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SAN FRANCISCO HISTORY ROOViys^' 



■I 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

ROOM 



REFERENCE BOOK 

Nol to be laken from the Library 



HLE COP' 

INFORMATION BURl 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUSINESS 

c^ — — ^ 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XI 



JANUARY 6, 1920 



Number 26 



1925 a Banner Year for San Francisco 



Chamber Suney Reveals 
Bay Area Prospered 

Industrial activity, port tonnage 
movements, bank clearings and 
building growth are positive indexes 
of a city's progress or retrogression. 
Preliminary departmental figures 
compileti by the Chamber of Com- 
merce show conclusively that San 
Francisco progressed steadily and 
consistently tluring the year just 
ended. 

There are 4,818 industrial estab- 
Ushments in San Francisco, accord- 
ing to approximate figures arrived 
at by L. C. Willems, director of the 
Chamber's information department. 
This is an increase of 600 establish- 
ments over 1924. These industrial 
units in 19'24 employed 66,304 
persons. Last year this number had 
been increa.sed to 7.5.735. The pay- 
roll for these emplovees last year 
amounted to $93,967,334 as com- 
pared with $82,'265,330 for 1924, 
while the capital investment has in- 
creased from $292,500,000 to $334,- 
107,500. 

B.4NK CLE.ililNGS 

Bank clearings, always a positive 
barometer of a city's industrial and 
commercial expansion, amounted to 
the impre.ssive total of 89,481,311,- 
406, putting San Francisco in the 
forefront among the Pacific Coast 
cities. The clearings for 1924 sum- 
med up to S8,365,700,000. 

According to figures compiled by 
the Marine Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce 6,655 vessels 
with a total tonnage of 15,313,025 
arrived here during the year, and 
6,726 vessels with a total tonnage 
of 15,131,070 cleared this port. The 
tonnage credited to ships arriving 



A SHELF OF BOOKS 

By 
C. E. T.iYLOR, Membership Director 

A man once subscribed for a set of books which, the publishers 
told him, contained the combined knowledge and wit of centuries. 
When they arrived, he unpacked them — placed them neatly on the 
shelf, and forgot aliout them, except when the installments came 
due. 

One day, an acquaintance examining the set inquired regard- 
ing their merit; whereupon the man who was subscribing for the 
books exclaimed, "Thej''ve never done anything for me — what 
good, are they?" 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce is organized to 
serve you and to serve San Francisco. It is daily compiling in- 
formation, turning out leads for business, acting as a clearing house 
for trade. Do you really know what a treasury of service we have 
here for you? In short, are you using this powerful allj- in your 
business? Don't buy a set of books and put them on the shelf. 

Now, just a word about this little coupon. Of course, you 
liclong yourself, but perhaps your neighbor does not. Ask him to 
sign this coupon and mail it in. 

Membership Department, 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Consider this my application for membership in the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce. I consider it an organization of value to 
me in my business and of vital importance to San Francisco. 



Signed 

Business 
Addre.'<s.. 



from foreign ports alone amounted 
to 2,807,858 exclusive of the 2,628 
tons listed to sailing craft. 

Building permits for the year ag- 
gregated a tur^-ove^ of $50,392,793. 

Some conception of the year's 
indu.strial expansion in the San 
Francisco metropolitan area is fur- 



nished by the following comparative 
building permits: 

1924 1925 

San Francisco.$57,852,973 $50,392,793 

Oakland 31.214,810 39,2,')0,795 

Berkeley 9,369,027 10,058,549 

Alameda 2,562,008 4,127,300 

San Jose 3,670,190 4,847,773 

$104,669,008 $108,677,210 



SAN FRANCISCO BISINKSS, JANrAUV 6, 192fi 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Published weekly by the Sao FrancLico Chamber of 
CotnmerM, 205 MercbanU Exchange. Telepbooe 
Kearny 112. SubscriptioD, %i % year. Entered aa 
aecond-ctaaa matter July 2, 1 920, at the Poetofliee, San 
Fraocisco, California, under the act of March 3, 1 879. 



High Court Ruling Concerns 
All Shippers 

The Argentine Court of Appeals 
has recently handed down a sweep- 
ing decision of extreme importance 
to everyone interested in shipping, 
according to adNnces received l)y the 
Foreign antl Domestic Trade De- 
partment. Several well-known 
clauses in bills of latling are de- 
clared to be null and void so far as 
they affect shipments to Argentina. 

The clau.se stipulating non-liabil- 
ity of the carrier is declared illegal 
because the shipper is in an inferior 
position when forced to sign the con- 
tract and such clauses must be taken 
as not written. Also the original 
carrier under the bill of lading is 
held responsible for the merchandise 
until it is delivered at destination 
even when the original ship does not 
come to an Argentine port and the 
damage occurs on another vessel to 
which the merchandise has been 
transshipped. 

Must Be Tried 

It is held also that suits arising 
from freight contracts to Argentine 
ports must be tried in Argentine 
courts regardless of any stipulation 
to the contrarj' in the bill of lading. 

The case arose over damage to a 
shipment of 1,150 cases of mineral 
oil from New York at Buenos Aires 
in 1920. Due to labor troubles at 
Buenos Aires the original carrier 
put in at Montevideo, whence the 
cargo was transshipped to Buenos 
Aires. Despite the fact that the 
damage occurred by negligence of 
the second carrier, the consignee has 
a right of action against the original 
carrier. The original carrier, of 
course, has a right to an action 
against his agent, the second carrier. 

The consignee sued in the Argen- 
tine courts and in 1924 obtained 
judgment. The carrier appealed, but 
the decision of the lower court was 
sustained. The Federal Chamber of 
Appeals, which has handed down 
this decision, is the court of last 
resort on questions of fact, and the 
case could be appealed to the Su- 
preme Court of Argentina only on 
question of law. 



Foreign 1 rvADE TIPS Domestic 



C4 

9S55 — New York. \d aabcatos shingle eompany 
diTtiree to comniunieate with San FiTioeiseo import 
broken reKar<linE the handlinit of importations of 
BIII.DI.VC .MATERIALS. Prefer firma whieh 
have had ezperienee in thia line. 

98Sfi — .\eaponcta. N*ay.. Mexico. Firm deairea to 
purchase DIVING EQUIPMENT, suitable for use 
in di\'uiK for oyaten in water of from 10 to 50 feet in 

9857 — Maxatlan. Mexico. Party, established in 
business in Maxatlan. desires to purchase NOTION.S 
and .NOVELTIES from American manufacturen or 
dealers. Solicits citaloes and prices from interested 

9S58— -Matehuala. S. L. P.. Mexico. Firm desires 
to establish connections with a manufacturer of 
GASOLINE BURNERS FOR STOVES. LA.MPS. 
etc. 

9SS9— San Juan, P R. Importera and commission 
merchants desire to communicate with San Fran- 
cisco exporters of RICE. BEANS. CANNED 
SALMON and SARDINES. 

98(30 — Cienfueicas, Cuba. Commission mer- 
chants desire to represent California exporters of 
BEANS and RICE wishini; to market these com- 
modities in Cuba. 

9661 — New Orleans. La. Firm desirca to get in 
touch with San FraneJaco brokers or GRAIN 
dealers who would be in a position to ship WHITE 
CORN at competitive prices to Central .\meriea for 
their account. Prefer coocems which carry stock of 
com in San Franciaco for prompt shipment. 

9S«2— Balboa. Canal Zone. Party havini; 3.000 
tons of BAT CiUA.NO. located in a dry cave, desires 
to communicate with interested San Francisco im- 
portera. Can ship almost any amount on short 
notice. Will supply sample to pros)>ective buyers. 

9S«.3— Atlantic, Iowa. Suppliers of CORN and 
W'HE.\T desire to establish connections with San 
Francisco Erain exporters. 

9864 — Ceylon. Gem merchant is desirous of find- 
ing a market in San Francisco for CEYLON 
PRECIOUS and SEMI-PRECIOUS STONES 
Will send samples to prospective buyers. 

9865 — Leeds. England. Well-known manufac- 
turers of SPADES. SHO\'ELS. FORKS. PICKS. 
etc.. desire to appoint a suitable representative to 
handle the sale of their tools here. Their articles are 
of a high grade and have been selling well in Canada. 

9866 — Shanghai. China. Firm is interested in the 
importation into China of TI.NNED FISH, par- 
ticularly SARDINES IN TOMATO SAUCE in 
oval one-pound tins, packed 48 tins to a case. ReH 
labels are preferred in China and they would be 
interested in receiving a sample tin. fully labelled, 
along with c. L f. prices Shanghai, from interested 
suppliers. 

9867— Chemnitz. Saxony Established and ex- 
perienced manufacturers' representative, furnishing 
references, desires to communicate with San Fran- 
cisco manufacturers wishing to establish a market 
for their products in Saxony. 

986S — Graefenroda, Thueringen, Germany. Ger- 
man manulacturcr of LABORATORY' GLAS,S- 
W.ARE wishes a representative in San Francisco. 

9869 — Dresden, Germany. German manufac- 
turer of HIGH PRESSURE ASBESTOS JOINT- 
INGS wishes to establish connections with import- 
ers in San Francisco. 

9870 — Switzerland A manufacturer of SWISS 
CHEESE is very desirous of appointing a repre- 
sentative in San Francisco. 

9871 — Tonsberg, Norway. Gentleman desires to 
represent a California exporter of DRIED and 
FRESH FRUIT. Would prefer the sole agency for 
the entire of Norway. 

9872 — Tonsberg. Norway. General export repre- 
of packers of CANNED NORWEGIAN 



#0 

FISnnALI.S of finest (luality, CANNT^D COD- 
FISH ROE and SARDINTrg, desires to communi- 
cate with interested California importers of these 

9873 — Italy. Maoufaeturer* of OLIVE OIL 
SOAP desire to communicate with San Francisco 
importers. 

9874— Italy. .\n Italian supplier of DRIED 
MUSHROOMS desires to establiah connections 
with a San Francisco firm in a position to handle the 
sale of hL^ commodity in this territory. 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 

D-1921 — Houston. Texas. Party establishing a 
drug store wishes to purchase merchandise from 
Sao Francisco jobbers and «*holesaler8. 

D-1922— Paso Robles. Calif. Gentlcroao desires 
to communicate with San Francisco firma in a 
position to manufacture REVERSIBLE SAILOR 
C.\PS. red and white one side and lavender and 
white the other. 

D-1923 — Florence. Arizona. Fuel, eraio and seed 
company is in the market for CALCIUM PHOS- 
PHATE (bone charcoal or rock phosphate, un- 
treated). FERRIS PHOSPHATE (iron oxide), 
SULPHATE OF MAGNESIU.M (epsom salts), 
SULPHATE OF SODIU.M (GUuber salts). They 
request chemical dealers or manufacturers to sub- 
mit prices per cwt. for LCL shipments. 

D-1924 — Baltimore. Md. Gentleman desires to 
communicate directly with growers or shippers of 
ORANGES. LI>fES. FILBERTS, ENGLISH 
WALNUTS. BRAZIL NUTS SHELLED and UX- 
SHELLED PECANS. RAISINS and FIGS who 
can supply CI. and LCL lots. States he can dispose 
of several carloads of these commodities in Balti- 
more and vicinity during the year. 

D-192.T — .\tlantic, Iowa. Company desires to 
communicate with San Francisco firms which buy 
CORN and WHEAT for milling purposes. 

D-1926 — Detroit. Mich. FoodstufT distributor 
has facilities to distribute CANNED GOODS. 
CITRUS FRUITS. OILS, etc., in his territory, and 
wishes to communicate with San FraoC'Sco firms 
desiring representation in that market. 

D-1927 — Cincinnati. Ohio. .\n established 
brokerage company, very highly recommended by 
the Cincinnati Chamber of Commerce, is seeking 
desirable accounts for Cincinnati and surrounding 
territory of FOOD PRODUCTS and articles 
handled by the GROCERY' trade. Solicits inquiries 
from San Francisco producers of food products and 
kindred lines. 

D-1928 — HiUsboro, Ore. Gentleman offers for 
sale sev'eral tons of HORSERADISH and wishes to 
communicate with interested San Francisco mer- 
chants. 

D-1929 — San Francisco, Calif. Firm desires to 
dispose of a quantity of S.\LALL BOTTLES, 
GUiSS JARS, PERFU.MERY STILL and entire 
stock of PERFUMERY EXTR.\CTS. 

D-I930 — San .\ntonio, Texas. Firm wishes to 
with San Francisco DRUG jobbers. 



New List Available 

The Foreign and Domestic Trade 
Department has received a list of 
commodities which the Chinese dele- 
gates to the Customs Conference in 
Peking propose shall bear import 
duty at the rate of 20 per cent, and 
which is known as the "Luxury 
List." Copies of this list are avail- 
able at this office. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 



Ecuador Increases 
Invoice Ratings 

Consulai- invoice increases rang- 
ing from 4 to 20 per cent are in- 
cluded in a new schedule of %ase 
rates, according to advices conveyed 
to the Foreign Trade Department of 
the Chamber of Commerce by the 
Consul General of Ecuador. The 
new schedule, it is announced, be- 
came effective January 1, but the 
Chamber of Commerce asked the 
consent of the Consul General of 
Ecuador to cable his government 
requesting a stay of execution of 
from 60 to 90 days in 6rder to pro- 
tect traders who have contracted 
for future shipments. 

The increases announced by the 
Consul General include: 4 to 20 per 
cent on declared value: sobordos 
(ship's manifests) are increased 2.5 
per cent of total duties of the con- 
sular invoice; parcel post is S2.50 on 
each declared package; letters of 
correction, certificates of sanitation 
and other documentation charges 
also have been increased. 

Firms desiring additional informa- 
tion can communicate with the 
Foreign Trade Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



Committee to Survey 
San Francisco 

San Francisco's sea and rail 
terminals are to be inspected by the 
Illinois Terminal Permit Commis- 
sion, who, with their wives and 
friends, will arrive here next Sun- 
day for a three-daj^ stay. At the 
conclusion of the survey here the 
delegation will go to Los Angeles 
to inspect the terminal situation 
there. 

The party is headed by Fred E. 
vSterling, Lieutenant-Governor of 
Illinois, Robert Scholes. speaker of 
the Illinois Assembly; State Sena- 
tors R. J. Barr and T. E. Essington 
and Assemblymen F. E. Abbey, R. 
F. Cutler and Matthew- Franz. 



Specifications Available 

The following epecificationa covering bids re- 
quested for variouB supplies is now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department: 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at Army Transport Wharf. Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, California, as required during the month 
of February, 1926, various subsistence supplies. 
Bids are to be submitted to the Quartermaster 
Supply Officer, Fort Mason, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, and will be opened January 15. 192S. 



A new firm entering a new territory must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources- It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
st includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by maifing in or relephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop. Industrial Department. Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor. Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, plione Kearny il2. 

A daily service available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10 30 a. m., at the desk of the Information 
Department. 451 California street, or if desired. 



Accountants — Mj-rtile Cerf and Harry J. Cooper 
announce formation of a partnership under the 
name of Cerf & Cooper, 519 California; Donald 
Craig, Clunie Bldg. 

Adding Machines — Adding Machine SerHce & 
Supply Co.. Mills Bldg. to 507 Mission. 

Adjusters— B. B. Carx & Co. (insurance), 220 
Montgomery. 

Antiques— Mrs. H. Hempel. 380 Sutter. 

Attorneys — Brann, Van Duyn, Boekel & Rowe, 
and W. H. Jordan. 233 Sansorae; J. E McClellan. 
Bank of Italy Bldg. 

Automotive— Flint Motor Co. (used cars). 2947 
Mission: Blackhawk Auto Co.. 759 Valencia. 

Auto Painting — Bradley Auto Painting Shop, 39 
Polk. 

Auto Tires— J. P. Costello and J. Hirsch, 1022 
Geary to 539 Mission; Pacific Tire Sales Co.. 927 
to 982 Post: Fisk Tire Dealers. Ajax Tire Agency 
(Coast Tire Co.). 927 to 982 Post. 

Bakeries — Thieler's Bakery, California near 
Steiner, soon; Tuteuonia Bakery, 2808 24th. 

Batteries— D. & D. Battery Co.. 471 Clementina. 

Beauty Parlors— Balboa Beauty Parlor, 2041 
Balboa; New Mission Beauty Shop. 2494 Mission; 
Florence Beauty Shop, 1565 California. 

Beverages — San Francisco Products Co., offices 
74 New Montgomery. 

Bleaches— CaUfornia Bleaching Water Co., 2201 
Chestnut to new plant. 70 Rickard. 

Candy— p. J. McNamara. 2753 24th; Flomart. 
Inc. (A. J. Blumenthal), 68 Post. 

Chiropractor— Dr. S. E. Krouse (1509 Ocean 
Ave.). 4052 18th. 

Cleaners— Musicians Cleaning Co.. 1112 Fill- 



Collections— Colonial Law & Adjustment Co., 
783 Market. 

Contractors— Pool Construction Co., to Mills 
Bldg.; D. Paganini. 460 Montgomery; John Diestel, 
235 Montgomery to 381 Bush. 

Delicatessen — Premium DeUcatessen, 3286 Mis- 
Dentists— Dr. F. J. Moran. Flood Bldg. 

Drayage— Veterans Transfer & Storage Co., 611 
Post to Adelaide. 

Dresses— Garland Gown Co.. factory 153 
Kearny: Ted Lewis and Don Drysdale. 212 Sutter 
to 153 Kearny. 

Electric Appliances— Fitzgerald Mfg. Co. (Star 
Line), factory branch 1211 Van Ness Ave. 

Express— Ajax Transfer Co. (Thos. Gilboy), 154 
Leavenworth to 774 Golden Gate Ave. 

Finance — MacKenzie- Young Co., 485 California 
to 68 Post. 

Flooring— Hanley & McCrellis, 1875 9th Ave. to 
1443 ISth Ave. 

Florists— F. L. Figoni. 455 Bush. 

Food Products— Dromedary Co., Inc., Santa 
Marina Bldg, 

Furs — Nathan Goldberg. 259 Gearj'. 

Grocers— P. J. Masterson. 2800 Pine; J. F. 
Hogan. 2989 Cftlifornia; G. M. Huber. 1581 Church. 

Hay and Grain- Berringer & Russell, offire 1000 
6th to 465 California. 



Insurance — ^Gordon & Dunn (John M. Gordon, 
Harry S. Dunn), 433 California to 233 Sansome. 

Laboratory Furniture — Kewaunee Mfg. Co., 
Rialto Bldg. 

Laboratory Supplies — Lippold & Wagner, 171 
2d to 969 Mission. 

Leather Goods — Lampert Leather Goods Co., 
24 Battery. Geo. Goldwin. 279 Post. 

Lighting Fixtures — Peerless Light Co.. 149 2d to 
11 U Folsom. 

Machinery — Empire Machinery & Metal Co., 
481 5th. 

Manufacturers Agents — A M. Goldstein, 153 
Kearny. 

Marble — J M. Fabbris. Exhibit Sharon Bldg. 
Marine Engines— Hebgen Gas Engines. 660 
Howard to 27 Pine. 

Mirrors— Golden State Mirror Works. 308 Noe. 
Optical Goods — Jenkel & Davidson Optical Co., 
135 Stockton. 

Paints and Flooring — Andrew & Abbott, 2210 
Clement. 

Physicians— Dr. E. C. Taylor, 391 Sutter to 490 
Post: Theo. Pavlides, Flood Bldg. 

Plumbing Supplies — Pacific Sanitary Mfg. Co. 
(67 New Montgomery). 1000 Brannan. 

Printing— Thompson Printing Co., 348 Sacra- 
mento; Allan Press. 760 Mission to 183 Jessie. 
Publishers— C. F. Benoit. 101 Post. 
Real Estate — Irving & Miller, Hewes Bldg. 
Restaurants — Wayside Lunch, 1533 Hyde; Com- 
mercial Dairy Lunch, 612 Kearny: Mayflower Grill, 
2487 Mission 

Rice — Phillips Milling Co., 1098 Sansome to 310 
California; Wing Duck Co., 1134 Stockton to 944 
Stockton. 

Sheet Metal Work — Rubin Glantz Auto Metal 
Works, 1120 Golden Gate Ave. 

Shipping — Kingsley Na\'igation Co., Ltd., Mat- 
son Eldg. to St. Clair Bldg. 

Shoes— Eisenberg's, 1207 Fillmore. 
Signs— LawTcnce Goldberg, 1042 to 1080 Golden 
Gate Ave. 

Tailors — H- P. Brown, 101 Broderick; Mary 
Baker. 1732 Taraval; Geo. Boss, 1120 to 1048 
Market. 

Teas, Etc. — Merchants' Tea House, 1559 Ellis. 
Textiles— Lois Martin, 127 Grant Ave. to 533 
Post 

Transportation — Island Transportation Co., Pier 
19 to Pier 5. 

Trunks— J. D. West (1018 Fillmore), 1227 Fill- 
Miscellaneous — Bearing Specialty Co. , 1424 
Bush to 115 New Montgomery; San Francisco 
Association for the Blind, offices 760 Market: Stand- 
ard Mercantile Co.. 821 Folsom to 734 Harrison; 
American Purchase & Sales Corp., 681 Market; 
Brimberg Bros., Inc., 259 Geary; King Quality 
Products. Inc., 527 Howard; Federal Thrift Corp., 
Santa Fe Bldg.; Master Motor Service Corp., 
Hewes Bldg.: CaUfornia Woolen Mills, loc . offi;i?9 
821 Market. 

San Francisco firm desires to dispose of a quantity 
of small bottles, glass jars, perfumery still and 
entire stock of perfumery extracts. Direct inquirers 
to E. Moulie. 183 Tehama. 

Dettner's Printing House, Inc., is inviting at- 
tention to part of their new building on Howard 
Street, suitable for manufacturers' agents, general 
offices or drafting rooms. Leasing arrangements may 
be made with any agent. 

A drug store is being opened at 1821 Congress 
Ave . Houston, Texas, by Alejandro Canales. 
Dealers in the drug line are requested to make 
themselves known to the new concern. 

State Corporation Commissioner, State Building 
and Loan Commission and State Banking from 
State Building to Security Bldg., 343 Sansome. 
February Ist. 

The American Topographical Map Co. opening 
offices 406 Mills Bldg.. and will specialize in the 
making of topographical relief maps. 



8AN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. .lAMARV ti. 192H 



Members Urged to 
Send in Data 

Compilation of tlip meml>prship 
list of till- Chamber of Coiiimoroc is 
beinR expcilited and Mr. L. M. 
Hyslop, of the Industrial Depart- 
ment, urges memljers to send in all 
data whieh definitely defines their 
bu.siness and business activities. 

The Indu.strial Department, ac- 
cording to Hyslop, constantl.v is re- 
eeivinp; Ijuving inquiries for virtuall.v 
every conceivable product and serv- 
ice. In order to answer these queries 
promptly and adequately it will be 
necessan,- for the membership list 
which is being compiled clearl.v to 
define the business of each memljer. 
This, it was pointed out, will make 
it possible for the Industrial Depart- 
ment to put prospective purchasers 
in direct contact with business mem- 
bers and avoid the possibility of the 
inquiry being referred to an Eastern 
source. 



TRANSPORTATION 



Time for Hearing 
Is Extended 

The Senate Interstate Conunerce 
Committee, which will conduct 
hearings on the Gooding long and 
short haul hill this month, has ex- 
tended the time in which representa- 
tives of the railroads and proponents 
of the bill can submit their argu- 
ments, according to word received 
by the Traffic Bureau of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

The additional time granted for 
the hearing now includes Januan' 
18, 19 and 20. 



Revenue Freight 

Loading 

''Loading of revenue freight tlie 
week ended November 28 totaled 
923,213 cars," says the car service 
division of the American Railway 
Association. This was an increase 
of 44,082 cars over the same week 
in 1923. It also was an increase over 
the corresponding weeks in 1920, 
1921 and 1922. Due to the observ- 
ance of Thanksgiving, the total for 
the week of November 28 was a de- 
crease of 134,461 cars under the pre- 
ceding week. 



Transcontinental Freight Bureau 

The Bubjecta listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than January 14. 
Full information concerning the subjects iietcd may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the TraflBc 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Docket 6464 — Garage equipment. LCL. weal- 
bound; 6465. Washington and Old Dominion Rail- 
way: Request for representation as a participating 
carrier in Tariff 27-H and pro\-ide for rates on 
lumber from California points to stations on that 
line; 6466, flavoring s>Tups, LCL. westbound; 6467, 
awning arms. CL, westbound. 



United States Intercoastal 

Conference Westbound 

Rate Docket 

Bullotin N'o. 33. poeting date January 6. 1926. 

Tbo folloninK subjects have been rrferred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than Januar>' 18. Full information con- 
cerning the subjects listed may be had upon inquiry 
at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket Xo. R-I5$. iron or steel shoe lasts and 
stands, request for reduction in rate: R-150, Flit 
(insecticides), request for reduction in LCL rate 
to S1.20, Item 1K60: R^60. articles in compressed 
bales, request for modiBcation of items carr>'inK 
the pro\'inon "in compressed bales" by 8pecif>'inK 
a specific density. 

Bulletin No, 29, posting date December 9, 1925. 

The following subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than December 21, 1925. Full informa- 
tion concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Action on the subjects listed will not be restricted 
to the exact scope of the docket, but may include 
other commodities or recommendations var>ing 
from the changes proposed, if such modifications 
appear necessary or ad\'i8ab1c in disposing of the 
subject. 

R^2I — Bars, rods or shafting: Proposed addition 
to Item 2145 note reading as follows: "Steamer will 
not assume responsibility for outturn of pieces 
under 6 inches in length unless boxed, bundled or 
crated:" R-422, lamp outfits, Christmas tree. 
electric (electric wiring and plugs with equipment 
of incandesceot lamps), in boxes, request for specific 
rate on outfits which do not include incandescent 
lamps: R-423, lunch kits, proposed elimination of 
lunch kits from the first entry. Item 430; R-424, 
pumps, hand measuring, request for reduction in 
CL rate from SI.20 to 90e, minimum weight 24.000 
pounds; R-125. rubber sheeting or sheets, request 
for reduction in LCL rate from 82.40 to $1.50 per 
100 pounds: R-423, paper napkins N. O. S., docket- 
ed for tariff clarification; R-427, air filters (Sparco 
typ^), request for specific rate; R-*2S. spectacle 
cases, propHMed qualification of Item 645 by adding 
the words "Covered or Uncovered." 



New Parcel Post Cooveotion with Cuba Extends 
Weight Limit of Parcels 

According to advices received from the local 
Consul of Cuba, a Parcel Post Convention with 
Cuba was signed io Washington by the United 
States Postmaster Gtaeral and the Director of the 
Cuban Post Office Department on October 31, to 
become effective January 1, 1926. 

The convention is effective for a period of eighteen 
months from January 1, 1926. pending the modifi- 
cation or repeal of certain statutes which prohibit 
the importation int<i the L'nited Stateu by mail or 
parcel poet of cigars and cigarettes in quantities of 
less than 3,000 ii^ a single package, thus excluding 
some of Cuba's most important articles of export. 

Provision ia made for the exchange of parcel- 
post packages, ordinary and registered, exceeding 
eight ounces up to and not exceeding eleven pounds 
in weight, and requires the sealing of parcels with 
wax, adhesive tape, or in some other acceptable 



An indemnity is provided not to exceed SlO.OO for 
the total loss (wrapper and content) of re^tered 
parcel-post packages exchanged between the two 
countries. 

Importation of Livestock and Forage from Texas 
and California Prohibited 

Because of the existence of hoof and mouth 
diaease in Texas and California, the importatioo 
into Cuba of cattle, sheep, goats, swine, and horses, 
as well as all kinds of forage (hay. alfalfa, clover, 
etc.). from these States is temporarily prohibited, 
according to a decree effective from November 6, 
1925. A similar ban. effective November 4, has 
been placed upon Cuban imports of livestock and 
forage from Mexico. 



"The Czechoslovak Market" 

The Foreign Trade Bureau has received a copy 
of the first issue of "The Czechoslovak Market," a 
monthly re\'iew, published in Prague, Ctecho- 
slovakia . 



TRADE AT A GLANCE 

Conduced by the Information Department of the Qhamber of Qi 



CURRENT VOLUME OF BUSINESS INDEX 

Week Ending 

Dec. 30 

San Francisco (192.222,000 

Los Angeles 168.472.000 

Seattle 36,185.000 

Portland 31,167,000 

Oakland 28,932.000 

[Federal Reserve Bank] 



BUSINESS FAILURES 
Week Ending 

Dec. 30 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Number Failures 2 

Net Liabilities $6,415 

LOS ANGELES 

Number Failures 9 

Net LiabiUties $87,944 

SEATTLE 

Number Failures (Figures not 

Net Liabilities yet available) 

[R. G. Dun & Co.] 



Previous 


One Year 


Week 


Ago 


233,212.000 


»184,91T,000 


205,221.000 


175,557,000 


49,607,000 


42,268,000 


40,699,000 


35,959,000 


39.299.000 


23,715,000 


Previous 


One Year 


Week 


Ago 



SAN FRANCISCO 






BUSINESS 



'-^L: ' 



-U 




JANUARY 13, 1926 



;\\ 1'1!AN( ISCO HISINKSS. .lAM AliV l.i, \m: 



•:^ Ml:^ 



RADIOGRAMS 




Buy Coffee -m the Dutch Ea§t Indies 



The United States, with an annual 
consumption of coffee reaching ten 
pounds per capita, imports $4,500,000 
worth of coffee from the Dutch East 
Indies every year. 

Shipments of merchandise from the 
Dutch East Indies take a long time 



to reach this country. And it is im- 
portant to save every possible mo- 
ment in the transmission of orders. 

The new Radiogram circuit direct 
to the Dutch East Indies speeds your 
messages and handles them accu- 
rately. 



Always Mark Your Radiograms 




File messages to Hawaii, Japan and the Dutch East Indies at any 
Western Union office, or phone for a Western Union messenger. And 
to Europe, the near East and South America at any RCA or Postal 
Telegraph office; or phone for an RCA or Postal Telegraph messenger. 

"Radiograms Go "Direct from .yimerica to 

Hawaii, Japan and the Dutch East Indies 
England Poland Nomay 



Radio Corporation of America 



SAN FRANCISCO 
28 Geary Street Garfield 4200 

LOS ANGELES 
453 So. Spring Street— TUcker 6761 501 Mai 



SEATTLE 
e Building-ELiot 3719 



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 



Section 5 of the Act of March 25. 1901, Statutes of California, creating the 
State Board of Accountancy, provides: 
"Any citizen • • • may apply for examination • • • and upon issuance and receipt of 
such certificate, and during the period of its existence, or any renewal thereof, he shall be styled and 
known as a Certified Public .Accountant or Expert of .Accounts, and no other person shall be permitted 
to assume and u.'* such title or to use any words, letters or figures to indicate that the person using the 
same is a Certified Public -Accountant." 



Is your .Accountant licensed to pract 



i Certified Public .Accountant in California? 



VICTOR AARON 

.American Bank Building 
Garfield 1547 



AUSTIN & CO. 

625 Market Street 
Douglas 607 

WALTER B. BAII F.V 

255 California Street 
Douglas 7559 

ALEXANDER B.ALL 

1219-1220 Hearst Building 
Sutter 1464 

STUART S. BARNARD 

Kohl BuUding 
Sutter 46S 

PETER B.ARNETT 

Mills Building 
Garfield 94 

BOURS A.ND SMYTH 

Crocker Building 
Garfield 5655 



BROTHERTON. THOMAS & 
CO. 

-American Bank Building 
Kearny 5939 



DAWSON & RILEY 

Hearst Building 
Sutter 5175 



,. T. DIEBELS 

-American Itank Building 
Garfield 5064 



WILLIAM DOI.GE & CO. 

