increasingly more interested in pullorum-free stock. 

During the past season the laboratory has been confronted with many diffi- 
culties in carrying on the work. Shortage of labor, transportation difficulties, 
and scarcity of equipment have increased the burden on the testing personnel, 
especially the permanent staff. The flock owner, likewise, has had his troubles 
in arranging for time and help to get his flock tested. Most flocks were tested 
without delay. The laboratory is appreciative of the fine cooperative spirit 
displayed by the flock owners and other persons associated with the testing pro- 
gram. As this bulletin is being prepared, it appears that during the coming 
season the demand for testing may be even greater than in 1944-45. In such an 
event, the laboratory will carry on as effectively as possible, and it is hoped that 
the flock owners will recognize the difficulties involved and continue to cooperate 
to the fullest extent. 

Summary of Service Rendered 

Applications received 543 

Applications cancelled - 14 

Flocks tested - 529 

Chicken flocks - - 447 

Chicken and turkey flocks - - 11 

Turkey flocks - 71 

Number of tests.. 975,041 

Chickens: 

Routine .: 908,478 

Experimental 36,323* 

Fowl other than chickens: 

Routine ..- 28,949 

Experimental 1,291 

Owners receiving necropsy service 71** 

Necropsies of reacting birds .- 182*** 

* Includes 814 fowl typhoid tests. 
** Includes 2 turkey flocks. 
*** Includes 3 turkeys. 

^Poultry Disease Control Laboratory Staff: H. Van Roekel, Chief of Laboratory; K. L. BuUis- 
Assistant Veterinary Pathologist; O. S. Flint, Assistant Research Professor; Miriam K. Clarke, 
Research Assistant; Felicia Jewett, Laboratory Assistant. Appreciation is extended to Dr. J. B. 
Lentz, Head of the Department of Veterinary Science, for the assistance given to the testing work. 





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DISTRIBUTION OF TESTS AND REACTORS 

In Table 1 the number of tests and reactors are listed by counties. From 
the 12 counties a total of 943,987 samples was tested which revealed 0.12 percent 
reactors. No reactors were found in Berkshire and Dukes counties. In the 
remaining 10 counties, the percentages of infection ranged from .008 to 0.43. 
Middlesex, Worcester, Plymouth, Bristol, and Essex counties lead in the number 
of tests. In all of these five counties the number of tests exceeded one hundred 
thousand. 

The following breeds and varieties were tested: Bantam, Barred Plymouth 
Rock, Brahma, Crosses, Dark Cornish, Jersey White Giant, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island Red, White American, White Leghorn, White Plymouth Rock, and 
White Wyandotte. The bulk of the increase in samples over the previous season 
occurred among three breeds, Rhode Island Red, Barred Plymouth Rock, and 
New Hampshire. Reactors were detected among the Rhode Island Red, Barred 
Plymouth Rock, White Plymouth Rock, New Hampshire, Brahma, White 
Wj'andotte, Bantam, Jersey White Giant, and Dark Cornish. 

A total of 858,686 samples was collected from females (hens 62,499 and pullets 
796,187). The incidence of reactors was lower among the hens (0.07 percent) 
than among the pullets (0.12 percent). Among 85,301 samples tested from males, 
0.11 percent were detected as reactors. It is of interest to note that the incidence 
of reactors among males was about the same as among the pullets. 

ANNUAL TESTING OF FLOCKS 

The results from flocks tested for the first time, intermittently, for two con- 
secutive years, and for three or more consecutive years are given in Table 2. 

There was a slight decrease over the previous season in the number of flocks 
and birds tested for the first time, but the number of samples tested and the 
percentage of reactors were slightly greater. There were 80 non-reacting flocks, 
representing 89,851 birds, and 8 positive flocks, representing 7,212 birds. 

In the group tested intermittently, the number of flocks was the same as in 
the previous season, but the number of birds and samples greatly exceeded the 
figures for 1943-44. The percentage of infection (0.42 )was also less. Twenty- 
three flocks, representing 41,082 birds, were identified as non-reacting; while 
seven flocks which represented an unusually large number of birds (21,299) were 
classified as positive. 



Table 2. Annual Testing Versus Single and Intermittent Testing 





u 
o 

ta 

88 

30 

80 

260 


V 

S 


H 

c 
H 


Positive 
Tests 


Negative 
Flocks 


Positive 
Flocks 


Classification 


E 

3 


c 
a; 


•a 

D 


73 
V 

V 

H 

13 
a 


T3 
IV 

V 

H 

o 
o 


is 

c3 


Flocks tested — 


97,063 

62,381 

107,267 

569,770 


115,811 

67,582 

116,068 

644,526 


468 
287 
177 
181 


0.40 
0.42 
0.15 
0.03 


75 

22 

73 

243 


5 
1 
3 
9 


5 
3 
3 
5 


3 


Intermittently 

Two consecutive years 

Three or more consecutive years 


4 
1 
3 


Totals 


458 


836,481 


943,987 


1,113 


0.12 


413 


18 


16 


11 



In the group tested for two consecutive years, considerable increases in flocks, 
birds, and tests were observed over the previous year. A total of 80 flocks was 
tested, representing 116,068 tests of which 0.15 percent were positive. Of- these, 
76 flocks, representing 103,067 birds, were non-reacting. 

Among the group of flocks tested for three or more consecutive years, the re- 
sults are much the same as those of the previous season. This group is by far 
the largest of the four groups and has the lowest percentage of positive tests. 

For the four groups as a whole 458 flocks were tested, representing 836,481 
birds and 943,987 samples, of which 0.12 percent were positive. The 413 flocks 
which were 100 percent tested and non-reacting contained 776,089 birds or 93 
percent of the total birds tested. 

The number of positive flocks was the same as the previous season, 27 flocks 
representing 43,930 birds. The objective of the puUorum eradication program 
is to reduce the number of infected breeding flocks to as low a minimum as 
possible. Approximately 5 percent of the birds tested are in positive flocks. 
Owners of infected flocks are advised not to breed from such flocks until all of 
the infection has been eliminated from the premises either through intensive 
retesting or by flock replacement with puUorum-free stock. 

Annual testing of all birds on the premises still remains a sound and effective 
practice in the control and eradication of pullorum infection. Unfortunately, 
each year a considerable number of flock owners discontinue testing. Approx- 
imately 15 percent of the flocks tested in 1943-44 were not tested in 1944-45. 

APPEARANCE OF INFECTION IN FLOCKS PREVIOUSLY NEGATIVE 

The appearance of pullorum infection in previously non-reacting flocks is of 
great concern to the testing agency, the flock owner, and the hatcheryman. 
Progress in the eradication of pullorum disease is greatly influenced by the 
success in maintaining flocks free of the disease after the infection has once been 
eliminated. 

Table 3 gives the testing results for flocks which had been non-reacting for 
one or more years but showed infection in 1944-45. Twenty-one "breaks," 
which is four more than occurred the previous year, are listed. Seventeen of 
these flocks had less than 0.5 percent reactors. Three flocks revealed more than 
2 percent reactors. Expressed in number of reactors, 15 flocks had six or less. 
These figures reveal that the amount of infection detected is very small, in fact 10 
of these flocks regained their Pullorum Clean rating through one retest, 5 quali- 
fied for the Pullorum Passed grade, and 6 failed to obtain a negative test. Seven 
of the "break" flocks had been negative only one year. However, 12 flocks had 
been negative for five or more consecutive years. 

As to the explanation for the "breaks," the source of infection was unknown 
in 13 flocks. Purchase of infected or questionable stock, and inadequate pre- 
ventive measures were responsible for the other eight "breaks." 

A "break" may prove very expensive to the flock owner as well as an added 
burden to him, to the testing laboratory, and to the official state agency. A 
good many "breaks" can be avoided by greater care in keeping out infection. 
It is recognized that under these war-time conditions, adequate facilities and 
labor for disease prevention may have been curtailed. However in spite of these 
difficult times, it is hoped that the flock owners and hatcherymen will observe 
and exercise the following measures: 

1. All the birds on the premises should be tested each year. 

2. If infection is present, the entire flock should be retested within four to 
six weeks until a negative report is obtained, provided the value of the birds 
justifies the expenditure. 



3. Every reactor, regardless of its value, should be removed from the prem- 
ises and sold for slaughter immediately upon receipt of the report. 

4. Offal from all birds dressed for market or home consumption as well as 
dead birds that are not fit for consumption should be burned. 



Table 3. Appearance of Infection in Flocks Previously Negative 





Number 
of Years 
Negative 




1944-45 Season 






Flock 


Flock 
Total 


Number 
Tested 


Positive 

Tests 

Percent 


Explanation for Infection 


1 


5 


8,943 
8.464 


8,942 
8,463* 


0.08 
0.00 


Unknown 


2 


5 


1.736 
1.335 
1,250 
1.111 
1,014 


1.733 

634* 
1.249* 
1.111* 
1.014* 


2.14 
0.00 
0.56 
0.27 
0.00 


Introduction of infected stock 


3 


6 


1,254 
1.176 


1,253 
1.176* 


0.16 
0.00 


Unknown 


4 


5 


1,272 


1,271 


0.16 


Inadequate preventive measures 


5 


6 


5,303 
4.167 


5.302 
4,167* 


0.06 
0.00 


Unknown 


6 


6 


1.219 
1,136 


1.179 
1,136* 


0.42 
0.00 


Unknown 


7 


3 


1.200 


613 


3.92 


Inadequate preventive measures 


8 


5 


1,402 
1,281 


1,401 
1,281* 


0.07 
0.00 


Unknown 


9 


6 


2.139 
2,007 
1,966 


2.088 
507* 
166* 


0.10 
0.20 
0.00 


Unknown 


10 


2 


922 
656 


920 
656* 


0.33 
0.00 


Unknown 


11 


10 


5,210 
5,018 
4,719 


5,132 

1.217* 

4,716* 


0.14 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


12 


8 


1,754 
1,758 
1,658 


1,753 

457* 
1,655* 


0.06 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


13 


1 


1,273 


1.273 


0.08 


Questionable stock 


14 


1 


765 


765 


1.44 


Inadequate preventive measures 


IS 


1 


1,951 
1,584 


1,801 
1,584* 


0.28 
0.00 


Unknown 


16 


9 


2,972 
2,741 


2,972 
2,741* 


0.03 
0.00 


Unknown 


17 


1 


5,074 
4,835 
4,515 


5,074 
3,520* 
800* 


0.06 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


18 


1 


59 


59 


8.47 


Inadequate preventive measures 


19 


1 


2,606 
2,358 
2,140 


2,606 
2,358* 
540* 


0.31 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


20 


6 


3,935 
3,900 

3,827 
2,870 


3,134 

986* 
1,125* 
2,518* 


0.26 
0.30 
0.00 
0.00 


Inadequate preventive measures 


21 


1 


5,319 
5,012 
4,636 
4,600 


5,319 
5,012* 
335* 
285* 


0.41 
0.06 
0.00 
0.00 


Introduction of infected stock 



* Represents retests 



5. The poultry houses, runs, and equipment, should be thoroughly cleaned 
and disinfected immediately after removal of reactors. Provide an empty pen 
to each house to facilitate cleaning and disinfection during the winter months. 
Use disinfectants approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

6. Birds removed from the premises to egg-laying contests, exhibitions, 
etc., should be held in quarantine and determined free of disease before they are 
readmitted into the flock. 

7. Purchase of stock in the form of adults, chicks, and eggs should be from 
known puUorum disease-free flocks. Consult your county agent regarding addi- 
tions or replacements in your flock. 

8. Eggs should not be saved for hatching until after a flock has been tested 
and all the infected birds removed. Early pullet testing will permit early hatch- 
ing. 

9. Fresh and infertile eggs from unknown or infected sources should not be 
fed to chickens or exposed to birds or animals such as crows, sparrows, and skunks 
that may carry or spread the infection. 

10. Poultrymen should not custom hatch for untested or infected flocks 
(including fowl other than chickens). 

11. Owners of pullorum disease-free flocks should not have hatching done 
where infected eggs or stock may be found. 

12. Poultrymen should not buy feed in bags that have been used or exposed 
to infection. (Such bags if properly disinfected will be safe for further use.) 

13. Poultrymen should regard fowl other than chickens as a possible source 
of pullorum infection unless tested and found free from pullorum disease. 

14. Poultrymen should not use equipment that has been exposed to or con- 
taminated with infective material unless it is properly cleaned and sterilized or 
disinfected. 



TESTING OF FOWL OTHER THAN CHICKENS 

There has been a marked increase in the number of turkeys tested during the 
past season. This may be explained to a large degree by the rapid expansion of 
the turkey industry in Massachusetts, including a tremendously increased demand 
for locally produced hatching eggs and poults. During the season 82 turkey 
flocks were tested, 11 of which were on farms with tested chickens. 

The following table summarizes the results of testing fowl other than chickens: 





Number 

of 

Birds 


React 


ors 


Number 


React 


ors 




Number 


Percent 


Tests 


Number 


Percent 


Turkevs 


... 22,257 


630 


2.83 


30,204 


958 


3.17 


Guineas 


15 





0.00 


15 





0.00 


Ducks 


10 





0.00 


10 





0.00 


Geese 


11 





0.00 


11 





0.00 


Totals 


22,293 


630 




30,240 


958 





The percentage of reactors among turkeys is rather high. These reactors were 
confined to 19 flocks, in which the amount of infection ranged from 0.94 to 46.94 
percent. Eight of the 19 flocks were subjected to either a partial or a complete 
retest. In a few flocks a negative test was obtained on retest. The following 
summary shows the range in size for the turkey flocks: 



Size of Flock Number of Flocks 

0-50 34 

51-100 11 

101-150 7 

151-200 4 

201-500 15 

501-1000 8 

1001-2000 1 

2001 and more 2 

Among the 26 flocks with 200 birds or more, 11 were infected. A further 
analysis of these data shows that the bulk of the turkey breeding stock tested 
in Massachusetts is located in infected flocks. This presents a situation which is 
not very encouraging to the Massachusetts turkey industry; and unless steps are 
taken to correct it, the future of the Massachusetts turkey breeder cannot be 
looked upon with a great deal of optimism. 

Turkey breeders have not appreciated fully what is necessary for the control 
and eradication of pullorum infection. Greater caution should be exercised in 
the selection of sources of new stock. Far too many turkey raisers buy from in- 
ected flocks. Those breeders with infected flocks fail to follow a sound and 
complete eradication program. Too much reliance is placed on one or two tests 
for eliminating the infection from their flocks. Too few make a conscientious 
effort to adopt and follow a sound program for the establishment of a puUorum- 
free flock. 

Owners of infected breeding flocks are advised to plan an eradication program 
which is suitable and workable for their own flock and which, if conscientiously 
carried out, should lead to the establishment of a pullorum-free flock. The 
eradication measures listed in the previous section apply to turkeys as well 
as to chickens. 

NON-REACTING AND POSITIVE FLOCKS CLASSIFIED BY COUNTIES 

In Table 4 the non-reacting and positive flocks are classified by counties. A 
total of 431 non-reacting flocks, representing 792,551 birds, was detected in 12 
counties. Of this total, 413 flocks were 100 percent tested, representing 776,089 
birds; and 18 were partially tested, including 16,462 birds. Middlesex, Worcester, 
Essex, and Bristol counties have the largest number of birds in non-reacting 
flocks. 

Twenty-seven flocks (5.9 percent of the flocks tested) were classified as positive 
at the close of the season. The number of birds represented was 43,930 which 
is 5.2 percent of the total birds tested. Berkshire, Dukes, and Hampden counties 
had no positive tested flocks at the end of the season. 

These results show that Massachusetts has a large supply of pullorum-free 
stock and that pullorum infection is still a problem in approximately 6 percent 
of the flocks tested. The number of infected flocks can be reduced if flock owners 
will recognize the possible ways infection can be eliminated. Too often owners 
of infected flocks delay their plans until it is impossible to correct the situation 
before the main hatching season commences. 



Table 4. 


Non-reacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 




lOO'^^f Tested Partially Tested Total 


County 


Flocks Birds Flocks Birds Flocks Birds 



Barnstable 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol .... 
Dukes. . . . 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 
Norfolk. . . 
Plymouth, . 
Worcester . . 

Totals . 

Barnstable. 

Bristol 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 
Norfolk. .-. 
Plymouth. . 
Worcester. . 

Totals. 



Non-reacting Flocks 

2 3,711 — 

4 9,028 — 

54 109,393 2 

1 2.206 — 

58 111,721 4 

21 39,039 — 

17 19,800 1 

26 29,430 — 
85 157,249 4 

27 57,963 1 
41 90,985 4 
77 145,564 2 



252 

6,502 
356 

4,680 
806 



776,089 



16,462 



Positive Flocks 




1,877 


— 


— 


1.271 


1 


578 


— 


4 


1,196 


1,384 


— 


— 


765 


1 


613 


14,089 


1 


289 


2,665 


1 


3,786 


8,921 


3 


3,021 


3,475 


— 


— 



2 


3,711 


4 


9,028 


56 


109,867 


1 


2,206 


62 


115,113 


21 


39,039 


18 


20,052 


26 


29,430 


89 


163,751 


28 


58,319 


45 


95,665 


79 


146,370 



1,877 
1,849 
1,196 
1,384 
1,378 

14,378 
6,451 

11,942 
3.475 



34.447 



43,930 



COMPARISON OF 1943-44 AND 1944-45 TESTING 

Table 5 gives the comparison of the 1943-44 and 1944-45 testing results for 
the different counties. Increases in the number of tested flocks and in the num- 
ber of non-reacting flocks were observed only in five counties, Bristol, Essex, 
Middlesex, Plymouth, and Worcester. Decreases in the number of tested birds 
were observed in Berkshire, Franklin, Hampden, Hampshire, and Norfolk 
counties. 



10 



Table 5. Comparison of 1943-44 and 1944-45 Testing 



County 



Barnstable. . , 
Berkshire. . . 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden. . . . 
Hampshire. . 
Middlesex. 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . . 
Worcester. . . 

Totals 

Barnstable. . . 
Berkshire. . . . 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin 

Hampden . . . 
Hampshire. . 
Middlesex. . . 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . . 
Worcester. . . 

Totals 









Positive 


Non- 


Flocks 


Birds 


Tests 


Tests 
Percent 


reacting 
Flocks 




1943-44 Season 








3 


5,005 


5,005 


0.00 


3 


8 


13,579 


13,579 


0.00 


8 


55 


108 241 


115 263 


10 


53 


1 


1,859 


3,695 


0.11 


1 


51 


91,192 


91,280 


0.03 


49 


27 


46,947 


47,765 


0.13 


24 


24 


24,617 


25,528 


0.28 


21 


33 


39,059 


45,726 


0.08 


32 


70 


141,877 


142,012 


0.23 


60 


32 


66,073 


66 124 


002 


31 


38 


87,525 


93,325 


0.07 


36 


71 


136,092 


142.294 


0.11 


68 






413 


762,066 
1944-45 Season 


791,596 


0.11 


386 


3 


5,588 


5,588 


0.07 


2 


4 


9,028 


9,028 


0.00 


4 


58 


111,716 


132,647 


0.02 


56 


1 


2,206 


2,206 


0.00 


1 


66 


116,309 


119,207 


0.05 


62 


24 


40,423 


42,445 


0.05 


21 


18 


20,052 


24,716 


0.20 


18 


28 


30,808 


33,830 


0.12 


26 


95 


178 129 


184 251 


12 


89 


30 


64,770 


69,560 


0.10 


28 


SO 


107,607 


139 370 


43 


45 


81 


149,845 


181,139 


0.008 


79 






458 


836.481 


943.987 


0.12 


431 



For the State as a whole, a comparison of the results for the past two years 
is given in the following summary: 



1943-44 

Tested flocks 413 

Tested birds - -- 762,066 

Tests _. 791,596 

Non-reacting flocks 386 

100 percent tested, non-reacting flocks 354 

Birds in 100 percent tested, non-reacting flocks 692,556 

Infected flocks , 27 

"Breaks"... 17 



Increase 



458 


45 


836,481 


74,415 


943,987 


152,391 


431 


45 


413 


59 


776,089 


83,533 


27 




21 


4 



The average percentage of reactors did not change significantly over the 
previous season. Of the total birds tested, 93 percent were in 100 percent tested 
non-reacting flocks. 

These results show that the testing work has increased markedly during the 
past year. It is hoped that the number of positive flocks can be reduced and 
that the number of "breaks" can be maintained at a very low minimum. 



11 



TWENTY-FIVE-YEAR TESTING SUMMARY 

A 25-year testing summary is presented in Table 6. This summary reveals 
that through annual testing of flocks and by employing effective eradication and 
prevention measures, flocks can be established and maintained free of puUorum 
disease. 



Table 6. Twenty-Five-Year Pullorum Disease Testing Summary 











Positive 


Non- 


Birds in 


Non- 








Total 


Tests 


reacting 


reacting Flocks 


Season 


Flocks 


Birds 


Tests 


Percent 


Flocks 


Number 


Percent 


1920-21 


108 


24,718 


24.718 


12.50 


25 


2,414 


9.77 


1921-22 


110 


29,875 


29 875 


12.65 


27 


4,032 


13.50 


1922-23 


121 


33,602 


33,602 


7.60 


29 


5.400 


16.07 


1923-24 


139 


59,635 


59,635 


6.53 


38 


11,082 


18.58 


1924-25 


156 


66,503 


66.503 


2.94 


79 


25,390 


38.18 


1925-26 


201 


67,919 


67,919 


2.31 


124 


33,615 


49.49 


1926-27 


249 


127,327 


127,327 


4.03 


114 


40,269 


31.63 


1927-28 


321 


190,658 


232,091 


6.52* 


138 


80,829 


42.39 


1928-29 


413 


254,512 


304,092 


4.25* 


228 


153,334 


60.25 


1929-30 


460 


331,314 


386,098 


2.17 


309 


203,038 


66.97 


1930-31 


447 


356,810 


402,983 


1.47 


328 


267,229 


74.89 


1931-32 


455 


377,191 


420,861 


0.90 


355 


298,534 


79.15 


1932-33 


335 


296,093 


300,714 


0.47 


276 


238,074 


80.41 


1933-34 


262 


263,241 


284,848 


0.53 


229 


212,782 


80.83 


1934-35 


244 


281,124 


301,887 


0.39 


213 


251,778 


89.56 


1935-36 


252 


329,659 


344,081 


0.30 


230 


315,215 


95.95 


1936-37 


307 


448,519 


561,762 


0.37 


281 


424,431 


94.63 


1937-38 


308 


480,227 


497,769 


0.17 


286 


457,466 


95.26 


1938-39 


355 


571,065 


615,205 


0.34 


327 


469,134 


82.15 


1939-40 


346 


573,000 


673,222 


0.51 


332 


497,356 


86.80 


1940-41 


309 


527,328 


538,589 


0.09 


299 


492.475 


93.39 


1941-42 


366 


653,080 


662,715 


0.27 


350 


591,628 


90.59 


1942-43 


332 


637,666 


649,137 


0.48 


317 


600,607 


94.19 


1943-44 


413 


762,066 


791,596 


0.11 


386 


721,229 


94.64 


1944-45 


458 


836,481 


943,987 


0.12 


431 


792,551 


94.75 



*Based on total birds tested: 1927-28, 190,658 birds; 1928-29, 254,512 birds. 



12 



COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS 

Annual Testing of All Birds on the Premises: This past year 30 tested flocks 
were classified with intermittent testing history. These flocks contained 62,381 
birds. The percentage of positive tests was 0.42 which is considerably above the 
average for all samples tested. It is very evident that flocks with an intermittent 
testing history usually contain more infection than flocks tested annually. Flocks 
should be tested annually in order to determine their pullorum status. The 
occurrence of "breaks" is well recognized and if flocks are- tested annually, such 
"breaks" can be detected before the flocks become heavily infected. Eradication 
is far more difficult in heavily infected flocks. Consequently annual testing will 
prevent some flocks from becoming heavily infected. The records reveal, as 
was pointed out in a previous section, that a number of infected flocks have been 
identified in which only one or two infected birds were detected. The early 
detection of infection has prevented considerable loss to the flock owner. 

This past season 29 flocks, representing 25,945 birds, were partially tested. 
In 18 of these flocks, no reactors were detected. However, this does not mean 
that the untested birds in these flocks were also free of infection. Using par- 
tially tested flocks for breeding purposes is following a breeding program with 
a possible hazard of pullorum disease. Furthermore, partially tested flocks can- 
not be officially recognized by the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture 
even though no reactors are found among the tested birds. 

Early Testing: Flock owners are requested again to test all or part of their 
flocks as early as possible in order to relieve the congestion during the months of 
October, November, December, and January. The volume of testing has reached 
such proportions that it is impossible with present facilities to test more samples 
during the peak months. It is hoped that more flock owners will cooperate in 
having their birds tested earlier in the season. The following data shows the 
distribution of tests by months: 



Month 


Tests 


Month 


Tests 




April, 1944 


18,045 


October 


138,076 




Mav 


8,385 


November 


182,862 




June 


5,550 


December 


164,749 




July 


12,303 


January, 1945 


145,718 




August 


31,030 


Februarv 


115,170 




September 


68,956 


March 


84,197 





In conclusion it may be emphasized again that flock owners should take every 
possible precaution to prevent the introduction of pullorum infection. The 
known and suspected channels of infection should be kept under the strictest 
vigilance at all times. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
3M (b) 7-45-16568. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 125 JULY 1945 



Inspection of Commercial 
Feedstuffs 

By Feed Control Service Staff 



This, the fifty-first report of feeding stuffs inspection, contains, in addition 
to information required by statute, carotene determinations on commercial 
poultry mashes and alfalfa products and other data of importance in determining 
the value of a feedstuff. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 

By Philip H. Smithi 



The first feeding stuffs act in the United States became effective in Massachu- 
setts on July 1, 1897. Since that time bulletins have been issued at least annually 
and if a need was indicated, semi-annually. This is the fifty-first of the series. 

Early feed legislation required little of the manufacturer but was sufficient in 
a general way to protect the consumer from fraud. As there were but few com- 
mercial feedstuffs, a considerable part of each bulletin was devoted to advice 
on the home mixing of rations, a function later cared for by Extension Service 
which was not then in existence. 

About the turn of the century the mixing of prepared rations by commercial 
millers began and has gradually increased up to the present. The sale of ready 
rations now far exceeds the sale of ingredients for home mixing. 

The manufacture of efficient feeds is a highly specialized business. Many of 
the larger companies maintain laboratories and experimental farms in an attempt 
to keep pace with progress of knowledge in the field of nutrition. To conform 
to the guarantee requirements of the State law for protein, fat, fiber, and in- 
gredient content is relatively simple. We now know that rations can be made 
which conform to all these requirements and yet prove far from satisfactory 
because various vitamins and trace elements are also essential in a ration. Our 
knowledge of the significance of these is far from complete but progress is being 
made. 

With a view to furnishing information somewhat broader than that required 
by the feeding stuffs act, Control Service is interested in making other analyses 
and assays so far as time and facilities permit. The data thus secured are presented 
as a part of the annual bulletins. 