569 IMne Street 
Sutter 697 



HASKINS & SELLS 

Crocker Building 
Douglas 5 4 SO 



LESTER HERRICK & 
HERRICK 

Merchants Exchange Building 
Kearnv 844 



PAUL HEYM.ANN 

Mills Building 
Garfield 1965 



HOOD AND STRONG 

425 Standard Oil Building 
Sutter 795 



LYBR.AND. ROSS BROS. & 
MONTGO.MERV 

2 Pine Stre.t 
Sutter 1252 



H. S. PATTERSON 

Milk B.nMing 
Kearny :^.: 

PEAT, MARWICK. 
MITCHELL & CO. 

.American Bank Building 
.Sutter 2696 

ROBINSON. NOW El.i. & C". 

Crocker Building 
.Sutter l.'f4S 



RUCKSTELL & LAND 

705 Market Street 
Claus Spreckels Buildin 
Keaniv 6010 



CILARLES P. RUPP 

209 CaUfomia Street 
Douglas 8787 

SKINNER & llAM-MOND 

j}2 Pine S:reet 
Douglas 6S9S 



BULLOCK & KELLOGG 

-American Bank Building 
Garfield 5424 



EDW-ARD B- JORD-AN 

110 Sutter Street 
Kearnv 7956 



J.AMES O- SULLY & CO. 

260 California Street 
Sutter 1886 



CERF & COOPER 

Successors to 
Greenhood & Jansen 
519 California Street 
Kearny 1151 

C- P. CH-A.MBERLAIN 

3 1 1 California Street 
Sutter 5019 



JORGENSON. LUCKHAM & 
BL'NN 

Chancery Building 
Garfield 4499 



GEO. J. KASCH 

525 Bush Street 
Garfield 6156 



A. SLTTER & CO. 

.Nevada Bank Building 
Sutter 5179 



WALTHER WOLF 

625 Market Street 
Garfield 6554 



WALTER H. CRA.MER 

26S Market Street 
Sutter 2588 



HOWARD KROEHL & CO 

1010 Balboa Building 
Sutter 5296 



E. G- WliNNER 

260 California Street 
Sutter IS86 



Please Mention S.\s Fr.\ncisco Business 




Designed for efficiency — built for 
long wear — finished for lasting 
beauty. There are features you'll 
get in a desk of Crocker Quality. 
Whatever your desk needs, you'll 
get real value here. 

Our Deferred Pay Plan 

If you desire— payments will be dis- 
tributed to suit your convenience. 



H. S. CROCKER CO., Inc. 

S65-S71 Market Street < 242 Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



v\N FRAXCISCn BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



Telling ^^Georgey^'c/f bout California 



Ten -Million -Dollar 

Campaign 

That's 

Always 

Working 



,- — >^ J>:^fv-;-^ 'W^ Gtorgr J- Bn 

X ^v jT-^ ^^-*-^ enjoy the tateft copy of j^m 

Jy ! ] greatest literary bargain. It is 

^^^> ' Thursday evraing. 




<Bj A. McKIE DONNAN 

Illu:Mi,on ky BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 



MR. GEORGE J. BROWN, 
average citizen of one of our 
average mid-western cities, 
has just finished giving the furnace 
an extra jab in the ribs. Dinner is 
over; Mrs. B. is clearing away the 
dishes and directing the ablutionary 
efforts of her high-school daughter 
at the dishpan. George J., Jr., has 
gone out to keep a "date" and the 
youngsters are already in bed. Com- 
parative quiet reigns and George .1. 
sighs heartily as he resigns his 
slightly corpulent frame to the wel- 
coming arms of his favorite fireside 
chair, lights his evening pipe and 
starts to enjoy the latest copy of 
America's greatest literary bargain. 
It is Thursday evening. 

Like many a magazine reader 
nowadays, George J. starts at the 
back and goes forward. As a matter 
of fact, he rather prides himself upon 
his interest in current advertising. 
Somewhat of an advertising man 
himself, he would remind you 
modestly if the subject should come 
up in some conversation you might 
be having with him. Only in a small 
way, of course: classified advertise- 
ments in the local paper. But he 
"likes to keep up with what the 
bigger fellows are doing" — even 
those who spread themselves nation- 
ally. 

The back cover strikes his eye. 
It is in colors. Raisins! Yes — and 
more. The place where raisins grow- 
best is modestly mentioned (in about 



96 point type — which, as everyone 
knows, is more than an inch high). 
In fact, the advertisement, peculiarly 
enough, makes considerable of a 
point of where the raisins grow best. 
It's that place where Aunt Emma 
went last winter, you know, when 
she thought she was getting too old 
for Eastern blizzards. Sure enough, 
you've guessed it — California. 

The Idea Germinates 

George J. puffs heartily upon his 
pipe and turns several pages idly, 
his mind apparently wandering 
somewhat from the masses of typog- 
raphy which he is flipping over with 
his finger. California! It must be 
considerable of a country, at that. 
Like to take a run out there himself 
some day and see the country first 
hand. Will have to do it, too, just 
as soon as Sis graduates from "High" 
and the old business is running just 
a little smoother. Any place that 
could turn out such confoundedly 
fine raisins certainly must be an 
interesting place to visit. Might 
even be a good place to live. People 
must live there to take care of the 
raisins. Ho, hum, he'd find out for 
himself some one of these fine days. 
[Ehp-flip-flip.] 

Well, well, what's this? Dogone 
me, if it isn't another California ad- 
vertisement. By gollies, those people 
certainly must think they live in the 
only place on earth! Half their 



advertisements seem to be taken up 
with the fact that the product ad- 
vertised came from the consarned 
state. As though that made any 
difference! Why, right here in — 
well, of course, we don't grow prunes. 
But then I don't know why we 
couldn't! Let's see — "under the 
glorious California sun where prunes 
develop as they can nowhere else." 
Well, maybe that's right. Prunes 
would need a lot of sun, probably. 
Yes, they'd hare to have it. What 
was it Aunt Emma had said about 
that — that — "Say, Mother, what 
was the name of that Blossom thing 
Aunt Emma told us about out in 
California that they have every 
year'?" — 

California oranges ! California 
prunes! California lemons! Cali- 
fornia canned fruits and vegetables! 
California walnuts ! California Bart- 
lett pears! Heavens preserve us — 
even California sports hats! 

All a part of California's p^-ral 
$10,000,000 annual advertising cam- 
paign, the greatest natural co- 
operative advertising effort the 
world has ever known. 

Other cities besides those of Cali- 
fornia advertise. But they "go it 
alone." Other products are adver- 
tised besides those grown or manu- 
factured in California. But, they 
are advertised on their sheer merits 
and with little or no "local color" to 
bolster up their sales arguments or 

[ continued on page 22 ] 





.AN 1 K \Nl,i> 



,11 \MiilK 1)1 (OMMI l<(.l 



Publiabed weekly by the SaD Fnineuco Cbamt>cr of Comincrre. 205 Merchants EzchaDge. Phone Kearny 112. 

Sul'scription 84 a year. 

Entered aa sccond-claaB matter at the Poet OfTice, San Franciseo, California, under the act of March 3, 1S79. 

GEDRGE L. NORTH. Bdilor L. P. BOVCE, .U^trluint ilanatrr 

Vol. XI t San FR.\Nrisco, Caufornh, .I:iiiuary 13, I92fi \o. 1 

/linking idaho ^Kith Jan francisco 



OX)') of the most important rail- 
road flevelopinents in recent 
years is the construction by 
the Union Pacific System of a line 
from Roperson, Idaho, to Wells, 
Nevada, now rapidly nearing com- 
pletion. 

This new railroad traverses a 
hitherto undeveloped section of 
Nevada, passing through the mining 
camp of Contact and not only pro- 
viding transportation for the ore 
and concentrates that are expected 
to come from that field, Vjut furnish- 
ing also an outlet from nearby sta- 
tions by rail for livestock that for 
years it has been necessary to trail 
either to Wells or to Kogerson. 
Some agricultural development will 
doubtless also occur in the tributary 
territory. 

The new line, through a branch 
line from Rogerson to the city of 
Twin Falls, will also .serve, as far as 
California business is concerned, the 
rich anil famous Twin Falls section 
of Idaho. Here is an irrigation 
project that has just passed the 
twentieth year of its existence. Less 
than two decades ago it was all 
sage brush, entirely unproductive 
except as it furnished a winter range 
for sheep. In the comparatively 
short time that has passed since the 
water was turned on the land a 
miracle of achievement has been 
wrought. 

Today the Twin Falls section 
looks much hke the great farming 
territory of the middle west. There 
are progressive villages, towns and 
cities ranging in population up to 
8,500; there are miles of paved roads 
connecting them; there are trees of 
every kind and farms that produce 
abundantly of crops that California 
needs and will use. 

What is known as the Twin Falls 



.south-side project contains 21(3,000 
acres of land, practically all of which 
is under intensive cultivation with 
a never-failing supply of irrigation 
water. 

In addition, there arc tw-o other 



Tfu new line described in the accom- 
panying article extends from Rogenon, 
Idaho, to tVellj, Nevada, a distance of 
ninety-eight miles, connecting with both 
the Southern Pacific and Western 
Pacific lines at ITells. 

This line, which will be in operation 
early in February, will shorten the dis- 
tance between San Francisco and points 
in Southern Idaho, Twin Falls being 
a representative point, by about ^3^ 
miles. This traffic is at present moving 
either via Ogden, Utah, or Portland, 
Oregon. This will place San Francisco 
on a parity with Portland, mileage con- 
sideifd, in the Southern Idiho territory, 
and will undoubtedly open up a new 
market for California products, also 
making available a producing market of 
livestock and agricultural products. 

This will also make San Francisco 
available as a port of export for the 
products of Southern Idaho. 



important irrigation enterprises that 
will be served l)y the new line. These 
are the Twin Falls north side, con- 
taining IM.OOO acres, and the Mini- 
doka project, comprising 140,000 
acres. The fertility of the land on 
both these projects has been 
thoroughly demonstrated, and while 
they have not attained the high 
development found on the Twin 
Falls south-side tract it is only be- 
cause they were not completed until 
some years later. Here, too, pros- 
perous cities have grown up and an 
alert, progressive rural population. 
The irrigated acres of Idaho may 
well be regarded as the bread basket 
for California's fast-growing cities. 
The Idaho climatic and soil condi- 
tions are such that they produce in 



great al)un(lanfe crops that Califor- 
nia with its higher-priced land and 
its greater manufacturing and indus- 
trial activity cannot afford to raise. 

Already a hea\'y consumer of 
Idaho products, it is thought that 
the opening of the new railroad will 
bring about a far greater demand. 
The Idaho potato, which has 
achieved nation-wide fame during 
the last few years, is one of the crops 
that have found ready sale in Cali- 
fornia. There is something in the 
soil of Idaho that brings the once 
lowly but now lordly spud to a 
standard that very nearly approaches 
perfection. These potatoes grown 
in the Twin Falls and other sections 
of the state arc so superior in quality 
that they readilj' command a higher 
price than those from any other 
state. It is on this quality that 
Idaho has built its reputation. Idaho 
produces and markets an average of 
12,000,000 bu.shels of potatoes an- 
nually and is excelled in yield per 
acre only by the states of Maine, 
Vermont and New Hampshire. 

Another Idaho product that is 
finding an increasing market in 
California comes from the orchards, 
from which nearly 7,000 cars of 
apples were harvested this year. All 
kinds of apples do well in Idaho, but 
the standard varieties such as the 
.lonathan, Delicious, Winesap, 
Spitzenberg and Roman Beauty 
seem to more nearly approach the 
required degree of excellence in 
flavor, texture and color. This is 
due in part to the long, sunshiny 
days of the Indian summer that 
comes when the fruit is ripening on 
the trees. 

In recent years, due in large 
degree to the activity of the Union 
Pacific System in promoting the 

[ continued on page 12 ] 



SA\ FRANCISCO BUSINESS. JANUARY 13, 192(i 



Colors -Dorn of 
Ounshine 



miMimAM 



<By C. E. KUNZE 



FOR the year 1925 the gross sales 
of the Simon MiUinery Co., 
makers of the famous Meadow- 
brook Sports Hat, are well over the 
million-dollar mark. And that, let 
it be candidl}' set down, is some- 
thing also for Californians to think 
about. 

The Meadowbrook hat is a San 
Francisco product. Here was its 
birthplace, and here is the plant in 
the I\Ieadowbrook Building on Mar- 
ket near Si.xth street. All the work- 
ers — builders, creators, artists, call 
them what you will — who make this 
dainty article of dress are San 
Francisco men and women. And 
when next you see that alluring 
phrase. Colors Born of Sunshine, 
which has helped to carry the name 
and fame of Meadowbrook around 
the world, don't overlook the im- 
portant point that the sunshine in 
this product is San Francisco sun- 
shine. 

AND sunshine is a very palpaljle 
element in the success of the 
Meadowbrook hat, make no mis- 
take about that. Sunshine is the 
true mother of color, and without 
color there could be, perhaps, a 
sports hat industrj', but it wouldn't 
be what Meadowbrook has made it. 
Colors and Meadowbrook go to- 
gether, and colors and sunshine go 
together. Thus, literally, Cahfornia 
sunshine has poured itself into a 
widely used and widely sought com- 
mercial product to the very practical 
end of helping to build up a million- 
dollar industry, and to throw, if one 
may use so colorful a metaphor, the 
Meadowbrook spectrum across the 
continent from coast to coast. 

But whatever San Francisco and 
the genial climate of California may 
have contributed to the success of 
the Meadowbrook hat, the balance 
sheet is more than even. For the 
Meadowbrook has made San Fran- 
cisco the style center for sports hats. 



Here is something that many 
people from time to time have talked 
about, and dreamed about — the ac- 
ceptance of San Francisco as a style 
center in articles of women's apparel. 
The ready wealth that has ever been 
a community characteristic, the 
taste and pleasure people have here 
for fine clothes, its cosmopolitanism, 
its Bohemianism, its touch of 
Orientalism and its outlook upon the 
great Pacific — all these have con- 
tributed to the thought and hope, so 
frequently expressed, that here is a 
city which should be an arbiter in 
the world of fine clothes, a dictator 
in fashions, a world center in 
women's styles. And now that dis- 
tinction has actually come to it 
through the work and persistent 
efforts of two young men. the Simon 
brothers, Irwin B. and Gerald H., 
who came here some fifteen years 
ago mere novices even in their own 
line, the merchandising of millinery 
supply goods. 

It was notthedream, however, that 
brought them here from their home 
in Salt Lake City. That dream came 
later. It followed in the wake of 
what was the beginning of the whole 
Meadowbrook creation, the notion 
that in the millinery trade there was 
room for a type of hat specially 
adapted for outdoor sports, golfing, 
motoring, boating, yet a hat which 
would look well indoors, too, in the 
clubhouse, on the verandas, at a 
garden party, or what not. 

THE original thought of the 
sports hat, as it came to be 
called, is credited in the Meadow- 
brook establishment to Gerald 
Simon, the younger of the brothers. 
It came to him while he traveled 
about the state as a salesman. The 
firm was then located in a loft on 
Market street near the Emporium. 
The more Gerald Sunon thought 
about the sports-hat idea, the more 




convinced he became that such a hat 
would be popular and would sell. 
But there was no such hat in the 
market. This was not an insuper- 
able difficulty. He set about to have 
a small line of sport hats made, and 
the Emporiiun, right next door to 
the Simon Millinery Supply Co., was 
one of the fir.st stores to offer that 
line for sale to the general public. 

As Gerald Simon had predicted, 
the line was popular, and thus was 
born the Meadowbrook sports hat, 
and thus was started the Meadow- 
brook plant, now the largest for the 
exclusive manufacture of women's 
sports hats in the world. 

Not only that, the Meadowbrook 
plant is today the largest buyer in 
the world of shapes, or hat bodies as 
they are called. 

These bodies are made of felt, 
velour, and various kinds of straw or 
reed braids. Hat bodies are aU im- 
ported, Italy, France, the South Sea 
islands, Japan, the Philippines, 
China and Central America being 
the chief producers. 

MEADOWBROOK combs the 
whole world for its shapes or 
hat bodies. Each country special- 
izes in its own particular type. 
From France come chiefly the fine 
felts and velours. Italy contributes 
the lacy Florentine shapes, the 
beautiful Venetians with the wide 
brims and open weave. 

From the South Sea islands and 
the Orient come the close-woven 
bodies, some of them as soft as 
Panamas, identified by the hat 
makers by such alluring names as 
Shantungs, Bankoks, and the Balli- 
buntals, which come from Italy. 

It is from Italy, too, that the 
plaques come, mere discs of woven 
straw or reeds, which look for all the 

[ continued on page 17 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINKSS, JANUARY 13, 1>)26 



Work of the Better business Bureau 



Tl 1 10 Better Business Bureau of 
the San Francisco Advertising 
Club is one of forty-three simi- 
lar Bureaus in the United States. 
Headquarters are in New York City. 

Daily exchanges of information 
occur by letter and telegraph just as 
among branches of a great mercan- 
tile concern. 

The Better Busine-ss Bureau move- 
ment i.s fourteen years old in the 
United States and has now reached 
England and the Continent. 

The San Francisco Bureau is 
twelve years old. 

Many business men have sought 
reasons for the sponsorship of Better 
Business Bureaus by advertising 
clubs. 

Increasing the belie vability of ad- 
vertising, through promotion of 
truth in adverti.sing of all kinds, was 
one of the original ol)jects of the 
Bureau movement, and remains to- 
day a fundamental. 

For this reason, plus the fact that 
the Better Business Bureau idea was 
born of organized advertising, the 
clubs have been the logical sponsors. 
Advertising clubs, being composed of 
buyers, writers and sellers of adver- 
tising, were the first to hear the 
gospel of truth in advertising and 
the members were in a position to 
and did give the first great impetus 
to this phase of responsibility to the 
public. 

Business Insurance 

The expansion of the Bureau work 
was a natural one in view of the 
great strides made in advertising 
and sales promotion. 

Protection of the immense invest- 
ments in advertising and marketing 
plans called for forms of business in- 
surance of which Better Business 
Bureaus were quick to see the need. 

By nation-wide contacts, by means 
of a central clearing house, through 
the instrumentality of national and 
regional conventions, by traveling 
speakers, the word was passed, 
agreements were reached, principles 
were established, enlarged Bureau 
activities were outlined, and today 
the Better Business Bureau move- 
ment has become on one hand an 
active partner in the conduct and 
protection of legitimate business, an 
interpreter of busine.ss to the buying 
pubhc, and on the other hand a foe 
to all confidence-destroying agencies 
which prey or attempt to prey upon 
the unsophisticated. 



% FRED H. MANTOR 

Manager Better Business Bureau, San 
Francisco Advertising Club 

While education is the prime factor 
in Bureau work, it has been necessary 
to originate and to have placed upon 
the statute books forms of legislation 
which have put teeth in Bureau 
activities when other corrective 
measures have failed to meet re- 
quirements. 

Although the fundamentals of 
Bureau work are national and even 
international, it has been recognized 
that regional conditions could not be 
met unless freedom of action was 
given local Bureaus in the develop- 
ment of superstructures of service to 
fit local conditions. 

The San Francisco Plan 

The groat California prosperity of 
1925 placed such heavy responsibili- 
ties upon the local Bureau and 
developed such specific requirements 
in Bureau service, that in the fall of 
last year it was determined to create 
the San Francisco Plan of operation. 

In November last the fortunate 
presence in San Francisco of C. King 
Woodbridge, president of the Asso- 
ciated Advertising Clubs of the 
World and, in private life, president 
of the Dictaphone Co. of New York, 
gave opportunity to go over w-ith 
him the skeleton of the San Fran- 
cisco Plan. It met with his warm 
approval, and the completed plan is 
now in effect. 

Experience having demonstrated 
that the confidential nature of most 
Better Business work had kept manj' 
business men in the dark as to the 
true nature of the organization and 
type of service rendered, it was de- 
termined to set forth in the San 
Francisco Plan concrete facts, free 
from generalities. 

Value of Membersliip 

It was recognized that the finan- 
cing of the Bureau has for years been 
done by some civic and business 
leaders who understood the princi- 
ples of Bureau work, but that con- 
siderable support also came from 
men who looked upon membership 
in the Bureau somewhat in the 
nature of a goodwill offering. In 
nearly all cases, the Bureau services 
to members have been of a character 
to convince the members of the 
dollars-and-cents value of Bureau 
membership. 



There still remained, however, two 
outstanding facts: 

a. Bureau members were ob- 
taining a general service, not clearly 
defined and taken rather on faith. " 

b. Hundreds of reputable busi- 
ne.s.s men were almost completely in 
ignoraiK-o of Better Business Bureau 
work and of its value to them, hence 
were not identified with the move- 
ment. 

The problem of Bureau develop- 
ment presented several angles in 
addition to the above, but all have 
been met in some degree, and there 
will be no standing still. 

In the San Francisco Plan, em- 
phasis is laid first of all upon the 
fact that the Better Business Bureau 
is as remote from donation-seeking 
as is an insurance company that sells 
policies. 

Next it is brought out that the 
general Bureau service has been 
.split up into ten distinct services, so 
that "mctcri'il nienil)prships" may 
be taken according to the needs of 
any legitinuite bu.siness. The indi- 
vidual services listed below may be 
taken singly, in any desired combi- 
nation or in full : 

Unfair Competition: The Bureau to 
advise those whose advertising violates 
the rulings of legally constituted regula- 
tory bodies. Intentional violators to be 
acted against when educational measures 
fail. 

Truthful Adverlisinq: The Bureau to 
resort to the Advertising Law in eases 
where fraud or deception has been the 
proved intention or result, but to co- 
operate at all times with legitimate busi- 
ne.sses when errors have occurred in their 
advertising or sales promotion efforts, 
with a view to establishing with the pub- 
lic the essential integrity of the adver- 
tiser. 

Goodwill Insurance: The Bureau to 
encourage all customer-complainants to 
give the concern with which they have 
had an unsatisfactory transaction every 
opportunity to make direct adjustment 
before expecting the Bureau to act. In 
short, the Bureau's work in this classifica- 
tion to be goodwill insurance for the 
honest concern, through education of con- 
sumers. 

Cooperative Assistance: The Bureau to 
report from time to time to members such 
sales practices or advertising methods in 
their individual establishments as are 
against the best interests of the business, 
and which may have been discovered by 
Bureau investigators or brought to the 
Bureau's attention. 

To Combat Fraud: The Bureau— through 
cooperation now existing between offices 
of the State Corporation Commission, the 
State Real Estate Commission, the State 
Division of Weights and Measures, the 
District Attorney's Office, the City 
Police Department and Detective Bureau, 
the United States Postal Inspection Serv- 
[ continued next page I 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



(continued from preceding page] 

ice, credit reporting agencies and Better 
Business Bureaus in other cities — to com- 
bat the invasion of San Francisco by 
fraudulent enterprises of all kinds. The 
Bureau also to keep a watch upon sales 
operators whose methods are deceptive, 
and to act against them. 

Speaking Service: An acceptable Bureau 
speaker to appear semi-annually before 
selling staffs to explain trath in selling, 
truth in advertising and other construc- 
tive ideas along Better Business lines, for 
the benefit of, and after consultation with 
the Reneral management of, any member 
institution. 

Composing Disputes: The Bureau, upon 
request, to assist as a confidential neutr.il 
party in composing disputes between com- 
petitive businesses with respect to adver- 
tising and selling. 

Protecting the Small Investor: The 
Bureau to warn the inexperienced and 
those of small means against high-pressure 
operators, against speculative securities 
or enterprises, against swindlers of vari- 
ous kinds, and to urge the selection of real 
investments upon advice of reputable 
dealers in securities. Extra non-confiden- 
tial Bureau bulletins for the financial 
education of pay-roll employees to be 
furnished, upon request, in reasonable 
quantity, same to be posted on time 
clocks or otherwise circulated by organi- 
zations holding membership in this 
service. 

Media Service: Keeping out of Members' 
Pockets the Hand of the Advertising Grafter: 
The Bureau to continue and enlarge its 
Media Service, obtaining and keeping on 
file information as to illegitimate or 
worthless publicatioas seeking to sell 
advertising space to members of this 
service; to investigate claims of publica- 
tions; to receive statements of publica- 
tions desiring to be on record with the 
Bureau; to have quickly available, or to 
seek quickly, information which will 
avoid waste of advertising funds. 

Bulletin Service: At least two confiden- 
tial bulletins monthly reporting typical 
Bureau cases, giving facts of educational 
value, warning against fraudulent proposi- 
tions and schemes to be shuimed, etc. 

On December fifteenth a signifi- 
cant service was established upon 
the initiative of certain mattress, 
pillow and comforter manufacturers 
and dealers. It involved the creation 
with the San Francisco Better Busi- 
ness Bureau of a departmental forthe 
education of producers, dealers and 
consumers of the foregoing lines, and 
the enforcement of the state bed- 
ding laws. 

Seeing in the Better Business 
Bureau a neutral body, interested in 
constructive manufacturing and 
marketing methods, a group of far- 
visioned men in the mattress, pillow 
and comforter industries decided to 
take sufficient memberships in the 
Bureau to justify the estabhshment 
of a separate departmental for the 
protection of the public from hy- 
gienic and value standpoints. 

In effect they divorced themselves 
from any attempts to make their 
industries self-regulating (with con- 
sequent charges of competitive bias), 
and elected the Better Business 
Bureau as arbitrator, investigator, 

[ contijiued on page 14 ] 



The Function of the Insurance Broker rr Number 8 of a Series 

She Made NewTork City 

Readlnsurance 
Policies 




n 



Fully corered by insurance. 

Muriel Lanlor, film star, 

helped put the "Read Tour 

Policy" idea across. 



iO YOU ever read your insur- 
ance policies ? If so, you are 
-"n exceptional person. 

The public generally accepts its in- 
surance contradts without question. 
While this speaks well forthe reputation 
possessed by the insurance business, 
unfortunately the acceptance of the 
policy form without careful examina' 
tion sometimes results in dissatisfadiion 
when a loss occurs,because the individ' 
ual assured has not understood the provisions of the policy. 
In an attempt to corred: this condition in New York City 
the Fireman's Fund and eleven other leading companies 
conducted a "Read Your Policy Week," publishing a series 
of fuU'page newspaper advertisements and other general 
publicity in which the illustration shown here was used. 

HOW BROKER MAKES POLICIES EASY TO READ '■'' 

Knowing that people don't read their policies, every good 
insurance broker encloses with the policy when he delivers 
it, a letter explaining to the assured any obligations he has 
assumed toward the underwriters in his policy contradt. 
Further than that, he is constantly on the alert to see that 
nothing his client does during the entire term of the policy 
violates his agreement. 

Thus the services of good brokers make for satisfactory 
loss adjustments — satisfactory to both the underwriters 
and the assured. 



FIREMANS FUND 

^ INSURANCE COMPANY 

M 




SAN FRANCISCO BISINKSS, JANUARY 13, lf»2<i 



20YearsAfter 




Ten years after being swept by 
fire, San Francisco, rising from 
its ashes with that indomitable 
spirit that characterizes its citi- 
zens, amazed the world by play- 
ing hostess at the great Panama 
Pacific International Exposition. 

Marvelous as was the rehabilita- 
tion during the first decade after 
the fire, it has been surpassed in 
the second. This thrilling, grip- 
ping story of achievement will be 
told and visualized by means of 
graphs, maps and statistics in a 

Year Book Edition of 

San Francisco Business, 

April 14, 1926. 

Membership Directory 

Chamber of Commerce members 
of record March i, 1926, will be 
listed by commodity classifica- 
tion. Those desiring their listing 
in bold face type may have this 
privilege by the payment of $1. 
Members will receive one copy 
of the Year Book gratis. Addi- 
tional copies will be available at 
$2.50 each. 

Regular advertising rates. 

Copy closes April i, 1926. 



YEAR BOOK ORDER 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

465 California Street 

Please enter our order for page adverUsing to be run in 

fU^J News Sections \ r ^r a r> r.^/->T^ ... ^ .7 

'^'{ Duectory Sections \ °/^°"'' ^^^^ ^^^K edition, April 14, 1926. 
Please list our name in bold face type, for which we will pay one dollar extra 
Please enter our order for additional copies at $2.^0 each (plus postage). 

Firm 

By 

Address 



l\X FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



C/ur I'oreign irade C/utlook 



THl'', year 1925 closed witli our 
foreign trade in a highly 8atis- 
factory situation. Unless un- 
foreseen pauses should arise drasti- 
cally affecting either our own pro- 
duction or the purchasing power of 
(lur leading foreign markets, the 
prnspocts for the coming year are 
altogether favorable. 

Foremost, perhaps, among the 
factors which promise favor to our 
foreign trade for the coming year is 
what has already come to be known 
as "the spirit of Locarno," in the 
countries of Europe that are among 
our best customers. No review of 
the past year would be complete 
without mention of the Treaties of 
Locarno, whereby the principal 
nations of Western and Central 
luu-ope pledged themselves to niu- 
tual guarantees of peace, stability 
and good will. We have reason to 
hope that a new era has been thus 
invoked among the former warring 
nations, and to believe that Europe 
is at la,st about to enter into a period 
offering the most beneficent 
opportunities for her undisturbed 
internal development. 

Our European Market 

Restored to a reasonable sense of 
national stability and the oppor- 
tunity for greater industrial produc- 
tivity, Europe must undoubtedly 
find herself with an increased ability 
to buy from abroad; and it can 
hardly be doubted that American 
trade will have its appropriate share 
in Europe's improved markets. 

During 1925 the export trade of 
the United States continued its 
steady advance, exceeding by more 
than 7 per cent its value in 1924. 
The total value of our exports for 
the year is in the neighborhood of 
.'S4,900,00(),()(10, the largest figure 
since 1920, anil representing an in- 
crea.se largely due to increased 
volume rather than to higher prices. 
This is an eminently satisfactory 
showing when compared with that 
of other leading industrial countries. 
British exports of domestic products 
were slightly less than in 1924, and 
French exports also showed a decline. 
Very naturally those of Germany, 
in view of the recstablishment of her 
currency and the at least partial 
settlement of international compli- 
cations, have shown some increase — 
about 6 per cent. After allowing for 
the changing prices, British exports 



By JULIUS KLEIN 

Director, United States Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce 

are only about three-fourths as great 
as before the war, and German ex- 
ports a little more than one-half as 
great, while French exports, as 
nearly as can be ascertained, have 
increased slightly. Those of the 
United States, on the other hand, 
show a large increase in physical 
volume — at least 20 per cent. 

Finished Manufactures 

It is particularly a matter for 
comment that our exports of finished 
manufactures have again risen 
markedly. Almost every class of 
manufactured articles has been ex- 
ported in greater quantity than ever 
before, except in the inflation years, 
1919 and 1920. A truly remarkable 
achievement of American industry 
is its increase of nearly 60 per cent 
over 1924 in the number of automo- 
biles exported, raising the automo- 
bile to a rank in our export trade 
surpassed only by cotton and mineral 
oils. 

But our so-called favorable trade 
balance, that is the excess of exports 
over imports, has been about one- 
third less than last year. This is 
due, in large part at least, to per- 
fectly normal and healthy condi- 
tions. When our business is active 
and the people prosperous, we de- 
mand more exotic foodstuffs on our 
dining tables and more raw materials 
from abroad for our factories. The 
year 1921, which was one of marked 
depression, for example, showed 
much smaller imports and a much 
larger excess of exports over imports 
than in the years since. The year 
1925 was marked by greater pros- 
perity than 1924. As against an 
increase of a little over 7 per cent in 
our exports, imports have increased 
by 17 per cent in 1925. This dis- 
parity need be lamented only be- 
cause of the fact that fully half of 
the increase in value of imports has 
been due to price advances. 