Credit should be extended to the industry for meeting so satisfactorily the 
abnormal conditions of the present. While substitutions in ingredients have 
often been necessary because of actual shortages and regulations, there has been 
no general attempt to make capital out of the situation. Adulteration and mis- 
representation have been no greater than in normal times. 

^The following staff members assisted in the inspection: John W. Kuzmeski, Albert F. Spelman, 
C. Tyson Smith, and Henry B. Rodman, chemists; Frederick A. McLaughlin, micro.'scopist; James 
T. Howard, inspector; Joseph A. Kartell, laboratory assistant; Cora B. Grover, clerk. 



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14 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 



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15 






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16 



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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 19 

Alfalfa Products 

Alfalfa meals which are used as a source of carotene in poultry mashes should 
contain at least 50,000 International Units of carotene per pound in terms of 
vitamin A equivalent. In 1942 when Control Service made the first assays, 59 
per cent of those examined met this standard; in 1945, only 32 per cent proved 
satisfactory. 

Rapid deterioration of carotene can be caused in a number of ways, even 
though the unprocessed material is of excellent quality. For most of these the 
manufacturer is not responsible, although overheating in dehydration and grind- 
ing may cause considerable loss at the mill. This can be prevented to some 
extent by subsequent rapid cooling. 

The data presented indicate that more care should be exercised in the purchase 
and subsequent holding of alfalfa prior to its use in feeds. Purchasing shipments 
far in advance of requirements and holding for long periods of time under the 
usual storehouse conditions is conducive to rapid deterioration. 



20 



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21 



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11 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 

Ground Oats 

The variation from normal in the ground oat samples analyzed indicates in 
general the use of a No. 3 or No. 4 oat, and sometimes an even lower grade. 
The fat content of barley is much lower than that of oats, consequently the 
presence of barley in any considerable amount will lower the fat content of the 
mixture. Normal oats contain between 4 and 5 per cent of fat, a figure seldom 
reached in the ground oats found on the market. Sixteen and one-half per cent 
of protein in the Delaware Mills sample could indicate the addition of cereal by- 
products of higher protein content than that carried by the cereals themselves. 

Of especial interest are the samples manufactured by the Northwest Distribut- 
ing Co., the Flambeau Milling Co., and two unidentified samples sent by the 
Northampton State Hospital. All of these samples carried an ash content much 
in excess of normal. Analysis of several of these samples indicated the presence 
of lime or calcium carbonate. One sample from the Flambeau Milling Co. had 
a calcium content equivalent to 5.5 per cent calcium carbonate; another, 5.8 
per cent; a sample from the Northwest Distributing Co., a calcium carbonate 
content of 2.4 per cent. An unidentified sample from the Northampton State 
, Hospital contained calcium equivalent to 4.29 per cent calcium carbonate. A 
microscopic examination of the sample showed it to contain ground oats, wheat, 
and barley, together with a large amount of oat hulls, stems, and weed seeds. 
It could be considered as nothing more than oat screenings. 

These inferior samples were collected when freight embargoes were in force. 
Any kind of feed was welcome and prosecution was not attempted. The in- 
formation has been filed for further reference should their sale continue. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



23 





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n States Farmers' E 
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r Ventura Grain Co. 
y Grain Co., Tauntc 
rbeck & Sons, New 
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24 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 



Riboflavin Supplements 

(Many of which contain other vitamin or nutritive qualities for which an ex- 
amination was not made) 

(John \\ . Kuzmeski) 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Riboflavin 


Parts per Million 


19 


6 


61 


2 


54 





6.7 





32 


4 


320 





51 


2 


47 


7 


18 





11 





10 


8 


12 


9 



Borden Co., Special Products Div., New York, N. 

Flaydry Poultry Feed Supplement 
Flaydry Poultry Feed Supplement 
Ladpro Poultry Feed Supplement 
Ladpro Poultry Feed Supplement 



Center Milk Products Co., Middleburv Ctr., Penn. 

Vita-Brand Dried Buttermilk 



Commercial Solvents Corp., Peoria, III. 

B 43 Riboflavin Supplement . 



Dawes Manufacturing Co., Peoria, III. 

Dawes Vitamelk Base 
Dawes Vitamelk Base 



Getek Industrial & Agricultural Supplies Corp., New York. N. 

Getek Dried Distillers Solubles 

Getek Dried Distillers Solubles 

Getek Dried Distillers Solubles "M" 

Getek Dried Distillers Solubles "M" 



Milktone Concentrate Co., Baltimore, Md. 

Dia-Gea 



National Distillers Products Corp., New York, N. Y 

Produlac with Solubles 

Produlac Wheat Distillers Grains with Solubles 

Western Condensing Co , San Francisco, Cal. 

Peebles Lacto-G Dried Whey 

Peebles Lacto-G Dried Whey 

Peebles Lacto-G Dried Whey 

Peebles Lacto-G Dried Whey 

Peebles Whey Solids 



Whitmoyer Laboratories, Inc., Myerstown. Penn. 

Brewers Blended Dried Yeast .... 



18.6 
13.5 



30.5 
23.1 
33.6 
34.9 

22.8 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



25 



Carotene and Riboflavin Content of Commercial Poultry Feeds 

(John W. Kuzmeski and Albert F. Spelman) 



Manufacturer and Brand 



*Vitamin A from 

Plant Sources only 

per pound of 

total feed 

International 

Units 



Vitamin G 
(Riboflavin) 
per pound of 

total feed 
Gammas or 

Micrograms 



Allied Mills, Inc. 

Economy Laying Mash with Fortified Sardine Oil 
Wayne Growing Mash with Fortified Sardine Oil . 

Barber & Bennett, Inc. 

Fort Orange Laying Mash 

Beacon Milling Co., Inc. 

Beacon Breeders Mash 

Beacon "22" Egg Mash . . 

Beacon Emergency Broiler Feed 

Beacon Fleshing Pellets 

Borden Grain Co. 

Borden's Laying Mash . . , 

Courcy Grain Co. 

Courcy's Eastern Milk Laying Mash . . . . 

Chas. M. Cox Co. 

Wirthmore Breeder Mash Pellets 

Wirthmore Complete Egg Ration 

Wirthmore Starter & Broiler Ration . . . . 

Dailey Mill's, Inc. 

Dailey's Egg Producer Mash 

Dailey's Super Laying Mash 

F. Diehl & Son, Inc. 

Diehl's Dry Mash 

Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc. 

D & G All Mash Layer 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange . 

Eastern States All-Mash Egg Pellets . . . . 

Eastern States Developer 

Eastern States Turkey-Grower 

Elmore Milling Co., Inc. 

Elmore Egg Mash 

Elmore Growing Mash 

Flory Milling Co., Inc. 

Flory Laying Mash 

Flory Starter Mash 

Fred A. Fountain 

Fountain's Starting and Broiler Mash ... 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc. 

Garland Complete Starting and Broiler Mash . 
Garland Laying Mash with Cod Liver Oil 

General Mills, Inc., Larrowe Division 

Larro Egg Mash 

Glidden Co , Feed Mill Di\ision 

Glidden Breeder Mash 

Glidden Laying Mash 

D. H. Grandin Milling Co. 

Grandin's Laying Mash 

Grandin's Starter & Broiler Ration 

Hales & Hunter Co. 

Red Comb Chick Starter 

D. Harbeck & Sons 

Crusader All Purpose Mash 

Welcome Egg Mash 

Welcome Starter and Broiler Ration 

Harper Feed Mills, Inc. 

Harco Broiler Mash 

Harco Starting Mash 



605 
1,211 



2.419 



983 



3,251 
1,588 



2,797 
3,553 



832 
2,797 



4.007 



832 
1,436 
1,436 



983 
1,210 



1,769 
1,814 



5,296 
3,704 
2,948 
1,361 


2,132 
1.633 
2,132 
1,950 


1,739 


1,542 


1,890 


1,814 


2,646 
1.890 
3,402 


2,585 
1,724 
1,769 


3,175 
5,443 


1,633 
1,769 


983 


1,588 


2,419 


1,814 


1,512 
3,780 
3.402 


2,631 
2,177 
2,769 


3,478 
3,326 


1,361 
1,769 


1,210 
1,210 


1,860 
1 .633 



1,724 



1,769 
1,497 



1.678 
1,769 



1,633 
2,449 



1,950 



1,950 
1,814 
1,588 



1,905 
2,268 



*Vitamin A from fish oils and materials other than plant sources not determined. 



26 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 

Carotene and Riboflavin Content of Commercial Poultry Feeds — Continued 



Manufacturer and Brand 



*Vitamin A from 

Plant Sources only 

per pound of 

total feed 

International 

Units 



Vitamin G 

(Riboflavin) 

per pound of 

total feed 

Gammas or 

Micrograms 



Mackenzie & Winslow. Inc. 

Turkey Fat 

Turkey Growing 

Turkey Starter 

Mansfield Milling Co. 

Mansfield Chick-Growing Mash 
Mansfield Dry Poultry Mash 

Ralston Purina Co. 

Purina Broiler Chow 

Purina Chick Growing Chow 
Purina Turkey Growena .... 

Ryther & Warren Co. 

Minot Chick Mash 

Minot Growing Mash .... 

Arthur Ventura Grain Co. 

Ventura Laying Masli .... 
Ventura Starter 

C. P. Washburn Co. 

Made Right Starting & Growing Feed 

Wayne County Grangers Feed Corp. 

Superior Laying Mash .... 

H. K. Webster Co. 

Bl'ie Seal All-Mash Egg Ration 
Blue Seal Breeder's Mash 
Blue Seal Broiler Mash .... 
Blue Seal Turkey Growing Pellets . 

Stanley Wood Grain Co. 

Prefer; ed Laying Mash .... 



378 

1,663 

832 



832 
832 



.S.IOO 

1.285 

605 



,100 
454 



983 
1,512 



756 



529 



680 



1,860 
1,905 

2,495 



1,406 
1.905 



2,177 
2,404 
2,313 



1,678 

1,588 



1,451 
1,497 



2,344 


1,724 


4,763 


1,769 


4,234 


2.676 


2,419 


1,588 



1.542 



*Vitamin A from fish oils and materials other than plant sources not determined. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



27- 



The preceding table contains the determined content of carotene and riboflavin 
in commercial mashes found in Massachusetts markets. The list is in no way 
complete and simply represents such samples as were picked up by Control 
Service inspectors and were available at the time the work was undertaken. 

Carotene is an organic substance from which vitamin A can be formed by 
biological processes. One part of carotene is equivalent to 1.6 parts of vitamin A. 
The principal source of carotene in commercial mashes is alfalfa meal, which 
varies widely in carotene content. It is believed that some feed mixers use very 
little care in the selection of al.alfa. 

It should be understood that the assays here reported are for carotene and 
that low results do not necessarily indicate a vitamin A deficiency as dependence 
may have been placed on other sources for a part of the vitamin A. All of the 
feeds examined declared cod liver or other fish oils as an ingredient, both of which 
contain vitamin A. 

Titus, in an article published in the 1939 edition of the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture Year Book, suggests that if a feed is to be stored for more 
than a month not less than 70 per cent of the vitamin A should be derived from 
plant sources, the reason being that vitamin A in oil carriers when incorporated 
in a mixed feed is much more unstable than carotene derived from such plant 
sources as alfalfa and corn. Carotene in alfalfa is also unstable when the alfalfa 
is not produced and stored in such a way as to conserve the carotene. 

The assays for riboflavin (vitamin G) indicate that furnishing a sufficiency of 
this vitamin is not a serious problem. Its principal sources are distillers' residues 
or by-products, dried yeast, dried milk and milk by-products, alfalfa meals, and 
numerous commercial blends which depend upon some of the above listed as a 
riboflavin ingredient. Riboflavin is more stable than either carotene or vitamin A. 

Following is a compilation of vitamin A and riboflavin requirements for poultry 
taken from the 1939 United States Department of Agriculture Year Book, found 
in the article "Practical nutritive requirements of poultry" by Harry W. Titus. 



Class 


*Vitamin A 
per pound of total feed 
International Units 


Vitamin G (Riboflavin) 
per pound of total feed 
Gammas or Micrograms 


Chickens 

Growing chicks 
Laying stock 
Breeding stock 

Turkeys 

Growine; poults 
Breeding stock 


1450 
3150 
4720 

3630 
4720 


1670 
680 
1250 

1670 
1250 



*If the feed is to be stored for more than a month before it is fed, not less than 70 per cent 
of the vitamin A should be derived from plant sources. 

For the benefit of feed chemists who may be interested the methods used in 
determining carotene and riboflavin follow. 



28 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 

Methods Used for Determination of Carotene and Riboflavin in Mixed Feeds 

Carotene 

A 5 gram sample was refluxed for one -half hour with 50 ml of freshly prepared 
alcoholic KOH (50 g in 200 ml alcohol) and 5 grams anhydrous Na2S04. The 
solution was cooled to room temperature and decanted into a 500 ml separatory 
funnel. The residue was extracted by shaking and decanting with at least 3 
portions of 35 ml of Skelly-solve B until extracts were colorless. The extracts 
were combined with the alcoholic KOH extract and washed with 90% methanol, 
shaking thoroughly after each addition, until washings were colorless. The 
Skelly-solve was then washed with water until free of KOH and filtered through 
anhydrous Na2S04. The filtrate was passed through an adsorbent column of 
activated magnesium oxide and Hyflo Super-Cel according to the method of 
Wall and Kelley, Ind. & Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed., 15, 18 (1943). The eluate was 
diluted to a convenient volume and the carotene content determined by measuring 
its per cent transmittance in a spectrophotometer. 

Riboflavin 

The method used is a modification of the Hodson and Norris method for the 
fluorometric determination of riboflavin. 

A 5 gram sample was weighed into a 250 ml amber extraction flask, 50 ml of 
0.25 N H2SO4 were added and the mixture was refluxed for one hour. After 
cooling, the pH of the mixture was adjusted to 6.8 with Na3P04.12 H2O (6% 
solution) using a glass electrode, diluted to a volume of 200 ml and mixed thor- 
oughly. The precipitate formed was allowed to settle for at least one-half hour. 
A 50 ml aliquot was taken from the more or less clear supernatant layer and 2 ml 
of 4% KMn04 were added while swirling the solution. After about 4 minutes 
0.2 gram of solid Na2S204 and 2 ml of dilute SnCU (1 ml of 4% SnCl2 in HCl 
diluted to 250 ml) were added and the solution was mixed thoroughly. 5 ml of 
acetone were then added if necessary to reduce foaming and solution made to 
volume of 200 ml with water, mixed and allowed to stand at least 10 minutes. 
The solution was filtered through No. 41 Whatman filter paper into a 1000 ml 
amber Erlenmeyer flask until filtrate measured about 100 ml. The unstoppered 
flask and contents were placed in a shaking machine and shaken for 10 minutes. 
A 25 ml aliquot was pipetted into a small Erlenmeyer flask (solution A) and the 
remaining solution was divided into two approximately equal portions (solutions 
B and C). To solution A, 1 ml of a standard riboflavin solution containing .002 
mg riboflavin per ml was added and the solution was well mixed. To solution C, 
0.1 gram of solid Na2S204 was added. 10 ml portions of each solution were 
pipetted into 3 matched cuvettes and the fluorescence of each solution was meas- 
ured. The calculation involved, using the weight of sample and dilutions given 
here, is: 

64 (B - C) . 

• • =p.p.m. ribonavm 

5.2 (A -B) 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



29 



What is Scratch Feed? 

Just what grains should be used in the making of an ideal scratch feed or in 
what proportions they should be present is a matter of diverse opinion. Shortages 
of certain cereals, principally corn, and a plentiful supply of wheat have made 
wheat the preponderant cereal grain in scratch feeds during the past season. 

With a view to determining the ingredient content of scratch feeds sold, 19 
samples officially collected were divided into their component grains. The 
results indicate that the samples were on the whole as represented. The follow- 
ing exceptions were noted: one sample contained inferior oats instead of No. 2 
oats as declared; two samples which declared buckwheat as an ingredient con- 
tained none; oats were found to be present in one sample where none were de- 
clared; and sunflower seed declared in. another was not present. The scarcity 
and high price of sunflower seed should make its absence obvious. One sample 
contained whole Argentine corn instead of the usual cracked corn. 

The mixing and sampling of scratch feeds present difficulties not common to 
finely ground meals. Even with the most careful mixing the seeds of different 
sizes and shapes tend to segregate. While this is not usually apparent to the 
eye, it does make considerable difference when an attempt is made to determine 
accurately the percentage by weight of the grains used in the mixture. Two test 
mixes made in the laboratory of wheat, cracked corn, and oats gave results 
probably closer to the true content than could be expected of a commercial mix. 
The first contained by weight: wheat 60%, cracked corn 10%, oats 30%. Act- 
ually recovered was: wheat 59.5%, corn 10.6%, oats 29.9%. Of the second mix 
consisting of wheat 20%, cracked corn 60%, oats 20%, the recovery was wheat 
20.4%, cracked corn 6C.4%, oats 19.2%. It is believed that the results obtained 
for the commercial mixtures are at least approximate if not accurate. 

The results are reported by number instead of by brand name as, with the 
fluctuating kinds and amounts of grain available, it is often necessary for the 
manufacturer to modify his formulas. With a return to normal conditions 
brands may be expected to be more uniform. 





Barley 


Buckwheat 


Cracked Corn 


Kaffir & Mile 


Oats 


Wheat 


No. 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


Per Cent 


1 


21 





66 


1 


— 


12 


2 


— 


_ 


6 


— 


33 


61 


3 


9 


— 


16 


2 


8 


65 


4 


5 


3 


9 


3 


28 


52 


5 


11 


— 


15 


9 


8 


57 


6 


3 


— 


26 


9 


9 


53 


7 


3 


— 


28 


8 


9 


52 


8 


21 


— 


19 


3 


— 


57 


9 


14 


— 


11 


3 


— 


72 


10 


21 


3 


11 


— 


8 


57 


11 


15 


10 


17 


— 


— 


58 


12 


4 


— 


24 


— 


9 


63 


13 


12 


9 


33 


— 


— 


46 


14 


15 


— 


35 


— 


— 


50 


15 


5 


— 


46 


— 


7 


42 


16 


10 


— 


52 


5 


— 


33 


17 


— . 


— 


43 


— 


8 


49 


18 


_ 


— 


58 


— 


4 


38 


19 


5 


— 


44 




8 


43 



30 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 

Directory of Manufacturers Who Registered Feeding Stuffs for Sale 
in Massacfiusetts in 1945 

Ward G. Ackerman, Altamont, N. Y. 

Albers Milling Co., Seattle, Wash. 

Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago, 111. 

American Maize-Products Co., 100 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

A. P. Ames & Co., 10 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Arcady Farms Milling Co., 223 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., Atlanta 3, Ga. 

Atlantic Supply Co., Duncannon, Penn. ' 

E. W. Bailey & Co., Montpelier, Vt. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Co., Ltd., 1907 Elm St., Dallas 1, Texas 

Barber & Bennett, Inc., Albany, N. Y. 

Bay State Milling Co., Winona, Minn. 

Beacon Milling Co., Inc., Cayuga, N. Y. 

Best Foods, Inc., 237 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bisbee Linseed Co., Inc., Amsterdam, N. Y. 

Bisbee Linseed Co., 2100 Lincoln-Liberty Bldg., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Blatchford Calf Meal Co., Waukegan, III. 

Blatchley & Ballard, Inc., Middletown, Conn. 

Bluepoints Co., Inc., Aberjona Packing Division, Woburn, Mass. 

Borden Co., Special Products Div., 350 Madison Aye., New York, N. Y. 

Borden Grain Co., West Water St., Taunton, Mass. 

A. H. Brown & Bros., Boston, Mass. (Registered by Mellin's Food Co. of North America) 

George B. Brown Corp., Ipswich, Mass. 

Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

A. B. Caple Co., Toledo 5, Ohio 

Center Milk Products Co., Middlebury Center, Penn. 

Central Soya Co., Inc., Fort Wayne 2, Ind. 

Cerophyl Laboratories, Inc., 2438 Broadway, Kansas City, Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Stores, Ralston Purina Co., Prop., St. Louis 2, Mo. 

Coatsworth and Cooper Ltd., 67 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Commander-Larabee Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Community Service. Inc., Canaan, Conn. 

Consolidated Products Co., Danville, 111. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Continental Distilling Corp., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 

O. A. Cooper Co., Humboldt, Neb. 

Cooperative Alfalfa Mills, Inc., Box 1525, Central Station, Toledo, Ohio 

Corn Products Sales Co., 17 Battery Place, New York, N. Y. 

Courcy Grain Co., 12 Waverly St., Taunton, Mass. 

Cover Grain & Feed Co., 150 Middle St., Lowell, Mass. 

Chas. M. Cox Co.. 177 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. 

Crawford Brothers, Inc., Walton, N. Y. 

Crookston Milling Co., Crookston, Minn. 

Dailey Mills, Inc., Olean. N. Y. 

Dairymen's League Cooperative Association, Inc., Ill West 42nd St., New York 18. N. Y. 

Decatur Milling Co., Inc., Decatur, 111. 

Dehydrated Alfalfa Mills, Inc., 247 East Washington St., Fremont, Neb. 

Dehydrating Process Co., 60 Mt. Washington Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Delaware Mills, Inc., 88 Front St., Deposit, N. Y. 

Denver Alfalfa Milling & Products Co., Lamar, Col. 

Frank Diauto, 87 Warren St., Randolph, Mass. 

F. Diehl & Son, Inc., Wellesley 81, Mass. 
Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc., Frederick, Md. 
Drack-ett Products Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington 98, Del. 

Eagle Roller Mill Co., New Ulm., Minn. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, West Springfield, Mass. 

B. A. Eckhart Milling Co.. 1300 Carroll Ave., Chicago 7, 111. 
Economy Grocery Stores Corp., 393 D St., Boston, Mass. 
Egg-O-Milk Co., Baltimore, Md. (Registered by P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son) 
M. W. Ellis Estate, 19 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 

Elmore Milling Co., Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 

John W. Eshelman & Sons, Lancaster, Penn. 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Assoc, Topsfield, Mass. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 31 

Evans Milling Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Excelsior Milling Co., Minneapolis 15, Minn. 

Fair Grain Co.. Holliston, Mass. 

Farm Industries, Inc., DeGraff, Ohio 

Farmers Feed Co., 532 Ea?t 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Federal Mill, Inc., Lockport, N. Y. 

Ferneau Grain Co., Blanchester, Ohio 

Finger Lakes and Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., Geneva, N. Y. 

Finger Lakes & Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., 7 Madison St., Troy, N. Y. 

First National Stores, Inc., 5 Middlesex Ave., Somerville, Mass. 

Flory Milling Co., Inc., Bangor, Penn. 

Fred A. Fountain, Taunton, Mass. 

Fremont Molasses Feed Co.. Fremont, Neb. 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc., Worcester, Mass. 

Gateway Milling Assoc, Inc., Buffalo 13, N. Y. 

Gerieral Foods Corp., Battle Creek, Mich. 

General Foods Corp., Corn Mill Division, Kankakee, 111. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, Minn. 

General Mills, Inc., Farm Service Division, Fitchburg, Mass. 

General Mills, Inc., Larrowe Division, Detioit 2, Mich. 

Gerard Milk Products Co., Baltimore 5, Md. » 

Getek Industrial & Agricultural Supplies Corp., 1270 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Walpole, Mass. 

Glidden Co., Feed Mill Division, 1160 West ISth St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Glidden Co., Soya Products Division, 5165 \\est Moffat St., Chicago 30, 111. 

Gloucester Dehydrating Process Co., Gloucester, Mass. 

Gorton-Pew Fisheries Co., Ltd., 327 Main St., Gloucester, Mass. 

D. H. Grandin Milling Co., Jamestown, N. Y. 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., New York, N. Y. 

Griscom & Co., Inc., 20 Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 

Hales & Hunter Co., 166 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

D. Harbeck & Sons, New Bedford, Mass. 

Henkel Flour Mills, Division of International Milling Co., 323 East Atwater St., Detroit 26, Mich. 
Hercules Powder Co., Dairy Products Division, 332 South Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Hood Mills Co., 4101 East Monument St., Baltimore 5, Md. 

E. C. & W. L. Hopkins, Inc., Greenfield. N. H. 
Hubinger Co., Keokuk, Iowa 
Humphreys-Godwin Co., Memphis 3, Tenn. 
Illinois Cereal Mills, Inc., Paris, 111. 

Independent Tallow Co., Inc., 39 Cedar St., Woburn, Mass. 

International Milling Co., Minneapolis 1, Minn. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

Spencer Kellogg & .Sons, Inc., 98 Delaware Ave., Buffalo 5, N. Y. 

Keystone Dehydrating Co., Nazareth, Penn. 

H. H. King Flour Mills Co., Minneapolis, Minn 

Kinsey Distilling Corp., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 

Kraft Cheese Co., 500 Peshtigo Court, Chicago 90, 111. 

Chas. A. Krause Milling Co., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 

Larabee Flour Mills Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

L. B. Lovitt & Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

Mackenzie & Winslow, Inc., Fall River, Mass. 

Maine Fish Meal Co., Union Wharf, Portland, Maine 

Mansfield Milling Co., Mansfield, Mass. 

Maritime Milling Co., Inc., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Meadow Brook Farms, Nazareth, Penn. 

Mellin's Food Co. of North America, 41 Central Wharf, Boston, Mass. (Registered for A. H. 

Brown & Bros.) 
Merrimack Farmers' Exchange, Inc., Concord, N. H. 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau Assoc, 155 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 
Milktone Concentrate Co., 1327 Baltimore Trust Bldg., Baltimore 5, Md. 
Miner-Hillard Milling Co., Wilkes-Barre, Penn. 

Mississippi Valley Dehydrating Assoc, Inc., Box 152S Central Station, Toledo Ohio 
Geo. Q. Moon & Co., Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. 
Jas. F. Morse & Co., 11 Horace St., Somerville 43, Mass. 
National Biscuit Co., Shredded Wheat Bakeries, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 
National Distillers Products Corp., 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 
National Lead Co., Ill Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 



32 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 

National Milling Branch of National Biscuit Co., 2221 Front St., Toledo, Ohio 

New Bedford Grain Co., New Bedford, Mass. 

New England Grain Co., 390 Commercial St., Portland, Maine. 

P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son, 4101 East Monument St., Baltimore 5, Md. 

(Registered for Egg-O-Milk Co.) 
Ogden Grain Co., Utica. N. Y. 