A Creditor Country 

It should be borne in mind that 
since pre-war years the United 
States has changed from being 
primarily a debtor country to being 
a great creditor country, toward 
which interest payments and pay- 
ments on principal flow, tending to 



increase imports. Moreover we now 
have to pay relatively much less to 
foreigners for ocean transportation 
on account of the development of our 
our own shipping. Were we not con- 
stantly making large new invest- 
ments in foreign countries, the 
change in our position in this respect 
might readily result in a normal 
excess of imports. The continuous 
large balance in our favor represents 
primarily our increasing loans and 
investments abroad. Our new place- 
ments of capital in foreign countries 
during 1925 have probably totaled 
more than -SI, 000,000,000 and bring 
our total foreign investments (ex- 
clusive of loans by our Government) 
to more than 89,000,000,000, as 
compared with about $2,000,000,000 
before the war. These investments 
represent, of course, savings of the 
American people and additions to 
their wealth; they supply a future 
increase of national income in the 
form of interest and dividends from 
such investments, as well as a most 
potent stimulus to our exports. 

Changes in Trade 

Considering more particularly the 
character of the recent changes in 
our trade, it should be borne in mind 
that our exports of crude materials 
and of foodstuffs are dependent not 
so much upon the enterprise of our 
producers and exporters as upon 
changes in our crops and those 
abroad. To a greater extent exports 
of semi-manufactures, and especially 
of finished manufactures, reflect the 
degree of efficiency and enterprise 
of our industries and our traders, 
although at the same time they also 
are afifected by general economic 
conditions and the buying powers of 
our customers. An increase in ex- 
ports of these classes is a favorable 
sign, both as to domestic and foreign 
conditions. 

The exports of 1925 show, as com- 
pared with 1924, an increase of 
about 13 per cent in the value of 
crude materials, a slight decrease in 
foodstuffs, and an increase of about 
12 per cent each in semi-manufac- 
tured and finished articles. The 
increase in crude materials would 
have been still greater but for the 
decline in the price of cotton, the 
most important item. Owing to the 
marked inprovement in our last two 
crops, our cotton exports were more 

[ continued on page 16 ) 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINKSS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



[ continued from pace 6 } 

industry, Idaho has taken rapid 
forwarci strides in dairying and 
cheese production. Less than five 
years ago, Idaho was importing 
cheese and butter. The great pro- 
duction this year will bring the state 
up to third place in the manufacture 
of cheese and from seventeenth to 
fourteenth place in butter. The 
largest producer of cheese in the 
United States after several visits to 
Idaho was so impres.sed with its 
future as a dairy state that he estab- 
lished at Pocatello a large plant 
where Idaho clieesc is assembled and 
manufactured into standard prod- 



ucts for distribution throughout the 
countr}-. Indications are that Idaho's 
cheese production will increase from 
6,700.000 pounds in 1924 to 10,000,- 
000 pounds in 1925. 

There is at Pa}'ette, Idaho, a co- 
operative creamery which started 
five years ago. The first year less 
than 200,000 pounds of butter was 
produced. This year the same 
creamery will manufacture nearly 
3,000,000 pounds. While this is an 
exceptional illustration of growth, it 
is fairly representative of the prog- 
ress that has been made. The total 
for the state this year will, according 
to the most careful estimate, be 



oAssociateJ fjT Three Generations miiih the "Best Progress of the IVest 



'B 



IG business and big banks : 
together they keep commerce 
and industry active. 

Conditions of commerce and 
trade change; but the well 
capitalized business, with the 
aid of the well capitalized 
bank, can take full advantage 
of every new situation. 

The financial histories of 
many of the largest Pacific 
Coast enterprises ar« written 
in the records of this big 
West-wide bank. 




^^ BANKOF CALIFORNIA 



COHMEKOAL 



San Francisco 

Capital, Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, over 
$17,000,000 — 
a guarantee fund for 
the protection of our 
depositors. 



24,000,000 pounds. A very consider- 
able proportion of this product is 
being marketed in California and 
more will doubtless go there as a 
result of the closer relations to be 
established by the opening of the 
new railroad. 

Another industry that has been 
developed rapidly in Idaho recently 
is the poultry and egg business. This, 
too, is in part at least due to the 
efforts made by the Union Pacific 
System. Last year in cooperation 
with the State Agricultural College 
a special train was operated over its 
lines for the purpose of encouraging 
tlie ■production of poultry. The 
train was etiuipped with an exhibit 
comprising the best available speci- 
mens of all recognized breeds and a 
tour of the state was made. 

Readers of San Francisco Busi- 
ness may be interested in knowing 
that Idaho acres are the most 
productive for agricultural crops in 
the Union. The United States De- 
partment of Agriculture in a bulletin 
covering 1923 crops shows that 
Idaho led the nation in yield per 
acre of wheat, beans, alfalfa seed, 
Grimm alfalfa seed, seed peas and 
rye. In the production of oats it 
was excelled only by Washington, 
in clover seed by Mississippi, in 
barley by Washington, in corn by 
Massachusetts, in potatoes by Maine, 
Vermont and New Hampshire, and 
in sugar beets by Colorado. 

Actual figures on Idaho's agricul- 
tural and horticultural, livestock, 
wdcil and lumber crops and mines for 
192.3 will show a value in excess of 
.5225,000,000, divided as follows: 

Wheat 27,975,000 bu. $.3.5,000,000 

Hay 3,148,000 tons 31,480,000 

Potatoe,s 12,254 000 bu 14,.50O,0O0 

Beans l,512,000bu. 3,000,000 

Beets 438,000 tons 4,380,000 

Fruits 12,000,000 

Oats 9,75I,000bu. 5,000000 

Barlev 4,928,000 bu. 3,500,000 

Onions 568,000 bu. 850,000 

Dairy products 12,000,000 

Wool 8,000,000 

Lambs 15,000,000 

Cattle and hogs 6,000,000 

Bees 2,000,000 

-Mines 40,000,000 

Lumber 35,000,000 

Total 8227,710,000 

Construction of the new line means 
the fulfillment of a desire that has 
been uppermost in the minds and 
the thoughts of the people for many 
years. It is the achievement of an 
ambition and the fruitition of a 
dream, and there will be, it is hoped, 
many thousands from California as 
well as from the intermountain terri- 
tory to congratulate and rejoice 
with Twin Falls in the day of destiny 
that is dawning. 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS. JANUARY 13. 1926 



cyf Leader s Kiews ofyapan's Problems 



A VISITOR to San Francisco in 
December who was of more 
than passing interest was Mr. 
Kyohei Kato. managing director of 
the Mitsubishi Trading Company of 
Japan. His mission on the Pacific 
Coast was to visit a number of the 
firms exporting to Japan through 
his organization. Mr. Kato is travel- 
ing on the Pacific Coast as a guest of 
Mr. A. C. McLaughlin, vice presi- 
dent and general manager of the 
Associated Oil Company. 

In Japan the Mitsubishi Company 
occupies a prominent position in the 
industrial and commercial world. 
Among its activities are shipbuilding 
and repair facihties, coal mines, 
metal and machinery manufactur- 
ing plants, a bank, an insurance 
company, and other similar enter- 
prises. The stock of the holdinii 
company which controls the varioii- 
subsidiaries is held in large part l)y 
Baron Iwasaki. 

The Mitsubishi Shoji Kaisha, or 
Trading Company, has a branch 
office in Seattle, and also maintains 
offices in New York, London, Paris 
and Berlin. Mr. Shimatani, man- 



ager of the Seattle branch, 
arciiiiipanied Mr. Kato on his 



who 
tour 




KYOHEI KATO 



of the Pacific Coast, stated that last 
year his exports of wheat from the 



Northwest to Japan exceeded one 
hundred thousand tons. 

"The agricultural lands of Japan," 
said Mr. Kato, "are no longer able 
to produce enough food to support 
our nation. The poor people in the 
country and in the smaller villages 
have stopped eating rice, because 
the price is too high. They are eat- 
ing wheat, which we are importing 
from the United States, Canada and 
Australia. Only the well-to-do can 
afford to have rice as part of their 
regular diet." 

From the Pacific Northwest the 
Mitsubishi Company is exporting to 
Japan large amounts of lumber, and 
Mr. Kato looks forward to a gradual 
increase in the amount used in the 
islands. 

"Our own supply is very limited," 
he stated in conversation with some 
of the leading lumber men of Port- 
land. "It is probable that the price 
will gradually increase in the islands, 
because our people are rebuilding 
and extending their building opera- 
tions very rapidly. The government 
is making loans on very favorable 

[ continued on page 15 ] 



Crocker First National Bank 




OF 


SAM FRANCISCO 






Crocker First Federal Trust Company | 


Montg 


omer>- and Post Streets 






STATEMENT of CONDITION 






RESOURCES 








CROCKER FIRST 


CROCKER FIRST 






NATIONAL BANK 


FEDERAL TRUST CO. 


COMBINED 


Loans and Discounts . . 


$44,390,413.09 


$ 2,909.012 37 


$ 47.299,425.46 


U. S Bonds and Certificates . 


12.271.093 78 


5.938.934 26 


18,210.028.04 


Other Bonds and Securities 


2,517.368 19 


5.963,196 64 


8.480.564.83 


First Mortgage Loans on Real Estate 




12.473,080.40 


12.473.080.40 


Bank Building. Furniture and Fixtures 


3.697.365 39 


50.000 00 


3.747.365.39 


Customers' Liability under Letters of Credit 


3.748.362.97 




3.748.362.97 


Capital Stock in Federal Reserve Bank 


360.000 00 




360.000.00 


Other Assets 


208.750 05 


86.057:51 


294.807.56 


Cash and Sight Ejcchange . 


20.439.799.87 


3.086.133.99 


23,525.933.86 




$87,633,153.34 


$30,506,415.17 


$118,139,568 51 




LIABILITIES 






Capital 


$ 6.000,000.00 


$ K500.000 00 


$ 7,500,000.00 


Surplus 


2.500.000.00 


425,000.00 


2,925,000.00 


Undivided Profits 


618.553.18 


590.151 00 


1,208.704.18 


Letters of Credit and Acceptances 


3,800.568.56 




3.800.568.56 


Circulation 


2, 96 L 300 00 




2.961.300.00 


Reserve for Taxes 


113,729.30 


23.024 00 


136.753.30 


Other Liabilities 


920.025.80 


30,111.31 


950.137.11 


Deposits ... 


70.718.976 50 


27.938.128.86 


98,657.105.36 




$87,633,153.34 


$30,506,415 17 


$118,139,568.51 


January 2. 1926 






1 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. JANUARY 13, 1926 




[ continued from page ) 

odiieatoi- and, when necessary, as 
prosecutor, for the uplifting of the 
industries as a whole in this terri- 
tory. 

The local Bureau was able to en- 
list the state authorities, the inspec- 
tion is done under the auspices of 
the State Division of Weiglits and 
Measures, and the resulting co- 
operative effort is counted upon to 
set a precedent for other parts of the 
nation. 

This is indicative of the trend of 
Bureau work. 

Several other local industries and 
civic leaders of some neighboring 
communities are contacting the 
local Bureau with a view to making 
it an arbitrator, an investigator, or 
a roi)()rting agency and source of 
information in relation to standards 
of i)ractice in advertising and sales 
promotion, manufacturing processes 
with regard to existing laws, unfair 
competition, worthless advertising 
schemes and fake investments. 

The San Francisco Better Busi- 
ness Bureau has the whole-hearted 
cooperation of the State Corporation 
("omnii.ssion, the State Real Estate 
("omiiiission, the State Division of 
\\'ciKhts and Mea-sures, the District 
.Attorney's Office, the City Police 
Department and Detective Bureau, 
the United States Po.stal Inspection 
Service and of other Better Business 
Bureaus throughout the United 
States. 

The Bureau is the recognized 
clearing house for matters in its field 
which are diverted to it by the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
and has a high record of results in 
handling problems involving local 
concerns which have dealt with 
people living at a distance, particu- 
larly in the protection of goodwill 
for the concerns and in so doing 
holding the faith of outsiders in the 
San Francisco business community. 

The membership roster of the San 
Francisco Better Business Bureau 
presents a cross section of the repu- 
table mercantile, financial, trans- 
portation and industrial organiza- 
tions of the city, and the present 
Bureau plan seems destined, by its 
concrete character, to engage the 
interest and membership of many 
other legitimate concerns. 

The Better Bu.siness Bureau, 
through President Hal H. King and 
other officers and directors of the 
San Francisco Advertising Club, 
was one of the first organizations to 
pass resolutions favoring the work of 
the San Francisco Endorsement 
Council, which will pass upon all 
drives for charitable funds in San 
Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



Pacific Foreisn Trade 

Council to Meet Here 

in March 

RI. BEXTLEY, president of 
the California Packing Cor- 
* poration, has been named 
chairman of a committee of repre- 
sentative San Francisco business 
men who are making ambitious 
plans for the fourth annual conven- 
tion of the Pacific Foreign Trade 
Council to be held here March 4, 5 
and 6. It will be the first time the 
Council has convened in this city. 

The convention will take up con- 
sideration of every phase of trade 
development on this coast, particu- 
larly in connection with world trade 
expansion. Nationally known ex- 
perts on trade conditions will partici- 
pate in the discussion. The list of 
speakers includes Dr. Julius Klein, 
head of the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce, Washington. 
D. C; J. J. Donovan, widely known 
lumberman of Bellingham, Wash- 
ington; William Pigott, of Seattle, 
president of the Pacific Coast Steel 
Company; J. D. Spreckels, of San 
Diego; Captain Robert Dollar, Her- 
bert Fleishh acker, Frederick .J. 
Koster, Clay Miller, president of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, and others. 

The Chamber of Commerce is 
taking an active part in arranging 
for the convention through its 
Foreign Trade Department. 

"The prosperity and development 
of the whole Pacific Coast depends 
so intimately upon foreign trade ex- 
tension that the Council wishes to 
broaden its .scope still further." Mr. 
Bentley declared yesterday. "This 
will be the first time that the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council has met in 
San Francisco and the event is of 
unusual significance to this section 
of the coast." 



A Leader's Views of 
Japan's Problems 

[ coiitiimod from page 13 ] 

terms, and building and loan asso- 
ciations are also being formed b\ oui 
capitalists." 

At a luncheon given in his honor 
in San Francisco, Mr. Kato ex- 
pressed himself briefly on the subject 
of immigration. 

"Regardless of what our politicians 
may think, the Japanese business 
leaders are a unit in believing that 
the small number of people who 
leave Japan to come to the United 
States will never help us very much 
in solving our problem of congested 



population. Our people are increas- 
ing at the rate of over seven hundred 
thousand annually. Perhaps we can 
send some of them to Africa, Man- 
churia, South America, and other 
places where there is very little 
settlement. The opinion of our 
business men, however, is that our 
best policy is to develop trade and 
more manufacturing. We must keep 
abreast of the rapidly growing re- 
quirements of the Orient by increas- 
ing out own trade and manufactur- 
ing. If politicians, both in the 
United States and in Japan, could 
get this point of view, I think our 



trade relations would improve very 
rapidly." 

While in California, Mr. Kato 
visited the distributing plants, re- 
fineries, pipe lines, and oil fields of 
the Associated and Pacific Oil com- 
panies. The Mitsubishi Trading 
Company several months ago ac- 
cepted an agreement to act as dis- 
tributors for the Associated Oil 
Company in Japan. Accordingly, 
Mr. Kato was particularly desirous 
while visiting on the Pacific Coast 
to learn at first hand the methods by 
which petroleum products are han- 
dled in this country. 



Every Audit Should Be 

A Detailed Audit 

The leaders in practically every field of business 
now regard the Detailed Audit as an absolute 
necessity. The Reserve Cities Bankers Associa- 
tion, and most of the Credit Associations through- 
out the country, stand on record as preferring it 
to the Balance Sheet Audit. 

Offering an expert and independent study in 
detail of the items represented in mass by 
balance-sheet figures, the Detailed Audit not 
only verifies, but clarifies. It digs beneath the 
figures and reveals the buried facts. 

Every audit should be a Detailed Audit. It 
brings to light avoidable leaks and wastes. It 
finds the fiaws in accounting, in credit and col- 
lection methods. It presents the cause, and the 
effect, of financial policies. It points to possi- 
bilities for greater profits. 

Free from the qualified statements of the Balance 
Sheet Audit, the Detailed Audit is the ideal basis 
for credit. Complete in its presentation of the 
facts behind the figures, it is the only basis for 
executive plans and action which lead to progress 
and success. 

ERNST 5c ERNST 

AUDITS — SYSTEMS 
TAX SERVICE 




SAN FRANCISCO HISINESS, JANIAKY 13, 1926 



Foreign Trade Review and Prospeds 



than 40 per cent greater in quantity 
in 1925 than in 1924; but the in- 
crease in value has been around 25 
per cent. The principal individual 
foodstuffs exports declined ma- 
terially in quantit}', but owing to 
higher prices show much less de- 
crease in value. Exports of wheat 
and flour, for example, have been 
about one-third less in quantity 
than in 1924. 



Secretary-Auditor 

Full or part-time position lb (Jeslrvd 
by a quallNed accountant uho I9 
secretary of a prominent local cor- 
poration; his present work requires 
only part ol his time. He handles 
and is ciperlcnced in Kuper^'islon 
and auditing of bookM, federal and 
state tax returns and claims, and 
laying out of systems. Available 
imtnedlately. References. Address 
Box 310, San Francisco Business, or 
Telephone San Matoo S55-H . 




COLLECTIONS 



No nJWtioo DO chstse 

We remit dsr coUmed 

Riles: 15%. 87c. 4% 

A World-wide Service 



People 

Don 't Stand Still 

Neither do banks. Forward or 
bark — the forces of competi- 
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It means something to be iden- 
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looking bank like 

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SAN FRANCISCO 




t Banking Offiiei in San Francisco Bay Regie 



[ coutiimcd from page 1 1 ] 

Particularly gratifying is the 
showing of our exports in most of the 
major classes of manufactured goods. 
The increase of nearly 60 per cent in 
the number of automobiles exported 
has already been mentioned, and 
every indication is that this remark- 
able advance will continue — largely 
because of the general improvement 
of world economic conditions, the 
lowered prices of our automobiles, 
the inaljility of most ICuropean pro- 
ducers to satisfy demand, and the 
exploitation of hitherto undeveloped 
markets, stimulated in se\eral im- 
portant instances by the Depart- 
ment of Commerce. Outstanding 
examples of increased purcha.ses of 
.\merican automobiles in 1925 over 
1924 are: Belgium, 36 per cent; Den- 
mark, 700 per cent; Norway, 30 per 
cent; Brazil, 154 per cent; and 
United Kingdom, 260 per cent. 

Exports of machinery (other than 
electrical and agricultural) have in- 
creased in value more than 20 per 
cent, and those of agricultural 
machinery more than 25 per cent. 
Exports of electrical machinery, in 
contrast with the normal increase of 
recent years, have been stationarj*. 
The increase of recent j'ears in ex- 
ports of copper was continued dur- 
ing 1925, stimulated by the further 
recovery of Europe and the effort 
there to make up for deficient elec- 
trical development during the war 
years. Our exports of rubber tires 
increased about one-third in quan- 
tity, again a commodity to which 
the Department of Commerce has 
been giving some special attention. 
Those of cotton manufactures, which 
liad fallen off somewhat in 1924, 
again rose materially. In fact, the 
only important class of manufac- 
tured articles to fall off in exporta- 
tion are lumber and iron and steel. 
The decrease in iron and steel is 
comparatively insignificant, and is 
the natural result of a gradual re- 
covery of European production and 
of the severe competition of countries 
like Germany, Belgium and France 
with much lower wage scales — in 
the case of the two latter countries — 
with a temporary stimulus to ex- 
portation resulting from currency 
depreciation. 

Our exports to every continent, 
except Asia, were greater in 1925 
than the year before. On account of 
the diminished bujnng power of 
Cuba, however, resulting from the 
fall in sugar prices, and of Canada's 
poor harvests of 1924, our exports 
to North American countries showed 
but a small increase. In Asia the 



decrease is confined substantially to 
Japan and China, but even so our 
sales to the Continent of Asia in 

1925 were not far short of four times 
as great in value as they were in 
1913. In the case of Japan, the 
decline in our exports is attributable 
to the naturally reduced demands 
for reconstruction material, and to a 
general business depression that has 
been felt there; but the outlook for 

1926 in the Island Empire is more 
encouraging. Disturbed poUtical 
conditions in China have seriously 
hampered our exports to that 
countrj-, and the trade prospect 
there for 1926 is still uncertain, but 
we should at least equal this year's 
trade. Our exports to India in- 
creased slightly in spite of falling 
price levels and of British, German 
and Japanese competition. Ameri- 
cans are steadily gaining a foothold 
in this market. L^xports to both 
Australia and New Zealand show an 
increase despite greater competition 
from Europe, and totaled in 1925 
more than three and a half times 

[ continued on page IS ) 



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specializing exclusively in Tax Exempt 

Irrigation District Manicipa] Bonds 

Our customers arc Savings Ban>ts.Lile 
Insurance Companies, and individuals 
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Interest 5% to &^c. List on application. 
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Merchants Exchange. Sutfcr 6620. San Francisco 



Conservative margin 
accounts solicited. 

Particular service to 
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Special market letters. 

Correspondence Invited. 

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SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone .Sutter 7676 

1404 Franklin Street, OAKLAND 
Telephone Oakland 1680 

DircS Uised Wires to Chicago & "Hs^ Tork 

New York Office : 1 20 Broadway »» 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



A Million Dollars a Year for Sports Hats 



tinued from page 7 ] 



world like an ordinary mat for a 
table, but which under the deft 
manipulation of the Meadowbrook 
artists become shapely hat forms, 
and a little later beautiful hats in 
green or blue, pearl-pink or coral- 
red, or any one of the thirty-six 
colors in which the Meadowbrook 
products appear. 

These raw shapes or hat bodies 
are purchased by the Simon con- 
cern in hundred-dozen lots, and in 
the native colors that each particu- 
lar type comes in. The importing is 
all done through one firm in New 
York, where the shapes are redyed 
to bring them into the color card 
which Meadowbrook trade demands. 
They are then shipped to San Fran- 
cisco and are here converted into 
the finished Meadowbrook hat. 

Milady's hat as it appears upon 
her head or in the showcase of the 
smart millinery shop is of course a 
composite creation, and its ground 
color, that is, the main mass of its 
color, is more or less modified by the 
trimmings or ornamentations that 
have been placed upon it. Thus the 
blend becomes individual. It is 
pleasing and personal, an isolated 
bloom, that somehow eludes the 
true relationship which it bears to 
the great color scheme of the hat 
world. To catch the true and vital 
import of color and the part it plays 
in the Meadowbrook spectrum, you 
should visit the stock room where 
the raw shapes are stored, or better 
still, the blocking room, where the.se 
shapes, now stiffened with glue, are 
molded into the graceful and at- 
tractive forms of the finished prod- 
uct. 

Here is a riot of color, the drab tan 
of the Shantungs, the golden wheat 
of some Bankok straws, a delicate 
pearl-pink — not onje, you must 
understand, but hundreds of kinds 
stacked together in tall mounds or 
pillars of hat forms. Here is a whole 
bin of shapes, some of coral-red, 
some of a raspberry-glace, of greens 
and blues and lavender, of rose and 
mauve and Cathedral blue. And 
here, ah, what a flaming beauty in 
that shade, and what a name for it! 
Phantom Red! It's particularly 
popular just now, for it rides on the 
high wave of publicity given to it 
by the film called "The Phantom of 
the Opera." It's a brilliant scarlet 
color with just a hint of yellow that 
is somehow suggestive of a glowing 
fire, or a flaming sunset. 

Thirty-six colors, each of which 
may be given any number of modifi- 



cations and adaptations later by the 
craftsmanship of the designers who 
are busily at work in the chief de- 
signing room. 

The raw shapes are mostly very 
soft and as limp as a rag. To make 
them stand up, and hold their form, 
they are aU treated to a bath in a 
kettle of hot glue or gelatin. Here 
is where workmanship comes into 
the art of hat-making, for the hat 
can be made or spoiled right here in 
the sizing room, as it is called. There 
is no formula to go by. The process 
is one of the secrets of the hat- 
making business, and the whole thing 
depends largely on whether or not 
the dipper knows his stuff. A 
spoiled shape is a considerable loss, 
for the cost of the undipped forms 
runs from $1.50 to $9.00 each. A 
doUar-and -fifty-cent shape will work 
up into a $6.00 or $7.50 hat. A 
nine-dollar shape when ready for 
Milady's head will cost $35. In the 
Meadowbrook establishment the 
consumption of shapes runs around 
some 500 per day, in the height of a 
season. 

From the sizing room the shapes 
go to the blocking room, where men 
are pressing the glue-stiffened forms 



into their final sliape. Some of the 
straws are here given a coat of var- 
nish, which brings out the color in a 
beautiful gloss. The hat forms now 
are hung on trees, a dozen or more 
hats on each tree, one tree of blues, 
one of greens, one of pinks, one of 
blacks, and so on. The great color 

[ continued on page 10 ] 



SAN RAFAEL 

Military Academy 

In THE FOOTHILLS of the Tamalpais 
range.on thirty-acre country estate. 
Idealclimate, selected companions, 
I dormitories and individual 
,^. Splendid educational and 
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experienced staff of masters, 
uph preparation for entrance 

Military drill 
cavalry training 
school band 
indoor gymnasium 
ngpool 
id hikes 
<Soys May Enroll ^otf. 

WriU-forilosL-riplive 




v\X FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUAUY 13, 1926 



[ continiir<l from piiKC I'i ) 

tluwc in 1913. And likowiso, in the 
face of keener competition fioni both 
I'.uiope and Japan, wc made fairly 
large gains in nur exports to 
Malaysia. The biiyinc power of the 
Malay region is being much en- 
larged by the high prices of rubber 
and tin. 

As has been so frequently the case 
in recent years, our exports to South 
America show a marked increase, 
being more than 20 per cent greater 
than for the previous year, and our 
products in the markets of that con- 
tinent can only be regarded a.s most 
gratifying. Improvcnl world trade 



stability and a much enhanced de- 
mand in Kuropean markets for 
Latin- American products have 
brought about more prosperous con- 
ditions in the countries of Latin 
America. Tliis has been reflected in 
their increa.sed purchases of our 
manufactured products during 1925. 
Exports to I'^urope consist very 
largely of foodstuffs and raw materi- 
als, and they have shown an increase 
of about 14 per cent in value in 1925. 
Exports to liussia increased over 50 
per cent, cotton being the dominant 
item: those to the United Kingdom 
by 9 per cent. The improvement in 
the economic situation of Gernianv 




HOroltHATES 




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Cycol Motor Oil 

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ASSOCIATED OIL COMPANY 

Sustained Quality Products 



is reflected by an inrrea.se of nearly 
20 per cent in our exports to that 
country. Increasingly stabilized con- 
ditions, both political an<l economic, 
and restored opportunities for the 
reorganization of productive indus- 
tries after the disorders following in 
the wake of the war are doubtless 
the main rea.sons for the steady 
growth of our trade in European 
markets. 

Rut while much of our continued 
success may be attributed to what 
has already been termed the grow- 
ing "Spirit of Locarno." a word may 
justly be said for the services of our 
Bureau lA Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce in behalf of American 
export trade, and the manner in 
which our American exporters have 
responded to them. The Bureau's 
corps of trained experts, placed in 
every foreign trade field of any im- 
portance, has kept the American 
business man supplied with practical 
trade information all over the world ; 
and the reaction of the business man 
to this service is ample evidence of 
its value. 

Every day it becomes clearer that 
there is a better understanding 
among American business men of 
export methods, of credits and 
agencies abroad, of all the manifold 
problems that enter into export 
trade. More intelligent and compli- 
cated inquiries are addressed to the 
Bureau and an increasing interest 
displayed in the opportunities for 
export. This is especiallj' true of the 
many smaller firms which hitherto 
have evinced little desire to engage 
in export trade. There is positive 
indication of a keen interest to 
know who's u'ho in the foreign 
trade centers and byways, as indi- 
cated by actual requests from 
Bureau clients for lists of dealers 
and importers in all types of com- 
modities. Covering the calendar 
year 1925 the Bureau delivered, 
against actual requests, over 800,000 
such typed lists. 

Turning now to imports, the total 
value of our import trade for 1925 
increased even more than that of 
exports, being about 17 per cent 
greater than in 1924. While this in- 
crease reflects the greater prosperity 
of the country, with enhanced buy- 
ing power for tropical and semi- 
tropical foodstuffs and exotic raw 
materials, it is unfortunately at- 
tributable also in considerable part 
to marked advances in the prices of 
a number of important articles, such 
as rubber, coffee, tin, wool, and 
hides and skins; and some of these 
increases in turn are due to in- 
defensible artificial restrictions di- 

I continued on page 21 ) 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



[ continued from page 17 ) 

scheme takes here a very tangible 
form. The Meaclowbrook spectrum 
iDegins to unroll. The commercial 
and artistic value of San Francisco 
sunshine begins to reveal itself. 

The Meaclowbrook studios occupy 
two entire floors of the Meadowbrook 
Building, the fifth and sixth stories, 
with a cafeteria and a roof garden 
overhead. All in all some four 
hundred workers are employed, 
though the number varies depend- 
ing upon the time of year. Most of 
these workers are women, the true 
milliners, whose deft fingers give 
the final touch to the finished hat 
shape as it comes to them from the 
blocking room, the touch which 
transmutes it into a Meadowbrook. 

Model Workrooms 

These women, hundreds of them, 
work in large, sunlighted rooms on 
the top floor of the Meadowbrook 
Building, grouped at long tables, 
each table engaged in the making of 
some particular style of hat. These 
workrooms are clean and airy. 
They are scientifically ventilated, 
and no effort or cost has been spared 
to create ideal conditions wherein 
the work may be carried on. Thus, 
you observe, the basic concept of 
the Meadowbrook success is a state 
of mind, a thing of the imagination, 
the theory that a beautiful hat is 
not essentially a manufactured ar- 
ticle, something that could be 
turned out in any sort of a place. 
The thought behind it is more 
intellectual. A Meadowbrook hat 
must be an artistic creation, some- 
thing with life and feeUng in it, 
something that expresses a "joie de 
vivre," as the Meadowbrook people 
call it, and such a creation can come 
only from a studio and the hands of 
a true artist. 

Here is psychology of a very 
sound and a very practical kind. It 
is a subtle thought, and one can 
understand why it has so completely 
escaped other hat manufacturers. 
It did not escape Mr. Gerald Simon, 
to whom is credited this idea that 
an artist who loves his work, and is 
given the opportunity, will somehow 
pour his feeling and his sense of 
beauty into the work whereon he is 
engaged, be this work a landscape 
done in oil, or a beautiful hat done 
in colored straws and silk and 
flowers. 

Thus, the Meadowbrook work- 
rooms have been designed with the 
thought that they are studios, and 
thus also the artistic concept has 
been distilled and injected into the 
very atmosphere. 

The workers are copyists, mainly. 



COMMUNITY CHEST TREATMENT 
OF THE HOMELESS MAN 

THI'] Community Chest, through the Council of Social and Health 
Agencies, has established a Registration Bureau for Homeless 
Men at Room 904 Atlas Building, 604 Mission Street. 

This registering will discover definite data concerning the indi- 
vidual man making up that group which constitutes a homeless-man 
problem in San Francisco. To this end the interviewer besides making 
out a "case history" will also have a brief report from an assisting 
doctor. 

There is another and important function performed by the 
Registration Bureau. As you know, the Community Chest supports 
agencies given over to relief work for men. These are all doing the 
work for which they are equipped. It is for this bureau to put the man 
in touch with that agency best suited to his needs. A man asks you 
for the price of a meal. What he really needs may be medical care to 
make him fit for his place among the workers. 