Oswego Soy Products Corp., East Seneca St., Oswego, N. Y. 
Palm Grain Co., 1801 Gorham St., Lowell, Mass. 
Park & Pollard Co., 356 Hertel Ave., Buffalo 7, N. Y. 
George H. Parker Grain Co., 56 Water St., Danvers, Mass. 
Pasco Packing Assoc, Dade City, Florida 
Patent Cereals Co., Geneva, N. Y. 
Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glr.ss Co., Linseed Oil Division, 2-10 Chester Ave., Newark, N. J. 
W. N. Potter Grain Stores, Inc., Greenfield, Mass. 
Procter & Gamble Distributing Co., Cincinnati 1, Ohio 
Publicker Commercial Alcohol Co., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 
Quaker Oats Co., 141 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 
Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis 2, Mo. 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., Cambridge, Mass. 
Rex Grain & Milling Co., Inc., 95 Kentucky St., Buffalo 4, N. Y. 
D. F. Riley, North Hatfield, Mass. 
Rodney Milling Co., Kansas City 8, Mo. 
Russell-Miller Milling Co., Minneapolis 1, Minn. 
Ryther & Warren Co., Belchertown, Mass. 
Saunders Mills, Inc., Box 1582 Central Station, Toledo, Ohio 
Schenley Distilleries, Inc., 350 Fifth Ave., New York 1, N. Y. 
Schoeneck Farms, Inc., R. No. 3, Nazareth, Penn. 
Schultz, Baujan & Co., Inc., Beardstown, 111. 
Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., Louisville, Ky. 
Sears, Roebuck & Co., 925 South Homan .Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Sheboygan Falls Marketing Assoc , Sheboygan Falls, Wis. 
Sherwin Williams Co., 101 Prospect Ave., N. W., Cleveland, Ohio 
W. J. Small Co., Neodesha, Kan. 
A. W. Staley Manufacturing Co., Decatur, 111. 
Staley Milling Co., Kansas City 16, Mo. 

Standard Milling Co., 309 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 6, 111. 
Stratton & Co., Concord, N. H. 

Swift & Co., Feed Department, Union Stock Yards, Chicago, III. 
Swift & Co.. Soybean Mills, Champaign, 111. 
Toledo Soybean Products Co., 215 Pontiac St., Toledo, Ohio 

Union Sales Corp., Columbus, Ind. (Distributor for Union Starch & Refining Co.) 
Union National Mill, Springfield. Ohio 
United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg, Mass. 
United Farmers Cooperative Creamery Assoc, Inc., Charlestown, Mass. 
United Mills Co., Inc., Grafton, Ohio 
Unity Feeds, Inc., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 
George Urban Milling Co., 332 North Oak St., Buffalo 3, N. Y. 
Valley Dehydration Plant, McAllen, Texas 

Arthur Ventura Grain Co., Longmeadow Road, Taunton, Mass. 
Vita- Vim Millers, 135 Scott St., Buffalo 4, N. Y. 
Wakefield Sawdust & Shavings Co., Wakefield, Mass. 
Hiram Walker & Sons, Inc., Peoria 1, 111. 
C. P. Washburn Co., Middleboro, Mass, 
Wayne County Grangers Feed Corp., Clyde, N. Y. 
H. K. Webster Co., Lawrence, Mass. 
West-Nesbitt, Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 
Western Condensing Co., Petaluma, Cal. 
Whitmoyer Laboratories, Inc., Myerstown, Penn. 
Williams Bros. Co., Kent, Ohio 
Est. M. G. Williams, Box 603, Taunton, Mass. 
Stanley Wood Grain Co., Taunton, Mass. 
Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester. Mass. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
2M-8-45 



i:n.3AGIL B.V/OOD, 11 45 

LIBRARY 

MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 126 SEPTEMBER 1945 



Inspection of Commercial 

Fertilizers 

and 

Agricultural Lime Products 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff: 



This is the seventy-second report of the Massachusetts Fertilizer Control 
made in accordance with Chapter 94, Sections 250 to 261, inclusive, of Mass- 
achusetts General Laws 1920, as amended by Chapter 67 ,Acts of 1933. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Pertinent facts relating to Massachusetts fertilizer law 3 

Manufacturers and brands 4 

Fertilizer tonnage 5 

Mixed fertilizers: 

Deficiency statistics. 6 

Average variation table - 7 

Calculation of shortages 7 

Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton 9 

Mixtures substantially complying with guarantees 11 

Chemicals and raw products: 

Nitrogen compounds 14 

Potash compounds . 15 

Phosphoric acid compounds 15 

Products supplying nitrogen and phosphoric acid 16 

Adulterated bone meal 16 

Ground bone 20 

Pulverized animal manures 22 

Agricultural lime products: 

Manufacturers and brands 24 

Hydrated or slaked lime 25 

Pulverized limestone (fine-ground limestone)... 26 

Ground limestone (coarse-ground limestone) 27 

Directory of manufacturers who registered fertilizers for sale in 

Massachusetts in 1945 28 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FERTILIZERS 

AND AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 

FOR THE SEASON OF 1945 

By Fertilizer Control Service Staff 

Philip H. Smilhi, Official Chemist in Charge James T. Howard, Inspector 

John W. Kuzmeski, Senior Chemist Louis A. Graves, Inspector 

Albert F. Spelman, Assistant Chemist Joseph Conklin, Inspector 

C. Tyson Smith, Assistant Chemist Joseph A. Martell, Technical Assistant 

Henry B. Rodman, Junior Chemist Cora B. Grover, Senior Clerk 

M. deKay Thompson, Junior Chemist 



PERTINENT FACTS RELATING TO MASSACHUSETTS 
FERTILIZER LAW 

Commercial Fertilizers 

Registration is required annually on January 1. 

Registration fee is $8 for eachi element: nitrogen, phosphoric acid, potash, mag- 
nesia. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of fertilizer 
Name, brand or trade mark, and grade 
Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, water soluble 
potash. A guarantee of total phosphoric acid may be used instead of 
available phosphoric acid for bone, untreated phosphate rock, tankage, 
dried and pulverized manures, ground seeds, and wood ashes 
Tonnage reports are required semi-annually, on January 1 and July 1. 
Tonnage fee: 6 cents per ton of 2,000 pounds. 

Lime Products 

Registration is required annually on January 1. 
Registration fee: $12 for each brand. 
Label must show: 

Net weight of product 

Name, brand or trade mark, and form of lime 

Name and address of manufacturer 

Guaranteed analysis: calcium oxide, magnesium oxide, carbonates of cal- 
cium and magnesium, or calcium sulphate (In gypsum or land plaster) 



Make checks pa\able to Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station and 
send correspondence to 

PHILIP H. SMITH 

Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 

Amherst, Mass. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 



Manufacturers and Brands 



Registrations have been perfected in Massachusetts during 1945 by 54 firms, 
covering 229 brands of mixed fertilizer and unmixed fertilizing materials. 

The following brands were not found on display by the sampling agent at 
any point in the state and therefore do not appear in the tables of analyses. 

Brands of Fertilizer Registered but Not Sampled 



Allied Chemical & Dye Corp., 
The Barrett Division 

Sulphate of Ammonia (20.6-0-0) 

American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

AA Quality 4-12-4 

Agrico for Cranberries 5-8-7 

American Cyanamid Co. 

21% Aero Cyanamid Pulverized (21-0-0) 

American Liquid Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Liqua-Vita 6-9-7 

American Potash & Chemical Corp. 

Trona Muriate of Potash (0-0-60) 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Liberty 0-14-14 

Liberty Tobacco Mixture 5-3-5 

Liberty Tobacco Starter 5-5-15 

Liberty (with Sulphate Potash) 5-10-10 

Liberty Tobacco Mixture 6-3-6 

Castor Pomace (4.5-0-0) 

Sulphate Ammonia (20.5-0-0) 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop 0-14-14 
Armour's Big Crop 4-12-8 
Armour's Victory Garden 5-10-5 
Muriate of Potash 60% (0-0-60) 

Berkshire Chemical Co. 

Berkshire Victory Garden 5-10-5 
Specialty Fertilizer 6-6-4 

Buell Fertilizer Co. 

Buell Peat Poultry Manure (3-3-1.5) 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco Raw Bone & Tankage (4-20-0) 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States 0-19-19 with Borax 
Eastern States 5-5-15-1 Tobacco 
Eastern States 8-4-8 Tobacco 
Eastern States 8-16-16-1 LCS 
Eastern States Sulphate of Potash 
(0-0-52) 



Humphreys-Godwin Co. 

Dixie Brand 41% Cottonseed Meal 
(6.58-0-0) 

McCormick & Co., Inc., 

Hy-Gro 13-26-13 

Old Deerfield Fertihzer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield 5-8-7 & 2 Set Onion & Potato 

Fertilizer, Potash other than Muriate 
Old Deerfield Castor Pomace (5.5-0-0) 
Old Deerfield Dry Ground Fish (9.5-2-0) 
Old Deerfield Muriate of Potash (0-0-60) 
Old Deerfield Superphosphate (0-20-0) 

Olds & Whipple, Inc. 
O & W 5-10-5 
O & W 5-10-10-2 Potato 

Ramshorn Mills, Inc. 

Sheep Manure — Wool Waste (2-0.5-4.5) 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corp. 

Ra-Pid-Gro 23-21-17 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Red H 5-10-5 

Hubbard Dry Ground Fish (9.56-0-0) 

Hubbard Muriate of Potash (0.-0-60) 

William H. Rorer, Inc. 

Plant Dinner 5-7-5 

Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co. 

Red Seal Brand Ruhm's Phosphate 
Rock 30% (0-30-0) 

Sears, Roebuck & Co. 

Garden Master Specialty 5-8-7 
Garden Master Victory Garden 5-10-5 

Swift & Co., Plant Food Division 

Swift's Red Steer 5-8-7 
Swift's Red Steer 5-10-5 
Swift's Red Steer 5-10-10 
Sheep Manure (1.5-1-2.5) 

Tennessee Corp. 

Es-Min-EI 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 5 

Fertilizer Tonnage 

During the past several years publication of the annual bulletin of the Fertilizer 
Control Service has been delaj'ed by the late filing of tonnage reports by one or 
two fertilizer companies. Since these late reports generally cover a large tonnage 
they cannot be ignored in the compilation of the fertilizer tonnage tables. There- 
fore, in order to advance the publication date of the bulletin henceforth, the 
tonnage tables in this and future bulletins will include the fertilizers sold from 
January 1 to January 1 rather than from July 1 to July 1. 



Tonnage of Mixed and Unmixed Fertilizers Sold in Massachusetts 

January 1, 1944, to 
January 1, 1945 

Mixed fertilizers 61,824 

Fertilizer chemicals and materials unmixed 12,466 a 

Pulverized animal manures 1,573 

Totals 75,863 

a Does not include 15,218 tons of 20% superphosphate distributed by the A. A. A. 



Tonnage of Mixed Fertilizers, January 1, 1944, to January 1, 1945 



Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Grade* 


Tonnage 


Brands 


5-8-7 


18,627 


22 


4-12-16 


98 


— 


5-10-10 


13,529 


21 


6-12-4 


95 


— 


5-10-5 


8,442 


23 


6-5-5 


82 


— 


6-3-6 


6,517 


13 


5-15-20 


82 


— 


7-7-7 


4,531 


11 


8-7-3 


75 


— 


3-12-6 


2,870 


11 


.08-. 16-. ID 


72 


— 


8-16-16 


2,105 


— 


4-10-10 


41 


— 


5-17-0 


945 


— 


3-12-3 


41 


— 


4-12-4 


816 


— 


3-8-7 


40 


— 


6-10-4 


511 


— 


4-8-4 


38 


— 


6-8-2 


447 


— 


0-20-20 


29 


— 


8-16-8 


411 


— 


4-9-7 


20 


— 


10-10-10 


352 


— 


5-8-5 


15 


— 


5-3-5 


308 


— 


4-16-20 


12 


— 


0-14-14 


276 


— 


0-10-20 


10 


— 


5-10-4 

S-4-8 

8-8-8 


130 

117 
117 


— 


Miscellaneous 


23 


— 


— 


Totals 


61,824 


148 



*The grade represents the plant food guarantee and is expressed in the order of nitrogen, avail 
able phosphoric acid, potash. 



Tonnage of Unmi.xed Materials, January 1, 1944, to January 1, 1945 



Material 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Material 


Tonnage 


Brands 


Nitrate of soda 


3,300 





Sulfate of ammonia 


301 


5 


Superphosphate 20% . 


2,742 


8 


Castor pomace 


147 


— 


Pulverized animal manures 


1,573 


22 


Uramon .... 


141 


— ■ 


Superphosphate 18 % . 


1,414 


— 


Cyanamid .... 


101 


— 


Milorganite 


1,357 


— 


Bone and tankage 


44 


— ■ 


Ammonium nitrate 


802 


— 


Superphosphate 47% . 


31 


— 


Muriate of potash . 


737 


8 


Sulfate of potash . 


14 


— 


Bone meal .... 
Cottonseed meal 


689 


8 


Miscellaneous 


28 


— 
















! 


Total . . 


14.054 


71 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 



MIXED FERTILIZERS 
Deficiency Statistics for Mixed Fertilizers 



Manufacturer 



Number of 
Samples 



_c3 ^ 



Number of Tests 



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Acme Guano Co 

Agricultural Laboratories, Inc. 
American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

Apothecaries Hall Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works 
Berkshire Chemical Co. 
Joseph Breck & Sons Corp. 
Consolidated Rendering Co. 
Eastern States Farmers' Exclian^e 
Essex County Co-operative Farming 

Association . 
Excell Laboratories . 
Goulard & Olena, Inc. 
Grasalo Co. . 
A. H. Hoffman, Inc. 
Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc. 

Hy-Trous Corp 

, International Minerals & Chemicnl C 
Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Olds & Whipple. Inc 

Plantabbs Co 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co. ... 

Sears, Roebuck & Co 

M. L. Shoemaker Division of Wilson 

& Co.. Inc 

Swift & Co., Plant Food Division 

Tennessee Corp 

C. P. Washburn Co 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works. Inc. . 



3 

1 

80 

17 
17 
16 
2 
26 
18 

3 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

25 

18 

11 

1 

32 

7 

1 

1 
13 
3 
2 
2 





1 

1 

1 



1 

1 

13 

11 

11 

1 

24 

1 

1 

1 
5 



2 



9 

3 

239 

51 

51 
42 
6 
75 
69 

9 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

79 

61 

33 

3 

83 

21 

3 

2 
39 
9 
6 
9 



TOT A I S 



305 



920 



1 


37 
3 

13 
5 

5 
3 

3 







11 

2 


7 
1 



10 
5 
3 
1 

110 





10 
1 



1 
3 













1 

5 










15 



21 



Average Variation from Guaranteed Analysis 

Thirteen firms have registered three or more brands of mixed fertilizers. On 
the basis of composition found by analysis as well as of tonnage sold, the follow- 
ing table shows that each manufacturer was successful in avoiding average de- 
ficiencies in plant food guarantees in his mixtures. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



Manufacturer 



Average Percentage of Plant Food 
Above or Below the Minimum Guarantee 



Nitrogen 



Available 

Phosphoric 

Acid 



Water 
Soluble 
Potash 



American Agricultural Chemical Co 

Apothecaries Hal' Co 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Berlcshire Chemical Co 

Consolidated Rendering Co 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange .... 
Essex County Co-operative Farming Association 
International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc 

Olds & Whipple, Inc 

Rogers & Hubbard Co 

Sears, Roebuck & Co 

Swift & Co , Plant Food Division ... 



Calculation of Shortages 

For calculating the approximate commercial shortages per ton the following 
figures were used: 

Retail Cost 
Per Unit 

Nitrogen : 

Water-soluble and synthetic organic - $2.00 

Water-insoluble of good quality and 

Water-soluble amounting to one-eighth of the percentage of 
water-insoluble nitrogen found when the percentage of 
water-insoluble nitrogen exceeds v30 8.00 

Available phosphoric acid - - L40 

Potash : 

Muriate... — - -80 

Sulfate - -- --- 1.10 

From cotton hull and boll ashes and wood ashes — - - 1-25 

These values represent the average retail cost to the consumer of the plant 
food elements in unmixed materials. This does not include mixing and overhead 
costs which increase the retail cost of these elements in mixed goods. 

To compensate for the increased unit cost in mixed goods the commercial 
shortage as found by using our values is multiplied by the factor: Actual retail 
selling price divided by our calculated guaranteed value. 



Example: A 5-8-7 fertilizer selling for $39.00 a ton analyzes: 

Total nitrogen ...- 4.67 

Water-insoluble nitrogen -- - - .88 

Available phosphoric acid 7.43 

Potash - 7.13 

Shortage: Nitrogen -- -.33 X$2.00 =$0.66 

Available phosphoric acid .57 X 1.40= .80 

Total - - S1.46 



8 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

Our calculated guaranteed value: 

Water-insoluble nitrogen = .88 + .11 = .99 x|$8.00 = $7.92 

Water-soluble nitrogen ......= 5.00 - .99 = 4.01 X $2.00 = 8.02 

Available phosphoric acid = 8.00 X $1.40 = 11.20 

Potash = 7.00 x|$0.80 = 5.60 

Total $32.74 

Approximate commercial shortage = (39.0C -h 32.74) X 1.46 = $1.74 per ton. 

Explanation of Table of Analyses 

Gucirantee. The plant food guarantee or the grade of each fertilizer is made 
a part of the trade name under the heading "Name of Manufacturer and Brand", 
and is expressed as nitrogen, available phosphoric acid, and water soluble potash 
and in that order. 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with the Guarantee. In addition to those 
fertilizers which meet their guarantees in every respect, this table includes also 
those mixtures which have one or more elements below the guaranteed percentage 
but have a shortage of less than $1 per ton. 

From the Control Official's viewpoint, the amount of overrun, within reason- 
able limits, found in any sample of fertilizer is not especially significant. Of 
main importance is the fact that the particular sample analyzed shows that the 
manufacturer of the brand represented by the sample is selling a product which 
is or is not substantially as guaranteed. The manufacturer whose 4-9-7 brand 
is found by the Control Official to be running 4.01-9.03-7.02 in every sample of 
the brand tested is meeting all requirements covering this part of the fertilizer 
control laws as fully as the manufacturer of another 4-9-7 brand found to run 
4.85-9.95-7.90 in each sample tested. 

Therefore this table, in addition to the data mentioned in the next paragraph, 
contains only results of analytical tests pertaining to the average amount of 
water insoluble nitrogen present in each brand, since this information is of value 
to tobacco growers and other users of fertilizers containing a high percentage of 
this form of nitrogen. 

Potash Forms. Tests for chlorine are made only on tobacco mixtures and on 
those fertilizers which carry a guarantee of potash in forms other than muriate. 
When the amount of chlorine present in any brand exceeds the tolerance allowed 
for that brand, this fact is indicated by a footnote. 



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FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 
Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees 



11 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Acme Guano Co. 

Acme 5-8-7 

Acme 5-10-10 

Agricultural Laboratories, Inc. 

Stim-U-Plant 11-12-15 

American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

AA Quality Fertilizer 5-8-7 

AA Quality Fertilizer 5-10-10 

Agrico Phosphate & Potash 0-14-14 

Agrico for Truck 4-12-4 

Agrico for Corn 4-12-8 

Agrico for New England 4-12-8 

Agrico for Seeding Down 4-12-16 

Agrico for New England 5-8-7 

Agrico for Gardens (Victory Garden) 5-10-5 

Agrico for Potatoes 5-10-10 

Agrico for Tobacco 6-3-6 

Agrico for Lawn Trees & Shrubs 6-10-4 

Agrico for Top Dressing 7-7-7 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Liberty Fertilizer 4-12-4 

Liberty High Grade Market Gardeners -5-8-7 

Liberty High Grade Market Gardeners (with Sulphate Potash) 

5-8-7 

Liberty Fertilizer S-10-5 

Liberty Victory Garden 5-10-5 

Liberty Fertilizer 5-10-10 

Liberty Tobacco Mixture (with Cotton Hull Ashes) 6-3-6 

Liberty Green-Gro 6-7-4 

Liberty Special for Fruit & Grass 7-7- 7 

Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 4-12-4 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-8-7 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-10-5 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 5-10-10 

Armour's Big Crop Tobacco Special 6-3-6 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 7-7-7 

Armour's Big Crop Fertilizer 8-16-16 

Armour's Special Ornamental Fertilizer 6-12-4 

Berkshire Chemical Co. 

Berkshire 4-12-4 

Berkshire 5-8-7 

Berkshire 5-10-5 

Berkshire 5-10-10 

Berkshire Tobacco 6-3-6 

Berkshire 7-7-7 

Joseph Breck & Sons Corporation 

Breck's Victory Fertilizer 5-10-5 

Brexone for Gardens & Lawns 5-10-4 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco 0-14-14 Top Dresser 

Corenco 4-12-4 Complete Manure 

Corenco 5-8-7 Potato & General Crop 

Corenco 5-10-5 Victory Garden Fertilizer 

Corenco 5-10-10 Peerless Potato 

Corenco 6-3-6 Special Tobacco Grower 

Corenco 6-8-2 Landscape Fertilizer 

Corenco 7-7-7 Complete Fruit & Top Dressing .... 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



Average 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 



.27 
.21 



4 


.27 


1 


.43 


1 


— 


5 a 


.19 


4 


.26 


6 


.21 


3 


.16 


IS 


.29 


9 a 


.32 


8 


.24 


46 


3.70 


3 


.15 


6 


.12 


2 


.39 


2 


.79 


1 c 


.55 


1 


1.25 


3 


.92 


2 


.46 


26 


2.97 


1 


1.97 


2 


1.02 


2 


.21 


2 


.34 


3 


.39 


4 


.33 


1 b 


3.07 


3 


.30 


1. 


.20 


1 


.31 


1 


.24 


5 


.19 


1 


.20 


3 


.23 


26 


2.64 


4 


.16 


1 


.34 


1 


.84 


15 a 


_ 


19 


.21 


30 


.20 


2 


.23 


25 


.19 


1 6 


3.45 


2 


.30 


2 a 


.14 



a. See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton. 
6. Potash in forms other than muriate. 
c. Potash in form of muriate. 



12 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Continued 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States 0-10-20 with Borax, 1% magnesium oxide 
Eastern States 5-10-5 Victory Garden, 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 5-10-10, 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 5-15-20, 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 8-16-16, 1% magnesium oxide 

Eastern States 8-24-8 

Eastern States 10-10-10, 1% magnesium oxide 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Association 

S-X Brand 5-8-7 

S-X Brand (2% magnesium oxide) 5-10-10 

S-X Brand 7-7-7 

Excell Laboratories 

New Plant Life 2-1-2 

Goulard & Olena, Inc. 

Rose Food 5-7-4 

Grasalo Co. 

Grasalo 5-10-5 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc 

Hyponex 7-6-19 

Hy-Trous Corporation 

Hy-Trous 4-8-4 

International Minerals <& Chemical Corporation 

International 0-14-14 

International 4-12-4 

International 4-12-8 

International 4-12-16 

International 5-8-7 

International 5-10-5 

International Specialty 5-10-5 

International Victory Garden 5-10-5 

International 5-10-10 

International 5-10-10 Potato, 1% magnesium oxide .... 

International 6-3-6 

International 7-7-7 

International 8-16-16, 1 Yt,% magnesium oxide 

International Caribee 5-10-10, 2% magnesium oxide 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield 4-12-8 

Old Deerfield 5-8-7 Onion and Truck 

Old Deerfield 5-10-5 Trucker's Special 

Old Deerfield 5-10-10 Potato Fertilizer 

Old Deerfield 5-10-10 (2% magnesium oxide) Potato, Potash 

other than Muriate 

Old Deerfield 6-3-6 Complete Tobacco 

Old Deerfield Lawnshrub 6-5-5 

Old Deerfield 7-7-7 Grass Top Blessing 

Olds & Whipple, Inc. 

O & W 4-12-4 Market Garden 

O & W 5-3-5 Complete Tobacco 

O & W 5-8-7 Potato & General Purpose 

O & W 5-8-7 Potato & General Purpose, with Sulphate of Potash 

O & W 5-10-10 Potato 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Tobacco 

O & W 6-3-6 Blue Label Tobacco, Potash derived from Cotton 

Hull Asii 

O & W 7-7-7 Top Dressing & Grass 



Number 


Average 


of 


Percentage 


Samples 


of Water 


Analyzed 


In.soluble 




Nitrogen 


1 




4 


.24 


2 


.19 


1 


.16 


3 


.30 


2 


.ii 


3 a 


.31 


1 


.23 


1 


.15 


1 


.16 



.10 



1 





2 


.14 


1 


.20 


1 


.08 


3 


.19 


3 


.30 


2 


.15 


2 


.20 


2 


.16 


1 


.06 


1 6 


2,85 


9 


.15 


O 


.22 


1 


.43 


1 


.34 


2 


.83 


1 


.44 


4 


.50 


3 d 


.58 


4 b 


3.70 


1 


1.86 


1 


.14 


1 


.66 


1 h 


2.67 


3 


.46 


1 h 


.51 


2 


.52 


1 h 


3.35 


1 6 


3.08 


1 


1.01 



o. See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of $1 or more per ton.' 

h. Potash in forms other than muriate. 

d. In one sample the potash was in form of muriate. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LLVIE 
Mixtures Substantially Complying with Guarantees — Continued 



13 



Name of Manufacturer and Brand 



Plantabbs Co. 

Fulton's Plantabbs 11-15-20 

Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Gro-Fast Plant Food 5-8-5 

Hubbard Potato Fertilizer 5-8-7 

Hubbard High Potash Fertilizer 5-10-10 . . . 

Hubbard Tobacco Grower 6-3-6 

Hubbard Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 . 

Red H 0-14-14 

Red H 4-12-4 

Red H 4-12-8 

Red H 5-8-7 

Red H 5-10-10 

Red H 7-7-7 

Red H S-16-16 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co. 

Scotts Garden Builder 5-10-5 

Scotts Turf Builder 8-7-3 

Sears, Roebuck <£ Co. 

Garden Master Plant Food S-10-5 

M. L. Shoemaker Division of Wilson & Co., Inc. 

Shoemaker's "Swift-Sure" Tobacco Starter 4-10-0 

Swift & Co., Plant Food Division 

Vigoro 4-12-4 

Vigoro Victory Garden Fertilizer 5-10-5 

Tennessee Corporation 

5-10-5 All Purpose Loma 

5-10-5 Victory Garden Loma 

C. P. Washburn Co. 

Market Garden 5-8-7 

Special Potato 5-10-10 

Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc. 

Woodruff's 5-8-7 Fertilizer 

Woodruff's 6-3-6 Tobacco Special 



Number 

of 
Samples 
Analyzed 



Average 
Percentage 
of Water 
Insoluble 
Nitrogen 



2 


.97 


3 a 


1.57 


2 


1.34 


3 6 


3.21 


3 


.66 


1 


— 


5 


.52 


3 


.43 


4 


.50 


2 


-.49 


2 


.39 


1 


.45 


I a 


.36 


1 a 


1.05 


1. 


.32 


1 


.85 


9 


.33 


3 a 


.25 


2 


.27 


1 


.19 


1 


.35 


1 


.22 


2 


.62 


1 b 


2.62 



a. See table of "Mixtures showing a commercial shortage of SI or more per ton.' 

b. Potash in forms other than muriate. 



14 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 



NITROGEN COMPOUNDS 

Ammonium Nitrate, Calcium Cyanamid, Castor Pomace, Cottonseed Meal, 
Nitrate of Soda, Sulphate of Ammonia, Synthetic Urea 



Manufacturer and Brand 



Allied Chemical & Dye Corp., The Barrett Division 

Arcadian the American Nitrate of Soda 
Arcadian the American Nitrate of Soda 
Arcadian Sulphate of Ammonia .... 

American Cyanamid Co. 

20.6% Aero Cyanamid Granular .... 
20.6% Aero Cyanamid Granular .... 
20.6% Aero Cyanamid Granular 



Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co 

Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 
Nitraprills Fertilizer 



Compound (a) 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 
Compound . 