We are, therefore, asking you, the business men of San Francisco, 
to send to this Registration Bureau all men begging meals or money. 

When solicited for money or meals, please do not give either. This 
is not as hard-hearted as it sounds. Probably the most kindly action 
you can do for that man will be to send him to Room 904 Atlas 
Building, 604 Mission Street. The man needing help will be helped. 
The "professional beggar" will, of course, not go to the bureau, but 
he will meet with the proper police discipline. 



House samples from which the mer- 
chandise is made are designed by the 
chief designers, of whom a score or 
so are constantly engaged upon new 
creative details. These work 
separately in the chief designing 
room, and here they make on an 
average about 800 sample hats each 
season. These samples are sent out 
where buyers for the trade may view 
them, and from these the Meadow- 
brook orders are made up. The 
more appealing the model, the larger 
the orders that result from it, arid 
the replicas are then developed in 
the main workrooms. 

Volume the Secret 

Meadowbrook is not unmindful 
of the thing called volume. The 
more orders that can be realized 
from one sample, the more profit the 
firm will derive, for with each repro- 
duction of any particular hat, the 
design improves in workmanship. 
The aim is to concentrate the sales 
on as few models as possible, but 
the choice is left entirely with the 
buyers, for it is their judgment that 
is relied upon to determine what sort 
of models will sell best. 

Eastern distribution is carried on 
through Louis Strauss & Son of 
New York, where a full line of 
Meadowbrook hats is on display the 
year round. Seasonal displays are 
arranged in all the important cities 
of the United States, and are ar- 
ranged in groups, divided as follows: 



Pacific Coast, six cities; Middle 
West, sixteen- cities; South, nine- 
teen cities. 

In these cities the advance spring 
line for 1926 was shown on the dates 
from November 1 to November 30. 
From one to four days is allowed for 
each city, depending upon its size 
and its importance as a sales center 
for this type of merchandise. 

This early spring line goes by the 
trade name of Florida Line, from 
which one might gather the notion 
that these hats are for the mid- 
winter season in Florida only. That 
is not true, however. While Horida 
and California, because of their out- 
door climate during the winter 
months, have provided the motif for 
this line of hats, the hats are sold in 
all of the large cities, for the sports 
hat is as adaptable to the woman 
that goes out in a snowstorm, 
sheltered within an inclosed car, or 
any ordinary winter service in a cold 
climate as it is adapted for the 
warmer climate of a Florida or Cali- 
fornia beach resort. 

What's a Sports Hat? 

This may raise the question, what 
is a sports hat? In the Meadow- 
brook studio I was given this defini- 
tion. A sports hat is anything not 
required for dress purposes. 

This distinction is rigidly ad- 
hered to. Recently a San Francisco 
girl wanted a black felt hat to wear 

[ continued next page ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JAN UAH Y 13, 1926 



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USE 

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That's the miraculous transfor- 
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works without interfering in any 
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store or office. 

This new lacquer Finish — 
made by W. P. Fuller &? Co.— 
is particularly suitable for use on 
wood, concrete or linoleum floors. 
It produces a hard, tough, water- 
proof surface that will withstand 
severe wear and abuse. It can be 
appbed on new or painted sur* 
faces w'lth equally satisfactory 
results. 

NiTROKOTE For Floors is man- 
ufactured in six pleasing shades 
and clear — one of which will meet 
your particular needs. 

W. P. FULLER 6P CO. 

301 Mission Street 
San Francisco 

Branches in 26 Paci6c Coast Cities. 
Factories in San Francisco, Los 

Angeles and Portland. 

Distributors of Valspar on the 

Pacific Coast. 



FULLER 



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PIONEER WHITE LEAD 

77 years' experience — your assurance of 
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[ continued from preceding page ) 

to dances. She applied at the 
Moadowl)rook studios, having been 
unable to find a Meadowbrook in 
the shops which was suital)le. Slic 
discovered that while there were 
some six hundred models on rlisplay, 
there was no black felt to be had 
which would serve her particular 
need. What she re(|uired was a 
dre.ss hat, and Meadowbrook does 
not include that kind in its line. 

A very new Meadowlirook crea- 
tion is called the Flexo-VVeave. It 
is a crush hat, which can be safely 
packed away in a suit case, in the 
pocket of an automobile, without 
any regard as to its condition. When 
taken from its narrow confines and 
released to full space, the hat re- 
sumes its full shape in a twinkling 
and appears as chic as when it was 
crushed together. 

The Flexo-Weave was the result 
of long experimentation with ma- 
terials and manufacture. These are 
made altogether in the Meadow- 
V)rofik plant, where the materials, 
usually a oombination of silk ribbon 
and narrow straw braid, are braided 
together into narrow strips, from 
which the hat shape is then wound 
over a head-mold. The sale of this 
handy crush hat has increased very 
rapidly, some 20,000 being sold last 
year. 

In twelve years the Simon 
brothers have built up the largest 
plant in the United States which is 
entirely devoted to the production 
of stj'le merchandise. But their 
pride is not in this alone. The 
thought which seems to be most 
pleasing to the creators of Meadow- 
ijrook hats is that they have built up 
a model manufacturing plant tiiat 
possesses a spiritual endowment, 
and where conclitions for the workers 
are not of the ordinary workshop, 
but of the artistic studio type. 

They delight in the fact that their 
product pleases each year many 
tens of thousands of American 
women, but they also delight in the 
additional fact that this product has 
not required as an element of its 
success the sweat and blood of the 
workers that is so often an ingredient 
in eastern factories. They pay good 
wages. They keep their workers 
happy. They have provided a model 
cafeteria for their use and comfort, 
and a beauty spot on the roof where 
they may enjoy their lunch-hour 
leisure amidst pleasing surround- 
ings, under the open sky yet se- 
cluded from the noise and turmoil 
of the streets. 

Under these circumstances Mead- 
owbrook hats are the natural prod- 
uct of a pleasing environment, which 



the product itself reflects, and to 
which it is perfectly adapted. And 
that is, of course, as Mr. Gerald 
Simon says, not mere manufacture. 
It is art — the very high art of life 
itself. And the million-dollar in- 
come? Well, perhaps, that is a by- 
product ! 



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SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 13, 1926 



I continued from page IS ) 

ipcted against the consumers of the 
United States. 

The most striking phenomenon in 
our import trade of 1925 has been 
the great advance in the price of 
rubber, raising it, as in all probability 
the final figures will show, to first 
place among our imports. For the 
first ten months the quantity of 
rubber imported increased by 19 
per cent over the corresponding 
period of 1924, but the value in- 
creased 121 per cent. During recent 
months the average import price has 
been much more than double that 
for the corresponding months of 
1924. Had rubber remained un- 
changed in price, the total value of 
our imports would have increased 
but 11 per cent instead of 17 per 
cent. This immense rise in tlie price 
of rubber has been at least in part 
due to artificial restrictions, the 
serious character of which Secretary 
Hoover has recently called to the 
general attention of the public. 

Another considerable fraction of 
the increase in value of imports has 
been due to the higher price of coffee. 
While the quantity imported has 
been one-eighth less than in 1924,the 
value has been about one-sixth 
greater, indicating an increase of 
about one-third in price. This rise 
is largely attributable to artificial 
control. There was also a marked 
advance in the average prices of 
other major import items — wool, 
tin, petroleum, burlaps, and hides 
and skins. These various increases 
were only in part offset by certain 
price declines, the most noteworthy 
of which was the fall of more than 
35 per cent in the price of sugar, 
bringing that item down from first 
to fourth rank among our imports. 

Among the five great classes of 
imports, tlie only one to show a de- 
crease in 1925 was manufactured 
foodstuffs, and tliis was wholly at- 
tributable to the lower priceof sugar. 
Crude foodstuffs increased by 15 per 
cent, being materially swelled by 
the higher price of coffee. Imports 
of crude materials have tended to 
grow year by year since 1921, but 
the increase in 1925, no less than 38 
per cent, was materially accentuated 
by advance in prices. Imports of 
semi-manufactured goods i-ose by 
17 per cent, but those of finished 
manufactures, which have long 
tended to become a smaller propor- 
tion of the total, increased by only 
5 per cent. 

The high buying power of the 
United States in 1925 is indicated 
by the fact that most of the major 
individual articles of import in- 
creased quantitatively even when 
higher prices had to be paid for 



them. Increases, in most cases ex- 
ceeding 10 per cent, and in several 
exceeding 25 per cent, appeared in 
silk, sugar, rubber, wool, paper, furs, 
hides and skins, wood pulp, tobacco, 
tin, fertilizers, burlaps, vegetable 
oils and lumber. A conspicuous de- 
cline in flax-seed imports has taken 
place during the last two years as the 
result of marked increase in pro- 
duction in this country. 

Our imports from Oceania in 1925 
showed an increase of nearly 60 per 
cent. Those from Asia rose nearly 
40 per cent, advancing this conti- 
nent to first place among our sources 
of supply. These great increases, 
however, were in no small part due 
to higher prices of articles from these 
countries. The slight decrease in 
our imports from North America is 
more than explained by the lower 
price of sugar. Imports from South 
America and Europe each rose by 
about 13 per cent. 

The experience of 1925 has thus 
been highly encouraging with respect 
to the competitive ability of the 
United States in the export of com- 
modities — particularly those in which 
efficiency and enterprise on the part 
of producers and traders is able to 
bring results — while the increase of 
imports likewise furnishes ground 
for gratification. But the expe- 



riences of the year have also em- 
phasized the necessity for giving 
careful attention to securing the 
goods we need from abroad at 
reasonable prices. Although the 
United States is more nearly self- 
sufficient than any other important 
country, the maintenance of its high 
standard of living demands large 
importation of a number of exotic 
commodities. 



What's Your 
Business? 

A letter from you will bring from 
us a list of the most important 
books covering every phase of 
your bu 



TECHNICAL and 
BUSINESS BOOKS 

OIL. PAINT. SOAP. PAPER, 
LEATHER. MINING. BANKING. 
ACCOUNTING. COMMERCE. 
CHEMISTRY. INDUSTRY. 
SCIENCE. ETC. 



TECHNICAL BOOK CO. 




SAN FKAXfltSCO BISINKSS, JANUARY 13, 192G 



How California Products Advertise California 



allurements. They, too, usually 
"go it alone." 

It is small wonder, then, that by 
the time George J. Brown has read 
about California raisins, California 
prunes, California canned goods and 
a few other California products in 
his copy of Mr. Curtis' weekly letter 
to the American public, and then 
comes to several pages of California 
conununity advertising — it is no 
wonder at all, a-s a matter of fact, 
that he wants to read about the 
country that produces all these 
much-adverti.'sed products, and that, 
having nibbled of the fruit by re- 
calling what Aunt Kmma said al)Out 
the Blossom Festival, he should be 
so receptively-minded that he fur- 
tively clips the coupon in the corner 
and the next day at the office sends 
for details in the form of booklets, 
brochures, maps, statistics and gen- 
eral "complete information." 



SUTTER 



LINCOLN TAXI CO. 

Limousines 
De Luxe 
457 Powell Street 



Motorists Save 27 Miles 

DIRECT FERRY 

Vallejo-San Francisco 

Fastest Boats on San Francisco Bay 

Dining Room, Barber Shop. 
Boot Black and News Service 

Monticello Steamship Co. 

North Eod oF Ferrr BiildiGi Pboai Salter 371 



Fort SuTTEn"="CACITAL CiTV 




From 

Jackson Street Pier No. 3 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 
AT 6:30 P. M. 

PALATIAL STEAMERS 

Suites with Bath — Barber Shop 

Fare $1,80 °"' '"" $3.00 '«»'"'<' Trip 

Try Our Famous 50 Cent Dinners 
Phone Sutter 3880 for Reservations 

California Transportation Company 



California during the coming year 
will spend some .SI, 063, MO in com- 
munity advertising. The All- Year 
Club of Southern California will 
spend .SSOO.OOO; the San Diego- 
California Club, $50,(X)0; Califor- 
nians. Inc., $400,000; and other 
organizations in other cities smaller 
amounts which make up the grand 
total. 

However, this is not all that is 
being spent to advert isi' Culifornia. 
A large appropriation is spr>nt every 
year to advertise Sun-Maid Raisins 
(and California), .\nother appro- 
priation advertises Sunki.st oranges 
and lemons (and California). An- 
other appropriation advertises Del 
Monte canned goods (and Califor- 
nia). Still other appropriations ad- 
vertise Sunsweet prunes (and Cali- 
fornia), Diamond Brand walnuts 
(and California), Meadowbrook 
sports hats (and California), Cali- 
fornia Mission orange juice (and 
California). These accounts alone 
aggregate several millions to be 
spent to advertise less than a dozen 
businesses (and California!). 

A recent compilation of the 
national and .semi-national adver- 
tising going out of California shows 
that the total of approximatelv 
S9,000,00() is being spent to adver- 
tise California products (and Cali- 
fornia). This, coupled with the 
•SI, 063, .500 to be spent this year in 
community advertising, gives a 
grand total of over $10,000,000 that 
will be at work throughout the next 
twelve months interesting the George 
.1. Browns of Everj-where, U. S. A., 
in California products, California 
communities, California resorts — 
and California in general. 

Advertisingly, no community in 
the entire country is so fortunate in 
the cooperation which is given it as 
is a community located in this state. 
For, backing up every dollar that it 
spends, business concerns are spend- 
ing nine dollars to help spread the 
fame of the state or some section 
of it. 

Conversely, no manufacturer, pro- 
ducer (or group of producers) is so 
fortunately situated when he starts 
to advertise as the one who is lo- 
cated in California. For community 
advertising, directly, and other mer- 
cantile advertising, indirectly, are 
helping him — provided he "ties-up" 
with the word "California" in his 
own advertising. Sports hats might 
be made anywhere. But California 
Sports Hats — ah, now you have an 
identifying mark — and a mighty 



strong one. For isn't this the land of 
sunshine — of outdoor sports — of 
year-round pleasure resorts? C^er- 
tainl}'! Then, why shouldn't it be 
the place where sports styles origi- 
nate? Again — certainly! 

There is an allure — a fascination 
— about the word "California" that 
no California advertiser or prospec- 
tive advertiser .should underestimate. 
And he is wise who "ties-up" as 
strongly as possible with the magic 
of this name. For every dollar that 
he spends, California as a whole is 
spending many dollars to build up a 
background that will make his ad- 
advertising profitable — where, fre- 
quently, the same amount spent 
without this background might not 
pay its way. There innij come a 
time when the California background 
will lo.se its potency and strength. 
But that time is not yet! 



High class Lira .usines ant) Touring Cars 
for all (.ccasi.nswilh EFFlCIENr SERVICE 
and COURTEOUS DRIVERS. Try us. 

SAN FRANCISCO AUTO TOURS 

245 POWELL STREET 



SACRAMENTO 

and Sacramento Northern R. R. 
Polnta 

Observation iind Parlor Cars. 
Oininii Car leaves 5:00 p. m. via 



SACRAMENTO 

SH7RT LINE 



CHECKER CAB COMPANY 



of responsible : 



ns thf hijilu-st standard 



WHY? 

First: Checker drivers are the best paid cab 

drivers in the world. 
Second: 87', c of its personnel are stockholders. 

GRAYSTONE 400 



S.V\ FRANCISCO BUSIXESS, JANUARY 13, 192G 



Chamber is Represented at 

Hearings on Gooding 

Bill 

SI:TH MANN, manager of the 
Traffic Bureau of the Chamber 
of Commerce, left Saturday for 
Porthind and Washington to partici- 
pate in a series of hearings which 
will be watched with interest by 
shipping and commercial interests 
throughout the United States. 

In Portland Mr. Mann will attend 
a meeting of the Pacific Coast 
Traffic League, of which he is presi- 
dent, which will be representative of 
all coast cities and which will devote 
most of its attention to a considera- 
tion of national railroad legislation, 
particularly the Gooding bill. 

Mr. Mann's most important mis- 
sion will be his appearance before 
the Interstate Commerce Committee 
of the United States Senate, which is 
to hold a series of hearings in Wash- 
ington the latter part of this month 
on the so-called Gooding bill. This 
bill, if passed by Congress, would 
have what many traffic experts de- 
scribe as a disastrous effect upon 
railroad freight transportation ac- 
tivities, particularly where the rail- 
roads are competing with water 
carriers. 



The bill, in brief, would prohibit 
railroads competing with intercoastal 
water carriers from charging a rate 
to an intermediate point in excess of 
the rate imposed for a consignment 
to a terminal point. This, it is 
pointed out by Mann, would tend to 
raise transcontinental freight rates 
both by rail and water. 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce also has joined with the 
National Industrial Traffic League 
in the belief that passage of the bill 
would be equivalent to Congressional 
rate-making and would take from 
the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion its present jurisdiction which 
allows its "best judgment and dis- 
cretion in this regard." 



Bureau of the Census 

Asks Co-operation in 

AssembHng Data 

THE Bureau of the Censu.s is 
now engaged in collecting the 
data for the biennial census of 
manufactures, which will cover in- 
dustrial operations during the cal- 
endar year of 1925. 

The schedules or questionnaires 
have already been mailed to all the 



manufacturers. The Chamber of 
Commerce is very much interested 
in the success of the census, which 
will depend not only on the accuracy 
of the statistics but on the prompt- 
ness with which they are published. 
The Director of the Census has 
agreed to make a tabulation for each 
city within a few weeks after the 
receipt of the last schedule, properly 
and accurately filled out, and to pub- 
lish the results of this tabulation in 
the form of a preliminary report. 

At the census of 1923 it was 
necessary to send more than 100,000 
letters to manufacturers requesting 
additional information or verifica- 
tion or correction of their reports. 
This, of course, delayed considerably 
the publication of the statistics. It 
is highly important, therefore, that 
you answer each question as accu- 
rately as possible and that you mail 
your report promptly to the Bureau 
of the Census. 



The Old Firm 

MAUSTED & CO. 

Undertakers and Embalmers 
No Branches 

1122 SUXTER STREET 

Telephone Franklin 12J 



The Last Word in 
Toilet Paper Economy 

The No-Waste Toilet Tissue Cabinet saves paper! It forces 
economy on the user. Only one double sheet at a time can be 
drawn from the Cabinet and the average saving obtained in 
using No-Waste is from 25' , to 35'^;,. 

There is no necessity for the Cabinet becoming empty — the small 
slot in front shows when refilling is necessary. After one-half or 
more of the package is used up, a new one may be placed in the 
Cabinet, providing continual service. 

The paper, being entirely enclosed in the Cabinet, is kept free 
from dust, dirt and handling. 

No -Waste Toilet Tissue 

is made of clean, fresh spruce pulp; extremely soft finish and 
highly absorptive quality. The Cabinet is finished in nickel 
plate, white or green enamel. It is readily attached ; the slotted 
screw holes in back eliminate the necessity of drilling new holes 
when replacing. 
Cabinets leased without cost for use in public lavatories. 

AlanufaQured by 

National Paper Products Company 

No- Waste Tissue Public Service Towels Sop-O-zoN Liquid Soap 

1789 Montgomery St. Phone Suiter 7031 San Francisco, Cal. 




NO-WASTE CABINET 

—No more pulling off yards at n tir, 

from an exposed roll. 
—No more pilfering. 
—No more littered floors. 
—No mechanical features. 
—No springs to get out of order. 
—Delivers only one double sheet at i 
ti?ne. 



SAX FRANCISCO RnsiNKSS, .lANITAHV 13. l!)L>n 



Foreign TRADE TIPS Domestic 



, Clmnibrr ..f Con, 



!iS76-llui-iioa Air.-!,. ArKciiliriii. «.-ll rccom- 
iriciidecl American import and export hrni. estab- 
Iwhed in Bucnoa Aires, desires to establish bubioew 
connections with CaliforQia exporters of FRESH 
FRUITS, who wish to market their products in 
Bucnoa Aires and surroundinK territory. This firm 
has had ronsiderable experience in hnndtiDg the sale 
of fresh fiuits. 

9876 — Rivaa, Nicaragua. Party can supply large 
quantities of PURE YUCCA STARCH (Manihot) 



Going to the Orient! 

Young man. 27, desirous of fioinji 
to the Orient would be glad to 
hear from any concern wishing 
representation there. Address 
Box 315, San Francisco Business 



MITSUI & 
COMPANY 

LIMITED 

(Mitsui BusHan KaMha. Ltd ) 
Cable Addrca*: "MITSLT- 

GENERAL IMPORTERS 

EXPORTERS 

Coal Suppliers .Ship Operarora 

Shipowners Ship Builders 

Etc.. Etc., Etc 

Head Omce: TOKIO. JAPAN 

Saa Francisco Office: 

301 MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BLDG. 

>rk. London, 



and s 



nd, Ljo 



. Ha 



"Prompt 
service 



"Visible" Card Records 
provide instant, accurate, 
perpetual inventories — 
information alwas avail- 
able to any customer. 



Warehouse 

TOMPANV 

37DEumm Street, San Francisco. 



kI .(» 



^tc-I 



Krancbco imporUm. Sumplct of starch on file with 
the Foreign & Dnnii-stic Trade Department. 

9877 — Santiago. Cuba Established firm desi.03 
to obtain the agency of large packers and exporters 
of SARDINES. FRUITS and VEGETABLES. 
They will act as intermediaries, selling to the im- 
porters in the Cuban market on a brokerage ba^is. 
Will furnish rvferenns 

9S7S — Havana, Cuba. Commission merchant 
desirrs tu rstablish bui^incss connections with .San 
Francisco manufacturers or protluccrv. 

9879 — Cuadalajara. Mexico. LurRC expcrters of 
shelled PECANS wish to communicate with San 
Francisco buyers or importers of thi* commodity. 
9880— Racine. Wis. A foreign bu^incxs service 
company offers Its facilities to San Francisco ex- 
porters and imporlrrb. 

9S81 — Palmeraton. New Zealand. A dairy com- 
pany wishes to communicate with San Francisco 
importers interested in handling DAIRY PRO- 
DUCE from New Zealand. Would appreciate re- 
ceiving information as to prices, markets, handling 
nnti cold storage fncilities. 

98S2— Dulley Port. England. Large manufac- 
turers of SAUSAGES and HIGH CLASS PRE- 
SER\ED PRO\'ISIONS desire to promote- the talc 
of their products in California and would appreciate 
hearing from interested San Francisco impotters. 
9883 — Osaka, Japan. Import house wishes to 
purchase FURS and LEATHER from San Fran- 
cisco cxporterv. 

9884— Kobe. Japan. Exporters of COTTON 
GOODS. METAI^S, HARDWARE, CHEMI- 
CALS. PAPER. MATCHES. ROPE. PORCE- 
LAIN and EARTHENWARE. AltTIFICIAL and 
NATURAL FISHING LINES. SUNDRIES, wibh 
to get in touch with San Francisco importer' of 
these lines of merchandise. 

9SS.'j — San Francisco, Calif. Firm with th^ir own 
organization in the principal Mexican and Central 
-American cities, seeks representation of local firms 
in this territory cither to buy directly or handle 

988G — Amsterdam. Holland. Manufacturer of 
Dutch COCOA wiahcfl to appoint a suitable San 
Frnnc;Hco repiesentativc or wholesaler to handle 
the sale of their product? in this territory. 

9887 — Hamburg, Germany. Party desires to 
represent a California exporter of RAISINS and 
othei DRIED FRUITS. 

9888 — Hamburg. Germany. Importers of oilcake, 
ha%-ing excellent connections in Germany, Austria, 
Bohemia and Denmark, are very desirous of estab- 
lishinc business connections with mills or exporters 
of COCOANUT OIL CAKE and COTTONSEED 
OIL CAKE who would be interested in having an 
agent or broker to handle the sale of this commodity 
ill the territory mentioned. 

9889 — Hamburg, Germany. Established agent 
and broker desires to repre. ent a California producer 
or exporter of DRIED APRICOTS and DRIED 
APPLES in Hambuig. 

9S90 — Hamburg, Germany. Well-established 
exporter of Continental IRON and STEEL ALA- 
TERIAL of all kinds wishes to communicate with 
San Francisco importers of metals. 

9891— Dusscldorf-Reisholz. Germany. Manu- 
facturers of SHEET METALS and STEEL STRIP 
desire to establish a market for their products in 
San Francisco. Would appreciate hearing from San 
Francisco importer-s and users of this material. 

9892— Lodelinsart. Beleium. Supplier of COP- 
PER DISC RH-ETS. WIRE and WIRE NAILS, 
wishes to communicate with San Francisco im- 
porters of these articles. 

9893 — Prague, Czechoslovakia. Manufacturers 
of LEATHER GLOVES desire to appoint suitable 
sales representatives in San Francisco. 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 

D-I031— San Francisco. Ca.if. A local firm offer*, 
for sale at a rcu-sonable figure an A LCOHOL STI LL 
with a capacity of 5.000 proof gallons per day. Sli!l 
is now installed in a plant formerly engaged in the 
manufacture of alcohol. 

D-I932— Hoxcmao, Montana. Partv has for saV 
.H .luantity of PEAS, suitable fo- pigeon feed Would 
like to communicate with interested buyers. 

D-1933— WooDsocket. R. I. Large woolen mill, 
manufacturing MEN'S WEAR FABRICS and 
WOMEN'S WEAR FABRICS desires to secure 
a live representative on the Pacific Coast to handle 
their products 

D-19.'J1— St. I^uis. Mn. Manufacturere of 
SPECIAL RUBBER CEMENTS, as well as 
FRICTION TAPE for railroad use. desire to get iu 
touch with San Francisco buyers and users. 

D-1935 — San Fiancisco. Ca'if Party wishes to 
purchase a .MEN'S FURNISHING STORE or 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE BUSINESS in any 
part of the Stat*- of Calif6rnin. 

DI93ft— I^n^ Island City. N Y. Manufactuiera 
of ETCHED NAMEPLATES. DIALS, SCALES. 
ETC. wish to communirtite with interested San 



GENERAL TARIFF CHANGES 
CUBA 
Authorization of Tariff Changes by the President 
Expected. 
it appears certain that the Cuban I-egis'ature will 
soon pans a bill giving the President of Cuba full 
power for three years to make changes in the cus- 
toms tariff. 

American expoitcr? lo Cuba should, therefore, be 
prepared for possible changes in the Cuban tariff. 



r 

■ Reproductions from Testimonial Letters 
I Drawinns, Layouts, Charts, Catalog 
Bb Pages, etc.— A Complrn Personal Senki 

STANDARD PHOTOPRINT CO. 

SUTrtK ,675 - H2 S«NSOMS STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



(hotostat 
Copies 



THE YOKOHAMA 

SPECIE BANK 

Ltd. 



HEAIJ OFFICE. YOKOHAMA 

Established 1 880 

Capital .Subscribed 
Capital Paid Up 
Reserve Fund 

(Surplus I 



8.^..S00,000.00 



Exporters and Importers are invited 

to avail themselves of our services, 

especially with the Orient. 

San Francisco Branch 

415-429 Sansome Street 
K. KOJIMA, Manager 



SAN FRAXCI.SCO BUSINESS. JANUARY 13, 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



A new 6rm entering s new territory must make 
new friends, and established firni9 have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of businees from new- 
eoniera if tipped off" at the proper time. Thia 
department was created »Tlh the intention of de- 



veloping new bufliness for i 
of Commerre It is a con 

to the InduBtria! Oepartn 

Commerce from many aou 

out specific check-up, as : 

investigate for themselves 

tailed verification In addition to new concerns the 

list includes reports of removala and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M Hyslop, Industrial Department. Chamber of 
Commerce. Main Floor, Merchants Exchange Build- 



nenibers of the Chamber 
pitation of the names of 
rial enterprises reported 
ent of the Chamber of 
ces. It IS released »ith- 
irniB generally prefer to 
without waiting for de- 



, pho 



112 



COAST AGENCY WANTED 

YounK man. 32 years old. employed at preseni 
desires ptsilion as RalrsirannCLT or -Assistant I 



"MANY COPY" Carbon 

l.illht 4-lb. ueiliht. in blafk. blue. CP'> 77 

or purple. Siisll, per IIHP sheol^ - 9^-00 

42 (^r:i<]es (Carbons and Ribbons 

Moderate prices.. (;et samples. 

C. H. MILLER CO., 717 Market St. 

Phone Douelas l.ws 



OFFICE HELP 




G7 SUTTER ST. 











PROTECT >'OL'R 

TRADE MARKS 






Mida's Pacific f o"5t Trade Mark Bureau 

Affi'iated with MIDAS. Injorp^rated 

Chlcatio. Ill Washlnilton. D. C 

::ompIete Records to date of all II. S. Patent 

Office Rcclstrations and Cop.vrlehts. 

Have any of your Trade Marks eiplred ? 

name that has not been registered or 
investiftated ? If so. can same be reels. 
tered? Is it beinii Infringed? Have you 
had the records searched? Security 

RAPID - RELIABLE - REA.SONABLt 

112 Market Street San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter SI***) 





Departinent. 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes 



Agricultdral Implements — Rotary Plow .'^uk-s Co, 

*F T. Hanshaw). temporar.v offices Stewart Hotel. 
Architect— W. B. Favillo. 593 .Market to 1 Mont- 
Artists — Judson L. Starr. 127 Montgomery to 

.'t7G Sacramento; Fred Glauser. 575 Sacramento. 
Athletic Goods— California By-Products Co. 

i;i5;j loth) has opened general offices in Hewes Bldg, 
Attorneys— A- A. .\xclrnd. 309 Pine; H. J. Nen- 

barth. 220 Montgomery, 
Auto Accessories — Perfectioti Sliding Curtain Co 

2.->0 Cornell to -1142 Geary, 

Automotive — Hertz Drivurself System. 125 

.■Stevenson; I'nited .Motors Co of California, 1434 



1 Society, branch 



Howard, 

Banks— Hibernia Savin 
deary and 10th Ave. 

Bottles and Glass— A, G. Heunisch Co.. 112 
Market to 202 Davis, 

Bos Factory- .Mercantile Box Co. 1320 Market), 
opened new plant. 3d and .\latneda. 

Cigars— F,l Revino Cigar Factory. 604 Commer- 
cial, 

Confections — Perfection Nut Crisp Co,, Ru.ss 
Bldg, 

Dentists— Dr R H. Blanquie, 291 Geary to 870 
Morket; Dr. .1, R, McHugo. 1750 Clement to 819 
rll.ia. 

Draperies — Fisher Drapery Co.. 4444 Geary. 

Drugs — Cieary-.Tones Pharmacy (E. Edwards). 
i;.:.ry and lones. 

Electrical— Active Electric Co., 5254 Mission. 

Employment Agency — S. Shima, 1647 Post. 

Engineer— W. H. Thomas, Hobart Bldg. 

ExDorters — California-Pacific Mercintile Co. 
(i;.-.i Abelinc). 16 California. 

Finance— Western Mortgage & Guarantee Co.. 
;il5 Montgomery to 433 California. 

Fire Apparatus — American La France Fin 
Co. of California, factory 2829 16th. 

Fireproofing — Blenio Bros.. 580 Green. 

Flooring — L, H. Comer, 804 Alvarado t 



■ Eng. 



653 



—A. Cantrowith. 270 Natoma. 
Refinishing — Leon & McEvoy, 1818 

Grocers— Bush .Mason Grocery, 798 Bush; John 
cardi. 301 Brazil; M. Demcnio, 3800 to 379S 



Hats and Caps— Superior Hat Co,. 72 2d 1 



5.(0 



Importing — California Italian Products Inc. 
11. OS Abate), 314 Clay to 510 Battery. 

Investments — Bruce D. Ellis. 406 Montgomery. 