Chilean Nitrate Sales Corporation 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 
Chilean Nitrate of Soda— Champion Brand 
Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 
Chilean Nitrate of Soda— Champion Brand 
Chilean Nitrate of Soda — Champion Brand 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Sulphate of Ammonia 



E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc. 
Du Pont Uramon Fertilizer Compound 



International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 

Castor Pomace 

Castor Pomace 



L. B. Lovitt & Co. 

Lovit Brand Cottonseed Meal 41% 
Lovit Brand Cottonseed Meal 41% 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc. 

Old Deerfield Sulphate of Ammonia 

Olds & Whipple. Inc. 

Castor Pomace 



Nitrogen 



Found 



16.04 
15.74 
20.92 



21.16 
20.20 
20.30 



32.94 
32.75 
32.83 
32.98 
32.60 
32.58 
33.28 
32.64 
32.02 



15.97 
16.14 
16.00 
15.98 
16.10 



42.20 



5.93 
6.20 



6.60 
6.66 



20.66 



6.19 



Guaran- 
teed 



16.00 
16.00 
20.60 



20.60 
20.60 
20.60 



32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 
32.50 



16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 
16.00 



20.50 
42.00 



4.53 
4.53 



6.56 
6.56 



20.50 
4.50 



Brand Showing Commercial Shortage of More than $1 per Ton 



Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co. 

Cotton Seed Meal . 




5,76 



a Composite of 3 samples. 

6 Commercial shortage, SI. 17 per ton. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



15 



POTASH COMPOUNDS 
Muriate of Potash 



Manufacturer 



Apothecaries Hall Co 

Consolidated Rendering Co 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Farm Bureau Association 

International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 



Water Soluble Potash 



Found 



60.42 

60.17 

59.37 

60.30 

f60.88 
58.88 
60.70 
158.96 
160.48 



Guaran- 
teed 



60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 

60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60.00 
60 00 



Brand Showing Commercial Shortage of More than $1 per Ton 



International Minerals & Chemical Corporation . 



57.41 a 60.00 



a Commercial shortage, $1.85 per ton. 



PHOSPHORIC ACID COMPOUNDS 



Manufacturer and Brand 



American Agricultural Chemical Co. 

18% Normal Superphosphate 
18% Normal Superphosphate 

Apothecaries Hall Co. 

Superphosphate 20% 



Armour Fertilizer Works 

Armour's Big Crop Superphosphate 20% 

Consolidated Rendering Co. 

Corenco 20% Superphosphate . 



Davison Chemical Corporation 

Davco Granular Superphosphate 20% 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States Superphosphate 20% 



International Minerals & Chemical Corporation 

International Superphosphate 20% 



Rogers & Hubbard Co. 

Hubbard 20% Superphosphate 



Total 
Phos- 
phoric 
Acid 



19.00 

17.87 



21.50 
22.00 
20.95 
21.50 
21.25 
20.80 
20.40 



.A^vailable 
Phosphoric Acid 



Guaran- 
teed 



Found 



18.80 
17.57 



21.00 
20.70 
20.39 
20.96 
20.63 
20.34 
20.22 



18.00 
18.00 



20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 



Brands Showing Commercial Shortage of More than $1 per Ton 



Acme Guano Co. 

Superphosphate 20% 



Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 

Eastern States Triple Superphosphate 47^ 




40.68 b 



47.00 



a Commercial shortage, $2.83 per ton. 
h Commercial shortage, $6.61 per ton. 



16 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

PRODUCTS SUPPLYING NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORIC ACID 
Dry Ground Fish, Animal Tankage, Milorganite 









Total 


Available 




Nitr 


Dgen 


Phosphc 


ric Acid 


Phosphoric Acid 


Manufacturer 




Guaran- 




Guaran- 




Guaran- 




Found 


teed 


Found 


teed 


Found 


teed 


Apothecaries Hall Co. 














Dry Ground Fish . 


10.09 


9.00 


6.28 


5.00 


— 


— 


N. Roy & Son 














Animal Tankage 


7.02 


7.00 


13.67 


8.00 


— 


— 


Sewerage Commission of the 














City of Mi!waul<ee 














Milorganite .... 


6.15 


6.00 


2.88 


— 


2.48 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.09 


6.00 


2.80 


— 


2.42 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.08 


6.00 


2.83 


— 


2.47 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.38 


6.00 


2.73 


— 


2.37 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.27 


6.00 


2.83 


— 


2.47 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.01 


6.00 


2.83 


■ — 


2.47 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.39 


6.00 


3.00 


— 


2.60 


2.00 


Milorganite 










. 5.93 


6.00 


2.85 


— 


2.49 


2.00 


Milorganite 










5.91 


6.00 


2.85 


— ■ 


2.49 


2.00 


Milorganite 










6.37 


6.00 


3.00 


— 


2.60 


2.00 


Milorganite 










5.78 


6 00 


2.90 


~ 


2.34 


2 00 



Adulterated Bone Meal 

Analysis of several samples of bone meal collected by the fertilizer inspectors 
of the Control Service early in the spring of 1945 disclosed that some of the 
bone meal had been adulterated by the addition of phosphate rock and sulfate 
of ammonia or urea or both. In order to ascertain the extent of the adulteration, 
the inspectors were instructed to collect as many samples of bone meal as possible. 
A total of 71 samples was taken and 29 were found to be mixtures of bone meal 
and the ingredients listed above. 

As soon as it was possible to place the responsibility for the distribution of the 
adulterated bone meal, the Control Service sent out notices to stop further sales 
of the product. The distributors found to be handling this mixture were the 
American Agricultural Chemical Company, the Apothecaries Hall Company, and 
the Rogers & Hubbard Company. These companies have also distributed other 
bone meal which was not adulterated, and stated that they had purchased the 
adulterated bone meal from a broker acting for the Summers Fertilizer Company 
of Baltimore, Maryland. Upon receiving our notice to stop further sales of the 
product, the three companies involved immediately issued orders to their dealers 
to comply. Subsequently, acting on instructions from the Summers Fertilizer 
Company, they notified their dealers to return all unsold stocks to the Summers 
Fertilizer Company or to dispose of them otherwise than by sale as bone meal 
Records supplied by the three fertilizer companies show that about 170 tons of 
this adulterated bone meal had been placed on the market in Massachusetts. 
About 47 tons were removed from sale, leaving a total of 123 tons that had 
reached consumers' hands. 

In fairness to the three companies involved, it should be stated that routine 
analvsis would not detect the adulteration of the bone meal under discussion. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 17 

The usual analysis is for total nitrogen and total phosphoric acid, and in most 
cases the product was up to the guarantee in this respect. Basing the purchase 
on the usual analysis, therefore, the purchaser would buy the material as genunie 
bone meal as represented, unless there was reason to suspect its nature because 
of other factors. 

A large number of the sales of bone meal in Massachusetts are generally un- 
recorded cash sales of one or two bags or less. In such cases payment of rebate 
to the retail purchaser is impossible. However, some sales are in quantity large 
enough to be recorded. In these instances it is the policy of the Control Service 
to insist upon payment of any rebate due to the retail purchaser. This rebate is 
always based on the retail selling price of the material found deficient or adul- 
terated. 

In order to arrive at a satisfactory evaluation of the adulterated bone meal 
under discussion it was necessary to determine its approximate average composi- 
tion. Analysis of all bone meal samples collected during the 1945 season gave 
the following data: 



Average 29 samples Average 42 samples 

Adulterated Bone Meal Unadulterated Bone Meal 

Total nitrogen 2.56 

Water insoluble nitrogen 0.54 

Percentage of total nitrogen as water 

insoluble 21.09 

Total phosphoric acid 25.62 

Sulfur 2.32 

Fluorine 1.92 

Nitrogen from ammonia and/or urea 1.90 



Using the neutral ammonium citrate procedure prescribed for the determina- 
tion of available phosphoric acid in mixed fertilizers and superphosphates, the 
apparent average available phosphoric acid content of adulterated bone meal was 
found to be 6.74%; unadulterated bone meal, 15.01%. 

The following calculations were used in determining the average composition 
of the adulterated bone meal and the average rebate due the retail purchasers of 
this product: 

21.09 "=" 85.80 = 24,58 average percentage of bone meal in adulterated 
mixtures. Based on average percentage of total nitrogen as water in- 
soluble nitrogen in unadulterated bone meal. 

1.90 — .18 = 1.72 percentage of nitrogen from sulfate of ammonia and/ 
or urea. In most cases this nitrogen was from sulfate of ammonia. For 
calculation of average rebate it was assumed that all of this nitrogen 
was from sulfate of ammonia. 

1.72 H- 20.50 = 8.34 average percentage of sulfate of ammonia in 
adulterated bone meal. 

100 — 32.92 (percentage of sulfate of ammonia + bone meal) = 67.08 
average percentage of phosphate rock in adulterated bone meal. This 
indicates the use of phosphate rock containing about 3.00% fluorine 
which is about the normal fluorine content of domestic rock usually used 
in the manufacture of superphosphate. 



3.24 


2.78 


85.80 


23.33 


0.11 


0.08 


0.18 



18 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

Retail prices per ton used in computing average rebate: 

Unadulterated bone meal $60.69 

Sulfate of ammonia 45.00 

Phosphate rock 24.02 

The price for unadulterated bone meal represents the average retail selling price 
quoted by dealers. The price for sulfate of ammonia is the retail cash delivered 
price quoted by several fertilizer manufacturers. The price for phosphate rock 
is the average retail cash delivered price quoted by two large fertilizer manu- 
facturers. Since these are retail prices all costs for handling, grinding, bagging, 
bags, overhead, shipping costs, agents' commissions, etc. are included. The 
cost of mixing the various ingredients to form the adulterated mixture is not 
allowed. 

.2458 X 60.69 = 14.92 retail value of unadulterated bone meal 
.0834 X 45.00 = 3.75 retail value of sulfate of ammonia 
.6708 X 24.02 = 16.11 retail value of phosphate rock 



$34.78 calculated retail value of one ton of adulterated 
bone meal. 

Average retail selling price of adulterated bone meal $56.14 

Computed retail value ' 34.78 



Calculated rebate per ton due retail purchaser (average) $21.36 

It is emphasized that the value of $34.78 per ton for the adulterated bone meal 
is what the Control Service considers a fair retail selling price for this product. 
It is used only to establish the average rebate of $21.36 per ton to which the 
retail purchaser is entitled. Any adjustment between the Summers Fertilizer 
Company and the three distributors of the adulterated product is outside the 
province of the Control Service. 

Through Control Officials in Maryland the adulteration of bone meal sold in 
this and other states has been brought to the attention of the Federal Office of 
Price Administration. 



FERTILIZERS AND AGRICULTURAL LIME 



19 






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24 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

AGRICULTURAL LIME PRODUCTS 

Manufacturers and Brands 

During 1945, 13 firms registered for sale in Massachusetts 28 brands of lime 
products, manufactured and sold for neutralizing acid soils. The products are 
grouped as follows: 

Hydrated or slaked lime 14 

Pulverized and ground limestone 14 

28 

The analytical results which appear in this bulletin represent officially drawn 
samples secured by the same sampling agents who drew the samples of commer- 
cial fertilizer which served for the inspection of that commodity; the samples 
therefore came from every section of the state and are, we believe, representative 
of the lime products sold in Massachusetts as soil amendments. 

We were not successful in securing samples of the following brands: 

Brewer <S Co., Inc., 45 Arctic St., Worcester, Mass. 

Green Mountain Handy Hydrate 
Snow Fluff Agricultural Hydrate 

Conklin Limestone Co., Inc., Canaan, Conn. 

Higli Magnesium Agricultural Ground Limestone 

Limestone Products Corporation of America, Newton, N. J. 

Lime Crest Brand Calcite Hydrated Lime for Agricultural Use 

Solvay Process Co., Syracuse 1, N. Y. 

Solvay Pulverized Limestone 

United States Gypsum Co., 300 West Adams St., Chicago 6, III. 

Red Top Hydrate Lime — Genoa, Ohio 



Explanation of Table of Analyses 

Tables I, II, III, "Neutralizing value expressed in terms of calcium oxide" 
represents the acid neutralizing value of both the magnesium and the calcium. 
The figures in the "per cent" column are obtained by a direct titration with 
standard acid. The "pounds in one ton" are secured by multiplying the figures 
in the "per cent" column by 20. 

"Insoluble matter" represents material which is insoluble in dilute hydrochloric 
acid to which a few drops of nitric acid have been added, and is mainly sand. 

Under "Mechanical analysis" the figures represent in round numbers the 
percentage of product that would pass or be retained by the meshed sieves men- 
tioned. 

The limestone products have been published in two groups or grades (see 
tables II and III) according to fineness of grinding and to conform to definitions 
voted by the Association of Official Agricultural Chemists at their 1936 meeting. 



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28 CONTROL SERIES NO. 126 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS WHO REGISTERED FERTILIZERS FOR SALE 
IN MASSACHUSETTS IN 1945 

Acme Guano Co., 411 National Marine Bank Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Agricultural Laboratories, Inc., 1145 Chesapeake Ave., Columbus, Ohio 

Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation, The Barrett Division, 40 Rector St., New York 6, N. V. 

American Agricultural Cliemical Co., 2''5 River St., North Weymouth, Mass. 

American Cyanamid Co., 30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y. 

American Liquid Fertilizer Co.. Inc., 2nd & St. Clair Sts., Marietta, Ohio 

American Potash & Chemical Corporation, 122 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Apothecaries Hall Co., Waterbury 88, Conn. 

Armour Fertilizer Works, 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., 601 Trust Company of Georgia Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

.Atkins & Durbrow, Inc., 165 John St., New York 7, N. Y. 

Berkshire Chemical Co., 92 Howard -Ave., Bridgeport 5, Conn. 

Joseph Breck & Sons Corporation, 85 State St., Boston, Mass. 

Buell Fertilizer Co.. Exeter, N. H. 

Cliilean Nitrate Sales Corporation, 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

Consoldiated Rendering Co., IT^ Atlantic Ave., Boston 10, Mass. 

Davison Cliemical Corp., 20 Hopkins Place, Baltimore, Md. 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Inc., Wilmington 98, Del. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 95 Elm St., West Springfield, Mass. 

Essex County Co-operative Farming .Association, South Main St., Topsfield, Mass. 

Excel! Laboratories, 2625 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Farm Bureau Association, 155 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 

Glendale Poultry Farm, Somerset, Mass. 

Goulard & Ciena, Inc., 140 Liberty St., New York, N. Y. 

Giasaln Co., Wilmincton, Mass. 

A. H. Hoffman, Inc., Landisville, Penn. 

Humphrevs-Godwin Co., Memphis 3, Tenn. 

Hydroponic Chemical Co., Inc., 315 West 39th St , New York 18. N. Y. 

Hy-Trous Corporation, 131 State St., Boston, Mass. 

International Minerals & Chemical Corporation, Woburn, Mass. 

L. B. Lovitt & Co., Memphis, Tenn. 

McCormick & Co., Inc., 414 Light St., Baltimore 2, Md. 

Norwood Brand Fertilizer Co., Mt. Vernon St., North Reading, Mass. 

Old Deerfield Fertilizer Co., Inc., South Deerfield, Mass. 

Olds & Whipple, Inc., 168 State St., Hartford. Conn. 

Plantabbs Co., 1 W. Biddle St., Baltimore 1. Md. 

Pulverized Manure Co., 503 Exchange Bldg., Union Stock Yards, Chicago 9, III. 

Ramshorn Mills, Inc., West Millbury, Mass. 

Ra-Pid-Gro Corporation, Dansvlle, N. Y. 

John Reardon & Sons D-vision of Wilson & Co., Inc., 51 Waverly St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Rogers & Hubbard Co., Portland, Conn. 

William H. Rorer, Inc., Drexel Bldg., Independence Square, Philadelphia, Penn. 

N. Roy & Son, South Attleboro. Mass. 

Ruhm Phosphate & Chemical Co., Mt. Pleasant, Tenn. 

O. M. Scott & Sons Co., Marysville, Ohio 

Sears, Roebuck and Co.. 925 S. Homan Ave.. Chicago 7, 111. 

Sewerage Commission of the City of Milwaukee. Milwaukee 1 , Wis. 

M. L. Shoemaker Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., Venango St. and Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, 

Penn. 
Stockdale Fertilizer Co., Morris, 111. 

Swift & Co., Plant Food Division, 910 Court Square Bldg., Baltimore 2, Md. 
Tennessee Corporation, Lockland. Ohio 
Walker-Gordon Laboratory Co., Plainsboro, N. J. 
C. P. Washburn Co., Middleboro. Mass. 
Woodruff Fertilizer Works, Inc.. North Haven Conn. 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
2500-10-45 17030. 



rcs^^^. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 127 DECEMBER 1945 



Seed Inspection 



By F. A. McLaughlin 



This report, the eighteenth in seed control service, is a record of work dele- 
gated to the Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station during 1945, by 
authority of Chapter 94 as amended by Chapter 288 of the Acts of 1937 and 
Chapter 363 of the Acts of 1938. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS; 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

The seed Testing Laboratory will allow ten units of work free of charge, during 
any calendar year, to any resident firm or citizen of Massachusetts. 

Units are rated as follows: Units 

Purity analysis (red clover, timothy, etc.) . . 1 

Purity analysis (bluegrass, orchard grass, etc.) 2 

Purity analysis of a mixture of seeds (depending upon the number 

of kinds in the mixture) ^. _ 4-10 

Examination for noxious weeds (sample of 4 oz. or less) 2 

Identification of seed or plant -... 1 

Cleaning tobacco seed (4 oz. or less) 2 

Germination test (4 x 100 seeds of any seed not chaffy or requiring 

purity analysis) . 1 

Germination test (soil, 2 x 100 seeds) 1 

Germination test (chafTy grasses or seeds requiring purity analysis) 2 

Fees for work in excess of the ten free units allowed to a citizen or resident firm 
of Massachusetts are as follows: 

Germination test of all crop seeds except grasses $0.25 

Germination test of timothy .25 

Germination test of all other grasses .50 

Purity analysis of cereals . .50 

Purity analysis of timothy .75 

Purity analysis of all other grasses 1.00 

Purity analysis of all other crop seeds - .75 

■ Purity analysis of mixtures of not more than 2 kinds of agricultural 

seeds - - - - 1.00 

Purity analysis of special mixtures, including lawn grasses and pasture 
mixtures — a charge sufficient to cover the actual cost of working 
the samj.le, depending entirely upon the character of the sample. 

Minimum charge... -.... 1.25 

In no case will the final report be rendered until all fees are paid. 

The minimum weights of samples to be submitted for analysis are: 

a. Two ounces of grass seed, white or alsike clover, or seeds not larger than 
these. 

b. Five ounces of red or crimson clover, alfalfa, ryegrasses, millet, rape, or 
seeds of similar size. 

c. One pound of cereal, vetches, or seeds of similar or larger size. 

The minimum number of seeds. of any one kind to be submitted for a germina- 
tion test is 400. 



SEED INSPECTION 

By F. A. McLaughlin! 



MASSACHUSETTS VEGETABLE SEED STANDARDS FOR 1946 

Section 261 D of the Seed Law requires that a set of standards for germination 
of vegetable seeds be determined each year by the Director of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Experiment Station and approved by the Commissioner of Agri- 
culture. The following set of standards for 1946 has been so determined and 
approved. 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 
STANDARD 



KIND OF SEED 



GERMINATION 
STANDARD 

% 

75 
75 
60 
80 
75 
75 
*50 
70 
60 
60 
80 



Artichoke {Cynara Scolymus).... 60 

Asparagus- *70 

Beans: 

Limas 70 

Scarlet Runner 75 

Other Varieties - 75 

Beets 65 

Broccoli 75 

Brussels Sprouts 70 

Cabbage 75 

Carrots 55 

Cauliflower 75 

Celeriac - 55 

Celery 55 

Chard, Swiss... . . 65 

Chicory . 65 

Chinese Cabbage 75 

Citron - 65 

Collard.. 80 

Corn, Sweet 75 

**Cress, Garden 40 

Cress, Water... 35 

Cucumber 80 

Dandelion 45 

Egg Plant. 60 

Endive 70 

Fetticus (Corn Salad).... 70 

^Including Hard Seeds. 
**Garden Cress (Lepidium saiii'iim) is also called Pepper Grass and Curled Cress. Should not be 
confused with Upland Ctess or Spring Cress (Campe verna) for which no standard has been adopted. 



Kale 

Kohlrabi 

Leek . '. 

Lettuce 

Muskmelon 

Mustard 

Okra 

Onion 

Parsley 

Parsnip 

Peas... 

Pepper 55 

Pumpkin 75 

Radish .:!..„:... 75 

Rhubarb . 60 

Rutabaga. 75 

Salsify . 75 

Sorrel 60 

Soybean 75 

Spinach: 

Common 60 

New Zealand 40 

Squash 75 

Tomato 75 

Tomato, Husk = 50 

Turnip... 80 

Watermelon 70 



The above set of standards is identical with the one adopted by the United 
States Department of Agriculture for administration of the Federal Seed Act. 

■Assisted by Miss Jessie L. Anderson, Research .As.sistant; Mrs. Phyllis Russell, Laboratory 
Assistant from March to September, 1945; and Miss May J. Honnay, Clerk. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



1945 OFFICIAL INSPECTION OF AGRICULTURAL SEEDS 

From November 1, 1944 to November 1, 1945, the Seed Laboratory received 
4426 samples of seed, of which 1245 were collected by the State Department of 
Agriculture and 3181 were sent in by seedsmen, farmers and various state insti- 
tutions. An additional lot of 260 samples of flower seeds, for field tests only was 
received from the State Commissioner of Agriculture. 

Classification of the samples for which tests were completed, with the total 
number of laboratory tests involved, is shown in the following summary. It 
will be noted that the total number of tests required for the 4426 samples was 
5291; 449 for purity and 4842 for germination. 



NUMBER OF NUMBER OK TESTS 

SAMPLES PURITY GERMINATION 

357 Field Crops for Purity and Germination.... 357 357 

236 Field Crops for Germination Only 236 

30 Lawn Mixtures for Germination Only, 

Germinations involving 137 ingredients.. .. 137 

74 Lawn Mixtures and Other Types of Mixtures, for 

Purity; Germinations involving 401 ingredients 74 401 

18 Lawn Mixtures for Purity Only 18 

3613 Vegetables for Germination Only 3613 

7 Tree Seeds for Germination Only.... .' 7 

72 Tobacco Seeds for Germination 72 

19 Flower Seeds for Germination Only 19 

4426 449 4842 



Field tests to determine trueness to type were conducted in cooperation with 
the Departments of Olericulture and Floriculture, which tested 382 samples of 
vegetable seeds, and 260 samples of flower seeds, respectively. 

The Seed Laboratory cleaned 60 lots of tobacco seed and 19 lots of onion seed 
for Connecticut Valley farmers. The gross weight of the tobacco seed was 48.25 
pounds and the net weight for the cleaned seed was 40.15 pounds. Onion seed 
received had a gross weight of 1056.75 pounds which was cleaned to a net weight 
of 453.20. 



Explanation of Tables 

Each of the following tables contains seeds, the sale of which is regulated by a 
definite section of the Massachusetts Seed Law. The samples were taken by an 
inspector from the State Department of Agriculture and worked at the Seed 
Laboratory. Section 261A of the Acts and Resolves of 1937 and 1938, Chapters 
288 and 363, defines the group from Alfalfa to Wheat, inclusive; Section 261 B, 
Mixtures; Section 261C, Special Mixtures; and Section 261D, Vegetables. 

The last table is a summary, by wholesalers, of the total number of samples 
tested under each of the above four sections and the number of samples found to 
be mislabeled. 



SEED INSPECTION 



Within each table the wholesalers are listed in alphabetical order and the 
various kinds of seeds sold by them follow the same alphabetical arrangement. 

Mislabeling and other irregularities are emphasized in the tables by boldface 
type and explained in the final column of the table or in footnotes. 

The number preceding each analysis is for identification and reference. The 
line to the right of the letter "L" gives information copied from the label; that 
to the right of "F" what was found in the laboratory analysis. 

All lots of seed included in this report were tested according to the Rules for 
Seed Testing adopted by the Association of Official Seed Analysts. 

"Tolerance" is applied to both purity and germination, except for vegetable 
seed found below the minimum germination standards adopted, in which instance 
no tolerance is allowed. "Germination Tolerance" has been applied between 
a given germination and the result of the germination test as follows: 

GIVEN GERMINATION PERCENT TOLERANCE PERCENT 

96 or over 5 

90 or over, but less than 96 6 

80 or over, but less than 90 7 

70 or over, but less than 80... 8 

60 or over, but less than 70 9 

Less than 60 10 

In the determination of the tolerance for the percentage of the distinguishable 
kind, type, or variety (pure seed), weed seeds, other crops seed, ana inert matter, 
the sample shall be first considered as made up of two parts: (a) The percentage 
of the component (pure seed, weed seed, crop seed or inert matter as the case 
may be) being considered, and (b) the difference between that percentage and 
100. The number represented by (a) is then multiplied by the number rep- 
resented by (b) and the product is divided by 100. The resulting number is then 
multiplied by 0.2 (2/10) and the resulting product added to 0.2 or 0.6 as indicated 
in the following formulae: 



f a X b 

Pure seed tolerance = 0.6 + ^ 0.2 X ~—^~' 

I 100 



Weed seeds, other crop seeds, and f ^ i 

inert matter tolerance = 0.2 -f I 0.2 X ~^^^ 



For Poa spp., Agrostis spp., Festuca spp., bromegrass, crested wheatgrass, 
orchard grass, velvet grass, tall oatgrass, meadow foxtail, sweet vernalgrass, 
Rhodes grass, Dallis grass, carpet grass, and Bermuda grass, and mixtures con- 
taining these seeds singly or combined in excess of 50 percent, an additional 
tolerance shall be allowed. This is to be obtained by adding to the regular 
tolerance mentioned above the product obtained by multiplying the regular 
tolerance by the lesser of "a" and "b" divided by 100. 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 






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SEED INSPECTION 



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SEED INSPECTION 



15 












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16 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



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17 



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CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



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SEED INSPECTION 



19 



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20 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



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21 



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22 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261 D 

Each separate container of Vegetable Seeds must be labeled to plainly show 
the kind of seed and variety; the percentage of germination, with the month and 
year tested, provided the germination is below the Massachusetts Standard; and 
the name and address of the vendor, packer, or processor. 

Nine hundred and fifty three samples of vegetable seeds were received and 
tested in the laboratory; however, this table includes only such samples as were 
found to be mislabeled with respect to requirements of the law. Twenty-four 
samples, not shown in the table, were found to be above standard and thus 
complied with the law, but were below the germination stated on the label. All 
samples shown in the table were below standard in germination. 

The wholesaler's name is in boldface type. "Wholesaler Unknown" is applied 
to samples of seed M'hich were purchased for a previous season's sale but were 
offered for sale during the current season without having been retested. 