Junk— Hoffman Junk Co,. 0.30 Bryant to 516 
TowHsend 

Lamps and Shades— De Luxe Lamp Co . 240 
Stockton. 

Locksmith— G McNamara, 912 to 899 Mc- 
Allister- 
Loose Leaf Material — Pacific Litho & Loose Leaf 
Co,. 465 California. 

Lubricating Oils — Ensign Oil Co., 28^ Perry to 
97(1 Indiana 

Market— Eldorado Market. 1199 .Stockton. 

Men's Goods— C, X, Ludvigsen & Co.. 2S2 



Neckwear — Leo Schlesinger & Co.. 21 i 



Mining— Monarch Gold Mining Co.. 690 Market. 
Oil— Quaker State Oil Refining Co.. 525 Market. 
Patents and Trade Marks — Associated Trade 
Mark Bureau. 216 Pine. 

Perfumery— Roger & Gallet. Commercial Bldg. 
Plumber— Wm, J Borrmann. Jr., 1202 to 1(115 

PoUshes— H, R, Clough. .52 California to 112 
.Market. 

Porcelain Specialties — J .1 Harrison. 821 Market, 



Printing— Ott Bros.. 345 Battery to 122 HaMcck: 
Thing Wan Printing Co . 801 Stockton. 

Publications — H, F. Schaldach. 507 Montgomery; 
California Cotton Journal, to 215 LeidesdorlT, 

Radio — Radio Entertainments. Inc.. 153 Kearny; 
He.l Top Antenna Co . Hearst Bldg. 

Real Estate — Emmet Healy. 1.56 Montgomery; 
.1, C Graham. 325 Bush to 690 Market. 

Restaurants — Foster Lunch Co , 560 Broadway; 
-Martina's Restaurant. 131 Market; G. S. Limnios, 
7350 Fulton- 
Sheet Metal Work — Pencovic Sheet Metal 
Works. 4245 Geary 

Show Cards— .M R. Shepic, 964 to 973 Market. 

Store and Office Fixtures — j. F, Schemp & Co., 
411 Shotwell to 50 Brady. 

Tailors— H, Shapiro. Phelan Bldg.; .M. Corin. 709- 



[ continued t 




ILLUSTRATE 

yonrProdact 
in use 

~That which the eye sees 
the mind best comprehends 

WE OFFER A COMPLETE 
ART SERVICE INCLUDING 
PHOTO-RETOUCHING. 
ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTOGRAPHS 
THAT HAVE SALESVALUE 



LOUISA.LAUCK 

Company 



<a~>>~-. 



-.a^^ 




v\.\ FRANCISCO BUSINESS. JANUARY 13, 1926 



Ho^r Big 

will YOU be in 1927? 

Your growth this year will depend 
to a noticeable extent upon your 
advertising. 

The right merchandising plan^ 
the proper distribution — the con- 
vincing consumer appeal. 

Let us help you n nrk out a complete plan 



Pho 



: Garfield 2654 for 



Harold /^WuRTS 

cAdvQriising ^^ c^^'<2/ 



DECKELMAN BROS., Inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Barbers' Supplies, Cutlery 

and Beauty Parlor 

Equipment 

Koken Barber Chairs 

48 Turk Street Franklin 2870 




Recommended by 

James E. Power 

POWER RUBBER CO. 

670 Turk Street 
Prospect 69 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 

[ continued from pr^ccdine page | 
MifsioD: Marcel Smith. 206 StcvcDSOo; Balboa 
Tailor <!: Cleaner 115 Balboa; L. Salioger. 922!. 
Pine. 

Tamales— L A. Sauccdo, 2923 22d. 

Tax Specialties — Federal Income & Audit System 
Co . Chanctry BIdg. 

Time Recording Dences — Insto Electric Time 
.■^tamp Oj ,R \V. KIliA). 525 Market. 

Transportation -North Pacific .Stages, 54 4lh. 

Truck Tires -C. A. Gilbert. 16th and Shotwell 

Upholsleref--J. Bunow, 1826 Diviaadero to 5025 

Welding Equipment—PeerleflB Welding Co., 1239 
to 1345 Mission. 

Miscellaneous — Almond Growerfi Exchange. 
Dollar BIdg : John P Lynch Co 550 Howard to 
1164> Howard; Kruae Sulphur Vapor .S>-8tem. 533 
Sutter: WilUu Studio, 1028 Market; McrchanU 
Credit Aasn., 101 Poet; Herter Looms Studio. 251 
Po8t to 578 Sutter. 



Transcontinental Freight Bureau 

The suhjecta listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
Dent,il Freight Bureau not earlier than January 21. 
Full information concerning the subje.'>u listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau. San Francisco Chamber of Coi 

Docket No. 0408— Architectural ■ 
bronze work, CL. westbound: 6469. baling tic 
buckles, LCL, westbound; 6470. toilet paper. CI- 
westbound: 6471 automobile lamps, CL, westbound: 
6472. wind shields, CL. westbound: &473. steering 
wheels, CL. westbound; 6474, water tube boilers, 
CL, eastbound: 0475. heav'^- leathers, LCL. easl- 
bound; 6476. alfalfa meal. CL, westbound- 0477. 
hoofs and horns. CL. westbound; 6478. burlap bags, 
second hand, CL. eastbound; 0479, salt cake. CL. 
eastbound: 6480. portable wooden houses, CL. 
eastbound: 6481. tin cans. CL. westbound; 64S2. 
plaster board, CL. westbound: 64S3, small virma 
ammunition. CL. westbound' 6484. hoops, iron or 
steel. CL and LCL. westbound: 0485. coulter discs. 
CL. westbound; 0486. cream separators in mixed 
carloads nith agricultural implements; westbound; 
6487. enameled iron bathroom and laboratory 6x- 
lures, CL and LCL. westbound: 6488. lumber, CL. 
westbound; 64S9. lead and zinc ore. CL. eastbound; 
6490. moulding sand, CL, westbound; 6491. rran- 
berries. CL. westbound: 6492. zinc moulding, CL 
and LCL, westbound; 6493, cement bags, empty, 
returned, LCL, eastb->und: 6494. feldspar. CL, east- 
bound; 6495, steel blocks, returned, CL. eastbound; 
0496. stoveb. CL. westbound; 6497. refrigerators. 
CL. westbound. 



United States Intercoastal Conference 
Westbound Rate Docket 

Bulletin No. 34, posting date January 13, 1926. 

The following subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than January 25. 1926. Full information 
concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau. San 
Francisco Chambe: of Commerce. 

R-461 — Paper, wrapping, vegetable parchment, 
vs paper. ^Tapping, oil. Proposed addition to 
Item 2760 of two separate entries reading (IJ paper, 
wrapping, vegetable parchment. (2) paper, wrap- 
ping, oil: R-462. copper, sulphate of (bluestone*- 
Proposed reduction in CL rate to 50c. LCL rate to 
75c: R-463. costumers. steel. Request for reduction 
ID LCL rate to $1 25; R-164, waterproof cotton 
duck. Present rate $2,10 A. Q. Request for estab- 
lishment of an A. Q. rate of SI. 35; R-J65. oils Item 
2580. Proposed change in description of packing 
requirements to read "In wooden barrels, bound 
with six hoops, dogged or punched." No change in 
rates; R-466, linoleum cement, liquid or paste 
Request for modification of Item 655 to includt- 
liquid linoleum cement as well as linoleum ccmeni 
in paste form. 



Finest Live 




Cor. Jackson and Polk Sts. 




thf; downtown dimnks 



MONARCH GARAGE 

lUei Bush (SU >>ar Polk St 

\ttrnotive Monthly Kolei. 

■':ini;irc'nicnl of Vim. Saunders 



BISHOP &BAHLER 



369 PI.NE STREET 



Traffic Managers 

E. W. HOLLINGSWORTH 

Cummtrce Anornrv 

Consiiltatrrin free. l*hone us if voo 

have any traffic prnblems. Our 

representative will rail 

All Traffic and Transportation Matters 

Interstate Commerce and Stare 

Commission Cases 



Montague Pipe&SteelCo. 

Riveted Steel Pipe. High Pressure Pipe 
Lines. Oil and U ater Tanks. Steel Flumes. 
Syphons. Stacks. Montague Hell Casing, 
Water Tube Safety Boilers. 
Works: 17th and Kentucky Sts. 

Market 6909. San Francisco 



Follow the 
Industrial Develop- 
ment southward on 
the Peninsula — 
Do not wait until 
Prices advance. 
Sites available now 
5 to 15 cents a square 
foot. Spur track 
Privileges — 

South San Francisco Land & 
Improvement Company 

465 California Street 
San Francisco 

Telephone Sutter 2S--. 



;AX I'KAXCISCO BISINKSS, .lAXfAHV 13, I'.IJii 



NEW WINTER 



The new winter "Red Crown" is 
the /astest-starting, full-powered 
gasoline you ever drove behind. It 
is the achievement of our 47-years 
of gasoline-making experience! 

On sale at Standard Oil Service 
Stations and at "Red Crown" 
dealers. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 
(California) 




WILD 
TOCO 



See 
Apache Trail too 




Sunset 
Limited 

daily, 
strictly 
first-class in 
every detail. 

Also, 

Sunset Express 
daily. 
Ask about 
5-day 
ocean trip 
Neu' Orleans 
to New York. 



—enchanting region of southern Arizona 
easily accessible on your way east via 

Sunset Route 

For but $10 additional fare, follow the 
scarred trail of Apache warriors— now 
traversed daily by stage between Phoe- 
nix and Globe. 

See fantastic painted cliffs, rearing 
peaks grotesquely shaped, the placid, 
mulci-shaded Canyon Lake. 

Visit Roosevelt Dam. Stopover at 
Apache Lodge and visit the Tonto cliff 
dwellings. Hear, as you go, the haunting 
legends and stirring tales of early days in 
this magic land. 

Include other unique features of the 
Sunset journey east. Ask for descriptive 
booklets; have our agents advise you 
about New Orleans connections for 
east or north. 



Southern PacificLines 

F. S. McGINNIS 

PASSENGER TRAFFIC MANAGER 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO 






BUSINESS 

c^ ♦o 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XI I 



JAN'UARY 20, 1926 



Number 2 



Trade Council to Be Held in San Francisco 



Noted Speakers to Discuss 
Many Topics 

Complete plans fur the fciurth 
annual convention of the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council, which will be 
held in San Francisco March 4, 5, 
and 6, rapidly are nearing comple- 
tion, it is announced by R. I. Bent- 
ley, chairman of the convention 
committee, and Henry F. Grady, 
managing director of the Foreign 
Trade Bureau of the Chamber. 

Although still almost six weeks 
distant the event, because of its im- 
portance, is attracting wide atten- 
tion and it promises to be one of the 
most representative gatherings ever 
held in this city. 

M-\NY VARIED TOPICS 

The .scope of the convention is in- 
dicated by some of the following 
address subjects: Agricultural Prod- 
ucts the Basis of West Coast Pros- 
perity; Financing Pacific Coast Ex- 
port Industries with Pacific Coast 
Capital; Development of Inland 
Waterways; Building Up Our In- 
dustries by Exporting the Finished 
Products of Our Native Raw Ma- 
terials; Pacific Coa.st Influence on 
World Development ; Banking Serv- 
ice for Foreign Trade; and kindred 
topics. 

B.\NQIIET K FEATURE 

One of the big features of the con- 
vention will be the banquet to be 
held Friday evening, March 5. 

"The Pacific Foreign Trade Coun- 
cil is the outgrowth of a feeling on 
the Pacific Coast that this section of 
the United States has common 
foreign trade problems," declares 
Grady. "Its geographical po.sition 
in relation to the rest of the United 
States, its coastline and hai-bors, and 
the rapid development of the peoples 
in its legitimate trade area on the 
Pacific are the factors which have 



THi; TRAFFIC BUREAU of 
the Chamber is advised that 
the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission has dismissed a complaint 
brought by the Walla Walla County 
Farm Bureau attacking the rates 
on grain and grain products frf)m 
points in U'ashington and Oregon 
south of the Snake River to Port- 
land, Seattle and Taciima and other 
North Pacific ports. 

At present the grain rates to Port- 
land from the points involved south 
of the Snake River are less than the 
rates to Puget Sound ports. 

The complainant sought to have 
the Commission equalize the rates 
both to Portland and Puget Sound 
ports so as to place them on a parity 
in the matter of rates as competitive 
markets. 



crystallized in the minds of Pacific 
Coast producers and merchants the 
de.sirability of common, unified 
action. Hence the slogan of the 
Pacific Foreign Trade Council, 'Pa- 
cific Coast Unity for World Trade 
ExpaiLsion.' 

PBOBLEM.S SOLVED 

"The three meetings which have 
been held in past years have (wrought 
the trade interests of the Coast to- 
gether, have helped to visualize and 
solve their foreign trade problems, 
have educated the producers to the 
necessity of foreign trade to Coast 
prosperity, and have enabled the 
Pacific Coast cities to get behind 
Federal legislation beneficial to the 
Coast in a unified way. One form of 
this ha,s been united Coast action on 
rivers and harbors development ; an- 
other has been on trans-Pacific radio 
cormnunication ; and still another, 
on the amendments to the China 
Trade Act." 



New Steamer Service 
Put Into Effect 

In order to acconniiodate the e\'pr 
expanding coastwise traffic handled 
out of San Francisco a new pa,ssen- 
ger and freight service is announced 
between San Francisco and Port 
San Luis. The president of the 
White Flyer Line, James K. Nelson, 
has assigned the steamer San Juan, 
formerly of the Pacific Mail, to this 
service. The San .Juan left San 
Francisco for its first trip to San 
Luis last week. It was met at Port 
San Luis by a large delegation of 
San Luis ()bispo city and county 
officials, merchants and manufac- 
turers, who were entertained at a 
luncheon aboard the steamer. The 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce was represented by Ralph J. 
Scanlan of the Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Department. The Oakland 
Chamber of Commerce also was 
represented. 

The San Juan will call at Port San 
Luis three times a week on its regu- 
lar route between San Francisco and 
Los Angeles. 



Revenue Freight Loads 
Show Big Increase 

"Loading of revenue freight for 
the week ended January 2 amounted 
to 741,239 cars," says the car .service 
division of the American Railway 
Association. 

This was a decrease of 25,859 
under the corresponding week in 
1925 but an increase of 34,947 over 
the corresponding week in 1924. 
The total for the week of January 2 
also was an increa.se of 40,160 cars 
over the preceding week, when load- 
ings for both weeks were materially 
reduced due to the observance 
of Christmas and New Year holi- 
days. 



SAN FRANCISCO BrSINESS. lAM'AKV .'0. 1020 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



P.iblislieil v>rek]y by the San Frnncisco Chariibcr o( 
Coniinerce, 20S Merchant Richsnge Telephone 
Krarny 1 12. Sabnrription, t4 a year Entered aa 
aecund-class matterJuly2,1920,atthePoatofftce.San 
FranelBCO, Calif oraia. under the act of March 3. 1379. 



Definite Business Data V^■anted 
for Year Book 

M:imifacturrrs;i(;ain:in'i('((ilf'Kt('il 
iiiimcdiately to notify the ( 'liaiiiher 
of coinmodities or lines handled by 
thi'iii so that they can be classified 
intolligently in the pioper merchan- 
dise divisions in the forthcoming 
Year Book which now is being com- 
piled. 

They will, of course, lie listed iii 
the manufacturing agents' group, 
but if they handle hardware, leather 
goods, iron and steel, cooperage 
stock, etc., they also should be listed 
in the.se different sections. ( 'opies of 
citalogs, circulars and printed mat- 
ter will expedite the cotnpiling of the 
Year Hook and make possible more 
intelligent classification. 

All information intended for the 
Year Book .should be sent to L. M. 
Hy.slop, of the Indu.strial Depart- 
ment of the Chamber, who is pre- 
|).'irint; the classifications 



State Parley Held 

San I'rancisco and the bay area 
had ade(|uate representation at the 
c|Uarterly meeting of the California 
l>velopment A.ssociation, which was 
held in San Diego last week to plan 
imification of the state's industries. 
.\mong the twenty-four persons who 
l),u'ticipated in the meeting were: 
R, R. Hale, A. B. C. Dohrmann, 
Colbert Colwell, H. W. Jackson, 
Paul Shoup, Charles E. Virden and 
Joseph R. Knowland. 



Foreign 1 rvAL)il< 1 Ix S Domestic 



ۥ*- 



Tariff Regulation 

The Foreign Trade Defiartment is 
in receipt of an advice from Hon. 
Cyril H. Cane, British Vice Consul, 
which announces the revocation of 
the orders prohibiting the importa- 
tion of hay, straw and live stock into 
the United Kingdom from western 
and southern states of the United 
States. A subsequent order, how- 
ever, dated December 10, 1925, pro- 
vides for the maintenance of these 
restrictions on hay, straw and live 
stock frotii California and Texas. 



-♦o 



I'd in 



'.i«'i|— .Alamo-. Son.. .Mexico Pan: 
purehaaini! a PHESSIKE KIl.TfvH and a 
BUIQt'ETTINO MACHI.VE noltcila price, and 
particulara from .San Franctaco supplierH of auch 
equipment. The filter press should be nuilnlile to 
press out the liriuid contents of oranici^s or p/itato^'x 
and leave the tfolid with a low moisture content 

!l«9.5— Alamos. .Son. Mejico Supplier of 
FI.AXIi;l.i;ss PINE OlM OR UKSIN wish.-, to 
romniUiiicnte with intervste*! San Fninciaeo buyers. 

D89II— Guadalajara. .Mejico. Commisaion house 
dcsin's to net in touch with California suppliers of 
BEA.N'S. particularly PINK BEANS. wiahinK to 
export to Mexico. Has connections with reaponaihlc 
Mexican firms. 

0MI7— Chihuahua. Mexico Owner of a mine of 
RIOr> E.'\UTH fAlmaRre). producinit large qusnti- 

conHumcrs of this product 

ftslls— fluayaouil. Ecuador Finn, well estali- 
liithcd. and with good connections in (rlinyaquil. 
wishes to represent Snn FVaneiaco exporters of 
SAHnlNICS. CINNAMON. CLOVES, etc.. in that 
market . 

OWm— Bouota. Colombia. COFFEE exporters 
M ish to Im- put in touch with Sa.-i Francisco buyers of 
ihmcomni.slity, 

of 
o establish a nuirket for 
their t)roduets in San Francisco. 

il(H)l — Nilevitaa. Cul)a. Firm desires to establish 
connections with San Franciaeo cxportets of 
ONION.s. .SARDINES and other CANNED 
GOODS. 

9902— .San Franciaeo. Calif. Local firm wishes to 
get in touch with California users of I.MPORTED 
ITALIAN DRIED BI.ACK GRAPES 

990:i— Berki!ley. Calif Inivclsity gnidualo. 
with five years' technical experience touring the 
world, wishes to represent American business 
houses in foreign countriwi. 

9»ni — Piraeus. Greece. Supplicn. of VAI.ONIA 
NITS (containing tannin) desire to communicate 
with interested .San Fnuieisco importers. 

9905— Paris. France Well recommended firm 
desires to represent .San Franciaeo exporters of 
CANNED FISH in France. 

9f>0tl — Firenxe. Italy. ImportKrxport house 
wishes to purchase BITFALO SKINS of a quality 
suitable for the manufacture of purses, note books, 
writing cases, etc, ; would also be iiitereatiKl in com- 
municating with San Francisco importers of 
ARTISTIC LEATHER GOODS. 

9907— Piraeus. Greece. Commission agent di- 
sires to communicate with San Francisco packers or 
exporters of SALMON, LOBSTERS. SHRI.MPS. 
CRABS. MEAT. FRl'ITS and VEGETABLES, 
with a view to reprci-enting them in the Greek 
markets. 

9908— Ceylon Firm offers CEYLO.N CI.NNA- 
MON in 10<l-lb. barrels. MADRAS BLACK 
PEPPER in 100-lb. tins, and CEYLON WHITE 
PEPPER in ino-lb. tins, C. I. F. .San Francisco at 
low quotations. 

99(19— Calcutta. Indi.i. Large exporters ol 
WILD ANI.MAL SKINS, .such as SNOW LCIlP- 
ARD, LYNX. GOLDEN FOX. GRAY oi 
GHOV.ND FOX, OTTER. .\IAR.\IOT and 
LIZARD, also ANIMAL PRODfCT.S. RICE 
BRAN. FLOl'R BRAN, POLLARD. .lUTE. 
Gl'NNY, HEf^SIAN and TAILOR Cl'TTINGS. 

CRUDic lii.TwifM, nniTis, Mi-ninxAL 

OILS. i:,-^l -. I I \l •ill.v, "II .~l IDS and 

CAKES, '!■ - • ' -'■il.ll-l, l.il-l MM.r'llonS 

with Sai, I r.ihM „i,„,rl, ,- ,,„.| 1, .I,r- ,„ 1 hcse 

9910— .VIonib.asa. Kenya Colony. Br E. Africa 
Gentleman wishes tn art as agent on a commission 
basis for Ameriiari iiiiiunf u hin i - i,r exportersof 
TRACTORS, .M I' -.hinil I - \Lr.MINUM 
WIRE.CANNEliI 1,1 11- I "I loXHOSIERY 
etc, Iswcllcstal.li-I,. ' ,, \I,,i:, !,,.■, 



null— .Madras. India. Established ,-upnlicrs ol 
the following commodities wish to communicate 
with interested San Francisco importers: DRV 
HIDE FLESHINGS (gluestoekl. WOOL AND 
GOAT HAIR. RAW .SQflRREL PYTHON. 
.MO.NGOf>SE. WILD CAT. JACKAL. CROCO- 
DILE ami OTHER FANCY and REPTILE 
LEATHER.S 

9912 — Germany. A JEWELRY exporter, estab- 
lished in one of the principal jewelry manufacturing 
centers of Germany, is %-ery desirous of establiahing 
business connections with .San Francisco jewelry 
dealers and importers. 

991.T— Hamburg. Germany. Exportels of SALT, 
HEAVY CHEMICAIJJ and DRUGS wish to estal.- 
lish business connections with jnt«-rested importers 

9914 — Ravensburg, Germany. Large and well 
established manufacturers of PAI.NTERS*. .ART- 
ISTS'. DECORAT0R.S' and DRI'GGISTS' 
BRISHES wish to appoint a suitable salesman 
who could build up a good trade in these brushes on 
the Pacific Coast. 

991.'>— Brussels. Belgium .Supplier of GYPSl'M 
(Paris plaster) dewres to get in touch with Ameri- 
can importers of this product. 

9910— Tilly, Belgium Producers of BELGIAN 
RtJlTENSTONE and Pf)WI)EREn and GRAN- 
ILATED MANGANESE will send qimlations to 
inten-sted .Snn FrancLsco importers. 

9917— Jumet. Belgium. Belgian firm desires to 
appoint suitable representatives to handle the sale 
of their .METAL CLIPPINC; and STAMPI.NG 
ENGINES and their POCKET CALCl'LATING 
.MACHINE.S 

991S — Ghent. Belgium. Gentleman. connect4-d 
with the Consular service for over 2.5 years, is now 
establislicd in business and is very desirous of 
representing California buaineas houses in Belgium 

9919 -Xolo. Greroe. Exporters of GREEK 
OI.UI'S i,i-li ici I .tmiounicate with California con- 



■c.jii ( l„(,„,(l„na. Suppliers of SHEEP and 
Ht '< : ( \sl\(i.s ili-sire to establish business con- 
neitions with San Francisco buyers. Will forward 
sample shipment to interested firms References 
are given. 

9921— Osaka. Japan. General commission mer- 
chants engaged in exporting RAG Rl'GS desire to 
get in touch with San Francisco importers of these 
rugs. 

9922— Tokyo, Japan. Firm Ls in the market for 
.SCRAPS of l«)LLED LE.ATHERS, IMITATION 
PARCHME.NTS. TANNED LEATHERS and 
COTTON CALICO: also SECOND-HAND 
HOR.N. HOOF and .METAL BUTTONS. Request 
samples and quotations F. O. B. Tok.vo or Yoko- 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-19;J7 — Portland, Orepon. Publif-hinR company 
(IciIiriK in '■'-rial bfjoks and premium merchandist- 

'l'--^n - ' iiii'iujiii':itc with wholesale dealers in 

OlMIt - K,-, SH.VKRWARE and othr-r 

l*i;i M M \1 Ml i;cil.\NDISE, 

D-l,|;^ liulhilu. N. Y. Manufacturer of 
CHAIN BLOCKS. CRANES. MONORAII, 
TRACKS, desires represeQtation in San Franrism 
machinery dealer district. 

D-1939 — Chicago, Illinois. Sales agency with 
several years' experience in the industrial trade de- 
sires to take on a number of additional lines for 
manufacturers desiring to market their products in 
Chicago and surrounding territory. 

D-1940 — Montclair. X. ,). Manufacturers of 
lamp shades desire to Becure the services of a suit- 
able -sales agency to handle the sale of their PARCH- 
MENT SHADES in this territory on a commission 
bajiis. Shades range in price from $21.00 per doz, tn 
$72.00 per i\oT.. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANUARY 20, 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



must make 

iH'w friends, and established firms have a chance of 
olitaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
fii the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
1., M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce. Main Floor, Merchants Exchange Build- 



, phO! 



• 112. 



.\ dail.v service available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a, m., at the desk of the Information 
Department, 4.'il California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with staniped and addressed envelopes 



H Beehlold. I'niled Biink Bldg. 
to Fr.nch Bank Bide 

Advertising— H.irry IClliott, to Monadnock Hide 
Artists— The Brino .studio. 417 Montgomery. 
Attorneys— .4 B. and P. F. Dunne and .1. E. 
Cook. 11211 Market to 433 California; Henry Boyen 
:iiid F J Fontes, 14 .Montgomery to 700 Market- 
Automotive — Park Auto Electric Co., 482.S Geary; 
M.ifk & M.anuell. I40I Pine to 923 Polk; Central 
.\ut.) Sales Co.. 132 Valencia; Perrinc. Gurrin 4 
H.ins. Inc., -IKI Van Ness Ave. 



Auto Tires— C. A. Gilbert, 230 Howard to 2.io 
inlwell: Paul Diuiisch 'Paul's Tire Shop). 373.! 



Bacteriologists — Dairy Products Laborsitory 
(Ur H E Torgersen). 3S70 I7th. 

Bikeries- St. Paul's Bakery. 1610 Church; W:,v- 
Tiimi Bakery. 1533 Ocean; Comnnmity Bakery, 
'Mr.- Thieh. 217 Clement. 

Battery Service— E. A. Persons bought li li U 
Whiteside business, 3059 Geary. 

Beauty Parlors — Fielding Beauty .Salon 'hillian 
lOkhoml. 39(1 Geary; American Beauty Bt,\ iMis^ 
i:iiz!ibeth Traeyl. 2439 Mission. 

Brokers— C'. C. Butler & Co. Imerehandisel. (1911 
.Market 

Builders— Barnell & Campbell. Wratgnte Drive 
ui].l Kenwo.nl 

Cement— Monolith Portland Cement Co.. 703 
1..119II Market 

Chemist—.!. B.i;iliii;inii 'Tysniol Co.i. 72 2d to 
12113 Mission. 

Chiropractor— P. 1.. Chevrier. 1141 Market 

Cigars--S F. Hoth. 1905 Geary; Commercial 
Kmoke Shop. 431 .Sansome; Williams Cigar Store, 
4212 .3d. 

Cleaners— Bell Dyeing & Cleaning Co.. 140S 
Webster: Lewis Sher. 3182 21st; New ■•■illmore 
Cleaning Co . 2442 Fillmore. 

Cloaks and Suits — Ben Lando. 151 Sutter to ]5;{ 
Kearny 

Clothing -H. A. Grotte. 821 Market. 

Collection Agencies — Colonial Law & .Vd.iusl- 
nient Co.. Humboldt Bank Bldg. 

Contractors — Folsom Construction Co, l.sol 
Polsom; H. Steiger, 1G30 Haight; W, C Z«ieg, 351 
.Santa Ana 

Cotton Goods — Wni I.. Barrell Co., Postal Tel 



Hldg 



. Bo,ii 



Dentifts— Dr \V i' Schwarz, I(H5 Clenn 
Butler Bldg ; Dr. .1 1 1. Wilder, 2fi97 .VIi8.iion tc 
-Market 

Drayage— Commercial Transfer Co.. 300 L(: 



fO 

Drugs- New Potrero Pharmacy. 20th and Con- 
necticut; Civic Center Pharmacy. 1588 Market; 
Sutter Drug Co. (J. E. Seibold). 900 Sutter. 

Electrical — Fisher Electric Shop, 220(i Lombard. 

Engines — Colo Diesel Engine Co.. 149 California. 

Engraving — Leo Detoy, 35 Montgomery to 153 
Kearny. 

Finance — Industrial Credit Assn. (personal loans) 
from 2.507 Mission to 24S9 Mission; Mission Bldg. 
& Loan A.ssn., from 22d near MLssion to 2533 
Mission. 

Fruit— S. Cohn to 1001 Clement; Ojakian Bros. 
1.301 Church 

Furnishings and Draperies — Ron Marehe, 3421 

Furniture — M. H. Saltzman, 1120 Clement; 
Aleck Zelv<-r Iseeomi hanil), 1515 Ellis to 804 Mc- 
Allister; Han, Id Wallace, 251 Post to 578 Sutter. 

Furniture Movers -Hanson-Long Express Co., 
Ill Montgomery to 302 Kearny. 

Furriers— Jos. D. I.ieb, 773 Market to 2117 
Powell. 

Grocers — Galley Grocery. 189 6th: Henry Heide. 
74(i Arguello Blvd.; Fred O. Horner. 3100 Market 
to 4(100 18th; Timy Mavros. 17 Stoneman to 3029 
2.5th. 

Hairdressing— M. Clayton. 406 Sutter. 

Hair Specialist— Mabel M. Frank. 133 Geary to 
1.30 Geary, 

Hardware— Sterling Hanlware Co.. 535 Mr>nt- 



Household Appliances — Surpass Table Mat Co 
l.lohn O'Loughlinl. 783 Mission. 

Ice Cream— Mission lee Cream Parii 
Mission. 

Importers— E. W. Rosston. 24 Californi 
California; Oskar \'on Stetten. 821 Marke 

Information Burt-Jii M ,, I Travel 



14.S 



iishi 



Insurance— ( III- II r ' : ■ m ■ ilifornia (o mo 

.Sansome: Nortl,.^,N '.,,,,,.. I -H. 1 ,„ Co. In.'. 
374 Bush; J. W. Watrous, Agency, Mills Bldg ; 
Security Insurance Co. of New Haven. 50 to 1 U 
: H. R. Fenstermaeker. Inc. (Central l.ife 
ui.e Society). 760 Market, 
istments -Hopkins & Mercure. 58 Sutter 
elers — .\iibert's Diamond Palace (229.S 



Mi- 



I Mi.. 



Labor Contractors — Philippine People's Corp.. 
(117 Montgomery. 

Laboratories— Medical & Dentjd X-Ray Labora- 






.ekto 



Ladies' Wear— Annette R. Eaton. 153 Keari 
to 1.54 Sutter: I Hanak & Co.. 153 Kearny. 

Lighting Fixtures— Peerless Light Co.. 149 2d 
1114 Folsom; Brass & Bronze Lighting Fixture C' 
(.1. Guglielmo). 1061 Mi.wion to 955 Mission. 

Lumber — Barg Lumber & Shipping Co . Fir 
National Bank Bldg. to Dollar Bldg. 

Machinery — Emmons & Gallagher (cannery). 3 



Mai 



E Supplies- H A. B 



p Co.. 2(11- 



Mercantile Agencies— It. G, Dun & Co.. Wells 
Fargo Bldg. to 86 3d. 