Germination 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and 

Place Collected 



Given 



Date 
of Test 



— Mass. 
Found Stand- 

ard 

J Month % 
of Test 



937 
938 
1204 



1134 
1135 
1136 



Cauliflower 

Peas 

Tomato 



1208 Lettuce 



1246 Beet 



1181 Parsley 



487 
1409 



Associated Seed Growers, Inc., 
New Haven, Conn. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, No. Adams 

Early Snowball 77 

Thomas Laxton 

Dwarf Champion 

Martin W. Duean Co., Newburyport 
Prize Head Early 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Poole & Blodgett Co., Danvers App. 

Detroit Dark Red 87 

Comstock, Ferre & Co., Welhersfield, 
Conn. 

Ricard Grain Co , New Bedford 
Curled or Double 



Celery 

Pumpkin 

Squash 



112F Beans 



1237 


Lettute 


1093 


Lettuce 


139 


Cabbage 


160 


Lettuce 



Lettuce 



Celery 



Essex Co. Cooperative Farming Assoc, 
Topsfield, Mass. 

Golden Plume 

Conn. FieM 

Green Hubbard 

Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston, Mass. 

Strinaless Green Pod Giant 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Wethers- 
field, Conn. 

Centralville Hardware Co., Lowell 
New York 



3/1945 
3/1945 


63 
67 
59 


6/1945 
6/1945 
7/1945 


75 
80 
75 




47 


7/1945 


80 


11/1944 


55 


7/1945 


65 




50 


7/1945 


60 




28 
42 
62 


7/1945 
7/1945 
7/1945 


55 
75 
75 




65 


4/1945 


80 



C. F. Paige & Co , Athol 
May King 



Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vf. 

Northboro Hardware Co., North- 

boro App. 

Fine Early Winningstadt 75 

The Vermont Store, Amherst 
Extra Early Tennisball or Boston App. 
Market 75 

Michael Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, II!. 

W. E. A^ubuchon Co., Inc., Milford 
Big Boston 

F. W. Carson Co., Quincy 
Golden Self Blanching 





24 


7/1945 


80 




25 


7/1945 


80 


12/1944 


65 


4/1945 


75 


12/1944 


49 


4 '1945 


80 




65 


5/1945 


80 




34 


8/1945 


55 



SEED INSPECTION 



23 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other — 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and % 

Place Collected 



Given 



Germination 

Mass. 
Stand- 

ard 

% Month % 



Date 
of Test 



Found 



of Test 



220 Broccoli 



472 F Turnip 



J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc., Shushan, N. Y. 

Fred F. Smith, Inc., Reading 
Calabrese 



App. 
80 



Ross Bros. Co., Worcester, Mass. 

L. N. Jaques & Sons, Milford 
Early Purple Top Flat 



11/1944 62 4/1945 75 



52 5/1945 80 



771 


Cucumber 


1049 


Parsnip 


368 


Cabbage 


1318 
1316 


Onion 
Pepper 



Rudy Patrick Seed Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Western Auto Association Store, 
Palmer 
Long Green 

Western Auto Association Store. 
Wareham 
Hollow Crown No. 2887 ( 



1150 Kale 



Joseph Sordillo & Sons, Boston, Mass. 
Tottler's Improved Brun.swick. . . 

F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford, Conn. 

J. B. Sibley & Son, Ware 

Large Red Wethersfield 

Bull Nose or Large Bell 

Spence Hardware & Supply Co., 
Methuen 
Dwarf Curled 



57 6/1945 80 

1 1945 40 7/1945 60 
54 5/1945 75 



S37 
S41 


Beans 
Broccoli 


376 F 


Beans 


156 F 


Beet 


1233 


Lettuce 


1373 


Lettuce 


1245 


Turnip 


1275 


Pumpkin 


1206 


Celery 


1188 


Parsnip 


1053 


Squash 


1395 


Lettuce 


371 F 


Beans 


526 F 


Rutabaga 



S. D. Woodruff & Sons, Orange, Conn. 

Metropolitan State Hospital, 

Waltham .'\op. 

Bountiful, No. 3052 85 

Calabrese, No. 2460 App. 85 

**WhoIesaIer Unknown 

Allen Hardware Co., Needham 
Horticultural 



W. E. Aubuchon Co., Inc., Amherst 
Detroit Dark Red 

Cover Grain & Feed Co., Lowell 
Black Seeded .Simpson 



Crolek Hardware Co., Ipswich 
Iceberg 



Danvers Hardware Co., Danvers 
Purple Top 3 7 

Dies.ser-HuU Co., Lee 
Conn. Field 



Martin W. Dugan Co.. Newbiiryport 
Boston Market 



G. M. Earl, Merrimac 
Hollow Crown 



Hyannis Hardware Co., Hyannis 
Summer Crookneck 



Lynn Bird & Seed Co., Lynn 
New York or Wonderful 

Needham Hardware Co., Needham 
Stringless Green Pod 

J. O. Neil Supply Co., Fall River 
Macomber 



8/1945 70 
2 8/1945 55 



2 7/1945 



1/1945 66 4/1945 80 
12/1944 52 4 1945 75 



71 5/1945 80 

54 4/1945 65 

49 7/1945 80 

35 8/1945 80 

16 7/1945 80 

54 8/1945 75 

1944 7/1945 55 

2 7/1945 60 

... 62 7/1945 75 

... 30 8/1945 80 

70 5/1945 80 

47 6-/1945 75 



**Wholesaler not named because retailer admits, or wholesaler claims, that the following lots 
of vegetable seeds were not purchased by the retailer during the current year. 



24 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Results of Inspection and Germination of Vegetable Seeds 
Section 261D — Continued 



Germination 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed Given 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and % Date 

Place Collected of Test 



— Mass. 
Found Stand- 

ard 

, Month % 
of Test 



1182 


Swiss Chard 


1152 


Dandelion 


839 F 
8.S6 F 


Radish 
Rutabaea 


1315 


Lettuce 


1384 


Lettuce 


1304 


Lettuce 


1148 


Lettuce 


1076 


Cabbage 


1387 
1388 
1300 
1389 
1391 


Cabbace 

Celery 

Kale 

Lettuce 

Onion 


1263 


Onion 


418 


Bioccoli 



Wholesaler Unknown, (Continued) 
Ricard Grain Co., New Bedford 
LucuUus 63 

F. X. Robichaud, Methuen 
Improved Giant Thick Leaf 



Rocky's Hardware Co., Springfield 

Long Black 

Bloomsdale 

J. B. Sibley & Son, Ware 
New York No. 12. . 



J. Raymond Smith, Gloucester 
Prizehead 



The Snyder Store, Housatonic 
Improved, No. 44 



Spence Hardware Co., Methuen 
Big Boston 



Teaticket Hardware Co., Teaticket 
Stonemason 

Tree-Land Inc., Cambridge 

All Seasons 

Boston Market 

Dwarf Green Curled 

New York 

Red Wethersfie'.d 



United Cooperative Farmers' Exchange 
Fitchburg 
Yellow Globe 

Walsh & Packard, Inc.. Hingham 
Italian 



1945 48 7/1945 65 

7/1945 45 

10 6/1945 75 

6/1945 75 

8/1945 80 

8/1945 80 

5 7/1945 80 

68 7/1945 80 

50 7/1945 75 

9 8/1945 75 

3 8/1945 55 

... 62 8/1945 75 

8 8/1945 80 

4 8/1945 70 

25 7/1945 70 

46 5/1945 75 



♦♦Wholesaler not named because retailer admits, or wholesaler claims, that the following lots 
of vegetable seeds were not purchased by the retailer during the current year. 



SEED INSPECTION 25 



Summary of Inspection 

This table is a summary, by wholesalers, of the total number of inspection 
samples tested in the Seed Laboratory. Complete anal^'sis and germination of 
those which are mislabeled are shown in the preceding tables. 



Wholesale Distributors 



Vegetables 




Field 


1 Crops 


Mixtures 






_ 






13 






Tl 




>. 






>. 


D 




>. 


V 


Jn 


'3t3 


v 


^ 


"•o 


Si 


iit3 


~T3 


111 




O 0) 
















f "S 




G D 


r?^ 


« 




<i'v; 




P m 


i:£ 


". 






E'S 








o a 


s 




o « 


:§ 




C rt 


S 



Apothecaries Hall Co 

Waterbury, Conn. 

Associated Seed Growers, Inc., 39 35 4 

New Haven, Conn. 

Aubuchon, A. W., & Co 1 1 

Fitchburg, Mass. 

Barber & Bennett, Inc 

Albany, N. Y. 

Barrett, W. E. & Co 6 6 

Providence, R. I. 

Belt Seed Co., The 

Baltimore, Md. 

Boston Market Gardener's Assoc 2 2 

Waltham, Mass. 

Breck, Joseph, & Sons 41 41 

Boston, Mass. 

Burpee, W. Atlee, Co 18 17 1 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Comstock, Ferre & Co 78 77 1 

VVethersfield, Conn. 

Cone, Arthur R 20 20 

Buffalo. N. Y. 

Craver-Dickinson Co 

Chicago, 111. 

Crosman Seed Corp 12 12 

East Rochester, N. Y. 

Danvers Hardware Co 1 1 

Danvers, Mass. 

Dickinson, Albert, Co 

Chicago, 111. 

Doughten Seed Co 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Duryea Seed Co 

New York, N. Y. 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange 22 22 

Springfield, Mass. 

Empire Seed Co 11 11 

Fredonia, N. Y.. . 

Engbretson Seed Co 

Astoria, Oregon 
Essex County Cooperative Farming .\ssoc. 5 2 3 
Topsfield, Mass. 

Ferry-Morse Seed Co 19 19 

Detroit, Mich. 

Fisi Sales Co 4 4 

Boston, Mass. 

Fraser's 7 7 

Wellesley, Mas^ 

Fredonia Seed Co 14 14 

Fredonia, N. Y. 



26 CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Summary of Inspection — Continued 



Vegetables Field Crops Mixtures 



Wholesale Distributors av ^% ta a u v-^ a av v-^ a 

Eti i^^ ~ Em tl-O <" Em >-.Q "m 

rtiucc«;3 rti'OtoiS fliuoreS 



Garfield Williamson Co 

Jersey City, N. J. 

Genesee Valley Seed Co S 5 

Dalton, N. Y. 
Grey, Thomas J., Co IS 14 

Boston, Mass. 
Harris, Joseph, & Co 12 12 

Rochester, N. Y. 

Hart, Charles C, Seed Co 67 65 

Wethersfield, Conn. 
Hawkins, Budd D 35 33 

Reading, Vt. 
Johnson, J. Oliver, & Co 

CVicago, 111. 
Kresge. S. S., & Co 

Detroit, Mich. 
Landreth, D., Seed Co 45 45 

Bristol, Pa. 
Lawrence, H. V 4 4 

Fa'.mouth Mass. 
Lyon, John D., Inc 

Belmont. Mass. 
Mandeville & King Co 7 7 

Rochester, N. Y. 
Michael-Leonard Seed Co 38 36 

Chicago. 111. 
Middlesex County Farm Bureau .\ssoc 

Waltham, Mass. 
Montgomery Ward Co 

Chicago, 111. 
(*)New England Toro Co 3 3 

West Newton 
Northrup, King & Co 12 12 

Minneapolis, Minn. 
Ostberg Seed Co 

Chicago, 111. 
Page Seed Co 39 39 

Greene, N. Y. 
Pedigreed Seed Co 

New York, N. Y. 
Perry Seed Co 12 12 

Boston, Mass.. . 
Philadelphia Seed Co 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ralston Purina Co 23 23 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Reist Seed Co 

Lancaster, Pa. 
Rice, J. B., Jr., Inc 12 11 

Shushan, N. Y. 
Rice, Jerome B., Seed Co 11 11 

Cambridge, N. Y. 
Ross Bros. Co 21 20 

Worcester, Mass. 



►Known as The Clapper Company. 



SEED INSPECTION 



27 



Summary of Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributors 



Vegetables 



JSt3 O 41 
O. 4J '^'^ 

M 4» o a 



Rudy Patrick Seed Co 4 2 2 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Scarlett, Win. G., & Co 

Baltimote, Md. 

Scott, O. M., & Sons 

Marysville, Ohio 

Sears, Roebuck & Co 15 15 

Chicago, 111. 

Sordillo, Joseph, & Sons 10 9 1 

Boston, Mass. 

Stanford Seed Co 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Sterling Seed Co 9 9 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

Supple Biddle Co 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

Temphn Bradley Co 18 18 

Cleveland, Ohio 

Varick, John B., Co 5 5 

Manchester, N. H. 

Vaughan's Seed Store 6 6 

New York, N. Y. 

Western Auto Supply Co 2 2 

Kansas City, Mo. 

Whitney Seed Co 4 4 

Buffalo, N. Y. 

Winers Hardware Store 5 5 

Quincy, Mass. 

Woodruff, F. H., & Sons 82 79 3 

Milford, Conn. 

Woodruff. S. D., & Sons 92 90 2 

Orange, Conn. 
Unknown 40 12 28 

TOTALS 953 899 54 



Field Crops 


Mixtures 






•o 




•o 


i-n 


O 41 


.Q 


J-o 


ctly 
ed 

bele 


a o 


ts 


03 


a <v 


-S -2 






P t? 












OJ 


S 


^^ 


O rt S 








1 

2 


1 


17 


14 


s 


2 


1 


1 
1 




1 






2 













24 21 



39 29 10 



8 7 1 

12 7 5 



2 2 



1 1 



248 184 64 



3 1 2 



1 1 



45 15 30 



28 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



TYPE AND VARIETY STUDIES OF VEGETABLES 

Conducted in Conjunction with the Department of Olericulture 
Grant B. Snyder, Professor 

Each year tests are conducted by the Experiment Station to check on the 
quality of vegetable seed that is distributed and sold in packets throughout the 
State. The tests help to inform the public of the merits of certain strains and 
varieties of seed and also serve as a check to detect mixtures and substitutions 
that occur accidentally or otherwise. The results reported here should be inter- 
preted with certain reservations, however, because of the fact that all strains 
and varieties are not affected alike by various climatic and soil conditions. 

The soil of the trial plot was a fine, sandy loam and is naturally fertile. A 
rye cover crop was plowed under, a liberal quantity of fertilizer was applied and 
the soil was thoroughly prepared prior to seedage. Growth and development 
was generally satisfactory in spite of the very wet growing season. 

Yield records were not taken because of the necessity of using small plots and 
also because replication of the plantings was impossible with the large number of 
strains and varieties that were flanted. Conformity to type has been the meas- 
ure of general excellence in these tests. Individual plants have been called off-type 
when they could not be classified in a group of plants ranging fairly close to the 
type generally accepted as typical for the particular variety in question. 

The comparative type and performance records reveal that all but a few of the 
stocks were true to name and most of them were highly productive. A few strains 
were either misnamed or misrepresented but this was the exception rather than 
the rule. 

The source of the seed and the laboratory germination is given together with 
remarks on conformity to type, except that those lots of seed which were tested 
in the field and were found 100% true-to-type are not included in this table. 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other to 

No Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected % 



Associated Seed Growers, Inc., New 
Haven, Conn. 

Anthony Cos.. Chicopee 
823 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 90 

Lake Hardware Co., Arlington 
4'>9 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 92 

W. J. Walker Co., Wakefield 
517 F Beet Detroit 96 

Wells Hardware Co , Holyoke 

819 F Turnip Yellow Swede — 

820 F Turnip Yellow Globe 98 

Joseph Breck & Sons, Boston, Mass. 

126 F Radish Saxa 80 

124 F Turnip Purple Top Strap Leaf 99 

Needham Hardware Co., Needham 
371 F Beans Stringless Green Pod 99 

The Welch Co., Scituate Harbor 
424 F Beet Early Blood 98 



2% Deep Purple — 2% Cylin- 
drical — 6% Top Shape 

4% Deep Globe Shape — 
4% Cylindrical 

4% Flattened 



88%Rutabaga — 2% Purple 
Top Turnip 
2% Purple Top 



2% White Tip — 2% Oblong 
— 2% Long — 14% Spindle 
Shape 
1% White 



1% Pole Beans 
2% Spindle 



SEED INSPECTION 



29 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 

Wholesale Distributor, Variety or Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other to Remarks 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected % 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

William H. Casey Store, Milford 

484 F Rutabaga American Purple Top Yellow 100% Purple Top White 

Globe Turnip 
Clinton Hardware & Auto Supply Co., 
Clinton 

51 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 92 2% Light Red — 6% Short 

Spindle 
Northboro Hardware Co., Northboro 

OF Carrot Danvers Half Long 88 6% Cylindrical — 6% Stump 

Rooted 
The Service Co., Foxboro 
196 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 98 2% Short Top Shape 

Comstocl;, Ferre & Co., Wethersfield, Conn. 

A. J. Cataldo & Sons, Franklin 
41 1 F Beet Edmands Early Turnip 92 6% Obovate — 2% Long Top 

Center Hardware Co., Woburn 
504 F Beans Long Yellow Six Weeks 1007c Flat Green 

G. W. Gardiner & Sons, Fall River 
531 F Turnip Early Snowball 88 12% Purple Top 

Frank P. Mills, Campello 
25 F Beans Plentiful 99 1% Pencil Pod Wax 

Splann Estate, South Deerfield 
788 F Rutabaga Improved Purple Top Yellow 98 2%, Turnip 

Crossman Seed Corp., East Rochester N. Y. 

Foxboro 5c-$l 00 Store, Foxboro 
193 F Beans Stringless Green Pod 99 1% Flattened Pods 

186 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 2%, Flat— 2% Long Top 

Shape 

187 F Carrot Chanienay Half Long 94 6% Long Tapering 

188 F Radish French Breakfast 84 4%p Spindle — 6% Spherical 

6% Long Top 

Montgomery Ward Co., Greenfield 
807 F Radish Ici'le or Vienna 96 4% Red Shoulder 

Eastern States Farmers' Exchange, 
Springfield, Mass. 
Eastern States Farmers' E.xchange. 
Montello 
85 F Beans Stringless Green Pod 98 2% Flattened Pods 

78 F Beet Ciosby's Early Wonder 99 1% Short Top Shape 

79 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 47o Long Top 

82 F Radish Sparkler White Tip 90 6% Spindle Shape— 4% Long 

Empire Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Woodlawn Supply Co., South Hadley 

560 F Beet Early Blood Turnip 88 12% Short Top Shape 

562 F Radish Early Crimson Giant Globe 94 2% Spindle — 4%o Long Top 

564 F Turnip Purple Top Strap Leaved 99 1% White 

Ferrv-Morse Seed Co., Detroit. Mich. 

Jordan Marsh Co.. Bo=ton 

251 F Beet Early Blood Turnip 98 2% Short Spindle 

252 F Carrot Chantenay, Red Cored 98 2% Long Tapering 

256 F Radish Crimson Giant 82 18% Long Top 

Stoneham Paint & Hardware Supply, 
Sloneham 

511 F Beet Detroit Dark Red, Ferry's Strain 98 1%. Obovate— 1% Spindle 

Shape 

Eraser's, Welleslev, Mass. 

384 F Beet Crosby's Egyptian 98 2% Short Top 

402 F Carrot Red Cored Csiantenay 86 14% Cylindrical 

386 F Rutabaga. Long Island Improved 98 2% Purple Top Turnip 

388 F Turnip Purple Top White Globe 99 l%o White 

Fredonia Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Bellingham Hardware Co.. Weymouth 
684 F Turnip White Egg 98 2% Purple Top 



30 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor. Variety of Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number. Dealer when other to 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected % 



Remarks 



336 F Turnip 



112 F Beans 

106 F Beet 

107 F Carrot 
109 F Radish 



94 F Beet 
93 F Carrot 
98 F Radish 



831 F Beet... 

832 F Turnip 



Fredonia Seed Co. (Continued) 
Thomas L. McGrath, Whitman 

333 F Beet Early Blood Turnip 80 20% Top Shape 

334 F Carrot Chantenay 98 2'7g Long Tapering 

335 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 84 8% Long Top— 8% Spindle 

Shape 

Purple Top Flat Strap Leaf 99 1 % White 

Thomas J. Grev Co., Boston 

vStnngless Green Pod 99 1% Flattened Pods 

Ctosby's Egyptian Selected 98 2% Very Light Red 

Streamliner 88 12% Cylindrical 

Eady Scarlet Globe 92 8% Top Shape 

Joseph Harris & Co., East Rochester N. Y. 

Joseph Harris & Co., Cambridge 

Crosby's Egyptian 99 1% Short Spindle 

Hutchinson 98 2% Cylindrical 

Cavalier No. 821 92 2% Obovale— 6% Spindle 

Shape 

Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Welhersfield, 
Conn. 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

Detroit Dark Red 98 2% Very Light Red 

Purple Top White Globe 94 6% White 

R. E. Cobb, Inc , Weymouth 

695 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 88 4% Spindle Shape— 8% Long 

Top 

Downey & Howland, Fall River 
537 F Beet Edmand's Blood Turnip 98 2%, Top Shape 

Jefifwav-Hatch Co., Easthampton 
848 F Radish White Icicle 98 2%o Red 

Mason's Farm Market, Springfield 
571 F Radish White Icicle 98 2%, Pink 

Rockv s Hardware Co., Springfield 

837 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 88 12% Long Top 

836 F Rutabaga Bloomsdale No Germination 

Sears Plumbing & Heating Co., So. 
Deerfield , _, 

793 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 92 4%, Very Light Red— 2%, 

Long Top Shape — 2% Long 
Stump Rooted 
Waite Hardware Co.. Worcester ^, » . , 

624 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 96 2% Top Shape — 2% Light 

Red 
Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vermont 
EI wood Adams Co., Worcester 

142 F Beet New Eclipse. Ea. Blood Turnip 98 2%, Short Spindle 

143 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 92 8%, Flattened 

144 F Carrot Danvers Half Long, Orange 94 6% Stump rooted 

I. B. Barrows & Co., Worcester 

175 F Corn Golden Cross Hybrid Mixture of Golden Cross 

Types, Both Red and Green 
Tassel. Mostly Red. 

168 F Radish Early Scarlet Turnip 80 2%, Spindle Shape— 18% 

Long 

Franklin Hardware Corp., Springfield ^ ^ _ 

581 F Radisli New French Breakfast 96 2% Spherical— 2% Long Top 

582 F Radish Ea. Scarlet Turnip-White Tip 96 4 '7p Spindle Shape 

D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol, Pa. 

Elwood Adams Co . Worcester. „ , i- 

48 F Beet Eclipse Extra Ea 76 2% Oblong. 2% Long Top 

Shape —16%, Top Shape— 
4% Long Ovate 

49 F Beet Early Blood Red 94 4%, Deep Globe— 2% Short 

Top 
Belmont Hardware Co., Springfield 

842 F Rutabaga Purple Top 98 2% Turnips 

841 F Turnip Yellow Globe 99 1% Purple Top 



SEED INSPECTION 



31 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other to 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Tvpe 

Collected % 



Remarks 



183 F 


Beet 


289 F 


Carrot 


46 F 


Beet 


240 F 


Radish 


242 F 


Rutabaga 



342 F Radish 



299 F 


Beans 


50 F 


Beet 


490 F 
488 F 


Carrot. 
Radish 



554 F Radish 



870 F 


Turnip 


851 F 


Radish 


758 F 


Radish 


161 F 

162 F 
166 F 


Beet 

Carrot 

Turnip 


1 F 
3 F 
5 F 


Beans 
Beet 
Carrot . 


437 F 

438 F 


Rutabaga 
Rutabaga 


828 F 
827 F 


Carrot 
Radish 



893 F Corn 



261 F 
269 F 



Beet 
Corn 



264 F Radish 



407 F Corn 



D. Landreth Seed Co., (Continued) 
Foxboro 5c — $1.00 Store, Foxboro 
Extra Eatly Egyptian 94 

Sunshine Feed Store. Bridgewater 
Orange Danvers 96 

Worcester Grain & Coal Co., Worcester 
Detroit Dark Red 95 

Yankee Maid Products, Inc., Boston 
Scarlet Turnip, White Tip 94 

Macomber 98 

Mandeville & King Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Rockland Hardware & Paint Co., 
Rockland 
Scarlet Turnip, \\'hite Tip 88 

Michael -Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, III. 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Ayer 
Golden Wax 99 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Clinton 
Detroit Dark Red 90 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Milford 

Danvers Half Long 90 

Scarlet Turnip, ^^'hite Tip 92 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., Spencer 
Scarlet Turnip, White Tip 86 

Hamilton-Atwater Co., Westfield 
Yellow Globe 98 

Jeffway-Hatch Co., Easthampton 
White Icicle 98 

New England Tore Co., West Newton, Mass. 
Scarlet Globe 84 

Northrup, King & Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Ware 

Extra Early Flat Egyptian 98 

Chantenay Red Cored 96 

Purple Top Strap Leaf 99 

The Page Seed Co., Greene N. Y. 

Community Grain Store, Worcester 

Pencil Pod Black Wax 99 

Detroit Dark Red 96 

Danvers Half Long 98 

J. H. Fairbanks Co., Bridgewater 

American Purple Top 90 

Macomber 98 

R. J. Lafleur, Chicopee 

Danvers 86 

Crimson Giant 88 

Harry Seder, Webster 
Golden Bantam 

Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 

Early Wonder 99 

Lincoln 90 

Perry's Scarlet Globe 86 

Ralston Purina Co., S(. Louis, Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Franklin 
Golden Cross Bantam 96 



6% Globe Shape 
47c Cylindrical 



1% Oblong. -2% Obovate 
27o Scarlet 

2% Egg Shape— 4% Spindl 
Shape 

2% Purple Top Turnips 



10% Long Top— 2% Spindle 



1% Green Pod 



8% Long Top Shape— 2% 
Light Red 



10% Cvlindrical 
8% Scarlet Tip 



8%, Scarlet Tip — 4% Top 
Shape — 2% Spindle 



2% Purpie Top 

2% Red 

2%, Oblong — 14% Long 
Top Shape 



2%> Globe Shape 
4% Long Tapering 
1% White 



1% Flattened Pod 
4% Long Top 
2% Cylindrical 



10% Turnips 

2% Purple Top Turnips 



14% Cylindrical 
12% Top Shape 



Most Likely Marcross 



1 % Short Top shape 
10% Green Tassel — Oflf- 
Type Plants 
14%, Top Shape 



4% Green Tassel, Mixed Red 
and Green Tassel 



32 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds— Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 
Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other to 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected % 



549 F Beet 



53 F 

54 F 


Beet 
Beet 


56 F 
58 F 
60 F 


Carrot 
Radish 
Turnip 


213 F 

214 F 
216 F 


Beet 

Carrot 

Radish 


306 F 


Beet 


5 41 F 
5 43 F 


Beet 
Radish 


768 F 


Beet 


202 F 
198 F 


Beans 
Beet 


199 F 


Radish 


200 F 


Turnip 


317 F 


Beet 


318 F 


Carrot 



KaLslon Purina Co., (ConMnued) 
Checkerboard Feed Store, Spencer 
Detroit Dark Red 96 47c Flattened 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Taiinton 

Early Blood Turnip 94 6% Long Top Shape 

Crosby's Early Egyptian 92 6% Short Top Shape — 2% 

Short Spindle 

Danvers Half Long 92 8% Cylindrical 

Early Scarlet. White Tip 98 2% Top Shape 

Purple Top White Globe 99 1% White 

J. B. Rice, Jr.. Inc., Shushan. N. Y. 

Fred W. Smith, Inc., Reading 

Detroit Dark Red 96 4% Long Top Shape 

Danvers Half Long 90 10% Stump Rooted 

Scarlet Turnip 90 8% Long Top— 29c Long 

Spindle 
Jerome B. Rice Seed Co., Cambridge, N. Y. 
Western Auto Stores. Quincy 
Crosby's Egyptian 98 29c Verv Light Red 

Ross Bros. Co., Worcester, Mass. 

P. A. Richard Hardware Co.. Spencer 

Detroit Dark Red 98 2% Short Soindle 

French Breakfast 82 2% Spherical — 8% Spindle 

—8% Long Top 
Rudy Patrick Seed Co., Kansas City. Mo. 
Western Auto Store, Palmer 
Early Blood Turnip 96 4% Top Shape 



Sears, Roebuclc & Co.. Chicago, III. 

Sears. Roebuck & Co.. Norwood 

Strin^less Green Pod Black Valentine. . 99 

Detroit Dark Red 96 

Scarlet Turnip, White Tip 92 

Purple Top While Globe 99 



Sterling Seed Co., Minneapolis. Minn. 
J. J. Newberry & Co., Whitman 
Early Wonder or Crosby's Egyptian. 



92 



1% Flattened 

4% Obovate— Flattened 

Strain 

6% Soindle — 2% Cylindrical 

— 1007o White Tip 

1% White 



Imperator 90 



2% Light Red— 2? 
Shape - 47f flat 
10% Cylindrical 



Long Top 



445 F Carrot 

446 F Carrot 



The Templin Bradley Co , Cleveland, Ohio 

(The Children's Flower Mission) 
Washington School, Taunton 

Chantenav or Model 96 4% Long Tapering 

Danvers Half Long 96 4% Cylindrical 



379 F Radish 



Vaughan's Seed Store. New York, N. Y. 

The Garden Shop. Wellesley 
Scarlet Turnip, White Tip 



98 2% Spind'e Shape 



330 F Beet 



16 F Beet 

17 F Beet 
701 F Beet 

19 F Carrot 

15 F Spinach 



491 F Radish 
524 F Turnip 
467 F Turnip 



Winers Hardware Store, Qu'nry, Mass. 

Winers Hardware Store, Whitman 

Crosby's Egyptian 96 2% Obovate — 1% Long Top 

Shape — 1% Short Top Shape 

F. H. Woodruff & Sons, Milford, Conn. 

Middlesex County Farm Bureau, Waltham 

Detroit Dark Red 96 4%, Obovate 

Woodruff's Early Wonder 97 1% Long Top— 27o Short Top 

Woodiuft's Early Wonder 94 6%, Short Top Shape 

Danvers Half Long 94 6% Stump Rooted 

Va. Blight Resistant 9-6222 99 1%. Bloomsdale Type 

Milford Hardware Co., Milfnrd _ , .^ r 

Scarlet Globe 94 2% Dark Purple— 4% Long 

Top 

J. O. Neill Supplv Cn , Fall River 

White Egg 98 2% Purple Top 

Waldron Hardware Co., Taunton 

Purple Top White Globe 98 2% White 



SEED INSPECTION 



33 



Field Tests of Vegetable Seeds — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Variety of Seed True 

Lab. Kind of and Lot Number, Dealer when other to 

No. Seed than Wholesale Distributor, and Place Type 

Collected '7 



Remarks 



F. H. Woodruff & Sons, (Continued) 
Winer's Hardware Co., Braintree 

708 F Radish Scarlet Globe 86 12% Top Shape— 2% Spindle 

Shape 
S. D. Woodruff & Sons. Orange, Conn. 
Allen Hardware Co.. Needham 
379 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 98 2% Long Top Shape 

BelHngham Hardware Co., Weymouth 
685 F Radish Early Scarlet Globe 90 4% Obovate— 6% Long Top 

Copeland Hardware Co.. Taunton 
65 F Peans Sure Crop Wax •. 99 1% Pencil Pod 

H. J. Croteau & Co., Northampton 

600 F Radish Early Scarlet Turnip 4% Flattened— 2% Spindle 

Shape— 100% White Tip 

J. H. Fairbanks & Co., Bridaewater 
442 F Beans Golden Wax 99 1% Green Pole 

Unknown 

W. E. Aubuchon Co., .\mherst 
156 F Beet Detroit Dark Red 98 2% Short Spindle 

Harry Seder, Webster 

895 F Corn Whipple's Yellow -Absolutely not Whipple's Yel« 

low — Mixed Red and Greeii 
Tassel — looks like Golden 
Giant. 



STUDIES OF FLOWER SEEDS 

Conducted by the Department of Floricullnrc 

Clark L. Thayer, Profeseor 

and 

£. B. Risley, Student Assi.stant 



For the tenth season the Department of Floriculture has cooperated with the 
Seed Laboratory- in conducting trials to determine the quality of flower seeds 
offered for sale in retail seed stores, hardware stores, chain stores, schools, and 
other retail outlets. The seeds, collected by the State Seed Inspector, were 
tested for germination and performance under field conditions. 

All seeds were sown on Jul}' 6 and 7, which is late for many kinds of annuals, 
in particular those species which give best germination with cool soil temperatures. 
However, because of the abundance of rain in June, it was impossible to do the 
sowing at an earlier date. Rainfall for the four months is shown in the follow- 
ing table:* 

1945 Normal 

June 7.67 inches 3.75 inches 

July 7.36 " 4.10 " 

August 2.79 " 4.08 

September 3.57 " 4.24 " 

Total 21.39 inches 16.17 inches 



*Data on rainfall are taken from the Meteorologiral Observations of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural Experiment Station. 



34 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Because of the unfavorable conditions, duplicate sowings were made, if seed 
was available, for those varieties which gave unsatisfactory results in the first 
sowing. The results of such duplicate tests are indicated by the letter "D" 
in the table. 

Seeds of 260 lots, representing 59 genera, packeted by 29 concerns, and ob- 
tained from 49 retailers, were distributed as follows: 



Ageratum 6 

Alyssum 9 

Anagallis 1 

Antirrhinum 6 

Arctotis 1 

Brachycome 2 

Calendula 9 

Callistephus 15 

Celosia 6 

Centaurea. 10 

Cheiranthus 3 

Chrysanthemum 6 

Clarkia 3 

Convolvulus 1 

Coreopsis 3 

Cosmidium 1 

Cosmos 9 

Cynoglossum 2 

Dahlia 3 

Delphinium 5 



Dianthus 7 

Didiscus 2 

Dimorphotheca 1 

Eschscholtzia 4 

Gaillardia 2 

Gilia 1 

Godetia 2 

Gypsophila 7 

Helichrysum 4 

Hunnemannia 1 

Iberis 7 

Impatiens 1 

Ipomoea 4 

Kochia 3 

Linaria 3 

Linum 1 

Lobelia 1 

Lupinus 2 

Malcomia 1 

Mathiola 8 



Mirabilis 7 

Nemesia 1 

Nemophila 2 

Nicotiana 2 

Nierembergia 1 

Nigella 2 

Papaver 6 

Petunia 9 

Portulaca 4 

Reseda 3 

Salpiglossis 2 

Sanvitalia 1 

Scabiosa 7 

Schizanthus 1 

Tagetes 14 

Thunbergia 1 

Tropaeolum 9 

Verbena 5 

Zinnia 20 

Total . . .■ 260 



Germination tests were not made in the laboratory on any of the lots of seed. 
Results of germination were rated as "good" if seeds germinated in approximately 
two-thirds of the row; "fair" between one-third and two-thirds; "poor" for less 
than one-third. Performance was designated as "satisfactory" if the varieties 
were true to name, with only one-third or less of the plants not true to form or 
color; "fair", between one-third and two-thirds not true; and "not satisfactory" 
if less than one-third was true to name or if the lot did not produce sufficient 
plants for providing satisfactory data. 

As far as possible trueness to type was determined. However, since many 
lots were described as mixtures or did not carry varietal names, a wide range in 
color and form was permissible. 

Results of the test on germination are summarized as follows. Four lots are 
omitted which were washed out bv rain. 



Good 

Fair 

Poor 

None... 

Total. 



[UMBER OF 


PERCENT OF 


LOTS 


TOTAL 


108 


42.19 


69 


26.95 


79 


30.86 









256 



100.00 



SEED INSPECTION 



35 



Flower Seed Inspection 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Field Test' 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



Bodger Seeds, Ltd.. El Monte, Ca!. 

Monroe's Seed Market, Attleboro 

238F Calendula Double Florist Special Mixture Fair Satisfactory; 9 colors 

237F Gypsophila Elegans grandiflora Covent Garden 

Improved Good Satisfactory 

236F Ipomoea Morning Glory Heavenly Blue .... Good Satisfactory 

239F Zinnia Elegans Mixed, Pumila Good Satisfactory: 14colors 

Joseph Breck «£ Sons, Boston, Mass. 

671F Alyssum Violet Queen Good Satisfactory 

(D)662F Antirrhinum Super Majestic Intermediate Rose 

Sensation Fair Incomplete; only 2 

plants in bloom 
Sept. 29 

665F Calendula Orange King Good Satisfactory 

663F Callistepluis Aster, Early Giant Light Blue Poor Not satisfactory 

664F Callistephus Aster, Princess Marsha Poor Not satisfactory 

666F Chrysanthemum Single, Choice Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

667F Convolvulus Minor, Dwarf Morning Glory Good Satisfactory 

668F Dianthus Geisha Girl Good Satisfactory; 6 colors 

672F Mathiola Stock, Perfection Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

(D)673F Petunia Dwarf Bedding, Cheerful Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

669F Tagetes Flaming Fire, Single French Good Satisfactory 

670F Tagetes Gigantea, Sunset Giants Good Satisfactory 

674F Zinnia Dwarf Defiance Golden Orange Good Satisfactory 

L. E. Corkum Hardw. Co., Newtonville 

7S2F Lupinus Lupine, Hartwegi Mixed Good Satisfactory; 2 colors 

751F Tropaeolum Dwarf Rainbow Mixed Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

W. Atlee Burpee Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

William H. Casey Store, Milford 

480F Chrysanthemum Fleuret Single Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

479F Clarkia Finest Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

478F Didiscus Blue Lace Flower Poor Not sati.sfactory 

481F Eschscholtzia California Sunset Mixture Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

482F Scabiosa Large Flowered Tall Double Mixed. . Poor Not satisfactory 



601 F 

602 F 

603 F 
605 F 
604F 



661F 
659 F 
660F-A 
660F-B 
660F-C 
660F-D 



Alyssum 

Coreopsis 

Mirabilis 

Petunia 

Tagetes 



Alyssum 

Verbena 

Zinnia 

Zinnia 

Zinnia 

Zinnia 



Firestone Hardware & .^uto Supply 
Co., Northampton 

Sweet Poor Not satisfactory 

Calliopsis Tall Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Four O'clock Tall Mixed Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Flaming \^elvot Good Satisfactory 

Burpee Gold Odorless Foliage Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

Sweet Good Satisfactory 

Giant Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Giant Dahlia-flowered Lavender. . Good Satisfactory 

Giant Dahlia-flowered Scarlet. . Good Satisfactory 

Giant Dahlia-flowered Yellow Fair Satisfactory 

Giant Dahlia-flowered Rose Good Satisfactory 



901 F 
902 F 



734F 
732F 

727F 

726F 
733F 
730F 
731F 

728F 
725F 
729F 
735F 



Comstock, Ferre & Co., Wethersfield. Conn. 

La Palm Hardware Co., Webster 

Tropaeolum Tall Named V'arieties Mixed Fair 

Tropaeolum Dwarf Named Varieties Mixed Fair 

Crosman Seed Corp., East Rochester, N.Y. . 

S. S. Kresge Co., Boston 

Ageratum New Midget Blue Poor 

Callistephus .Aster, Giant Crego White Good 

Chrysanthemum .-Xnnual Mixed Colors Fair 

Cosmos Orange Flare Early Flowering Good 

Dahlia Double Hybrids Mixed Colors Poor 

Kochia Mexican Fire Bush Good 

Mathiola Stock German Dwarf 10 weeks Fair 

Scabiosa Tall Double Mixed Poor 

Tagetes Royal Scot .^11 Double Fair 

Tagetes Signata Pumila Border of Gold Fair 

Zinnia New Linearis Poor 



Satisfactory; 5 colors 
Satisfactory; 6 colors 



Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 
Sati.sfactory 
Not satisfactory 



36 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wliolesale Di<;tributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor. 

No. Seed Place CoUeined, and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



Crosman Seed Corp., (Cont.) 
S. S. Kresge Co., Quincy 

314F Arctotis Grandis, Blue-eyed Daisy 

313F Centaurea Double Pink Cornflower 

312F Reseda Mignonette Large Flowering Sweet . 



Poor Not satisfactory 
Good Satisfactory 
Poor Not satisfactory 



Montgomery Ward Co., Greenfield 

803F Antirrhinum Giant Mixed, University of Cal. Strain Poor Not satisfactory 

802F Centaurea Sweet Sultan Mixed Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

798F Cosmos Single, Early Flowering Mixed Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

799F Dahlia Unwin's Dwarf Hybrids. Mixture of 

Colors Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 

.S04F Gaillardia Double Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

805F Lupinus ./Annual Sorts Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

ROOF Tropaeolum Dwarf Nasturtium Mixed Colors. .. . Fair Satisfactory 



567F Antirrhinum 

56SF Cheiranthus 

(D)568F Dianthus 

566F Helichrvsum 

569F Mirabilis 



Empire Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 

Woodlawn Supply Co., South Hadley 

Snapdragon Five Mixed Colors Fair Incomplete; 3 plants 

in bloom Sept. 29 

Wallflower, Finest Mixed Good Satisfactory 

Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 

Everlasting finest mixed colors Poor Not satisfactory 

Four O'clock. Tall. Mixed Colors. . . Fair Satisfactory; 6 colors 



Ferry-Morse Seed Co., Detroit, Mich. 

Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 

,S30F Tagetes Burpee Gold Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

W. T. Grant Co., Boston 

65SF Centaurea Cyanus Double Mixed. . Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

656F Clarkia Double Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

657F Gypsophila Covent Garden Market Good Satisfactory 

6S8F Papaver Iceland Sunbeam Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Jordan Marsh Co., Boston 

2S7F Callistephus Aster Giant Crego Crimson Poor Not satisfactory 

260F Celosia Childsi. Woolflower. Crimson Good Satisfactory 

259F Dianthus Double China Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

258F Papaver Double Shirley Sweet Briar Poor Not satisfactory 

Frasier's. Wellesley, Mass. 

390F Ageratum Blue Perfection Poor Not satisfactory 

391F Chrysanthemum Single. Choice Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

703F Didiscus Blue Lace Flower Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

393F Godetia Double Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

711F Gypsophila Baby's Breath Annual Good Satisfactory 

704F Nemesia Strumosa Poor Not satisfactory 

702F Nicotiana Tuberose-flowered Tobacco. White . . Good Satisfactory 

392F Scabiosa Blue Cockade Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

705F Scabiosa Mourning Bride. Mixed Colors Poor Not satisfactory 

706F Zinnia Dahlia-flowered Rose Good Satisfactory 

Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 

423F Lobelia Crystal Palace Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Fredonia Seed Co., Fredonia, N. Y. 
Bellingham Hardware Co.. Weymouth 
677F Chrysanthemum ■ Coronarium Double Hybrids Finest 

Mixed Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

681F Coreopsis Calliopsis Finest Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 4 colors 

678F Gypsophila Baby's Breath. Large Flowers Good Satisfactory 

680F Iberis Empress White Poor Not satisfactory 

675F Impatiens Balsam Finest Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

679F Mathiola Stock Finest Mixed Double Poor Not satisfactory 

682F Tagetes Guinea Gold Fair Incomplete: had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

683F Zinnia Dahlia-flowered Orange Fair Satisfactory 



736F Dianthus 



Genesee Valley Seed Co., Dalton, N. Y. 

S. S. Kresge Co.. Boston 

Laciniatus 



Poor Not satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



37 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



(D)637F Ageratum 

639F Alyssum 

640F Calendula 

638F Callistephus 

648F Callistephus 

642F Centaurea 

643F Cosmos 

644F Delphinium 

645 F Helichrysum 

641 F Iberis 

647F Petunia 

646F Tagetes 



104F Centaurea 
105F Mathiola 



Thomas J. Grey Co., Boston, Mass. 

Dwarf Blue Bedder Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Minimum White Snow Cloth Good Satisfactory 

Orange Fantasy Crested Good Satisfactory 

Aster Crested Princess Ann Poor Not satisfactory 

Aster Giant Crego Improved Azure 

Blue Poor Not satisfactory 

Imperialis Lavender Beauty Poor Not satisfactory 

Mammoth Extra Early Single Pink. . Good Satisfactory 
Larkspur Giant Imperial Los Angeles Poor Not satisfactory 
Everlasting, Golden Ball Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Candytuft, Crimson Fair Incomplete; one plant 

in flower Sept. 29 
Hybrida Pendula Balcony White. . . . Poor Not satisfactory 
Chrysanthemum-flowered Mission 
Giants Mixed Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Joseph Harris & Co., Rochester, N. Y. 
Joseph Harris Co., Inc., Cambridge 

Cyanu^ Tall Double Blue Fair Incomplete; one plant 

in flov/er Sept. 29 
Stock Sure to Bloom Variety Mixture Poor Not satisfactory 



380F Kochia 



Charles C. Hart Seed Co., Wethersfield, 
Conn. 

Allen Hardware Co., Needham 

Mexican Fire Bush Good Satisfactory 



863 F Mathiola 



Bryan Hardware Co., Westfield 
Stock Finest Mixed Dwarf 10 weeks. 



Poor Not satisfactory 



688F Gypsophila 

690F Helichrysum 

(D)689F Iberis. 

69 IF Papaver 

692 F Scabiosa 

693F Verbena 



845F Tropaeolum 

429F Celosia 

180F Brachycome 

176F Callistephus 

179F Clarkia 

177F Iberis 

178F Salpiglossis 



R. E. Cobb Co., Weymouth 

Baby's Breath White Fair Satisfactory 

Strawflower Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Candytuft Dwarf Hybrid Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Shirley Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Mourning Bride Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Hybrida Best Mixture *. . Good Satisfactory; 6 colors 

Jeffway-Hatch Co., Easthampton 

Nasturtium Golden Gleam Fair Satisfactory 

The Welch Co.. Scituate 

Cristata Tall Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Budd D. Hawkins, Reading, Vt. 

I. B. Barrows Co., Worcester 

Swan River Daisy Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Aster, Scarlet Poor Not satisfactory 

Mixed Double Poor Not staisfactory 

Candytuft Fine Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

New Emperor Fair Satisfactory; 3 colors 



739F Alyssum 

738F Callistephus 

740F Celosia 

73 7F Coreopsis 



250F Calendula 

249F Gypsophila 

246F Mathiola 

247F Mirabilis 

248F Nicotiana 



(D)862F Sanvitalia 
861F Zinnia 



D. Landreth Seed Co., Bristol, Pa. 

George E. Warren Hardware Co., 
Braintree 

Benthami Procumbens Fair Satisfactory 

Aster Crego Giant Comet Mixed .... Poor Not satisfactory 

Plumosa Plumed Mi.xed Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 

Calliopsis Tall Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 7 colors 

Yankee Maid Products, Inc., Boston 

Lemon Queen (Yellow Colossal) Good Satisfactory 

Baby's Breath Annual Fair Satisfactory 

Stock Mixed .• Poor Not satisfactory 

Jalapa, Four O'Clocks Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

Affinis Hybrids Mixed Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 

Mandeville & King Co., Rochester, N. Y. 

Bryan Hardware Co., Westfield 

Creeping Zinnia Poor Not satisfactory 

Lilliput Rosebud Good Satisfactory 



38 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Lab. 
No. 


Kind of 
Seed 


(D)835F 


Antirrhinum 


834F 


Zinnia 


422F 
(D)374F 


Papaver 
Verbena 


857F 


Linum 


8S8F 


Thunbergia 


873F 
874F 


Nierembergia 
Scabiosa 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 

Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



Mandeville & King Co., (Cont.) 
Carlisle Hardware Co., Springfield 
Large-flowered Giant Buttercup. 



Navajo, all colors. 



Good 
Fair 



Incomplete; had not 
flowered Sept. 29 
Satisfactory; 6 colors 



Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 

Flanders Field 

Scarlet Defiance 



Fair 
Fair 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Depping & Moore, Inc.. Westfield 
Flax Scarlet 



Black-eyed Susan Vine. All Shades 

Hamilton & Atwater, Inc., Westfield 

Purple Robe 

Mourning Bride Rosette 



Good 
Fair 



Poor 
Poor 



Incomplete; had not 
flowered Sept. 29 
Satisfactory; 2 colors 



Not satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



(D)846F Iberis 



Jeffway-Hatch Co., Easthampton 
Giant Hyacinth-flowered. White 



Good Incomplete; one plant 
in flower Sept. 29 



8S4F 
865F 


Cosmos 
Papaver 


750F 
749F 


Cheiranthus 
Gaillardia 


37SF 


Dianthus 


(D)882F 


Brachycome 


748F 
747F 
746F 


Anagallis 

Linaria 

Schizanthus 


430F 


Delphinium 


872F 


Tropaeolum 


756F 

7S7F 

754F 

(D)755F 


Celosia 

Cheiranthus 

Gilia 

Hunnemannia 



Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 



Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 

Yellow Flare (Klondyke) Poor 

Flanders Field Fair 

Moore & Moore, Newton Corner 

Siberian Wallflower Good 

Indian Chief, Single Poor 

Needham Hardware Co., Needham 

Sweet Wivelsfield Poor Not satisfactory 

Waite Hardware Co., Southbridge 

Swan River Daisy Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

George E. Warren Hardware Co., Braintree 

Pimpernel Poor Not satisfactory 

Fairy Bouquet Poor Not .satisfactory 

Butterfly Flower Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

The Welch Co., Scituate 

Los Angeles Improved, Annual Poor Not satisfactory 

Michael-Leonard Seed Co., Chicago, III. 

Hamilton & Atwater, Inc.. Westfield 

Dwarf Mixed Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 



753F Linaria 



New England Tore Co., West Newton, Mass. 

Childsi Mixed Good 

Siberian Wallflower, Good 

Capitata (Mixed) Poor 

Sunlite Fair 

Mixed Hybrids Poor 



Satisfactory; 2 colors 
Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Incomplete; had not 
flowered Sept. 29 
Not satisfactory 



421F 

(D)611F 

616F 


Gypsophila 
Nemophila 
Verbena 


612F 
613F 
615F 
614F 


Cynoglossum 
Delphinium 
Dianthus 
Petunia 


745 F 
744F 


Alyssum 
Callistephus 


742F 


Celosia 


743F 


Mirabilis 



Northrup, King & Co., MinneapoHs, Minn. 

Cohasset Hardware Co., Cohasset 

Annual. Paris Market Good 

Blue Fair 

Mammoth Flowering Scarlet Spect- 
rum Red Poor Not satisfactory 

F. W. Woolworth Co., Northampton 

Dwarf Firmament Fair 

Los An.tjeles Improved Annual Poor 

Double Mi.xed Good 

Rosy Morn Good 

The Page Seed Co., Greene, N. Y. 

George E. Warren Hardware Co , Brain- 
tree 

Sweet White Fair Satisfactory 

Aster, Heart of France Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Plumosa and Cristata Mixed Good Satisfactory; chiefly 

Cristata forms 
Four O'clock Mixed Colors Good Satisfactory; 5 color 



Satisfactory 
Satisfactory 



Satisfactory 
Not satisfactory 
Satisfactory; 7 colors 
Satisfactory 



SEED INSPECTION 



39 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor. 

NOi Seed Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



Perry Seed Co., Boston, Mass. 

(D)273F Calendula Double Finest Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

274F Callistephus Aster .American Branching Mixed. . . F Incomplete;' had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

277F Centaurea Cyanus Blue Boy Good Satisfactory 

275F Cosmos Sensation Giant Early Flowering 

Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 4 colors 

278F Delphinium Giant Imperial Choice Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

276F Iberis Candytuft Giant White Perfection . . Good Satisfactory 

280F Petunia Choice Bedding Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 9 colors 

279F Zinnia Dahlia-flowered Golden State Good Satisfactory 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Checkerboard Feed Store, Westfield 

879F Cosmos Mixed Good Satisfactory; .3 colors 

878F Dimorphotheca African Daisy Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
876F Iberis Candytuft Mixed Good Incomplete; defol- 

iated by insects 

875F Mirabilis Four O'Clock Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 2 colors 

880F Tagetes African Tall Mixed Fair Incomplete;' had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
877F Z-.nnia California Giants Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 7 colors 

Jerome B. Rice Seed Co.. Cambridge, N. Y. 

Lake Hardware Co.. Arlington 
500F Linaria Superb Mi.xed Fair Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Manchester Forbes Co., Easthampton 
855F Tagetes French Dwarf Mi.xed Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Sears, Roebuck & Co , Northampton 

606F Mathiola Stock, Large Flowered Mixed Fair Incomplete; had no 

flowered Sept. 29 

Wadsworth Howland & Co., Inc., Boston 

654F Centaurea Dusty Miller Fair Satisfactory 

649F Dahlia Unwin's Dwarf Hybrids Poor Not satisfactory 

650F Eschscholtzia California Poppy Extra Golden Good Satisfactory 

652F Malcomia Virginian Stock Good Satisfactory; 3 colors 

6S1F Salpiglossis Mixed Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
653F Zinnia ^ Indian Summer Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

Western Auto Supply Co., Quincy 

309F Callistephus .A.ster Ostrich Plume Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

30SF Tagetes Marigold Harmony Good Satisfactory 

J. B. Rice, Jr., Inc., Shushan, N. Y. 

C. F. Jordan Co.. Bridgewater 

435F Centaurea Imperialis Sweet Sultan Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sect 29 

431F Chrysanthemum Tricolor, Annual, Single. Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

432F Cynoglossum Annual Chinese Forget-me-not Fair Satisfactory 

434F Nigella Annual Love-in-a-mist Poor Not satisfactory 

433F Reseda Mignonette Machet Annual Fair Satisfactory 

Ross Bros., Co., Worcester, Mass. 

(D)627F Ageratum Blue Perfection Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
(D)636F Callistephus Aster Super Giant El Monte Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

628F Celosia Cockscomb Glasgow Prize Good Satisfactory 

630F Ipomoea Morning Glory Heavenly Blue Good Satisfactory 

629F Ipomoea Morning Glory Pearly Gates Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
632F Scabiosa Rosette Tall Double Large Flowered. Poor Not satisfactory 
631F Tagetes Gigantea Sunset Giants Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

633F Tagetes Signata Pumila Dwarf Scotch Fair Satisfactory 

634F Tropaeolum Nasturtium Golden Gleam Good Satisfactory 

635F Zinnia Dahlia-flowered Oriole Good Satisfactory 

LaPalm Hardware Co., Webster 

899F Cosmos Early Flowering Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

897F Eschscholtzia California Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

900F Nigella Blue and White Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

896F Papaver Shirley Mixed Double Poor Not satisfactory 

898F Reseda Mignonette Sweet Good Satisfactory 



40 



CONTROL SERIES NO. 127 



Flower Seed Inspection — Continued 



Wholesale Distributor, Dealer When 
Lab. Kind of Other Than Wholesale Distributor, 

No. Seed Place Collected, and Variety of Seed 



Field Tests 



Germi- 
nation 



Performance 



Sears, Roebuck & Co., Chicago, III. 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Northampton 

White Sweet Good Satisfactory 

California Poppy Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Baby Blue Eyes Poor Not satisfactory 

Fantasy Mixed Good Satisfactory; 9 colors 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Quincy 

Stock Beauty of Nice Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Little Red Riding Hood Good Satisfactory 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Westfield 

Blue Perfection Good Satisfactory 

Orange King Good Satisfactory 

Four O'clock Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 5 colors 

Balcony Blue Poor Not satisfactory 

Nasturtium Gleam Hybrids Good Sati.^factory; 4 colors 

Sears, Roebuck & Co., Woburn 

Chrysanthemum-flowered Fair Satisfactory 

Giant Margaret Mixed Poor Not satisfactory 

Strawflower Mixed Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29. 