Millinery — Celia Millinery Shop, to 1015 Market; 
Hetty B. Hat Co.. 14S7 Bush. 

Mining — Colombia Consolidated Production Co , 
:tl5 Montgomery to 114 Sansome. 

Mining Engineer— J H. Mackenzie, 315 Mont- 
gomery to 351 California. 

Oils — Quaker State Oil Refining Co. of Califor- 
nia, recently opened offices 525 Market, has estab- 
lished warehouses at "1240 17th. 

Opticians— W. C. Jenkel and F. B. David.son. 
Butler Bldg 

Organizations — Down Town .Xssn. (,1. M. Cum- 
mings), 700 .Market to 85 Post. 



Painters— .lohnson A- Clark. 84 Land.rs 

Paper- Bush Paper & Bag Co., 3325 20th; 
K0.-.S.II D Hamilton, .582 Market to 143 2d. 

Planing Mill — Warden Bros.. York and Mariposa 
to 2501 Arm.--. 

Postage Stamps— H W. Doseher A Co. 215 
Montgomery to 821 Market. 

Poultry — A. Cereghino. 1001 Clement. 

Printing — McCoy Label Co.. 505 Commercial to 
004 Co: 



Puhhshers- Butterick Publishing Co., Pacific 
Bldg ; Newspaper Enterprises. Inc., 1120 Folsom 
to Clunie Bldg. 

Real Estate — Inter-Cities Investment Co.. 24 
California to 58 Sutter; Lucien R. Oruss, 5830 
Geary to 4541 Irving; Aaron StolT, 111 Montgomery 
to 302 Kearny: Blakely & Pengilly, Call Bldg.; 
Small Realty Co., 732 Taraval; Owners Realty Co., 
785 Market: Excelsior Reull.v .1,.! 11. iI.Ii,,L- C, 
(V. ,). Azznrello), 4671 MLsm..', \ - I;. ,!i, 
Co., 2565 Mission to 2834 M , ,,. 1 

Branch 20th and Judah: S. & II H,,l., 1 1_>12 
Capitol; Edw. A. Hayden, 38 Montgomery to 68 
Post; Ben K. Cherin Realty Co., 924 Irving: 
Richard Coombs, United Bank Bldg. to Hobart: 
M, J. Mertetis, 235 Montgomery to 550 Kearny; 
F. VV Doble. 346 Bush to Chancery Hldg. 

Restaurants — George Adams (Belmont Sand- 
wich Shop), 182 Eddy; L, Polacci, ISOl Lombard. 

Roofing— ,Iohn H. McCay, 1924 Irving; Ameri- 
can Roofing Co., 718 14th: Star Roofing Co., 19.50 
McAllister. 

Schools — Mulvihill Secretarial School and 
Chicago Business College, 2476 Mission to 2189 
Mission. 

Shoe Polishes — S. M, Bixby & Co., 461 Market 
ti> 112 Market: Geo. Morse (Barton Mfg. Co.). 
St, Clair Bldg. to 680 3d. 

Shoe Repairs— Chas. Dietle and Peter Wilhelm. 
4 19 Pine to 405 Kearny. 

Signs — Art Sign Co.. 255 4th ; Sticvener Sign Co.. 

Smelting — .Myron Folsom. 315 Montgomery to 
351 California. 

Soap— Ideal Soap Co.. 38 Clementine, 

Steamship Agent — Ernest Hixon. 128 .Sutter to 
Flatiron Bldg, 

Steel— Columbia Steel Corp, Balfour Bldg, to 
Matson Bldg., soon. 

Stocks and Bonds — A. E. I^wis, to Royal In- 
surance Bldg, 

Tailors— Jos Parker, 1866 Larkin: Sam Mycrson 
(New Fillmore Tailors). 804 Sutter to Jackson and 
Fillmore; Dillon Tailoring Co., 1169 Market; Sol 
.Shipper. Pantages Bldg. to 739 Market. 

Textiles— Pacific Woolen Co.. 305 Grant Ave. to 
25 Kearny. 

Tile and Roofing — Malott & Peterson. 2412 
Harrison to new building. 20th near Harrison. 

Trade Magazine— California Cotton Journal, to 
215 Leidesdorfl. 

Transportation — California Short Line Railroads, 
210 Mor.tgom?r.v. 

Typewriters — Halladay Typewriter Exchange, 
1 1 1 Montaomcry to 461 Market. 

Upholstering — Stanley Michaels, 848 Cole. 

Miscellaneous — D. E. Specialty Mfg. Co., 409 
Market to 1372 Mission: Anderson Foster 4 Co , 
Inc., 1372 Mission; Marr Duplicator Supply Co., 
Atlas Bldg.; Dry Steam Appliance Co., Sheldon 
Bldg.; General Sales Co., to 946 Howard: Imperial 
Fruit Products Co., 3255 17th to 468 Ellis; The 
Edwards Service Co., 401 Hyde; Automobile Under- 
»M'. ,- ~, , i.i , nil Post; Bay Shore Delivery Co., 
-"I'l I .: I'll, California Distributors, Inc., 

Hill Mill,: Iliijiard Jacoues, 3044 Fillmore: 
1 I,.., ■1,1. 1 W I..- ,>liade Mfg. Co., 1001 Mission; Sur- 
Val Box Lunch. Inc.. 1042 Folsom: S. F. Produce & 
Provision Terminals, 315 Montgomer.v; Nu-Way 
Sales Co., Commercial Bldg.; Juvenile Mfg. Co., 
417 Market; Working Co., Inc., 843 Montgomery; 
Superior Collar Co., 507 Mission; Alta Institute 
(Dr. Lucille H. Nolan), 600 Haight; Encinal Termi- 
nals, 1 12 Market to .Marine Bldg. 



SAN IHANCISCd UrsiNKSS, .lAMAin L'O. Iffir, 



fVho's Who oAmong the ^^ISlew Members 



A membership in the Chamber of Commerce is a step forward. It 
signifies a clearness of vision a grasp of the necessity for united 
action — and it is a badge of permanency and rehability. The Mem- 
bership Department introduces this week the following : 



HENRY DLFFY PLAYERS, Inc. 

Henry Duffy, the well knowTi and popular 
loeal theatrical producer operatinj; the 
.Mcazar and President theatres. 

P.\CIFIC MARINE INSURANCE 
AGENCY, Inc. 

General marine insurance agents located at 
330 California St. 

THE EGYPTIAN LACQUER MFG. CO. 

This concern occupies its own beautiful 
building at 1050 Howard St.. a classic 
example of Egyptian architecture in Cali- 
fornia. Its lacquer is used for metal 
parts and articles where permanent and 
protective finish is required. 

W. GORDON HESSON 

Pacific Radio Sales — 537 Geary St. — di-s- 
tribulor of the Radyne. Fada. \u-Red. 
Crosle\-, Thorolo and Arrow-Master Radios. 

K. B. MANUFACTURING CO. 

Located at 54 Washburn St. They make 
Bakclitc mouldings, moulding dies, and 
radio equipment J. H. Cooper is manager. 

THE MERCURY PRESS 

Printers and publishers, 818 Mission St. 
Publishing The Building and Engineering 
News and Daily Pacific Builder. 

NEWSPAPER SERVICE BUREAU 

Magazine publishers' representatives with 
offices at 202 Sharon Bldg. 

M. J. REEVES HEATING CO. 

Heating. Power. Pumping, Oil Burner plants, 
and general engineers, with works at 959 
\atoma St. 

WEST COAST NURSERY CO. 

Landscape architects and nurserymen. They 
la\- out parks, school grounds and private 
residence grounds. City office, 522 Powell 
St. Nurseries at Palo Alto. 



S. F. TYPEWRITER EXCHANGE 

H. J. Hastings, manager, 595 Market St 
Typewriters of all kinds and typewriter 
supplies. 

J. L. STUART MFG. CO. 

Manufacturers of beautiful awnings, tents. 
porch swings, flags and bunting. General 
decorators for festival occasions. Factor\- 
at 160 Russ St. 

N. M. HARPER 

204 Underwood Bldg. Continuous fanfold 
forms which save time and worrx- on carbon 
copies. They speed business 

AMERICAN TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP CO. 

If you want a topographical map — large or 
small — these people will survey the projjertN' 
and build a map to scale. Frank M. Mc- 
Veigh is manager at 406 Mills Bldg. 

JAMES FURLONG 

General builder and contractor, with offices 
at 352 Monadnock Bldg. 

GEORGE H. HART & CO., Inc. 

416-418 Mission St. .\ well known whole- 
sale dry goods house. 

HEDSTROM AND RYAN 

Construction engineers and naval archi- 
tects. 1219 Matson Bldg. 

E. R. PARKER SYSTEM OF DENTISTRY 

The well known Pacific Coast dental chain 
with headquarters at 15 Stockton St. 

WALTER G. VIEL 

Printing inks and colors, 371 Monadnock 
Bldg. 



SHARP FLOUR CO. 

315 Montgomcr\' St. 



Flour. 



UNITED MILK CO. 

3201 Sixteenth St Dairv. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



riLE COPY 



BUSINESS 

C>* — fO 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XII 



JAXUAKY L'7, 192(5 



Number S 



HITTING on ALL TWELVE 



'By C. E. TAYLOR, .Membership Director 



What a Chamber 
of Commerce 
Does for a 
Community 



F any one should happen 
to ask you why he slioukl 
join this Chamber of 
Commerce, tell him these 
things, and in the telling 
. Miay yourself discover a little 
hulilen treasure. 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce is organized primarily to 
further the advancement and pros- 
perity of the city as a whole. It is 
the official mouthpiece of San Fran- 
cisco and the clearing house for busi- 
ness and trade. The Board of Di- 
rectors of the San Francisco Chamber 
of Commerce are constantly weigh- 
ing matters affecting the welfare of 
this city, rejecting those which are 
harmful and fostering those which 
are good. It is the largest public 
body and is the watch-dog of your 
interests. Without it many evils and 
practices would soon become appar- 
ent. It is a necessary and vital key- 
stone supported by the best and 
most reliable citizens. 

In addition to these broad func- 
tions which affect you and every 
citizen, the Chamber of Commerce 
has several distinct and well-defined 
services to offer, any one of which, if 
properly used, will return your in- 
vestment in membership many 
times. 

1 If you are interested in expand- 

• ing your business into foreign 

fields, we have a Foreign Trade De- 



Hear HENRY S. IVES on 

" Government in Business " 

HENRY SWIFT IVIiS, .secretary of the Casualty In- 
formatioa Clearing House of Chicago, will deliver 
an address before a joint luncheon of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce and the San Francisco Com- 
mercial Club, on Thursflay, February 4. His subject is 
"Government in Easiness." 

A speaker of nation-wide repute, Mr. Ives' views on 
"Government in Business" coincide with those of Presi- 
dent Coolidge, who says: "When government enters the 
field of business with its great resources, it has a ten- 
dency to extravagance and inefficiency, but having the 
power to crush all competitors, likewise closes the door of 
opportunity and results in monopoly." 

Mr. Ives has addressed many of the largest industrial and business organi- 
zations in the country on the above subject, and his utterances have been widely 
published in the press. Among the organizations which .Mr. Ives has addressed 
are the Ohio Bar -Association, National Electric Light Association, Chicago 
Chamber of Commerce, and the Insurance Federation of America. 




partment which is second to none in 
the United States. Through the 
efforts of the Foreign Trade Depart- 
ment, San Francisco now has more 
foreign consulates represented here 
than any other city in the United 
States with the exception of Xew 
York and Philadelphia. The loca- 
tion of these consulates here stimu- 
lates and encourages trade. This 
department issues a directory which 
goes to even,' consulate throughout 
the world, listing the membership of 
the Chamber and the commodities 
which they handle. 

■O The Chamber of Commerce 
^' maintains a "Commodity In- 
dex" in which every member is listed, 
together with the articles he han- 
dles. Inquiriescomeinto the Chamber 
from all over the United States ask- 
ing to be put in touch with reliable 
concernshandlingcommodities which 
are sought for. Through this clearing 



house, if you are a member of the 
Chamber, your name goes to the 
person inquiring, should he inquire 
for the article you haniile, and 
automatically a contact is formed. 
"2 The Chamber of Commerce is- 
*^* sues a weekly publication which 
goes to all members, containing 
leads for new business and trade 
tips, which, if properly utihzed, will 
put you in touch with new customers 
and form new business contacts, 
which will result in additional 
revenue for you. Through one item 
in trade tips, a certain concern in 
San Francisco developed §160,000 
worth of business, netting a nice 
profit. 

A In April of this year, the Cham- 
' • ber of Commerce will issue an 
annual Year Book, containing a 
classified hsting of all members in 
good standing as of March 1st. This 
Year Book will become an official 



I 



SAN FRANCISCO BISINESS, .lANlAHV L>7, Ki26 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Foreign rivADh/ TIPS Domestic 



c ttie-M' opixirtiiiiirics phf.ulit be made to t)ie Trade Department of the 
> Chamber of Commerce, Kearny 112, list nuiubers being eiven. 



Publutied weekly by the San FrancLsco Chamber of 
Commerce. 205 .Merchanu Exchange. Telephone 
Kearny 112. Subscription, M a year. Entered as 
scconti-claas matter Ju)y2, 102O,at the Postodiee. San 
Francisco, California, under the act of March 3, 1 879. 



trsuli^ diiectorj' for San Franci,seo 
and goes not only to the member- 
ship, but to every Chamber of Com- 
merce in the United States and to 
every foreign consul througliout tlie 
world. Your name and address in 
this book alone is worth the cost of 
your membership. 

C The Chamber of Commerce an- 
*-^' nounces in its weekly issue of 
S.\N Fn.\.\cisco BisiNKss the names 
and addresses of all new members, 
giving them a brief write-up, out- 
lining the business they are engaged 
in. This nuigazine has a circulation 
of 7,(K)() and the advertising value of 
this write-up alone is worth the cost 
o( your memlx'rship. 
/i The Chamber of Commerce 
maintains a Traffic Bureau, 
which is constantly safeguarding 
rate increases that are prejudicial 
to San Francisco. This department 
is also at your service to give ytju 
any as.sistance possible in rates 
atTecting the commodity in which 
you deal. 

n A Retail Merchants As.sociation 
' * is pait of the Chamber of Com- 
merce and is constantly working for 
the betterment of the retail situation 
in San Francisco. Through this asso- 
ciation, local proposals are carefully 
watched to the end that retailers 
will not be uniluly burdened with 
unfair charges. This association 
recently saved one business gi-oup 
a charge of SIOO.OO per year for 
license, which saving alone will pay 
for a membership for several years 
in the Chamber. 

Q The C'hamber of Commerce has 
"• a salaried representative at 
Washington. D. C, who keeps his 
ear to the ground for San Francisco, 
and who will gladly give you any 
assistance possible if you have any 
business at the Nation's Capital. 
We maintain the same service at 
Sacramento during the legislative 
session. 

Q In addition to this, the Chamber 
^" of Commerce maintains a Hospi- 
tality Bureau, welcoming to San 
Francisco distinguished personages, 
conventions, round-the-world-tour 
steamers and visitors of all kinds 
whose presence here and favoralile 



9923 — Kobe, Jnpan. Foreign trarlinjE house de- 
sires to imnort BONES. HOOFS, HORNS and 
FCKS from San Francisco auppliera. Is also in a 
position to export Japanese FITIIS. 

9!»24— Glendnlc. Calif Manufacturer of bows, 
arrows, bonmeranns. etc., wishes to purchase the 
following foreien woods: I^NCE WOOD, LEMON 
WOOD (De Gamnio), BEEF WOOD, OaEEN- 
HEAUT (Bethabara, Waahaba and Dcmarara). 

092.>— Dallas, Texas. Party dc«ircs to establish 
connections with a San I-'rancisco importer of 
J.tP.VNESE GRASS Rt'CS, with a view to sellinu 
the^e runs in Texas. 

9926— Red Wing, Minnesota. Cientleman de- 
sires to communicate with importers of NOMCL- 
TIES. 

9927 — Switxerland. Swim wholeoate firm has 
demand for CALIFORNIA FRIIT PRODfCTS. 
Representative now in San Francisco. 

992S-NCW South Wales. Australia Supplier of 
furred skins, particularly KANGAROO SKINS, 
desires to establish business connectioits with San 
Francisco importers of furs. Sample of blue doe 
kangaroo skin on file with the Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Bureau. 

9929— Ixindon, England. Exporlcni of Conti- 
nental Sf^el Materials, such as BAII.S. CORRU- 
GATED BARS, PLATES, SHEETS, BEAMS, 
etc-, wish to establish connections with San Frao- 
ciaco importem of steel prtxlucts. They quote prices 
GIF San Francisco. 

9930 — Copenhagen, Denmark. Firm wishes to 
communicate with California producers of FISH- 
MEAL. 

gg.ll— Copenhagen. Denmark Well recom- 
mended firm of commi^ion agents and wholesalers, 
furnishine references, desires to net as sole agent of 
large San Francisco business house wishing to do 
business in the Danish or Scandinax'ian market. 

9932 — Sofia. Bulgaria Gentleman is in a posi- 
tion to supply parcel poet shipments of SILK 
WOR.M EGGS 

9933 — Fuessen, Bayern, Germany. German 
manufacturer of TWINE, WAXED THREAD, 
CORDS, NET YARN, and HE.MP VAR.V wishes 
a representative in San Francisco 



impressions of San Francisco are 
neces.sarj'. 

1 A The Marine Department of 
•'■ "• the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce is recognized throughout 
the world as the official bureau of 
shipping information for the Pacific 
Coast, and any shipping information 
which this bureau can give is avail- 
able to memlsers. It is open twenty- 
four hours of the day. 

"I 1 ,Just inside the door on the 
■'■ ■'■ • ground floor of the Chamber of 
Commerce is an Information Bureau 
with a battery of telephones. It 
is dispensing .service daily and is 
equipped to answer any question 
you care to ask. 

1 T The Chamber of Commerce 
■*• ■ looks to its membership alone 
for dependable revenue with which 
to maintain these ser%'ices of general 
benefit to the city and of direct 
interest to you. It is an organization 
to serve you and to serve San 
Francisco. 



9934— Brealau. Germany. Party wishes to 
communicate with San Francisco "FINANCE 
BROKERS." 

9935 — Hamburg, Germany. Establislied firm 
desires to represent California DRIED FRUIT 
packers in Hamburg. 

9936— Holland. .Suppliers of SARDELI.S and 
SALTED FISH wish to communicate with San 
PVancisco importers or wholesalers of these com- 
modities. 

99.37 — Amiens, France Party desires to estab- 
lish business connections with a CALIFORNIA 
DRIED FRUIT house which would deal directly 
with the interior of'Fhince. without passing through 
the importers at Havre. Wishes to handle business 
in his territory on a commission or representation 

9938— Venice. Italy. Manufact'irers of GLASS 
BEADS desire to establish connections with San 
Fmncisco importers. 

9939 — Naples. Italy. Party desires to obtain the 
agency of an .American manufacturer or exporter of 
TYPEWRITERS wishing representation in Italy. 
.\lso offers his services to other business houses de- 
siring representation in Italy. 

9940— llal> Suppliers of SULPHUR. CHEESE. 
BEET PULP. CHOCOLATES and CANDY, and 
M.\RBLE. wish to establish business connections 
with San Francisco importers 

9941— Chefoo. China. Suppliers of SHEEP and 
HOG CASINOS desire to estJiblish business con- 
nections with San Francisco buyers. References 
given. Samples on file W'th Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Department. 

9942— Calcutta. India. Exporter of JUTE. 
HESSIANS. GU.VNY and SHELLAC wishes to 
communicate with San Francisco importers of these 
commodities. 

9943— Tegucigalpa. Honduras. Gentleman wishes 
to purchase for own private use. wholesale. ca.*ie lots 
of CANNED GOODS. VEGETABLES. .ME.ATS. 
BUTTER, etc. Rcjuests intereeted San Francisco 
firms to quote prices. 

9944 — Culiacan, Mexico. Firm desires to estab- 
lish connections with Pacific Coast distributing 
houses and manufacturers of HARDWARE. DRY 
GOODS and GLASS. 

9945 — Cienfuegos, Cuba. Commission represent- 
atives desire to get in touch with San Francisco 
dealers in California and Oriental BE.\NS who 
wish to market this commodity in Cuba. 

9946— Coyoacan, Mexico. Owner of large rubber 
plantation on the Isthmus of Tchuantepec desires 
to market the GUM from liis plantation. He is also 
the owner of land suitable for planting rubbertrees. 
which land he is disposed to sel' or rent on good 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D- 1 94 1 — -Omaha, Nebraska . Party dtsires to 
communicate w-ith users and dealers in CORN 
HL'SKS for the tamale trade. 

D-1942 — Portland, Oropon. Large producers of 
CAXXED and FROZEN FRUITS desire to com- 
municate with San Francisco bakers or preserveand 
jelly makers, who buy FROZEN or CANNED 
BERRIES in carload lots. 

D-1943— San Francisco. Calif. Gentleman with 
15 years experience in selliiiK, and having small 
amount of capital, desires connections nnth some 
merchandising concern, either as an agent or an 
active partner. 

D-1944— San Francisco, Calif. Manufacturers' 
agent desires to represent either local or Eastern 
manufacturers on the Pacific Coast in MECHANI- 
CAL LINES 

D-1945 — Verington. Nevada. Party desires tc 
purchase a small GROCERY. LUNCH ROOM or 
ICE CREAM PARLOR, in a good location, 
[ continued on page 3 ] 



<AX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, .lANUARY 27, 1926 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 



O* 

A new hnu entering a new territory must make 
now friends, ant! established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if ■'tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansion.s. 

Business men can enhance the value of this sen-- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by maiUng in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor, Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A daily service available to members is' distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m., at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes. 



Architect— Mark T. Jorgensen, 110 Sutter to 321 
Hu.sh, 

Art Goods— Emalina Taylor, 2130 Fillmore. 

Attorneys — Alma Myers, Hearst BIdg. to Alaska 
Commercial Bldg. ; Edw. D. Mabson, Liberty Bank 
Bldg. to 251 Kearnv: R. T. Harding, 27.5 Bush to 
68 Po.«t. 

Auto Finance— Continental Finance Corp., 995 
Market to 1600 Van Ness Ave. 

Auto Repairs— L. T. Tilford. 1661 Pacific; Posch 
& Reuter. 719 Golden Gate Ave. 

Auto Trimming — Sunset Auto Trimming Co- (D. 
Thomson and Henry Henzi), 1275 9th Ave. 

Bakeries — Eastern Bakery, 720 Grant Ave.; 
Abramson Bakery, McAllister and Webster, Jan. 
30, 

B 
Co.. 

Beauty Parlor — Crystal Beauty Shop, 1566 Jack- 
son to 1932 Irving. 

Blue Prints— Electric Blue Print Co., Russ Bldg. 
tu Sheldon Bldg 

Candy— Doyle's Sweet Shop, 3898 24th; Coxon 
Candy Co,, factory (Mr. Coxon), 6th and Harrison. 

Chiropractor — Dr. Evelyn Coleman Olsen, 535 
Taylor. 

Cigars—.). F. Berries. 1098 Hyde. 

Civil Engineer — Cuttrell Engineering Corpora- 
tion (C. C- Cottrell). 369 Pine. 

Cleaners— Alexandria Cleaners, 5349 Geary ; New 
Method Cleaning & Dyeing Works, 1549 (icean 

Cloaks and Suits— Wm. HofF Co.. 212 S'ltter to 
117Stockton. 

Contractors— Golden Gate Concrete Co.. 2588 

Corsets— Fifth Av. Corset Co.. 1095 Market to 
606 Geary 

Custom Shirt Maker— L E. Landon, 291 10th 
Ave. 

Dentist— Dr C. S Knoles, 1990 Sutter to 1749 
Polk. 

Drugs— Roosevelt Drug Co., 299 Eddy. 

Engineers — G. K. Davol (mechanical). Traders 
Bldg.; J, S. Wroth (mining), 315 Montgomery. 

Foundry — Monarch Foundry Co., 3!0 Sansome 
to 681 Market. 

Gowns— Nola Gown Shop. 530 Sutter. 

Grocers— Curtin & Touhy, 2601 Diamond; 
George Michaeloff, 167 11th; Western Grocery Co., 
Chain Stores, General Offices and Wholesale Dis- 
tributing Dept., 3040 Geary: W. A Dietrich, 479 
Chenery. 

Hardware— Omer Cox, 604 Mission to 140 Spear. 



•s? 

Insurance — L. J. Wollenberg, 105 Montgomery 
to 681 Market. 

Investments— C. B..and J. G. Weil. Traders Bldg 

Lumber— Universal Veneer Products Co., 416 
Fulton; Firmstone Lumber Co., 4th and Channel. 

Machinery— Ohio Locomotive Crane Co.; Daven- 
port Locomotive Works and Western Wheeled 
Scraper Co., 681 Market tn 2;i4 Steuart. 

Manufacturers Agents^F. C. Bernhardt, 320 
Market to 149 New Montgomery. 

Men's Furnishings— Al's Toggery Shop (1023 
Fillmore). 2615 Mission. 

Newspapers and Publications — The California 
Boatman and Pacific Ports, Chronicle Bldg. 

Oriental Rugs — C. Raliof (Parisian Mercantile 
Co.), 545 .Sutter. 

Paint Manufacturers — Baer Bros., 60 California. 

Painting— W. L. Penwell, 385 Taylor: Antonietti 
Painting Co., 2920 Octavia. 

Physician— Dr. J. V. Leonard, 177 Post to 135 
Stockton. 

Radios— Geo. F. Potter, 1226 10th Ave.; General 
Radio & Electric Co., 1408 Market; Mervyn Kasser, 
729 Hyde; General Radio Co., K. M. Turner Radio 
Corp. and C. C. LangeWn Co., 681 Market to 274 
Brannan; R. M. Radio Service, 3188 21st. 

Railway Construction — Rankin & Welch, 220 
Montgomery. 

Real Estate— P O. Brewer and Henry Voorhies, 
Hobart Bldg. ; California Real Estate Exchange, 240 
Montgomery to 82 Sutter. 

Rental Agency — Associated Renting Bureau, 781 
Turk. 

Sheet Metal Products— Electrical Sheet Metal 
Work:-. 752 Bryant to 81 Shipley. 

Stationery— J. W. Hunt, 1749 Union. 

Stenography — Public Stenographic Studio, 110 

Trucking— Salinas Valley Freight Line Co., 430 
Davis. » 

Vulcanizing — Sebastiani & Barghini, 6231 Mis- 
Miscellaneous - — Western Paper Converting 
Co.. Dollar Bldg.; L. Bloom & Co , 149 New Mont- 
gomery; Gilman Caiton Co., 531 Howard; K C. D. 
Distributing Co, Marvin Bldg.; Krigbaum Mar- 
cellus & Co., 240 Montgomery to 82 Sutter; May- 
flower Tapestry Studio. 132 25th Ave.; Mechanical 
Machine Works (J. E. Minor). 1095 Market; 
National Business Show Co., Monadnock Bldg.; 
Dr. D. B. Vermiliion, 323 Geary: Schroeder & 
Tremayne, Inc., Marvin Bldg. 

Young man, recent arrival from Portland, seeking 
clerical position in San Francisco. Experienced in 
Lumber. Shipping, Merchandising and General 
Office work. Bookkeeper. 

ADDRESS WANTED: 

Address of the manufacturers of the Peerless 
Spark Plug Intensifier is wanted by a prospective 
purchaser making inquiry at this department. 

Offices have been opened in the Underwood Bldg. 
by R. W. Ellis, for the purpose of handling the dis- 
tribution of the Insto Electric Time Stamp and 
electrically operated time dating stamps. The Insto, 
a product of the Automatic Electric Machine Com- 
pany of Oakland, is intended as a time saver for it 
eliminates the necessity of striking with the hand, 
the insertion of the paper making a sensitive con- 
tact which automatically produces the blow and 
the resulting stamp. 

The local distributing office is now arranging for 
the appointment of agents in foreign territory, such 
as Central and South America. 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than February 4. 
Full information concerning the subjects listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket No. 6517 — Nacogdoches & Southeastern 
Railway: Proposal to amend Tariff 1-Y, add Sta- 
tions: Littles Chappie, Pauls Valley, Atoyac, Camp 
Worth. Harmony and Calgary, Texas at Group F 
basis of rates. Tariff 2-S, add the Nacogdoches * 
Southeastern Railway as a participating carrier. 
Tariff 3-S. add the Nacogdoches & Southeastern 
Railway as a participating carrier and provide 
Group F basis of rates to stations on that line in- 
cluding those named above; 6518. apples, CL, east- 
bound; 6519, scrap rubber, CL, eastbound; 6520, 
milk cans, CL, westbound; 6521, textile machinery, 
in mixed carloads, westbound; 6522, mechanical 
rubber goods with solid rubber tires in mixed car- 
loads, westbound; 6523, machinery and machines 
in mixed carloads, westbound; 6524. tables, CL, 
westbound; 6525. grape juice, CL, eastbound; 6526. 
aaphaltum, solid, CL, westbound; 6527, baskets, 
CL, westbound; 6528, bauxite ore, CL, westbound; 
6529, Stone Harbor Railroad Company and Wild- 
wood and Delaware Bay Short Line Railroad Com- 
pany: Request for representation as participating 
carriers in Tariffs l-Y, 4-V, 14-K and Circulars 
59-E and 61-F; 6530. wire cots, LCL. eastbound; 
6531, refrigerators, CL, westbound; 6532, amyl, 
butyl an-i ethyl acetate. CL and LCL, westbound; 
6533. brewers' rice, CL, westbound; 6534. de- 
hydrated orange pulp. CL, eastbound; 6468 (cor), 
architectural or ornamental bronze work, CL, 
westbound. 



FAIR DATE CHANGED 



ed 



The Foreign Trade Deparrtmetit h 
information from the Cuban Consulate that the 
Second International Exposition of Samples is tc 
be held in Havana from March 12th to 26th, 
instead of at earlier dates previously announced. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

[ continued from page 2 ] 

D-1946— Glendale, Calif. Manufacturer of 
boomerangs, bows, arrows, spears and cioss bows, 
is in the market for the following American woods- 
WYCH-ELM, HICKORY {2nd growth), RED 
CEDAR, OSAGE ORANGE, AMERICAN YEW; 
also LANCE WOOD, LEMON WOOD, BEEF 
WOOD and GREENHEART, which are foreign 
woods. 

D-1947 — Philadelphia, Pa. Manufacturers of 
HIGH GRADE LEATHER BELTING want to 
get in touch with dealers in California to handle 
their line. Exclusive territory to right parties. 
Factory representative will be here to discuss de- 

D-1948 — St. Louis, Mo. Manufacturers of a 
complete line of OIL BURNERS desire to appoint 
a territorial distributor in San Francisco to repre- 
sent them. They claim there is an excellent oppor- 
tunity for the right man to realize a very large 

D-1949 — Milwaukee, Wis. Fii;^ of sales engi- 
neers and mechanical experts desire to locate a man 
who has had experience in the advertLoing business. 
Must be a man capable of handling a HIGH CLASS 
AD\'ERTISING PROPOSITION that requires 
an investment of $1,000 to S5.000 with services. 

D-1950 — Beatrice, Nebraska. Biscuit company 
wishes to communicate with California wholesale 
cookie and cracker bakeries. 

D-1951 — Tulsa. Oklahoma. Large manufac- 
turers of WOODEN TOYS desire to appoint a 
San Francisco firm or individual to act as their 
selling agent in this territory. 



FEES REDUCED 

Reduction of Consular Fee for Vise of Bills of 

Lading. 

The consular fee for certif>-ing bills of lading to 
Salvador has been changed from $10 gold per set to 
SI gold per set for each S500 (or fraction thereof) of 
the value of the merchandise as shown by the con- 
sular invoice, but in no case shall the fee exceed $10. 
by a decree effective November 30. 1025. 



:^AN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, JANfAKV 



Survey Shows 1926 to be 
a "Good Year" 

Business in jifft^ral started out 
thp year satisfactorily with consider- 
able momentuni fi-oin the preced- 
ing months, and with prospects 
favorable in face of moderate in- 
flation due to a steady upward 
swing, according to a survey pre- 
pared l)y 1{. G. Dun & Company. 
,lobl)ers are still working on inven- 
tories, filling more orders for winter 
goods, and booking orders for spring. 
Comlitioris in millinery are more 
stabilized and country buying Ijetter 
than one year ago. the report says. 

Offerings at retail show a disposi- 
tion to reduce stf)cks, and season 
settlements with jobbers are show- 
ing up well, allowing reductions in 
loans at bank. 

Cold weather has stimulated buy- 
ing in some lines, but no serious frost 
damage has been reported. 

A fair amount of building con- 
tinues, and improved conditions are 
noted for the lumber industry, due 
in part to a better demand from the 
east coast and Florida. 

Authorities agree that 1926 should 
be a good year, and some expect 
business to outstrip 1925, but not 
without concentrated effort to get 
it and to keep down f>verhead 
charges. 



Employment Office for 
Engineers Opens in 
San Francisco 

The San Francisco office of the 
Engineering Societies Employment 
Service, according to an announce- 
ment l)y Newton D. Cook, manager 
of the office, lias opened an employ- 
ment office for professional engineers 
for the benefit of all concerns em- 
ploying men requiring technical 
training and experience. The serv- 
ice is fostered by four nationally 
known engineering societies. 

It is intended to make this office 
a clearing house for information 
about engineering opportunities on 
the Pacific Coast and in those foreign 
countries bordering the Pacific. 
Information as to positions available 
will be primarily for members of the 
supporting organizations, but an 
effort wiU be made to fill all demands 
made upon the office for technical 
emploj'ees in the fields covered. 

The local offices are at 57 Post 
street. 



Santiago, Chile, opening September 
15, 1927, in connection with the 
South American Railroad Congress. 
Railroad companies nf the I'nited 
States and manufacturers and dis- 
tributors of railroad materials and 
supplies are invited to participate. 
Those who wish to avail themselves 
of this opportunity to exhibit for 
South American buyer-s are re- 
quested to communicate with the 
Minister of Railroads and Public 
Works of Santiago de Chile. 



Committee for Trade Council 
is Named 

The persoimel of the committee 
which will be in charge of the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council convention 
to Ix* held in San Francisco March 
4, 5 and 6. will be compose*! of the 
following, it is announced by Robert 
I. Bentley, general chainnan: 

Vice-chairmen, Frederick .1. Kos- 
ter, Clay MiUer, Ralph Merritt, O. 
H. Fischer and Paul Shoup; secre- 
tarj', Henry ¥. Grady; conmiittee 
chairmen, program, I>eonard B. 
Gary-; attendance, Hugh Gallagher; 
arrangements, Paul Dietrich ; recep- 
tion, Robert Cabrera; transporta- 
tion, Percy R. Molt; entertainment 
for ladies, Mrs. Maliel T. Johnson; 
trade advisers. F. F., G. Harper. 

A preliminary list of speakers in- 
cludes the names of Mayor .lames 
Rolph; William Pigott, of Seattle, 
president of the Council; Ralph 
Merritt, of Fresno, president of the 
Sun-Maid Growers' Association; C. 
F. Stern, Los Angeles, president of 
the First National Bank; J. J. 
Donovan, Bellingham, Wash., presi- 
dent of the Bloedel-Donovan Lumber 
Mills; A. F. Haines, vice-president 
of the Admiral Oriental Steamship 
lines; Dwight K. Grady, secretary 
of the Dried Fruit Association of 
California; Paul Shoup, vice-presi- 
dent of the Southern Pacific Com- 
pany; James Bacigalupi; Robert 
Newton Lynch, vice-president of 
the Chamber of Commerce; Dean 
Stuart Daggett, school of commerce, 
L'niversity of California, and P. H. 
Patchin, assistant to the president 
of the Standard Oil Companj- of 
California. 



Chile to Hold Railroad 
Exposition 

The Foreign Trade Department 
has received information that a Rail- 
road Exposition will be held in 



Appointment Confirmed 

Richard \. Taylor of Alabama, 
who was appointed by the President 
as a menilier of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, was confirmed 
by the Senate on Januarj- 12th and 
was sworn in as a member of the 
Commission on JanuaiT 14th. 



Specifications Available 

Ttip follouing tii>ccificatinn.s fow-rins bids rc- 
quMtiKl tor various Hupplies are now on fil,> at the 
Foivien and Domnilic Trade I>epartiii>-nt: 

For fumiMhinjc the W'ar Department and deliver- 
ins to the l*, S. Eoxineen. Rio Vista. California. 
mijieellanpoUAi hardware aiHl tiuppli*^ Bids are to 
be .tubniitte*! to the U. S. Kn^nff'r Office. .Second 
Uistrict. 85 Sveond Street. San Franei-oo. anil will 
be opened January- 30. 1926. 

For furniflliinc the War Department and deliver- 
insT at Fort Maaon. San Franciscr.. n.i^cellaneous 
Kuppliet. Bids ar« to be submitted to the Quarter- 
maater Supply Officer, S. F. G. I. Depot. Fort 
Mason. San Fnindsoo, and will be opened Februarj* 
2. 192S. 

For furaisbios the War Department and deliver- 
init at San Francisco on or about Marcli 1§, 1926. 
for shipment tu Panama, Canal Zone, subsistence 
supplies Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer. Fort Mason, .?an Francisco. 
Calif., and will be opened February- 3. Kt26. 

For furnishing the War Department atnl deliver- 
inc at iKjsts on or about February 25. ll>26.*and as 
called lor durini; the month of March. 1926. sub- 
sistence supplies. Bids are to be submittetl to the 
Quartermaster Supply Officer. Fort Mason. San 
Francisco, California, and will be opened February 
5, 1926. 

For furnishiiuE the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charsc^, on dock at either Cristobal 
(.Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port'. Canal 
Zone. Lsthmus of Panama, with tinie-reoording 
clocks, Itasotine tractor, electric truck, truck trail- 
ers, phonoeraph, sewer pipe, asbestos-magnesia pipe 
covering, foundry pig-iron, stove bolts, expansion 
bolt slielU, switches, hydrometers, solid rubber 
tires, tire valve plungers, windshield wipers, rubber 
gloves, flax twine, red ink. and drawing paper. Bids 
lire to be submitted to the General Purcliasing 
OHicer of The Panama Canal, W.ishington. D. C. 
and will be opened February 2, 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by .steamer, 
free of all charges on dock at either Cristobal 
f.-Vtlantic port) or Balt>oa 'Pacific port). Canal 
Zone. Isthmus of Panama, with Portland cement 
Bids arc to be submitteil to the General Purchasing 
Officer of The Panama Canal. Washington. D. C., 
and will be opened February 5. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at San Francisco. Calif., March 15 to 20, 1926. 
for shipment to Manila, P. I., subsistence supplies. 
Bids are to be submitted to the Quartermaster 
Supply Officer. 8. F. G. I. Depot, Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, Calif., and will be opened Febrtiarj* 8. 
1026. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(.\tlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal Zone. 
Isthmus of Panama, with iron, steel, copper, brass, 
bronze, rope, cable, wire, panel boards, condulets, 
insulators, extension bells, reflectors, street-light 
fixtures, lead sleev-ing, zincs, switches, duplex 
pumps, chairs, electric grinders, inspirators, hose, 
nozzles, brushes, tire press, pipe cutters, fire ex- 
tinguishers, steam whistles, gauge glasses, scales, 
drawer handles, grindstones, casters, cable clips, 
ring bolts, padlocks, tackle blocks, nails, glass, 
flower pots, rubber boots, horsehide gloves, leather 
belting, cotton webbing, mop yarn, canvas, ticking, 
flush-tank balls, soap polish, varnish, transformer 
oil. stearic-acid candles, and ledger paper. Bids are 
to be submitted to the General Purchasing Officer 
of the Panama Canal, Washington, D. C, and will 
be opened February 1. 1926. 



The total production of field and 
fruit crops in this state during 1925 
was approximately 1,5.59.000 tons, 
or 18 per cent greater than in 1924, 
according to official tabulations 
that have been made pubUc. The 
value of this immense crop is placed 
at .9405.19.3.000. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FILE COf 

'NFORMATJON BU 



BUSINESS 

Cf» to 

Published JVeekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XII 



FEHHUAKY :i, 1926 



Number ,} 



''WHAT'S YOUR BUSINESS?" 



A S^ery Which 
Seeks a Prompt, 
Definite A nswer 



rf\ 



r 



iiip.k's a distinction he- 
twi-pn being classified as 
,1 iiiaiuifacturer's agent, 
a ri insult ins engineer or 
an inijxiitor. 

It is not enough merely to say 
that you are a gardener; you should 
make it clear whether you are a land- 
scape, flower and lawn or truck 
gardener. 

The product being offered for sale 
by the manufacturer's agent is the 
information required by the buyer 
seeking that specific article or line. 

To identify yourself as a cohsult- 
ing engineer is too general a descrip- 
tion. If you are specific you identify 
yourself as an electrical, mechanical 
or hydraulic engineer. It means 
more business when you make it 
clear that you are an engineer spe- 
cializing in power transmission and 
that you therefore are not even re- 
motely to be considered a steam 
locomotive engineer. 

A firm specializing in the impor- 
tation of Venetian glassware, to go 
further, is losing revenue when it is 
identified in the mind of the buying 
public merely as a "glass importer." 

A trade directory now being com- 
piled by the Chamber of Commerce 
is to be an up-to-date, definite classi- 
fication of the chamber membership 
— an adequate description of the 
liusinesses engaged in by the mem- 
bers. The trade possibilities in such 
a directory are incalculable. It will 
make possible immediate and intel- 
ligent contact between the producer 
and the consumer. 

[ continued on page 2 ] 



Free Service Bureau for Trade 
Council Delegates 

Delegates attending the fourth 
annual convention of the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council to he held in 
San Francisco March 4, 5 and 6, will 
find available the services of widely 
known trade advisors, it was an- 
nounced yesterday by Henry F. 
Grady, in charge of the Foreign 
Trade Department of the Chamber 
of Commerce and secretary of the 
convention committee. 

"The trade-advisor service of the 
convention," Grady said, "is proving 
to be a most attractive one to pros- 
pective delegates. 

"The 'key men' in the various 
trades along the coast are giving 
their services freely as advisors to 
the delegates. In other words, the 
exporter of some manufactured ar- 
ticle seeking to develop a market in 
China will be able to secure the 
advice of experts in methods of se- 
curing proper agents, advertising, 
financing, or any other detail of 
successful selling in the China 
market. 

"Likewise for Mexico or Central 
America. The importer will also be 
able to have invaluable advice given 
him by experts in the particular 
trades, such as rice, beans, coffee, 
etc. The assistance that can be se- 
cured in this way by the delegate to 
the convention would cost him 
thousands of dollars if he had to 
employ it. 

"All the cities on the Pacific Coast 
are co-operating in making this 
trade-advisor service a success. This 
has been one of the outstanding fea- 
tures of every foreign trade con- 
vention, and many delegates en- 
rolled for these conventions pri- 
marily for the practical, direct 
assistance which they can secure." 



National Business Show 
for This City 

Another phase of the manufactur- 
ing progress of the bay district, as 
well as the inventiveness of this 
locality's office efficiencj- experts, will 
be drawn to the notice of the na- 
tion's commercial leaders thiough 
the National Business Show, to be 
held in the Civic Auditorium March 
8 and 9. 

Waldo T. Tupper, Pacific Coast 
manager, emphasized this aspect of 
the show when he said he had assur- 
ance that a gi'eater gathering of 
business scientists may be expected 
at the forthcoming efficiency expo- 
sition than attended the show when 
it was held here on two previous 
occasions. 

Recently returned from Chicago 
and New York, where he helped to 
plan and stage such expositions, he 
said he had assurance from scores 
of executives and heads of big busi- 
ness concerns that they will attend. 

In addition to the display of Cali- 
fornia progress, the office machines, 
systems and methods of the nation 
are expected to be revealed by the 
event. 

Frank Tupper, president of the 
National Business Show organiza- 
tion, is expected within a few days to 
join his ncjihew. the other Tupper, 
to further the progress of the show. 
Headquarters for the exposition have 
been established in the Monadnock 
Building. 

While much of the booth space 
has been assigned to Eastern or na- 
tional manufacturing concerns, Tup- 
per yesterday reported a rapid turn- 
over of display areas to the local 
industries. 



SAN FRANCIflCO BrSINESS. Kl lilirARY :? I'liti 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



PubliafitKl wc«kly by the San Francisco Chaujbcr of 
Commerce, 205 Merchanu Exchange. Tclephooe 
Kearny 112. SubscripCioo, S4 a year Entered as 
sccoii<l-claa< matter July 2. 1 920. at the Poetoffice. San 
Francisco. Calilornia. under the act of March 3. 1879. 



"What's Your Business?" 

i cntinun) fron, pait.- I ] 

If an ICa-sUTn liuycr asks the In- 
dustrial DcpartnuMit of the Chanifjer 
for the name of a finii or individual 
doalinp in metal fittings but more 
partieularly in a certain make or 
kind of fauoet, the Industrial De- 
partment can meet the (luery com- 
[X'tently and promptly. 

It is necessary, however, for the 
memliers to co-o|K'rate in the prepa- 
ration of thi.s important trade di- 
rectory. The compilation of this 
directory is being supervised by 
L. M. Hyslop. statistician of the 
Industrial Department. 

When you send in your firm or 
individual name for classification 
see that it is accompanied by what- 
ever literature — pamphlets, circu- 
lars, etc. — you have that will make 
clear just what particular commod- 
ities you deal in or the kind of serv- 
ice you are selling. 

January Business Still 
On Up-grade 

Bank clearings, building permits 
and ship movements during January 
increased perceptibly over the same 
period in 192.) and give body to the 
prediction of observers that this will 
l)e a year of progress and expansion 
for the San Francisco metropolitan 
area, according to figures on file 
today at the ( "hamber of Commerce. 

Building permits alone last month 
aggregated §5,1.53,504 as compared 
with S.3.4(«.623 during January 
1925. In similar periods respectively 
for 1923 and 1924 the registration 
amounted to $3,205,811 and -<«,- 
178,413. 

The bank clearings last month are 
etiually impressive. During January, 
1925, they amounted to .?764,30d,- 
000; for the month just ended they 
reached a convincing total of $83l'- 
541,107. 

Aceoidingtofigurescompiledb3'the 
Marine Department of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce the ttjnnage arriv- 
ing here during last January aggre- 
gated 1,264,043 while the outgoing 
tonnage was 1,237,105. Outgoing 
tonnage in .lanuary, 1925, amounted 
to 1,113,788 tons and incoming 
1,103,816. 



Foreign 1 IvAJDil/ 1 IP S Domestic 



Sun Fruncisco Chamber uf Corr 



CH 

!K*47 — Anutcrdam. Holland Import hotue with 
offic*^ io Amsterdam and Ilambum d«-drr« lo rep- 
resent a California packer or direct exporter t»f 
nitlF.D FIU'IT. cspcrially PRUNES. APRICOTS 
Al'RICOT-KFKNF.I>:. PEACHF^ and PKARS; 
CANNED FKIIT. particularly PINE,\PPI,E: 
SAHI>INEfi. and other PR1-:SERVED FI.SH: abo 
producers or ez|»ortcr8 of HONKV. References are 
supplied 

9048 — Rotifrdam. Holland. Exporters havins di- 
rect connections with producers of PIG-IRON*. 
IRON, and STEEL PRODICTS. are in a position 
to offer low prices on these metals and solicit in- 
qtiirics from Fan Francim^ importers. 

M40 — Hamburs. Germany. Exporter of HARD- 
WARE wishes a representative in San Franciaeo. 

99.50— Barmen-I-angerfcld. Germany. Manu- 
facturer of IMITATION BOBBIN I^^CIvS wishM 
a repreeeoiative in California (or svlliuR his producic 

9951 — Detmold, Germany Manufacturer of 
DECOILATIVE STICCO MATERIAI^ wishes a 
reprpi«entativc in San FranctSfO. 

9952 — Numberg, Germany. Manufacturer of 
FLA\ORING EXTR.ACTS for candy munufac- 
turers. etc.. de^res a repri>«entative in California. 

9953— Hamburn. Germany. A DRIED FRl'IT 
broker desires to reprewot a CnKfomia packer of 
APRICOTS. PEACHF^. APPLES. PRUNES, etc. 

9954— Ham biirit. fiermany A nritL»h firm 
specialisijg in the exportation of all kinds nf IRON 
and STEEL NL\TERIAI.S. deairej. to w>loblish 
busineen connections with San Francisco importers 
of thifl material 

9955— Copenhagen, Oenmark. Firm de«ires to 
represent a California DRIED FRUIT packer in 
Denmark. 

9956— Sofia. Bulgaria. Supplier of THRACIAN 
SILK WORM EGGS of finest quality of white Bag- 
dad raee. desires to communicate nith intere?ted 
California importers. Eggs are exported after gov- 
ernment inspection, which guarantees *he quality: 
parcel post .shipments of more than 20 ounces are 
Sl.<i()per ounce 

9957 — New Orleans. La. Foreign tradinjc house is 
in the market for DRIED ABALONE. 

9958— Martinsville. Indiana. Producers of GIN- 
SENG desire to establish connections with San 
Francisco exporters or dealers in this commodity. 

9959— Kobe. Japan. Exporters of CHRISTMAS 
DECORATIONS, ^uch as CHIP FESTOONS. 
CHIP BELI^. CHIP WREATHS CHIP MATS. 
WALL MATS. EASTER BASKETS, etc.. are in a 
position to quote faclor>' prices to interested San 
Francisco importers. 

9960 — Gavre. France. Firm ft-i»hc8 to commun- 
icate n'ith Sau Francisco manufacturers of ICE 
CREAM and ICED CHOCOLATES. 

99G1— Messina. Sicily. Exporters of SICILIAN 
PRODUCTS, particularly DRIED FRUITS, wish 
to market their products in San Francisco. 

9962 — San Francisco. Calif. Local manufacturers 
of AUTOMATIC PRINTING DEVICES are in 
search of a local oi^anization, having connections in 
India, which could handle their businc^ in that 
country. 

9963 — Colombo. Ceylon. I^rge exporters of 
CEYLON PRODUCTS and CURIOS, particularly 
TEA. CARDAMOMS. CINNAMON. CINN.A- 
MON LEAF. OIL. CITRONELLA and COCOA- 
XUT OIL, K.\POK. K.\POK SEED. COCOA 
FIBRE, and CEYLON EBONY ELEPHANTS, 
wish to communicate with San Francisco importers 
of these articles. 

9964 — Oakland. Calif. Gentleman leaving shortly 
for Australia is desirous of representing San Fran- 
cisco manufacturers wishing to establish an outlet 
for their goods in Australia and New Zealand. 

9965 — London. England. Established merchants' 
and manufacturers' agents, well equipped to handle 
any general distributioD scheme, desire to establish 
business cormectioos with California producers or 



«o 

export«.-ra wishing lo market their products in Eng- 
land. 

99fi6— Playa-Ponce. Porto Rico Well established 
importers of RICE and PINK BEANS, deaire to 
t-Mtablish connections with California producers or 
shippers of these commodities. They will either buy 
for ttteir own account, or handle the goods on a 
commission banis. Refercucui are supplied. 

9967- Nogales. Arizona. Suppliers of CAB- 
RILLA. SHRIMPS. OYSTERS and SEA-BASS 
from Guaymas, Mexico, wish to communicate with 
.San Francisco buyers of fish and sea goods. 

9968 — .Steubenville. Ohio. Firm desires to get in 
touch with San Francisco importers who specialize 
in CHINESE FIREWORKS and who are in a 
position to sell to the jobbing trade. 

9969— Athens. Gre«-c* Exporters of articles of 
ancient Greek an. in silk embroideries. Byzantine. 
Attic. Isle of Rhodes style, such as CURTAINS. 
CUSHION'S. LAMP-SHADES. TABI.^ COVERS, 
etc., all handmaile. wish to communicate with in- 
terevted .^an Franciwo importers. 

9970— Brussels. Belgium. .Manufacturer of 
BASKETS and WILLOW AND CANE GOODS 
wishes to appoint an agent in San Francisco to 
handle the sale of his articles on a commiasion basis. 

9971 — Gablonc. Bohemia. Manufacturer and ex- 
porter of GLASS. WOODEN, CELLUTX)rD and 
GALALITH BEADS; -FEWELRY of all kinds; and 
SHOE Bl'CKLES AND ORNAMENTS, desire to 
appoint a suitable firm to act as selling rcpreaenta- 

9972 — San Francisco, Calif. Representative of a 
Mexico City firm of import and export agents, who 
is now in San Fmncisco, detdr^-s to get in direct 
touch with any San Francisco firms interested in 
appointing a huI<-8 iigcnt in Mexico. 

9973— Culiacan. Sin.. Mexico. EaUblished hard- 
ware and drj- gtMnls store solicit catalogs and prices 
from San Francisco manufacturers and exporters of 
HARDWARE and DRY GOODS lines. 

9974— Havana, Cuba Importer of HARD- 
WARE. IRON AND STEEL. BUILDING MA- 
TERIALS. FOODSTUFFS, deeirea to represent 
San Francisco manufacturers or exporters of these 
articles. 

9975— Vancouver. B. C. Firm handling adver- 
ti»ng specialties is in the market for BOTTLE 
OPENTiltS. ASH TRAYS, of any material includ- 
ing glass or aluminum. CELLULOID FOOT 
.RULES, and SALT SHAKERS. Prefer to deal 
direct with manufacturers. 

9976 — Copenhagen. Denmark- Firm wishes to 
represent a California exporter of CANNED 
FRUITS. CANNED SALMON and SARDINES. 
They deal exclusively in canned goods. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-1952— Cottonwood. Calif Manufacturers of 
OAK VENEER desire to communicate with San 
Francisco users of hardwood veneer, either as 
manufacturers or jobbers. 

D-1953 — Vineland, New Jersey. Manufacturers 
of CHEMICAL. LABORATORY. PHYSICIANS. 
SCXENTIFIC and SURGICAL GLASSWARE de- 
sire to secure suitable sales representation in this 
ierritor>'. 

D-1954 — Chicago. Illinois. Gentleman desires to 
communicate with California manufacturers of 
GLACE FRUIT, with a view lo handling the sale 
of this commodity in the Missiwippi Valley and the 
State of Illinois. 

D-19o5 — Glendale. Calif. Gentleman desires to 
represent manufacturing concerns throughout the 
Northwestern United Slates. 

D-1956 — Palo Alto. Calif. Art supply company is 
in the market for GUM ARABIC at lowest possible 

[ continued on page 'i ] 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 3, 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



A new firm entering a new territory must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released vdth- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by maiUng in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop. Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce.Main Floor. MercbantsExchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A dailv ser%-ice available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m.. at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes. 



Adjusters— W. C. Xicoll. Clunie Bldg. to Royal 
Ins, BidK 

Automobile Parts— Lee H. Craig & Co.. 75 
Fri?mnnt to HI Fremont, 

Cleaners— B & B Cleaners. 2471 Sacramento; 
Harvey Duarte. 3505 17th. 

Creamery— Clement St. Creamery. 440 Clement. 
Electric Sign Flashers-— Associated Distributors 
Inc. (Diamond Flasher Button Co.). 639 Mission to 
120 Sth. 

Engineer— Roy H. Elliott (mining). Mechanics 
Institute BIdg. 

Finance— Central Finance Co.. 1750 Market. 
Furniture — Lyon Furniture Mercantile Agency. 
1 M.mleonierj-. 

Income Tax Specialists — Delany Whjtehurst. 40 
San.-onie to 522 Exchange Blk. 

Instrument Repairing — Wm. O. Hammer. 35 
Montcomery to 153 Kearny. 

Machinery — Beaver Machine & Tool Co. (New- 
iirk, X. J.). 1066 Mission. 

Publicity— Thew. Inc.. Sharon Bldg; Western 
Ser\'ice News, 1112 Market. 

Radio— Emery Blum. Marvin Bldg to 26 O'Far- 
rell; Atwaler Kent Agency. 637 Irving. 

Real Estate — John Brickell Co.. Lick Bldg. to 58 
Sutter; P. W. Dongan. 2333 Irving; J. J. Lagoric, 
5S67 Mission. 

Restau I ant— Cortland Tamale Parlor. 626 Cort- 
land. 

Sheet Metal— Ace Sheet Metal Works. 1500 
Guerrero tu 444 Clementina. 

Window Shades— American Window Shade Co., 
15:^3 Pine to 1S19 Market. 

Miscellaneous— Dayton Products Co., 2260 
Folsom; Highway Development Assn., 74 New 
Montgomery: \. Levin & Co.. 1230 McAllister. 

Specialty salesman desires engagement with some 
house ha\'ing articles of merit and large territorj', 
preferably California, Oregon and Washington. 

Traveling salesman, covering territory' from Los 
Angeles lo Bellingham, Washington, handling paper 
products, such as napkins, toilet paper, coffee bags, 
glassine bags, and paper cutters, desires to handle 
on a commisiion basis any new account of kindred 
line, such as twine, strings, shelf hardware, etc. 

This department is in contact with a party who 
desires to purchase a small neighborhood grocery 



Domestic Trade Tips 

[ continued from page 2 ] 
D-1957— Berkeley. Calif. A selling organization 
covering the builders of Alameda and Contra Costa 
counties, now selling a composition for drainboards. 
kitchen and bath floors, showers and table tops, 
wishes to take on an additional line which would 
work in with the above product. Wish to com- 
municate with San Francisco manufacturers of a 
kindred line who would be interested in representa- 
tion in their territory. 

D-1958— New York, N. Y. Gentleman calling on 
the architects of New York State and vicinity, 
thoroughly familiar with the demands of that trade, 
desires to represent a San Francisco manufacturer 
of specialties for the construction line. 

D- 1959— Reading, Pa. Gentleman having ex- 
tensive experience in selling is desirous of obtaining 
the selling rights for some commodity for the East, 
preferably on a brokerage basis, although other 
arrangements would be considered. 

D-I960 — Philadelphia. Pa. Established manu- 
facturers' representatives desire to secure the sole 
representation throughout Pennsylvania, New Jer- 
sey and New York, for San Francisco manufac- 
turers desiring to market their products in that 
territory. 

D-1961 — San Jose Calif. Firm of importers, job- 
bers, and manufacturers' agents, having warehouse 
and offices centrally located in San Jose, desire to 
represent a San Francisco manufacturer or importer 
in Santa Clara and surrounding counties. 

D-1962— New York. N. Y, Suppliers of IN- 
SULATING LACQUER, of excellent quality, wish 
to communicate with San Francisco buyers, 

D-1963 — Los .\ngeles. Calif. Candy manufac- 
turer, established in business in Los .A,ngeles, desires 
to sell business, trade mark, and formulas to the 
proper organization. 

D-1964 — San Francisco, Calif. Gentleman wishes 
to purchase a SMALL NEIGHBORHOOD GRO- 
CERY business. 

D-1965 — Santa Fe, New Mexico. Suppliers of 
PINE NUTS desire to communicate with San 
Francisco buyers and consumers. 

D-1966 — San Francisco. Calif. Traveling sales- 
man, covering territory from Los Angeles to Bel- 
lingham. Washington, handling P.\PER PROD- 
UCTS, such as. NAPKINS. TOILET PAPER. 
COFFEE BAGS, GLASSINE BAGS, and PAPER 
CUTTERS, desires to handle on a commission 
basis any new account of kindred line, such as 
TWINE, STRINGS. SHELF HARDWARE, etc. 
D-1967 — Aguanga. Calif. Party having some 
fine BLUE TOURMALINES and CRYSTAL 
SPECIMENS for sale, desires to communicate with 
San Francisco gem merchants who would be inter- 
ested in buying these stones. 

D-196S— Fort Worth. Texas. Gentleman having 
about one hundred tons of HIGH-GR.A.DE ROSIN 
and a large quantity of TURPENTINE ready for 
shipment desires to communicate with prospective 
buyers of these commodities. 



shorten the distance between San 
Francisco and Twin Falls and other 
points in Southern Idaho by 325 
miles, and will open up a new market 
for California products, also making 
available a producing market for 
livestock and agricultural products. 



Takes New Quarters 

The Salinas Chainljer of Com- 
merce this week moved into its new 
and commodious quarters in the 
Farmers' Mercantile Building at 
Salinas. 



Specifications Available 

The following specifications covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at San Francisco. California, on or about 
March 25. 1926, for shipment to Manila, P. I., 
granulated sugar. Bids are to be submitted to the 
San Francisco General Intermediate Depot. Quar- 
termaster Section. Fort Mason. San Francisco. 
California, and will be opened Februar>- 27. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at San Francisco, California, on or about March 
25. 1926, for shipment to Honolulu. T. H.. sub- 
sistence supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the 
Quartermaster Supply Officer, Fort Mason. San 
Francisco, and will be opened March I. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by dteamer. 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone, Isthmus of Panama, with portable forges, 
drill chucks, 'pressure and vacuum gauges, boiler- 
tube cleaners, conduit hickeys, curtain fasteners, 
packing, oakum, leather, rocoa-fiber mats, emery 
cloth, sandpaper, and cash register paper. Bids are 
to be submitted to the General Purchasing Officer 
of The Panama Canal. Washington, D. C, and will 
be opened February 9. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal (.At- 
lantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal Zone, 
Isthmus of Panama, with cable, magnet, wire, road 
scarifier, oil drying and purifying outfit, brake 
shoes, transit, pipe, pipe fittings, bolts, nuts, rivets, 
washers, motors, electric drills, transformers, mag- 
netos, batteries, cutouts, condulets, electrical sup- 
plies, valves, cocks, floor drains, flueh-tank balls, 
tires and tubes, brake-band liaina. bricks, furnace 
cement, paints, varnishes, linseed oil. burning oil. 
cylinder oil. caustic soda, powdered graphite, ba- 
rium sulphate, paraffin, copper sulphate, alum, glue, 
cork-board, rattan webbing, rubber bands, empty 
cans, and lumber. Bids are to be submitted to the 
General Purchasing Officer of The Panama Canal, 
Washington, D C, and will be opened February 11, 
1926. 



New Rail Route Brings 
Better Rates 

The Traffic Bureau of the Cham- 
ber is calling the attention of San 
■Francisco shippers to the fact that 
new through rates between points in 
California and points in Idaho, 
routed over the new line of the 
Union Pacific extending from Roger- 
son, Idaho, to Wells, Nevada, will 
become effective February loth. 

This new line, making connections 
with both the Southern Pacific and 
the Western Pacific at Wells, will 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than February 
lOth Full information concerning the subjects 
listed may be had upon inquiry at the office of the 
Traffic Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Corn- 
Docket No 6535 — Trunks. CL, eastbound; 6536. 
starch and dextrine. CL. westbound; 6537. gilsonite. 
weetbound; domestic and export; 653S, boxes, 
pulpboard, fibreboard or strawboard. CL. west- 
bound: 6539, vegetable fibre felt, quilted, CL and 
LCL. westbound; 6540. electric cable with batter 
terminals att.^cbed, CL and LCL. westbound; 6541. 
casein (dry milk curd). CL. westbound; 6542, lum- 
ber to stations in Indiana. CL. eastbound: 6543, 
cottoi^eed oil, CL, westbound; 6544. underframes. 
CL, westbound: 6545, photographic mounts and 
printed paper bottle caps with tin rings. CL and 
LCL. westbound; 6546. green coffee, CL. eastbound; 
import; 6547. liquid crude rubber latex, in tank 
cars, westbound; 6548, flavoring extracts, spices 
and baking powder in mixed carloads, eastbound; 
6549. shock absorbers parts. CL, and LCL, west- 
bound; 6550. hard asbestos shingles, CL. east- 
bound; 6551, earthenware, CL, westbound: 6552. 
onions. CL, eastbound for ex-port; 6516 (Amended) 
casingheadgasoUne, CL. westbound ; 6534 (Amended) 
citrus fruit pulp (dry). CL, eastbound. 