609 F 

607 F 

rD)608F 

610F 



305F 
304F 



(D)864F 
865F 
866F 
869F 
867F 



508F 
509F 
SIOF 



Alyssum 
Eschscholtzia 
Nemophila 
Zinnia 



Mathiola 



Ageratum 

Calendula 

Mirabilis 

Petunia 

Tropaeolum 



Calendula 
Dianthus 
Helichrysum 



(D)772F Ageratum 

774F Calendula 

(D)773F Callistephus 

775F Cosmid'um 

781F Cosmos 

776F Godetia 

778F Ipomoea 

777F Kochia 

779F Tropaeolum 

780F Zinnia 



(D)465F Antirrhinum 



462 F 

461F 

(D)460F 


Calendula 

Centaurea. 

Callistephus 


463F 
464F 


Petunia 
Tagetes 


713F 
720F 


Alyssum 
Antirrhinum 


714F 


Callistephus 


(D)715F 


Centaurea 


716F 

(D)717F 


Cosmos 
Delphinium 


718F 

(D)719F 

721F 

722F 


Petunia 
Portulaca 
Verbena 
Zinnia 


399 F 
398F 
400F 


Mirabilis 
Petunia < 
Zinnia 



Sterling Seed Co.. Minneapolis, iVlinn. 

W. T. Grant Co., Palmer 

Dwarf Blue Perfection Good Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Double Orange King Fair Satisfactory 

."Vster, Crego or Ostrich Plume Red . . Fair Incomplete; had not 

bloomed Sept. 29 

Yellow & Brown Good Satisfactory 

Orange Flare Poor Not satisfactory 

Satin Flower Tall Mixed Double. . . . Poor Not satisfactory 

Morning Glory Crimson Rambler. . . . Good Satisfactory 

Childsi Mexican Fire Bush Poor Not satisfactory 

Nasturtium Golden Gleam Fair Satisfactory 

Navajo Mixed Good Satisfactory; 11 colors 

Templin-Bradley Co., Cleveland, Ohio 
(Children's Flower Mission) 

Washington School, Taunton 

Snapdragon Fair Incomplete; one plant 

in bloom Sept. 29 

Scotch Marigold Poor Not satisfactory 

Bachelor's Button, Double Fair Satisfactory 

-Aster, Extra Quality Mixed Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Hybrids Mixed Good Satisfactory; 5 colors 

."African and French. Mixed colors. . . Poor Not satisfactory 

Vaughan's Seed Store, New York, N. Y. 

Arnold Fisher Co., Boston 

Little Gem Poor Not satisfactory 

University of California Mixed Fair Incomplete; one plant 

in flower Sept. 29 
Aster, Giant Branching Mixed Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 
Cyanus Blue Boy Fair Incomplete; one plant 

in flower Sept. 29 

Orange Flare Good Satisfactory 

Special .Annual Mixture Fair Incomplete; had not 

flowered Sept. 29 

Blue Boy Good Satisfactory 

Single Mixed Good Satisfactory; 7 colors 

Mammoth Mixed Fair Satisfactory; 10 colors 

Red Riding Hood Good Satisfactory 

The Garden Shop, Wellesley 

Four O'clock Mixed Good Satisfactory; 4 colors 

Hybrids Finest Mixed Good Satisfactory; 6 colors 

Pompon (Lilliput) Mixed Good Satisfactory; 8 colors 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 
1-46-17683. 



MASSACHUSETTS 
AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 128 JUNE 1946 .. 



Twenty-sixth Annual Report of 

Pullorum Disease Eradication 

in Massachusetts 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory 



During the 1945-46 season, 1,259,623 samples representing 630 chicken and 
turkey flocks were tested. Compared with the previous season, there were 
increases in the number of samples (284,582) and the number of flocks (101) 
tested) yet the average percentage of reactors was the same, 0.12. Flocks tested 
annually revealed a lower average percentage of reactors than the flocks tested 
for the first time or intermittently. Progress in eradication of pullorum disease 
is definitely evident in that 95.3 percent of all birds tested are in 100 percent 
tested non-reacting flocks. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



TWENTY-SIXTH ANNUAL REPORT OF PULLORUM 
DISEASE ERADICATION IN MASSACHUSETTS 

1945-46 

By the Poultry Disease Control Laboratory' 



INTRODUCTION 

The 1945-46 testing season reveals a marked increase (284,582) ov^er the 
previous year in the volume of tests. The total number of samples tested exceeds 
the million mark (1,259,623), a new record in the history of the testing work. 

It is gratifying to note that even with the marked increases in the number of 
flocks and birds tested, the percentage of infection has not increased over that of 
the previous season. Even more encouraging is the fact that 95.3 percent of the 
birds tested are in 100 percent tested non-reacting flocks. Considering the heavy 
demands on the poultry industry these last few years and the difficulties under 
which those demands were met, the Massachusetts poultr\' industry is to be 
commended for maintaining standards that are effective in establishing and main- 
taining puUorum-free flocks. As conditions return to normal and operations 
can be carried on more satisfactorily, it is hoped that flock owners will be even 
more vigilant in keeping pullorum disease out of their flocks. 

During the past season, the testing work was carried on under extreme diffi- 
culties due to a lack of adequate help and facilities. Consequently some flock 
owners were unable to obtain testing service on approximately the date that was 
requested. The postponement of the testing of flocks created a hardship and 
financial loss to the flock owner because his hatching plans and operations were 
delayed or disrupted. 

The marked increase in the volume of testing has been a severe strain on the 
laboratory personnel, especially the permanent staff. This was further aggravated 
by the extraordinary pressure from flock owners to get their flocks tested by a 
certain date. In order to avoid a repetition of the last few years in meeting these 
heavy testing demands from the industry, increased facilities and additional 
personnel are imperative. 

It should be realized that the Massachusetts poultr\- industry has made con- 
siderable growth in the last ten years, but the facilities and personnel for the 
pullorum disease testing have not been provided for in direct proportion. Every 
effort should be put forth to safeguard what has been established on Massachu- 
setts poultry farms; namely, pullorum-free flocks — a quality product that has 
received universal recognition. 



'Poultry Disease Control Laboratory Staff: H. Van Roekel, Research Professor; K. L. Bullis, 
Assistant Veterinary Pathologist; O. S. Flint, Assistant Research Professor; F. G. Sperling, .-Assis- 
tant Research Professor; Miriam K. Clarke, Research Assistant: Felicia Jewett, Laboratory Assis- 
tant. Appreciation is Extended to Dr. J. B. Lentz, Head of the Department of Veterinary Science, 
for the assistance given to the testing work. 



SUMMARY OF SERVICE RENDERED 

Applications received 692 

Applications cancelled 62 

Flocks tested 630 

Chicken flocks.. 527 

Chicken and turke\' flocks 11 

Turkey flocks 92 

Number of tests. 1,259,623 

Chickens: 

Routine 1,184,427 

Experimental 41,167* 

Fowl other than chickens: 

Routine 25,436 

Experimental 8,593 

Owners receiving necropsy service 99** 

Necropsies of reacting birds 231*** 



♦Includes 2,724 fowl typhoid tests. 
♦♦Includes 11 turkey flocks. 
♦♦♦Includes 27 turkeys. 



DISTRIBUTION OF TESTS AND REACTORS 

Table 1 gives the number of tests and reactors by counties. P'lock owners in 

12 counties were given testing service. A total of 1,225,594 samples was tested 
which revealed 0.12 percent reactors. In only one county, Dukes, were no 
reactors found among the birds tested. However, seven counties (Barnstable, 
Bristol, Essex, Middlesex, Norfolk, Plymouth, and Worcester) had either 0.1 
percent or less reactors among the samples tested. Bristol, Middlesex, Norfolk, 
Plymouth, and Worcester counties led in the number of samples tested, all 
exceeding 150,000. Middlesex county had the largest number of tests, 224,109. 
This number approaches the total number of samples tested in the entire State 

13 years ago (1933-34). 

The following breeds were tested: Bantam, Barnevelder, Barred Phmouth 
Rock, Brahma, Crosses, Dark Cornish, Jersey White Giant, New Hampshire, 
Rhode Island Red, White American, White Leghorn, White Plymouth Rock, 
and White Wyandotte. Reactors were detected among the Rhode Island Reds, 
Barred Plymouth Rocks, White Plymouth Rocks, New Hampshires, and Crosses. 
The three leading breeds in Massachusetts are Rhode Island Red, New Hamp- 
shire, and Barred Plymouth Rock. Of the total samples tested 57.7 percent were 
taken from the Rhode Island Red, 19.3 percent from New Hampshire, and 18.5 
percent from the Barred Plymouth Rock. The balance was taken from the other 
breeds listed. 

Of the 1,112,569 samples collected from females, 79,113 were from hens and 
1,033,456 from pullets. The incidence of reactors was higher among the hens 
(0.27 percent) than among the pullets (0.11 percent). The 113,025 samples 
tested from males showed 0.12 percent as reactors. The incidence of reactors 
among males was about the same as among pullets. 



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ANNUAL TESTING OF FLOCKS 

The results from flocks tested for the first time, intermittently, for two con- 
secutive years, and for three or more consecutive years are given in Table 2. 



Table 2. Annual Testing Versus Single and Intermittent Testing. 






CI 

o 

E 


•c 

5 


H 

o 
H 


Positive 
Tests 


Negative 
Flocks 


Positive 

Flocks 


Classification 


5 
2 


V 
Oh 


•a 
v 

H 
§ 




■a 

H 

o 
o 


■2 

H 

a 


Flocks tested — 


113 
37 
81 

307 


136.658 
113,176 
157,958 

717,945 


139,607 
127,975 
179,423 

778.589 


448 
349 
210 

443 


0.32 
0.27 
0.12 

0.06 


100 
30 

77 

291 


8 
7 


5 
6 

4 

9 




Intermittently 

Two consecutive years 

Three or. more consecutive 


1 






Totals 


538 


1,125,737 


1,225,594 


1,450 


0.12 


498 


15 


24 


1 



The number of flocks tested for the first time exceeds the number tested inter- 
mittently and for two consecutive years, and the average percentage of reactors 
was higher than for any other group. However, it is particularly encouraging 
that all but five flocks were found to be negative. Also, 95 percent of the birds 
tested in this group were in flocks identified as negative. The average number of 
birds per flock in this group was 1,209. 

In the intermittent group are listed seven infected flocks. Of the birds tested 
in this group, 91 percent are in non-reacting flocks, which is a lower percentage 
than in the other groups. These results substantiate previous reports that inter- 
mittent testing is not a sound procedure in establishing or maintaining a non- 
reacting flock. The average number of birds per flock in this group was 3,059. 

In the flocks tested for two consecutive years, 97 percent of the birds tested 
are in non-reacting flocks. This exceeds the percentage in the groups te.sted for 
the first time and intermittently. The average number of birds per flock in this 
group was 1,949. 

The group tested for three or more consecutive 3'ears is by far the largest of 
the four groups. It also has the lowest average percentage of reactors as well as 
the largest number of negative flocks and of birds in such flocks. Approximately 
97.4 percent of the birds tested in this group are in non-reacting flocks, which is 
indeed very encouraging. The average number of birds per flock in this group 
was 2,339. 

For the four groups as a whole, 538 flocks were tested, representing 1,125,737 
birds and 1,225,594 samples, of which 0.12 percent were positive. The 498 flocks 
which were 100 percent tested and non-reacting contained 1,073,565 birds or 95.3 
percent of the total birds tested. This is 2 percent higher than the previous 
season in spite of the marked increase in the number of birds tested this season. 



The number of positive flocks, 25, was two less than in 1944-45. The number 
of tested birds, 40,011, in positive flocks was also less than the previous season. 
Approximately 3.6 percent of the birds tested are in positive flocks. It is hoped 
that the downward trend in the number of positive flocks will continue. Owners 
of infected flocks are advised not to breed from such flocks until all of the in- 
fection has been eliminated from the premises either through intensive retesting 
or by flock replacement with puUoruhi-free stock. 

It should be noted that 70 of the flocks tested in 1944-45 (approximately 15 
percent) were not tested in 1945-46. Annual testing of all birds on the premises 
should be observed by every flock owner who operates a breeding flock. 

It is of interest to compare the results presented above with those of the pre- 
vious season, as listed in the following summary: 



Change 



Classification of flocks 

Tested for the first time: 

Flocks 

Birds 

Percent positive* 

Negative flocks 

Birds in negative flocks 

Positive flocks 

Birds in positive flocks 

Tested intermittently: 

Flocks 

Birds 

Percent positive* 

Negative flocks 

Birds in negative flocks 

Positive flocks 

Birds in positive flocks 

Tested for two consecutive years: 

Flocks 

Birds 

Percent positive* 

Negative flocks 

Birds in negative flocks 

Positive flocks 

Birds in positive flocks 

Tested for three or more consecutive years 

Flocks 

Birds 

Percent positive* 

Negative flocks 

Birds in negative flocks 

Positive flocks 

Birds in positive flocks 

*Based on number of tests. 



Increase Decrease 



88 


113 


97.06.? 


136.658 


0.40 


0.32 


80 


108 


89.851 


130,258 


8 


5 


7,212 


6,400 


30 


37 


62,381 


113,176 


0.42 


0.27 


23 


30 


41.082 


102,623 


7 


7 


21,299 


10,553 


80 


81 


107,267 


157.958 


0.15 


0.12 


76 


77 


103,067 


153,184 


4 


4 


4.200 


4,774 


260 


307 


569.770 


717,945 


0.03 


0.06 


252 


298 


558,551 


699,661 


8 


9 


11,219 


18,284 



25 
39,595 



28 
40.407 



7 
50,795 



61,541 



50.691 

1 
50.117 

574 



47 

148.175 

0.03 

46 

141.110 

1 

7.065 



0.08 



3 

812 



0.03 



APPEARANCE OF INFECTION IN FLOCKS PREVIOUSLY NEGATIVE 



In Table 3 are listed the testing results of flocks which had been non-reacting 
for one or more years but showed infection in 1945-46. Twenty "breaks" were 
detected, which is one less than occurred the previous year. Fourteen flocks 
had less than 0.5 percent reactors on the first test; two flocks (5 and 10) had more 
than 1 percent reactors; and the remaining four flocks had between 0.5 and 1 
percent reactors. Nine flocks had five reactors or less on the original test of the 
flock. 



Table 3. Appearance of Infection in Flocks Previously Negative 





Number 
of Years 
Negative 




1945-46 Season 






Flock 


Flock- 
Total 


Number 
Tested 


Positive 
Tests 
Percent 


Explanation for Infection 


1 


1 


7,49,S 
999 
962 


7,491 
999* 
959* 


0.79 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


2 


10 


1,176 
1.016 


1,176 
1,016* 


0.09 
0.00 


Unknown 


3 


2 


2,988 
2,988 


2,988 
189* 


0.07 
1.06 


Purchased questionable stock 


4 


4 


6,613 
6,613 


6.609 
5,203* 


0.18 
0.06 


Unknown 


5 


1 


1,008 


958 


3.86 


Purchased questionable stock 


6 


1 


2,142 


2,142 


0.23 


Purchased infected stock 


7 


1 


1.768 
1,368 


1,768 
1,367* 


0.28 
0.00 


Unknown 


8 


1 


660 


660 


0.76 


Inadequate preventive measures 


9 


1 


7,007 
6,640 
6,640 
6.443 
6,400 


7,007 
6,640* 
1,026* 
6,440* 
892* 


0.13 
0.05 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


10 


9 


1,166 


1,111 


1.35 


Unknown 


11 


1 


2,971 
1,613 


1,771 
1,611* 


0.06 
0.00 


Questionable stock 


12 


1 


3,417 
3,417 


3,417 
1,512* 


0.88 
0.00 


Purchased infected stock 


13 


3 


769 
731 


768 
710* 


0.08 
0.00 


Unknown 


14 


17 


3,201 
3,201 
3.201 


3,201 
3,066* 
367* 


0.06 
0.00 
0.00 


Unknown 


15 


1 


7,578 


7.578 

443* 
1,134* 
2.969* 
1.962* 
1.816* 


0.33 
0.00 
0.53 
1.08 
0.05 
000 


Inadequate preventive measures 


16 


15 


3,589 
3.589 


3.589 
3.045* 


0.20 
00 


Unknown 


17 


4 


2,634 

2,547 


2.584 
2.546* 


0.08 
0.00 


Unknown 


18 


4 


1.426 
1,310 


1.396 
1.290* 


0.86 
0.00 


Questionable stock 


19 


1 


9,641 

5,812 


9.638 

5.811* 


0.03 
0.00 


Unknown 


20 


3 


3,342 
3,342 


3,342 
1,557* 


0.24 
0.00 


Inadequate preventive measures 



*Retests 



Ten flocks had been non-reacting for one >'ear, one for two years, two for three 
years, three for four years, and one each for nine, ten, fifteen, and seventeen years. 

The source of the infection was unknown in 11 flocks. In the nine remaining 
flocks, the purchase of infected or questionable stock, and inadequate preventive 
measures were responsible for the "breaks." 

Thirteen flocks regained their negative status through retesting, whereas three 
failed to do so. The remaining four were not retested. 

The problem of the appearance of pullorum infection in flocks previously 
negative should be of great concern to all breeders. "Breaks" may be very costly 
to the flock owner. Every precaution should be taken to prevent the introduc- 
tion of infection. This requires constant vigilance on the part of the flock owner. 
The following measures cannot be stressed too strongly in establishing and main- 
taining a pullorum-free flock: 

1. All the birds on the premises should be tested each year. 

2. If infection is present, the entire flock should be retested within four to 
six weeks until a negative report is obtained, provided the value of the birds 
justifies the expenditure. 

3. Every reactor, regardless of its value, should be removed from the premises 
and sold for slaughter immediately upon receipt of the report. 

4. Offal from all birds dressed for market or home consumption as well as 
dead birds that are not fit for consumption should be burned. 

5. The poultry houses, runs, and equipment, should be thoroughly cleaned 
and disinfected immediately after removal of reactors. Provide an empty pen 
to each house to facilitate cleaning and disinfection during the winter months. 
Use disinfectants approved by the United States Department of Agriculture. 

6. Birds removed from the premises to egg-laying contests, exhibitions, etc., 
should be held in quarantine and determined free of disease before they are 
readmitted into the flock. 

7. Purchase of stock in the form of adults, chicks, and eggs should be from 
known pullorum disease-free flocks. Consult \our county agent regarding addi- 
tions or replacements in your flock. 

8. Eggs should not be saved for hatching until after a flock has been tested 
and all the infected birds removed. Earh" pullet testing will permit early hatch- 
ing. 

9. Fresh and infertile eggs from unknown or infected sources should not be 
fed to chickens or exposed to birds or animals such as crows, sparrows, and skunks 
that may carry or spread the infection. 

10. Poultrymen should not custom hatch for untested or infected flocks 
(including fowl other than chickens). 

11. Owners of pullorum disease-free flocks should not ha\"e hatching done 
where infected eggs or stock may be found. 

12. Poultrymen should not buy feed in bags that have been used or exposed 
to infection. (Such bags if properly disinfected will be safe for further use.) 

13. Poultrymen should regard fowl other than chickens as a possible source 
of pullorum infection unless tested and found free from pullorum disease. 

14. Poultrymen should not use equipment that has been exposed to or con- 
taminated with infective material unless it is properly cleaned and sterilized 
or disinfected. 



TESTING OF FOWL OTHER THAN CHICKENS 

It is of interest to note that, while there was a great increase in the number of 
chickens tested during the past season, the number of turkeys tested was slightly- 
less than that of the previous season. This may be explained by the shortage 
in feed and the Government's request that the turkey industry decrease its pro- 
duction. This development was not announced until the bulk of the chickens 
had been tested and before the time turkeys usually are tested. However, 103 
turkey flocks, representing 21,473 birds, were tested, including 11 flocks which 
were on farms with tested chickens. 

The following table summarizes the results of testing fowl other than chickens: 



Fowl 



Number 

of 

Birds 



Reactors 



Number Percent 



Number 

of 

Tests 



Reactors 



Number 



Percent 



Turkeys 21,473 298 

Guineas. 7 

Ducks 39 

Geese — 75 

Pheasants 977 

Game -. 7 

Pigeons 5 

Totals 22,583 298 



1.39 



32,917 


744 


9 





39 





75 





977 





7 





5 






2.26 



34,029 



744 



The percentage of reactors among turkeys is less than that of last year (2.83 
percent). These reactors were confined to 12 flocks, representing 6,045 birds. 
The percentages of reactors ranged from 0.83 to 55.56. In a few infected flocks, 
retesting was conducted, but the results were not as satisfactory as with chickens. 

The following summary gives the range in flock sizes for the turke>' flocks tested : 



Size of Flock 


Number of Flocks 


0-50 


36 


51-100 


19 


101-150 


11 


151-200 


7 


201-500 


16 


501-1000 


13 


1001-2000 





2001 and more 


1 



Five of the 12 infected flocks had 200 or more birds tested on the premises. 
Approximately 25 percent of the tested birds are in infected flocks, which should 
be of great concern to the Massachusetts turkey industry. A more conscientious 
effort should be made to eliminate pullorum disease from the various breeding 
flocks in Massachusetts. A more eff^ective educational and testing program should 



10 

be instituted and followed. Likewise, more careful bu\ ing of stock (eggs, poults, 
mature birds) should be strongh- emphasized. Raising of chickens and turkeys 
on the same premises should be discouraged unless both types of fowl are sub- 
jected to the puUorum testing requirements. Custom hatching of turkey eggs 
should be discouraged unless the eggs are free of puUorum infection. The turkey 
breeder should follow the same pullcrum measures as have been outlined for 
chickens under the previous section. 

NON-REACTING AND POSITIVE FLOCKS CLASSIFIED BY COUNT.ES 

The non-reacting and positive flocks are classified by counties in Table 4. 
A total of 513 non-reacting flocks, representing 1,085,726 birds, was detected in 
12 counties. Of this total, 498 flocks, representing 1,073,565 birds, were 100 
percent tested and 15, representing 12,161 birds, were partially tested. Middle- 
sex, Worcester, and Plymouth counties have the largest number of birds in non- 
reacting flocks. In Dukes and Essex counties, all tested flocks were classified 
as negative at the end of the season. 

Table 4. Nonreacting and Positive Flocks Classified by Counties 



CountA 



lOO'v,. Tested 



Flocks 



Birds 



Partially Tested 



Flocks 



Total 



Nonreacting Flocks 



Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 

Bristol 

Dukes 

Essex 

Franklin . . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. . 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . 
Worcester. . 

Totals . 



Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol .... 
Franklin . . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . 
Worcester. . 



2 


4,629 


— 


6 


9.385 


— 


65 


127,631 


3 


1 


2,435 


— 


65 


140,660 


3 


26 


43,276 


— 


25 


29,302 


— 


29 


40,437 


1 


92 


202,825 


2 


36 


134,309 


2 


62 


154.245 


4 


89 


184,431 


— 


m 


1,073,565 


15 




Posilive 


Flocks 


1 


1,817 





2 


4,573 


— 


6 


12.551 


— 


4 


5,282 


— 


1 


1,960 


1 


3 


3,969 


— 


2 


1,163 


— 


1 


2,161 


— 


3 


4,393 


— 


1 


1,111 


— 



1,137 



HI 

2,424 
3,688 
3,848 



12,161 



1,031 



2 


4.629 


6 


9,385 


68 


128.768 


1 


2.435 


68 


141,613 


26 


43,276 


25 


29,302 


30 


40,548 


94 


205.249 


38 


137,997 


66 


158.093 


89 


184,431 


il3 


1,085,726 


1 


1,817 


2 


4,573 


6 


12,551 


4 


5,282 


2 


2,991 


3 


3,969 


2 


1,163 


1 


2,161 


3 


4.393 


1 


1,111 



Totals. 



11 



Twenty-five flocks were classified as positive at the close of the season. The 
number of birds represented was 40,011, which is 3.6 percent of the total birds 
tested. 

Of the total flocks tested 92.5 percent were 100 percent tested. In five counties 
(Barnstable, Berkshire, Dukes, Franklin, and Worcester), all flocks were 100 
percent tested. Only 16 flocks, representing 13,192 birds, were partially tested. 

These results show that Massachusetts has a large supply of pullorum-free 
stock well distributed throughout the State. It is hoped that these pullorum- 
free sources will be utilized to the fullest extent in replacing flocks throughout the 
Commonwealth. Every effort should be put forth to eradicate the remaining 
reservoirs of infection that may exist in the State. Much can be accomplished 
in this direction by following an effective testing program, maintaining vigilance 
in keeping out diseases, and educating the buying public in regard to the value 
and source of pullorum-free stock. 



Table 5. Comparison of 1944-45 and 1945-46 Testing 



Count V 



Positive Non- 

Tests reacting 

Percent Flocks 



Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol. . . . 
Dukes. . . . 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex. 
Norfolk. . . 
Plymouth. . 
Worcester . 

Totals. 

Barnstable. 
Berkshire. . 
Bristol. . . . 
Dukes. . . . 

Essex 

Franklin. . . 
Hampden. . 
Hampshire. 
Middlesex 

Norfolk 

Plymouth. . 
Worcester. . 

Totals. 



3 
4 
58 
1 
66 
24 
18 
28 
95 
30 
50 
81 



74 
1 
68 
30 
27 
33 
96 
39 
69 
90 



1944-45 Season 

5,588 

9.028 

111,716 

2.206 

116,309 

40,423 

20,052 

30,808 

178.129 

64.770 

107,607 

149,845 



836,481 



1945-46 Season 

6,446 

13,958 

141.319 

2,435 

141,613 

48,558 

32,293 

44,517 

206,412 

140,158 

162,486 

185,542 



5.588 

9,028 

132,647 

2.206 

119.207 

42,445 

24,716 

33,830 

184.251 

69,560 

139.370 

181,139 



943,987 



7,959 

15,515 

163.903 

2.435 

147,877 

48.617 

34.763 

48,189 

224,109 

156,982 

181,818 

193,427 



0.07 
0.00 
0.02 
0.00 
0.05 
0.05 
0.20 
0.12 
0.12 
0.10 
0.43 
0.008 



0.12 



0.06 

0.67 

0.07 

0.00 

0.009 

0.37 

1.01 

0.54 

0.05 

0.06 

0.10 

0.02 



2 

4 
56 

1 
62 
21 
18 
26 
89 
28 
45 
79 



6 
68 

1 
68 
26 
25 
30 
94 
38 
66 
89 



1,125,737 



1,225,594 



0.12 



538 


80 


1,125,737 


289,256 


1,225,594 


281,607 


513 


82 


498 


85 


1,073,565 


297,476 


25 


Minus 2 


20 


Minus 1 



12 

COMPARISON OF 1944-45 AND 1945-46 TESTING 

Table 5 gives the comparison of the 1944-45 and 1945-46 testing results for 
the different counties. Increases in the number of tested flocks and non-reacting 
flocks were observed in 10 counties. In all counties increases were observed in 
the number of tested birds. Six counties had an increase in the percentage of 
infection, five counties had a decrease, and one had no change. 

For the State as a whole, a comparison of the results for the past two years is 
given in the following summary-: 



1944-45 1945-46 Increase 

Tested flocks 458 

Tested birds 836,481 

Tests... 943,987 

Non-reactihg flocks 431 

100 percent tested, non-reacting flocks.... 413 

Birds in ICO percent tested, non-reacting flocks 776,089 

Infected flocks 27 

"Breaks" 21 



These results show that the testing volume increased markedly during the 
past year. It is hoped that the percentage of infection, the number of infected 
flocks, and the number of "breaks" can be reduced. 

The results also indicate that the poultry population is relatively free of 
pullorum disease because, as the number of new flocks tested increases over the 
previous seasons, a very small number of infected flocks is found. It should not 
be construed from the foregoing statement that it is unnecessary to test each year. 
As long as there are foci of infection within the State and the introduction of 
infection into the State is not prohibited, flock owners should recognize that 
annual testing is necessary to determine whether the infection may have spread 
to their flocks. It is hoped that sometime in the future the disease will have been 
sufficiently eradicated to permit flocks to go untested for one, two, or three years. 
If such a program were possible, it would be an economic saving to the industry. 

TWENTY-SIX YEAR TESTING SUMMARY 

A 26-year testing summary is presented in Table 6. Continued progress in 
testing and in the control and eradication of the disease is noted from the results 
listed in the table. For the last six years, the number of birds in non-reacting 
flocks, expressed in terms of percentage of total birds tested, has not been below 
90. 



13 



Table 6. Twenty-Six Year Pullorum Disease Testing Summary 











Positive 


Non- 


Birds in 


Non- 








Total 


Tests 


reacting 


reacting Flocks 


Season 


Flocks 


Birds 


Tests 


Percent 


Flocks 


Number 


Percent 


1920-21 


108 


24,718 


24,718 


12.50 


25 


2,414 


9.77 


1921-22 


110 


29,875 


29,875 


12.65 


27 


4.032 


13.50 


1922-23 


121 


33,602 


33,602 


7.60 


29 


5.400 


16.07 


1923-24 


139 


59,635 


59.635 


6.53 


38 


11.082 


18.58 


1924-25 


156 


66,503 


66,503 


2.94 


79 


25.390 


38.18 


1925-26 


201 


67.919 


67,919 


2.31 


124 


33.615 


49.49 


1926-27 


249 


127.327 


127,327 


4.03 


114 


40.269 


31.63 


1927-28 


321 


190,658 


232,091 


6.52* 


138 


80,829 


42.39 


1928-29 


413 


254,512 


304,092 


4.25* 


228 


153,334 


60.25 


1929-30 


460 


331,314 


386,098 


2.17 


309 


203,038 


66.97 


1930 31 


447 


356,810 


402,983 


1.47 


328 


267,229 


74.89 


1931-32 


455 


377,191 


420,861 


090 


355 


298,534 


79.15 


1932-33 


335 


296,093 


300,714 


0.47 


276 


238,074 


80.41 


1933-34 


262 


263,241 


284,848 


0.53 


229 


212,782 


80.83 


1934-35 


244 


281,124 


301,887 


0.39 


213 


251.778 


89.56 


1935-36 


252 


329,659 


344.081 


0.30 


230 


315,215 


95.95 


1936-37 


307 


448.519 


561.762 


0.37 


281 


424,431 


94.63 


1937-38 


308 


480,227 


497,769 


0.17 


286 


457,466 


95.26 


1938-39 


355 


571,065 


615,205 


0.34 


327 


469.134 


82.15 


1939-40 


346 


573.000 


673,222 


0.51 


332 


497.356 


86.80 


1940-41 


309 


527,328 


538,589 


0.09 


299 


492.475 


93.39 


1941-42 


366 


653.080 


662.715 


0.27 


350 


591.628 


90.59 


1942-43 


332 


637,666 


649,137 


0.48 


317 


600.607 


94.19 


1943-44 


413 


762,066 


791,596 


0.11 


386 


721,229 


94.64 


1944-45 


458 


836,481 


943,987 


0.12 


431 


792.551 


94.75 


1945-46 


538 


1.125,737 


1,225.594 


0.12 


513 


1,085,726 


96.45 



♦Based on total birds tested: 1927-28, 190,658 birds; 1928-29, 254,512 birds. 



COMMENTS AND SUGGESTIONS 

Annual Testing of All Birds on the Premises: The importance of testing all 
birds on the premises annually has been recognized for many years. It is ap- 
parent that the true pullorum status of a flock cannot be determined by testing 
only part of the birds in the flock. Furthermore, it cannot be assumed that a 
flock which has passed a negative test will remain negative. The fact that 
"breaks" occur is sufficient evidence to indicate the necessity of annual testing. 

This past season there were 37 flocks, representing 113,176 birds, with an 
intermittent testing history. This was approximately 10 percent of the total 
birds tested. It is hoped that the number of intermittently tested flocks may be 
kept at a very low minimum, because a sound breeding program includes the 
annual testing of flocks. 

A total of 16 flocks was only partially tested the past season. The number 
of birds tested in these flocks was 13,192. Again it may be emphasized that 
testing only part of the flock does not give the true pullorum picture of the 
flock. It is essential in a sound breeding program to test all the birds on the 
premises even though the untested birds may not be used for breeders. It should 



14 

be recognized that pullorum infection can spread among mature birds. Main- 
taining tested and untested birds in separate houses is not sufficient protection 
against the spread of the disease on the average commercial poultry farm. In 
states that have adopted the practice of testing all birds on the premises, the 
effort has been very fruitful in establishing and maintaining pullorum-free flocks. 

Poultrymen who have experienced pullorum "breaks" in their flocks realize 
that it is costly. However, many of these "breaks" could be avoided through 
more caijeful management. "Breaks" may completely ruin a poultryman's 
hatching season. Sometimes the infection can be eliminated before the start of 
the hatching season, especially if it is detected early in the testing year. Careful 
and conscientious observance of the preventive measures listed in a previous 
section will pay the flock owner very good dividends in maintaining a pullorum- 
free flock. 

Early Testing: Last season a number of poultrymen were disappointed be- 
cause they could not have their flocks tested at a desired time. This was due to a 
number of factors but the laboratory made every effort to test as many birds as 
was possible in the allotted time. It has been called to the attention of the 
poultrymen, prior to this past season, that the laboratory facilities can accom- 
modate only a limited number of samples at a given time. If more requests for 
testing are received for that given time than the laboratory can accommodate, 
it means the work will have to be either postponed or cancelled. The following 
summary shows the number of tests requested by months and the number of 
samples tested by months: 



Month Tests Applied For Tests Completed 

April, 1945 .._ 21,043 

May 4,711 

June 16,952 12,662 

July - 45,138 39,193 

August.... - 89,814 56,672 

September 204,125 111,783 

October 225,563 176,489 

November 291,634 192,378 

December 143,289 162,684 

January, 1946 58,397 197,792 

February 34,833 166,895 

March 6,440 117,321 



Among the reciuests for early testing, the number of postponements was quite 
large, which did not help the laboratory to complete a certain volume of work 
during the early part of the season. 

It is evident that if some of the testing work could be advanced from the peak 
months of October, November, December, and January into July, August, and 
September, a more satisfactory service could be rendered. The laboratory has 
no serious objection to "split flock" testing if proper precautions can be taken to 



15 

keep the tested and untested units distinctly separate. Poultrymen should 
understand that as soon as birds are five months of age, they are officially' eligible 
for the test. Furthermore, it is sound policy to test birds before their eggs are 
saved for hatching. If this principle were followed by flock owners, a great many 
of the birds would be tested during the first months of the testing season rather 
than during the ver>' congested months. 

It is hoped that flock owners will cooperate to the fullest extent in order that 
high quality service may be extended to the greatest number possible under 
existing circumstances 



Publication of this Document Approved by Commission on Administration and Finance 

3M-7-46-18974. 



nn,3ksiL B.v;ooD. ] 

•LIBRARY 

Massachusetts 
agricultural experiment station 

CONTROL SERIES BULLETIN NO. 129 JULY 1946 



Inspection of Commercial 
Feedstuffs 

By Feed Control Service Staff 



This, tlie fifty-second report of feeding stuffs inspection, contains, in addition 
to information required by statute, carotene determinations on alfalfa products 
and other^^data of importance in determining the value of a feedstuff. 



MASSACHUSETTS STATE COLLEGE 
AMHERST, MASS. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 

By Feed Control Service Staff: 

Philip H. Smith,! Official Chemist Henry B. Rodman, Junior Chemist 

in Charge Frederick A. McLaughlin, Microscopisl 

John W. Kuzmeski, Official Chemist James T. Howard, Inspector 

Albert F. Spelman, Senior Chemist Joseph A. Martell, Technical Assistan 

C. Tyson Smith, Assistant Chemist Cora B. Grover, Senior Clerk 



'Retired. 



This publication contains the analysis of official samples of ready mixed feeds 
found on the Massachusetts markets between September 1, 1945, and April 1, 
1946. While feed ingredients were to some extent sampled and analyzed, the 
results are not published on account of the small volume found. Many brands 
of feed new to the Massachusetts markets were offered, owing in most instances 
to the fact that the manufacturers best known to New England were often com- 
pelled to hunt out new sources of supply so urgently needed. These were regis- 
tered under the original manufacturer's name. 

Compliance with guarantees was remarkable when the scarcity of some in- 
gredients, especially protein concentrates, is considered. At times attached 
guarantees did not match either the registration or the contents of the sack, 
which can be considered excusable when the vital problem was to get feed into 
the market rather than to hold it until correct guarantee labels could be secured. 

Nutritional knowledge is far ahead of the requirements of any feed law. The 
present statute should be revised in order to give recognition to the advance in 
nutritional science. The present statute is based entirely on guarantees of pro- 
tein, fat, fiber, and ingredient content. Frequently, feeding stuffs carry guaran- 
tees of vitamin and mineral ingredient content. No protection under the law is 
afforded from the manufacturer who chooses to misrepresent the facts in these 
respects. 

While not of immediate interest to Control Service, have not feed conditions 
during the war and in the period immediately following suggested to Massachu- 
setts dairy and poultry farmers that even greater attention must be paid to home 
grown feeds? For the last fifty years a greater and greater dependence has been 
placed upon western grain products which under the circumstances has proved 
economical. Such supplies are now practically out of the market, whether per- 
manently or temporarily, no one knows. With improved roughage and more 
attention to grain crops, especially corn, it is believed that the need for purchased 
grain can be greatlj^ reduced. Such practice may eventually prove a necessity. 

In setting up the analysis tables an attempt has been made to use the guaran- 
tees actually attached to the commodity rather than to use the registered guaran- 
tees which may have been changed several times during the period of registra- 
tion because of the scarcity of some ingredients ordinarily used. Where the 
name of a firm or part of the firm name has been used as the brand name this 
has been omitted in the tables unless in the listing some confusion might be 
caused by the omission. 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 129 









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Gooo^uo'^oo(N'^av 

vCiOfOOOiO\Ct^O\COO 



incO'':fCioOGOONt^cO'^(^ 






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oO'^OnO'^'th^^OvOvO 
fsOt^'^f^r^JOCNt^O 



OoOOtrsOCMO^OiO'^O 
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10 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 129 






r*: cs f^r- 



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03 IV 

51 



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tH ^ ^ (>J ■^ 



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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



11 






OOOO OOCOOOOOOO lOOOO OOu^ioioOOOC lOOOOOOOOu^ 



■^^OC^ 






•N O li^ !>• rri SO C^ rc 00 CD ^ ■^ 0\ 

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12 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 125 



'-H r<i O O ^O t^ t* 

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coioo*ooNa\0'oavON 



OS CO 



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oooOr'^c^oo^NOroin'^ 

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mooooom 

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On '-I On 00 »-i On CD 
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INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



13 





OOOvO 




oOr'lOO 
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•r^OrO'* 

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r»5t^ (N OCOO 
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1/5 lO O (^lO CN 

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t^ so O O O 1/5 O 




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14 



CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 129 



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rt ro 't CS <-i CN fO rt —I •* T-i CN rH >-c«r^rO' 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 



IS 



O fO lO ^ CN vC O O '^ 0^ 00 t^ r^ O On CN O t^ '-f ^C -^ ^ t^ lO CS t^ lO fC ^ t^ fN t^ O P^ t-^ 

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f^oOfSO NOCNC^iCNi-^NCiocNf^pO'NCNi^Hoor^to'^cC'^aoto r^^-:^ ^ ONC^t^OO^NO 

t^ONf^ csONOiot^oONONOtoNONONOto»^tor^t^iot^t^t^ to^oto oo lor^toONNCON 



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26 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 129 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS WHO REGISTERED FEEDINGSTUFFS FOR SALE 
IN MASSACHUSETTS IN 1946 

Ward G. Ackerman, Altamont. N. Y. 

Acme Milling Co., Glean, N. Y. 

Acme-Evans Co., Inc., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Albers Milling Co., Seattle 4, Wash. 

Allied Mills, Inc., Chicago. 111. 

American Flours, Inc., Newton, Kan. 

American Maize-Products Co., 100 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Anchor Mills, Hagerstown, Md. 

Arcady Farms Milling Co., 223 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Archer-Daniels-Midland Co., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Armour & Co., U. S. Yards, Chicago, 111. 

Ashcraft-Wilkinson Co., Atlanta 3, Ga. 

E. W. Bailey & Co., Montpelier, Vt. 
Barber & Bennett, Inc., Albany, N. Y. 
Bay State Milling Co., Winona, Minn. 
Beacon Milling Co., Inc., Cayuga N. Y. 

Best Foods, Inc., 237 Main St., Buffalo 3, N. Y 

Black Brothers Flour Mills, Wymore, Neb. 

Blatchford Calf Meal Co., Waukegan, 111. 

Blatchley & Ballard, Inc., Middletown, Conn. 

Bluepoints Co., Inc., Aberjona Packing Division, Woburn, Mass. 

Borden Co., Special Products Division, 350 Madison Ave., New York 17, N. Y. 

Borden Grain Co., West Water St., Taunton, Mass. 

A. H. Brown & Bros., Boston, Mass. (Registered by Mellin's Food Co. of North America) 

George B. Brown Corp., Ipswich, Mass. 

Buckeye Cotton Oil Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

Buckeye Feed Mills, Dalton, Ohio 

A. B. Caple Co., Toledo 5, Ohio 

Central Soya Co., Inc., Fort Wayne 2, Ind. 

Checkerboard Feed Stores, Ralston Purina Co., Prop., St. Louis 2, Mo. 

Clinton Industries, Inc., Clinton, Iowa 

Coatsworth and Cooper Ltd., 67 Yonge St., Toronto, Ont., Canada 

Colonial Feed Dealers Cooperative Assn., Inc., LaRose, 111. 

Commander-Larabee Milling Co., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Consolidated Distilleries, Inc., East Taunton, Mass. 

Consolidated Products Co., Danville, 111. 

Consolidated Rendering Co., 178 Atlantic Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Continental Distilling Corp., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia 2, Penn. 

O. A. Cooper Co., Humboldt, Neb. 

Cooperative .\lfalfa Mills, Inc., Box 1525 Central Station. Toledo, Ohio 

Corn Products Sales Co., 17 Battery Place, New York 4, N. Y. 

Courcy & Sons Grain Co., 12 \^'averly St., Taunton, Mass. 

Cover Grain & Feed Co., 150 Middle St., Lowell, Mass. 

Chas. M. Cox Co., 177 Milk St., Boston 9, Mass. 

Crawford Brothers, Inc., Walton, N. Y. 

Crookston Milling Co., Crookston, Minn. 

Dailey Mills, Inc., Clean, N. Y. 

Dairymen's League Co-operative Association, Inc., 11 West 42nd St., New Vork 18, N. Y. 

Dawe's Manufacturing Co., 4800 S. Richmond St., Chicago 32, 111. 

Decatur Milling Co., Inc., Decatur, 111. 

Dehydrating Process Co., 60 Mt. Washington Ave., Boston, Mass. 

Delaware Mills, Inc., 88 Front St., Deposit, N. Y. 

Denver Alfalfa Milling & Products Co., Lamar, Col. 

Frank Diauto, 87 Warren St., Randolph. Mass. 

F. Diehl & .Son, Inc., Wellesley 81, Mass. 
Dietrich & Gambrill, Inc., Frederick, Md. 
Drackett Products Co., Cincinnati, Ohio 

E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co., Wilmington 98, Del. 

Eagle Roller Mill Co., New Ulm, Minn. 

East Bridgewater Farmers' Exchange, East Bridgewater, Mass. 

Eastern States Farmers' E.xchange, West Springfield, Mass. 

B. A. Eckhart Milling Co., 1300 Carroll Ave., Chicago 7, 111. 
Economy Grocery Stores Corp., 393 D St., Boston, Mass. 
M. W. Ellis Estate, 19 Walnut St., Peabody, Mass. 
Elmore Milling Co., Inc., Oneonta, N. Y. 

John W. Eshelman & Sons, Lancaster, Penn. 

Essex County Co-operative Farming Assn., Topsfield, Mass. 

Excelsior Milling Co., Minneapolis 15, Minn. 

Faesy & Besthoff, Inc., 220 East 42nd St., New York, N. Y. 

Farm Bureau Assn., 155 Lexington St., Waltham, Mass. 

Farmers Feed Co., 532 East 76th St., New York, N. Y. 

Federal Mill, Inc., Lockport, N. Y. 

E. H. Felton & Co., Indianola, Iowa 

Fernando Alfalfa Milhng Co., 6104 'Van Nuys Blvd., 'Van Nuys, Cal. 

Finger Lakes and Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., Geneva, N. Y. 

Fingerlakes & Hudson Flour Mills, Inc., 7 Madison St., Troy, N. Y. 

First National Stores, Inc., 5 Middlesex Ave., Somei-ville, Mass. 

Flambeau Milling Co., Phillips, Wis. 

Flory Milling Co., Inc., Bangor, Penn. 

Fred A. Fountain, Taunton, Mass. 

Fremont Molassses Feed Co., Fremont, Neb. 



INSPECTION OF COMMERCIAL FEEDSTUFFS 27 

J. B. Garland & Son, Inc., IS Grafton St., Worcester, Mass. 

Gateway Milling Assn., Inc., Buffalo 13, N. Y. 

General Foods Corp., Battle Creek, Mich. 

General Foods Corp., Corn Mill Division, Kankakee, 111. 

General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis 15, Minn. 

General Mills, Inc., Farm Service Division, Buffalo 3, N. Y. 

General Mills, Inc., Larrowe Division, Detroit 2, Mich. 

Gerard Co., Baltimore 5, Md. 

Getek Industrial & Agricultural Supplies Corp., 1270 Sixth Ave., New York 20, N. Y. 

W. K. Gilmore & Sons, Inc., Walpole, Mass. 

Glidden Co., Feed Mill Division, 1160 West 18th St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Glidden Co., Soya Products Division, 2165 W. Moffat St., Chicago 39, III. 

Gloucester Dehydrating Process Co., Gloucester, Mass. 

Gorton-Pew Fisheries Co., Ltd., Gloucester, Mass. 

D. H. Grandin Milling Co., Jamestown. N. Y. 

Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co., New York, N. Y. 

Gwinn Milling Co., Columbus 9, Ohio. 

Hales & Hunter Co., 166 West Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 

D. Harbeck & Sons, New Bedford, Mass. 

Harper Feed Mills, Inc., Washington, Penn. 

Henkel Flour Mills, Division of International Milling Co., Minneapolis 1, Minn. 

Hercules Powder Co., Dairy Products Division, 332 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

D. B. Hodgkins' Sons, 30 Pearl St., Gloucester, Mass. 

H. P. Hood & Sons, Inc., 500 Rutherford Ave., Boston 29, Mass. 
Hood Mills Co., Baltimore 5, Md. 

E. C. & W. L. Hopkins, Inc., Greenfield, N. H. 
Hubinger Co., Keokuk, Iowa 

Illinois Cereal Mills, Inc , Paris, 111. 

Illinois Yeast Co., Princeton, 111. 

Independent Tallow Co., Inc., 39 Cedar St., Woburn, Mass. 

International Milling Co., 800 McKnight Bldg,. Minneapolis 1, Minn. 

Jaquith & Co., Woburn, Mass. 

Kasco Mills, Inc., Waverly, N. Y. 

Kellogg Co., Battle Creek, Mich. 

Kellogg Co., Omaha, Neb. 

Kellogg Milling Co., 280 New Chamber of Commerce, Minneapolis 15, Minn. 

Spencer Kellogg & Sons, Inc., 98 Delaware Ave., Buffalo 5, N. Y. 

Keystone Dehydrators, Box 204, Nazareth, Penn. 

Chas. J. Koelsch Grain Co., 177 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

Kraft Foods Co., 500 Peshtigo Court. Chicago 90, 111. 

Chas. A. Krause Milling Co., Milwaukee 1, Wis. 

Larabee Flour Mills Co., Kansas City, Mo. 

Mackenzie & Winslow, Inc., Fall River, Mass. 

Maine Fish Meal Co., Union Wharf, Portland, Maine 

Mansfield Milling Co., Mansfield, Mass. 

Maritime Milling Co., Inc., 1009 Chamber of Commerce, Buffalo 2, N. Y. 

May Way Mills, Inc., Kansas City 6, Mo. 

Meech & Stoddard, Inc., Middletown, Conn. 

Mellin's Food Co. of North America, Boston, Mass. (Registered for A. H. Brown & Bios.) 

Merrimack Farmers' Exchange, Inc., Concord, N. H. 

Methuen Grain Co., Methuen, Mass. 

F. R. Miller Feed Mills, 6016 South 30th St., Omaha 7, Neb. 
Miner-Hillard Milling Co., Wilkes-Barre, Penn. 

Geo. Q. Moon & Co., Inc., Binghamton, N. Y. 

Jas. F. Morse & Co., 11 Horace St., Somerville 43, Mass. 

National Biscuit Co., Shredded Wheat Bakeries, Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

National Distillers Products Corp., 120 Broadway, New York 5, N. Y. 

National Lead Co., Ill Broadway, New York 6, N. Y. 

National Milling Branch of National Biscuit Co., 2221 Front St., Toledo, Ohio 

Nebraska Farm Products, Cozad, Neb. 

Neumond Co., 300 Merchants Exchange Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

New Bedford Grain Co., New Bedford, Mass. 

New England Grain Co., 390 Commercial St., Portland, Maine. 

North Dakota Mill & Elevator, Grand Forks, N. Dak. 

Northwest Distributing Co., Colby, Wis. 

Northwestern Yeast Co., 1750 North Ashland Ave,. Chicago 22, 111. 

P. Fred'k Obrecht & Son, Baltimore 5, Md. 

Ogden Grain Co., Utica. N. Y. 

Oswego Soy Products Corp., Oswego, N. Y. 

Palm Grain Co., 1081 Gorham St., Lowell, Mass. 

Philip R. Park, Inc., Outer Harbor, San Pedro, Cal. 

Park & Pollard Co.. 356 Hertel Ave., Buffalo 7, N. Y. 

George H. Parker Grain Co., 56 Water St., Danvers, Mass. 

Pasco Packing Co., Dade City, Florida 

Patent Cereals Co., Geneva, N. Y. 

Pierce Grain Corp., 1035 Seneca St., Buffalo 10, N. Y. 

Pillsbury Mills, Inc., Minneapolis 2, Minn. 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., Linseed Oil Division, 2-10 Chester Ave., Newark, N. J. 

W. N. Potter Grain Stores, Inc., Greenfield, Mass. 

Procter & Gamble Distributing Co., Cincinnati 1, Ohio. 

Publicker Industries, Inc., 1429 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Penn. 



28 CONTROL BULLETIN NO. 129 

Quaker Oats Co., 141 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, 111. 

Ralston Purina Co., St. Louis 2, Mo. 

John Reardon & Sons Division of Wilson & Co., Inc., Cambridge, Mass.' 

D. F. Riley, North Hatfield, Mass. 

Rodney Milling Co., Kansas City 8, Mo. 

Russell-Miller Milling Co., Minneapolis 1, Minn. 

Ryther & Warren Co., Belchertown, Mass. 

Saunders Mills, Inc., Toledo, Ohio 

Schenley Distilleries, Inc., 350 Fifth Ave., New York 1, N. Y. 

Schoeneck Farms, Inc., Nazareth, Penn. 

Joseph E. Seagram & Sons, Inc., Louisville, Ky. 

Shearer's Dried Milk Products Corp., 1046 Public Ledger Bldg., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Sherwin-Williams Co., 101 Prospect Ave., N. W., Cleveland 1, Ohio 

Sioux Soya Co., Sioux City, Iowa 

W. J. Small Co., Inc., Kansas City, Kan. 

Southwestern Sugar & Molasses Co., P. O. Box 10, McAllen, Texas 

A. E. Staley Manufacturing Co., Decatur, 111. 

Staley Milling Co., North Kansas City 16, Mo. 

Standard Milling Co., 309 West Jackson Bh d., Chicago 6, 111. 

D. A. Stickell & Sons, Inc., Hagerstown, Md. 

Stratton & Co., Concord, N. H. 

Sunny Slope Farms, Nazareth, Penn. 

Sunshine Stores, Inc., Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Swift & Co., Union Stock Yards, Chicago 9, 111. 

Swift & Co., Soybean Mills, Champaign, III. 

Taunton Grain Co., Taunton, Mass. (Successors to Est. M. G. Williams) 

Texsun Citrus Exchange, Weslaco, Texas 

Tioga Mills, Inc., Waverly, N. Y. 

Toledo Soybean Products Co., Toledo, Ohio 

Jacob Trinley & Sons, Inc., Linfield, Penn. 

Union Sales Corp., Columbus, Ind. (Distributors for Union Starch & Refining Co.) 

United Cooperative Farmers, Inc., Fitchburg, Mass. 

United Farmers Cooperative Creamery Assn., Inc., Charlestown, Mass. 

United Mills Co., Inc., Grafton, Ohio 

Unity Feeds, Inc., 177 Milk St., Boston 

George Urban Milling Co., 332 North Oak St., Buffalo 3, N. Y. 

Valley Dehydration Plant, Mc.Allen, Texas 
Van Vex Mills, Inc., 196 Smith St., Rochester, N. Y. 
Arthur Ventura Grain Co., Taunton, Mass. 
Vita-Vim Millers, 135 Scott St.. Buffalo 4, N. Y. 
O. B. Vunck & Co., Voorheesville. N. Y. 

Wakefield Sawdust & Shavings Co., Wakefield, Mass.