SAN FHANCISCO BUSINESS. Kl- HKIAHV 3 192(1 



Who's Who oAmong the ^TSl^w Members 



This week we take pleasure in introducing the following investors 
in community progress: 



G. W. REYNOLDS & CO., Inc. 

Well known manufacturers of aprons and 
dresses, flannelette wear, children's wear 
and bloomers at 120 Battery St. 

D. R. SHAPIRO 

.38-40 First Street. Manufacturers' repre- 
.sentative of silks and satins, spool cotton, 
linen and canvas coal fronts, undercollar 
cloths, braids, sewing silks, linen and jute. 
Venetians and cotton goods. 

KR.\FT CHEESE CO. OF CALIF. 

Manufacturers and distributors of a well 
known brand of cheese. 757 Sansome St. 

MARGETTS, Inc. 

Carpets and ru^s. 9S9 Market St. 

BRADLEY & ECKSTROM 

Industrial chemicals and minerals. 320 
Market St. 

OLD DRAGON RESTAURANT 

Operated hv Li>e Hov Man at 9203-2 Mar- 
ket St. 

UNIVERSAL MERCANTILE CO. 

506 Washington St. Agents for Egon Braun 
Amargo Bitters. 

CAPT. HENRY WEBER 

2020 Forty-seventh Ave., Oakland. En- 
gineer and inventor. 

PARSONS SALES & ENGINEERING CO. 

Sales and engineering. 221 Underwood 
Bldg. 

PHILOSOPHERS' INN 

A quaint Old World cafe at 659 Merchant 
St. opposite the Hall of Justice. Madame 
Florence Meyer is in charge. It's European. 



COLUMBIA CASUALTY CO. 

Insurance. 315 Montgomery St. 

PACIFIC WAREHOUSE CO. 

Warehouse and drayage. 699 Fifth St. 

DUNN PAINTING MACHINE CO. 

Single-line paint-spraying machines for all 
purposes. Ha\'c completed development 
work and commenced manufacture at 208 
Mission St. 

HARVEY D. S.\NDSTONE 

Builder and contractor. 459 Mills Bldg. 

PIONEER LIFE AND CASUALTY CO. 

Insurance. 503 Market St. 

EDITH P. JACKSON, D. S. C. 

Chiropodist. 376 Sutter St. 

CHURCH PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO 

Beautiful portrait studios at 560 Sutter St. 

BANFIELD-HULLINGER CO. 

Artistic picture frames. 501 Geary St. 

MAUD B. HEINEMAN 

Beauty parlors — face and scal]j treatment. 
Room 30. 166 Geary St. 

INTER OCEAN COMMERCIAL CO. 

(Calif. Chemical Co.) 237 Clara St. 
Chemicals. 

MCDOWELL SCHOOL OF 
DRESSMAKING 

450 Geary St. Dress designing, dress mak- 
ing and millinery. 

STIEFVATER'S 

Flour. 225 Sacramento St. 



FILE COP' 

' INFORMATION BUR 




February lO '^ 1926 



I 



SAN FHAXcisco nrsi.\i;ss, kkbhiahy ki, vmu 



The GREATEST Summer Travel BARGAIN 

Pacific and 
Atlantic Oceans 
Qrcat Lakes and 
the Qulf of Mexico 
Two Foreiffi Countries 
14 States 

Neiv York Harbor, 
Puget Sound and 
San Francisco Bay 





CIRCLE THE UNITED STATES 

In One Qlorious Vacation Trip 
LOW SUMMER EXCURSION EARE 



No other trip in all the world offers so much 
for such small cost. 

It will take you over your own country from 
ocean to ocean, from northern to southern 
border and show you its beauties, its moun- 
tains, its rivers, its lakes. You will see the most 
famous national parks, the largest and most 
colorful cities. 

California 

In California you see San Francisco, Oak- 
land, the Golden Gate,— side trips to Lake 
Tahoeand Yosemite National Park— the San 
Joaquin and other beautiful valleys as you travel 
southward, the coast line iOO miles along the 
ocean, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Pasadena, 
Hollywood, the beaches and the inoun tains, the 
orange groves and old missions. 

Go on to San Diego and thence over the Car- 
riso Gorge to Phoenix, the Apache Trail, the 
Roosevelt Dam, Tucson. 

El Paso offers a sidctrip into old Mexico, 
Juarez being just across the Rio Grande. Then 
San Antonio, Houston, New Orleans — cities full 
of romance and beauty. 

At Sea 

A palatial ocean liner carries you for 100 glor- 
ious hours down the Mississippi, through the 
Gulf of Mexico and northward on the Atlantic 
to New Y'ork. 

From there you may enjoy sidetrips to Bos- 
ton, Philadelphia, Washington and Atlantic 
City. 

Westward you may go through beautiful New 
York State to Albany, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, a 
trip through Canada, and then Detroit and 
Chicago. Here are the Great Lakes with all 
their summer fun. 

Milwaukee and Madison, Minneapolis and 



St. Paul— then you may continue westward 
through the United States or Canada. 

The former route takes you through North 
Dakota, Montana— a sidetrip to Yellowstone 
Park— and Idaho to Spokane and Seattle. The 
latter allows you to visit Winnipeg, Lake Louise, 
Banff, Jasper National Park, Mt. Rohson, Van- 
couver and Victoria before arriving at Seattle. 

Then Puget .Sound, Tacoma— a sidetrip to 
Mt. Rainier .National Park— the great valley of 
the C;olumbia River, Portland and the green 
Oregon Country. In Oregon is Crater Lake. 
Then southward through verdant valleys and 
over tall mountain ranges to Sacramento and 
San Francisco. 

Here is the trip of all trips. No matter where 
you live or from where you wish to start you 
may connect with trains which will carry you 
over the Big Circle Trip. 

Low Summer Fares 

Early in Spring the low summer roundtrip 
fares for 1926 will be announced. You'll be 
amazed at the Big Circle Fare. And it costs but 
little more than the summer roundtrip fare 
from .San Francisco to New York. Yet how- 
much more you see— what an amazing bargain. 

Plan now for this inost wonderful of all your 
vacations. Make this summer a liberal educa- 
tion for your children and yourselves. 

Ask your local ticket agent to give you the 
literature covering this tour of the United 
States. See America First— and see it in this 
easy, comfortable convenient way. 

The finest trains are at your service. You will 
enjoy the most luxurious travel and the cost 
will compare favorably with any travel vacation 
you could take. 



See 

San Francisco 

Oakland 

Berkeley 

Santa Barbar;; 

Los Angeles 

Pasadena 

Long Beach 

San Diego 

Vuma 

Phoenix 

Tucson 

El Paso 

San Antonio 

Houston 

New Orleans 

New York 

Albany 

Buffalo 

Niagara Falls 

Detroit 

Chicago 

Milwaukee 

Madison 

Minneapolis 

St. Paul 

Seattle 

Tacoma 

Portland 

Sacramento 



Southern PacificLines 

F. S. McGINNlS, 

Passenger Traffic Manager, San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. FEBRUARY 10, 1926 




CYCOLMOTOROIL- 
ihorough lubrication at 
COM. h cushions the niu' 


-r.j 

lo> 


parts 
onlyi 


of your 


motor Co 
.lity-.ner. 


idi: 



It takes in all three 

What do you want from the gasoline you use? Is it power? Is ic 
mileage? Is Jt quick starting? ((999 out of 1000 motorists want a 
gasoline performance that is the best possiblecombination of these 
three results, without sacrifice of any oneof them. Associated Gaso- 
line, with its distinctive range of boiling points, has the 999 in mind. 
It gives a perfect coordination of these three results: ( I ) satisfactory 
quick starting, (2) full stride of power, (3) mileage. CAssociated 
Gasoline is always associated with "morc-miles-to-the-gallon," 



ASSOCIATED 



O I L 



COMPANY 



Sustained Quality Products 



COMPLETE OFFICE EQUIPMENT 




Furnishing a new office, the 
first things you think of are 
desks and chairs. Then 
come the tables, files and 
the rest of the requirements 
for modern business. You'll 
find them all here— better 
in quality— better in value 
and a Deferred Pay Plan 
that will suit your con' 
venience. 



We have the exclusive 

agency for Globe- 

V/ern%c\e files and 

equipment. 



H. S. CROCKER CO., Inc. 

565-571 Market Street • 242 Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



Oamerica's rinest Steamship 




The La§l Word in Ocean Palaces Will Be the f^lew $6,^00,000 Liner ''Malolo' 




'NE of the most signifi- 
cant events in the history 
of shipbuilding in the 
United States is marked 
by the construction at 
Cramp's Shipyard, Philadelphia, of 
the Matson Navigation Company's 
new liner, the Malolo, which is to be 
the largest and fastest high-powered 
passenger steamer ever built on this 
side of the Atlantic. 

The displacement of the Malolo 
(Hawaiian for flying fish) will be 
22,000 tons. She will be 582 feet 
long, and her beam of 83 feet will be 
only five feet less than that of the 
Mauretania. The huge smokestacks 
of the vessel would rise above a 
fourteen-story building, while her 
anchors, weighing seven tons apiece, 
would be six stories above the pave- 
ment. 

Electric Lights for a City 
of 6,000 

The ship's electric lighting plant 
will be equivalent to that of a city 
of 6,000 people, and her pumping 
system will equal the waterworks 
of a city of nearly 2,000,000. The 



fuel tanks will have a capacity of 
4,590 tons of oil — enough fuel to 
run a small automobile for 350 years, 
driving from sunrise to sunset, dur- 
ing which time the car would cover 
a distance of 23,460,000 miles or 880 
times around the earth. 

160 Private Baths and 
274 Staterooms 

The lu.xury of the vessel's appoint- 
ments will be in keeping with her 
size. Six hundred passengers — all 
first class — will be accommodated in 
274 staterooms. There will be 160 
private baths — more than on any 
other passenger steamer afloat. On 
"A" deck will be located the ball- 
room, lounge, library, smoking room, 
and veranda; all connected on the 
port side by spacious foyers and 
galleries. 

The main dining room will extend 
the full breadth of the ship and will 
be 108 feet long. At its forward end 
will be two alcove coffee rooms suit- 
able for use as auxiliary dining 
rooms, or for private dinner parties. 
A gymnasium, a swimming pool, 



and electric baths will be provided. 
A complete system of mechanical 
ventilation will be installed. 

In the design of the Malolo all the 
requirements have been met which 
are necessary for the conversion of 
the ship into an auxiliary cruiser or 
troop transport in a time of national 
emergency. Extra water-tight bulk- 
heads will be installed which will 
provide an unusually wide margin 
of safety in case of damage to the 
hull, The decks are to be especially 
reinforced to provide for gun em- 
placements. 

Will Clip Four Days from 
Present Schedule 

The Malolo will be launched this 
coming spring and when completed 
in the spring of 1927 will be placed 
on the San Francisco-Honolulu run, 
where her sustained sea speed of 22 
knots an hour will enable her to clip 
four days from the round-trip time 
made by the fastest vessel now ply- 
ing between the two ports. The total 
cost of this newest addition to the 
American merchant marine will be 
$6,500,000. 




1 



SA> i K \\i isi M ( li \MBER OF COMMERCE 

H. CLAY MILLER. /V«ulm( !:~. Wrr PrtsiJenI VTllUP T AY . Vite PraUcnl 

ROBERT NEWTON I 'i I Manatrr W. W. STETTHEIMER. 7"rfamrer 

Publjahed we<kjy by the San Fninoistu Cfianil-rr of C'ommcn-e. 205 Mcrchanta Exchange- Phone Kearny 112. 

Subscription $4 a year. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Po«t Office. San Francisco, California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 

GEORGE L NORTH. BJilor L. P. BOYCE. AdTerlising ilanager 

Vol. XII S.<N- Fr,\xcisco, Californh. K(l)ni;iry 10. 1926 No. .5 

CURRENT EVENTS IN WASHINGTON 

'By C. B. DODDS, 'Hfpresentative San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



\ DMIKAL MOFFATT, Chief of the 
■^ Bureau of Aeronautics of the 
Navj', has asl^ed Congre.ss for au- 
thority to build a Hghter-than-air 
base on the Pacific Coa.st. It is 
believed he has in mind a site near 
San Francisco. 

TT has been revealpil that Professor 
Milliken of tlie Cahfornia Insti- 
tute of Technoloftj' has been on the 
advisory committee planning the all- 
metal dirigible suggested as an ex- 
perimental ship to test this new type 
of construction. It is also under- 
stood that there are California men 
ready to invest their money in an 
all-metal dirigil)le factory anri that 
their plans contemplate placing one 
of these ships on the run between 
San Francisco and Honolulu. Much, 
of course, will depend upon the re- 
sults obtained in the experiments 
with the smaller dirigible proposed 
for the Na\y. 

/Commissioner Philip S. Teller 
^ of the Shipping Board is well 
liked by everyone with whom he has 
come in contact since coming to 
Washington, and it is believed he will 
add considerable strength to the 
Shipping Board. 

"TjEPARTMENT OF AgRICDLTUEE 

plans for the establishment of 
the new Forest Experiment Sta- 
tion in California were made known 
when Colonel Greeley, the Forester, 
testified before the House Appro- 
priations Committee. He said it was 
his plan to place the main station at 
Berkeley, in rooms to be furnished 
by the University of California, and 
to establish field branches, one some 
place in the redwood district of 
Northern California and another in 
the southern part of the state, which 
will deal more particularly with fire 



prevention and maintaining vegeta- 
tion on the watersheds. It is planned 
to expend S50.000 or more a year in 
this work in the future in California, 
which is more than is now being 
spent in any other state. For the 
next fiscal year the House has al- 
ready appropriated S30,000. 

TThe tisLvy has estimated that 
its cruise last year to Australia 
cost only S515,000 over and above 
what the normal expenses would 
have been had the cruise not 
been undertaken. In commenting 
on this fact, the Commander-in-Chief 
said: "It was a military accomplish- 
ment of great value." 

A A A A 

IV/Trs. K.\hn. the California mem- 
ber of the House Census Com- 
mittee, believes the reapportionment 
bill has an excellent chance of being 
passed at least by the House at this 
session. California will gain three 
new members if the Barbour Bill is 
passed, w'hich provides for no in- 
crease in the membership of the 
House. If another bill pending is 
passed, which provides for the main- 
tenance of the representation quota 
as it now stands and which increases 
the size of the House to 465 mem- 
bers, from 435, California would gain 
five members. Under the California 
law, the State Legislature would 
have to reapportion Congressional 
districts before the new members 
could be elected, in the view of Con- 
gressman Curry of Sacramento. 

YX/"hex California lost the com- 
' ' munity property case all the 
other community property states lost 
likewise, in the view of the Commis- 
sioner of Internal Revenue. He has 
a staff of clerks at work now cheek- 
ing over the entire tax roll from each 
state and is asking taxpayers to sign 



waivers against the running of the 
statute of limitations. In those cases 
where waivers are refused, additional 
assessments are being levied. 

A A A A 

HPhe National Park Service has 
■'- abandoned its plans for the pres- 
ent session of Congress to increase 
the size of the Roosevelt-Sequoia 
National Park from 252 square miles 
to 900 square miles. The area in- 
tended to be included carries some 
of the best power sites in the state 
and San Joaquin Valley irrigation- 
ists would be very much displeased 
if these sites were taken into the 
National Park .system and put to no 
use, under the plea that our Na- 
tional Parks must not be desecrated 
through commercialism. The city of 
Los Angeles is also after these sites 
for municipal power. Thej' have 
been turned down by the Federal 
Power Commission. 

'T'he Rivers and Harbors Board has 
recently approved an Hawaiian 
project in which San Francisco con- 
cerns are interested. This is the har- 
bor of Kahului on the island of 
Maui. The improvements projected 
include extension of the present 
breakwaters and dredging. These 
improvements were necessary so that 
ocean-going steamers from San Fran- 
cisco could go up to the dock at 
Kahului and take on cargoes of pine- 
apple and sugar. 

XJearixgs have been held lately by 
the House Immigration Com- 
mittee on the Box Bill, to put Cana- 
dian and Mexican immigrants on a 
quota basis with Europeans. Cali- 
fornia interests appeared protesting 
against this measure on the ground 
that Mexican labor was needed to 
harvest California crops. There is 

( continued on page 20 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



The Port Chart Tells the tory 




any city whose wel- 
fare, like that of San 
Francisco, is to a large 
extent dependent upon 
maritime commerce, the 
nautical chart of the port, as pub- 
lished during successive decades, 
affords an interesting subject for 
study. That chart, to serve its pur- 
pose adequately, must be Icept cor- 
rected to show the changes incident 
to the growth of the port, and in 
consequence as the years pass, ex- 
amination of a file of the successive 
editions of any harbor chart gives an 
immediate birdseye view of the city's 
evolution probably with greater 
readiness than can be obtamed in 
any other way. 

This is particularly true of the 
communities on the Pacific Coast, 
whose developments have been con- 
summated so largely within the life- 
time of people still living, and in no 
case is it more strikingly exempli- 
fied than in that of San Francisco. 

THE Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey came to California ahead 
of the Forty-niners. In 1848 
its first expeditions set out from the 
eastern seaboard; some taking the 
route across the isthmus, while 
another, in the Survey schooner 
Ewing, followed the all-water route 
via the Straits of Magellan. The 
former parties probably reached 
Cahfornia late in 1848, while the 
Ewirig reached San Francisco Bay 
the following summer. 

The surveys which were imme- 
diately begun exhibit a striking con- 
trast to the situation which the vis- 
itor finds today. The San Francisco 
of that day extended from North 
Beach to Rinoon Point, and had a 
width of only eight to ten blocks 
back from the waterfront. Oakland 
consisted of a single street leading 
down to the wharf on San Antonio 
Creek, and bordered by a dozen 
scattered houses. It was 1855 before 
the surveys reached the town-site 
of Alameda, which by that time had 
assumed the proportions of a small 
village. Berkeley, in 1852, was oc- 
cupied by a few widely separated 
farmhouses, but had not yet at- 
tained to the dignity of a name 
which the surveyor could include on 
his map. Across the bay, Sausalito 
(it is Saucilito on the first survey in 
1850) consisted of a small cluster of 
houses in the valley, but streets ap- 
parently had not then been laid out. 



By COL. E. LESTER JONES, 

'Director U. S. Coast and Geodetic 
Surrey 




From these small beginnings the 
Coast and Geodetic Survey has 
watched and recorded the growth 
of the succession of communities 
which encircle the bay; communi- 
ties which today constitute one unit 
in everything except corporate or- 
ganization, and which, if combined 
into a "Greater San Francisco," as 
has been done in the case of New 
York, would make it the metropohs 
of the Pacific Coast. 

THE Coast and Geodetic Sur- 
vey has been much more than 
a passive spectator of this 
growth. Its work has been one of 



the contributing factors which have 
made the development possible. San 
Francisco has developed chiefly be- 
cause its geographic situation makes 
it the logical center of a vast web 
of commercial intercourse whose 
threads extend, on the one hand, 
to every city of the United States, 
and on the other to ports through- 
out the seven seas. Had there not 
been some agency to safeguard the 
paths of that part of the commerce 
which is carried in ships, to seek out 
the hidden dangers in order that 
others might avoid them, the devel- 
opment of San Francisco could not 
so readily have attained to its pres- 
ent impressive extent. 

Many Lives and Untold 
Millions of Dollars Saved 

It is difficult to find a concrete 
measure of the extent to which the 
Coast Survey chart has served San 
Francisco, partly because that serv- 
ice is indirect and preventive, and 
partly because it has usually been 
rendered in advance of the need for 
it. It is a simple matter to sum up 
the number of lives which our Coast 
Guard has saved from stranded ves- 
sels, but no one can attempt to esti- 
mate the number which the Coast 
Survey has preserved by charting 
the dangers and thus preventing 
vessels from disaster on them. We 
can make only the roughest estimate 
of the millions of dollars of insurance 
which have been saved to shippers 
as a result of surveys which the 
insurance companies accept as justi- 
ficijtion for a reduction in their 
rates. It was stated to me recently 
that a single steamship company 
operating between United States and 
Alaskan ports had profited during 
the past year to the extent of more 
than a hundred thousand dollars 
through reductions in insurance 
rates resulting from better surveys 
and charts of the territory. Alaska 
is not San Francisco, yet the state- 
ment is of interest here for two rea- 
sons: first, because San Francisco 
has such unpressive financial inter- 
ests in Alaska that anything which 
either facilitates or retards the de- 
velopment of that territory is of 
direct concern to the city; and 
second, because the effort which has 
produced this gratifying result is 
identical in kind with that which 
during the past ten years has been 

[ continued on page 12 J 



SAN FRANCI8CO lU SINICSS, FEBRUARY 10. 1920 



<SMore /ibout the Credit ^ 



usiness 



'By A. McKIE DONNAN, Illunrated by Benjamin Franklin 




ELVING, without undue 
diligence, into the manu- 
scripts of the ancients, 
this writer finds the 
carhest protest against 
charge accounts in the words of 
Omar, the youth who yearned for 
jugs of wine beneath boughs, etc., 
and who is quoted as having posted 
in his phico of business words to this 
effect, "Take the cash and let the 
credit go." 

Passing through the ages to that 
medieval time known as Ye Gyde 
Olde Daze, we run across the anec- 
dote (the truth of wliich this writer 
does not guarantee) running as fol- 
lows: A bartender yelled from the 
foot of the stairs to his boss, who 
lived with his family of little ones 
upstairs, "Shall I trust Pat Hooli- 
han for a drink?" The answer came 
back, also in question form, "Has 
he had it or hasn't he?" The reply 
was, "He has." To which the wily 
boss replied, "Then, trust him." 

All of which leads up to the ques- 
tion, Is this credit business all that 
its advocates claim that it is, or, as 
its enemies aver, is it one more 
step towards the ruination of an 
otherwise quite satisfactory modern 
civilization? The writer has no 
opinions. He merely wants to know. 
Therefore this public questionnaire. 

This One Says Debts Develop 
Earning Power 

One strong booster of the credit 
business (naming no names, but be 
it said that this particular man is 
the head of a large business organi- 
zation) claims that credit has done 
much to develop the latent powers of 
the average American — powers which 
were it not for credit and its results, 
this average American might never 
have discovered. Particularly the 
power of individual initiative — the 
development of undreamed-of earn- 
ing capacity. Bill Smith, average 
citizen, sees Jim Jones, another av- 
erage citizen, riding past in his Ford. 
Bill immediately buys a "Chevie" — 
paying this-much down and con- 
tracting to pay so-much per month. 

Mrs. Bill Smith, just about this 
time, sees a dray back up to Mrs. 
Jim Jones' door and unload a brand- 
new Chesterfield set. Whereupon 
Mrs. S. proceeds downtown and, 
by paying this-much down and con- 
tracting to pay so-much per month, 




has delivpi-ed at her front door (at 
high noon, when she knows that all 
the neighbois will be around to wit- 
ness her triumph) not only a new- 
Chesterfield set, but a new model 
console radio for extra measure. 

Being properly humiliated (and 
challenged) Mrs. Jones immediately 
by the same route, purchases a 
"period" dining room set, and Mr. 
J. trades in the Ford for a Buick. 
And thus, the game of advancing 
with neighborhood civilization goes 
merrily on. 

But, remarks this Master of In- 
dustry (and he is that, without a 
doubt), somehow or other the Smiths 
and the Joneses scrape up the money 
to meet the installments when they 
come due each month ! In, he claims, 
practically 100% of all cases. 

This means, in his belief, that 
when the Smiths are confronted with 
.? 200 worth of monthly on-time pay- 
ments and a . SI 50 income. Pa Smith 
(possibly with the assistance of some 
other members of the family) looks 
about him to raise the family in- 
come to a place where it will ade- 
quately cover his installments. And 
he does it. He works harder — be- 
comes more valuable to his boss — 
and his pay is increased. Or, he 
starts selling something during the 
evening hours, and finds out, to the 
surprise of himself, his family and 
aU his friends, that he can make 
more money selling something than 
he can as a high-grade mechanic, or 
whatever rut he happens to have 
fallen into. 

On the other hand, an equally 



important American industrial king 
states with equal emphasis that the 
mad chase to "keep up with the 
Joneses" can result, and is already 
resulting, in the breaking down of 
American family life and character. 
The country is money-mad, he says, 
and old-fashioned ideals and virtues 
are being sacrificed upon the altar 
of installment business. 

And there you are. Or, are you? 

The American Federation of La- 
bor "views with alarm" the in- 
creasing indebtedness which install- 
ment inducements have brought 
upon the laboring man, who, a trifle 
dizzy mayhap with the e.xtra money 
roUing his way the past few years, 
thinks he can buy anj-thing and 
everything offered him and soon 
finds himself up to his neck in 
monthly installments. 

What the Consumer Has 
to Say About It 

In the final analysis, it seemed to 
the writer, the answer as to whether 
or not the charge account, install- 
ment, budget, easy payment (or 
whatever name you may give it) 
business is beneficial or otherwise 
lay with the so-called ultimate con- 
sumer. And, in him, in his limited 
way, the writer endeavored to find 
the answer, attempting to interview- 
as wide a range as possible of in- 
comes. ■ 

One stenographer "has an abso- 
lute horror" of charge accounts. 
She "couldn't sleep nights" if she 
owed anybody anything. So, when 

[ continued on page 10 I 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



The Annual Appeal 
of San Francisco's 
Community Chest 

By GEORGE FILMER, Chairman Campaign 
Committee, The Community Chest 

ONCE more the annual appeal 
of the Community Chest is be- 
fore San Francisco — that sys- 
tematized, efficient method of col- 
lecting funds but once a year for the 
support of all the various worthy 
charities and helpful institutions of 
this city, instead of the former hit- 
or-miss, haphazard "drives," which 
ofttimes developed into annoying 
and mere "catch-penny" solicita- 
tions. 

The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce has a peculiar and indi- 
vidual — one might almost say a 
selfish — interest in the Community 
Chest, for it was under the auspices 
of this organization and with the 
personal assistance of its officers that 
the initial campaign was launched 
and the great organization for cen- 
tralized relief giving established. 

This year emphasis is being laid 
on the social and recreational achieve- 
ments of the Community Chest, 
though, of cour.se, agencies which 
extend succor to the needy, the sick 
and the disabled are by no means 
being shoved into the background. 

But an effort is being made to 
quicken interest in and appreciation 
of the preventive work being accom- 

[ continued on page 11 ] 



A "SQUARE DEAL" 

The suggested scale for Com- 
munity Chest subscriptions, pre- 
sented below, is the result of 
thousands of suggestions from San 
Francisco business men. It is less 
than one-third the scale suggested 
for average incomes in various 
other communities . 

Square the number of thousands 
in your income, thus: 



Income . 
$1,000 

2,000 
3,000 
4,000 
5,000 
6,000 
7,000 
8,000 
9,000 
10,000 



$ 1 



$11,000 
12,000 
1.3,000 
14,000 
15,000 
16,000 
17,000 
18,000 
19,000 
20,000 



$121 



196 
225 
256 
289 
324 
361 
400 



100 
and so on. 
Give at least a "square" dona- 
tion. Perhaps you can give more. 
COMMUNITY CHEST APPEAL 
February 23 to March 5 







,'^^^^^^-. 

"•^^^^^S?;: 









^ 



Where Do You Place 
Your Insurance? 

One of the leading compa- 
nies of America now doing 
a world-wide business, was 
founded in San Francisco in 
1863 and still has its Head 
O^ce on the corner of Cali- 
fornia and Sansome Streets. 

Fire, oAutomobile and SMarine Insurance 




FIREMAN'S FUND 

f INSURANCE COMPANY 



^^^^^a^?%^^%^^%^^^%^^^^@ 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS. FEBRUARY 10. 1926 



The Pros and Cons of the Credit Business 



she buys anything, she pays cash. 
Score one for the Antis! 

Another thinks it is "just lovely" 
the way the stores trust her. She 
"never could save any money any- 
way," so she just buys new coats 
and frocks on weekly paj-ments. And 
she is just working as hard as she 
can to please the boss so that she 
can get a raise soon! Score one for 
the Pros! 



( coDtiDU«d from pace S 1 

From a junior office executive 
comes this; "My wife is j'oung and 
now is the time that she can enjoy 
a car the most. Instead of waiting 
until we are middle-aged to get one, 
we have it now. We're getting more 
genuine happiness out of life, by a 
long shot, than our parents ever got 
at our age. And the slight cost for 
interest amounts to ahnost nothing." 
The score is now two to one! 



cAsiodated for Three Generations -with the 'Best Progress of the fVest 



% 



OR three generations The 
Bank of California, N. A., 
has handled large financial 
transactions. It has big-busi- 
ness experience; it has big- 
business judgment. 

Our organization, trained 
to fulfill its banking respon- 
sibilit)' with dispatch and ex- 
actness, can contribute its 
knowledge and equipment to- 
ward any worthy financial en- 
terprise. 




^^ BANK OF CALIFORNIA 



San Francisco 

Capital, Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, over 
$17,000,000— 
a guarantee fund for 
the proteaion of our 
depositors. 



From another junior executive, 
earning about the same salary: "I 
personally think the credit system 
is the greatest detriment in modem 
life. It gives a young couple e.vtrav- 
agant ideas. They 'go' too much. 
They spend too much. And. when 
sickness comes along, as it did in our 
case, they are both out of funds and 
are keyed up to a false standard of 
living. \A'hen my father was mj' age 
he had money in the bank and a 
home partly paid for. Today, and 
for the last year or two, we have had 
nothing but debts. Our lives have 
been miserable. If we ever get out 
from under this load, I hope we 
never buy another thing on credit, 
excepting a home. That is the one 
thing that I believe a young man is 
justified in going into debt for." 

Opinions Sought on Credit 
Business 

Which seems to even the score 
again. .\nd there you have it. Just 
a.« one person convinces you of one 
side, another comes along and gives 
you equally striking proof of the 
other. A leading business journal 
recently carried an article telling of 
the firms that had gone under from 
playing the credit game too hard — 
overselling their customers and hav- 
ing to re-po.ssess their goods at a 
loss. A salesman for one of these 
firms stated, "There are so many of 
us around trying to collect install- 
ments that we have to tag ourselves 
so as not to try to collect from each 
other." 

On the other hand, some of the 
most soundly organized business 
houses in the countrj', both whole- 
sale and retail, point to their great 
strides in volume as proof of the 
value of credit business and claim 
that these immense volumes are 
accomplished with a startlingly 
small loss through bad accounts. 

The writer would like to obtain 
opinions on this credit business. He 
would like them from pastors of 
churches, school teachers, college 
professors, leaders in social life, and, 
of course, from business men. 

It is possible that sufficient re- 
plies will be received to warrant a 
subsequent digest in these columns 
— a digest which should certainly 
prove interesting. 

TCindly address communications 
to Editor, San Francisco Business, 
Merchants Exchange Building, San 
Francisco." 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10. 1926 



f coDtinued from page 9 ] 

plished through the agencies of the 
Comniunity Chest — how good citi- 
zens are being made out of the boys 
and girls of San Francisco through 
neighborhood and other recreational 
centers, how the health of the coni- 
munit}' is being safeguarded by in- 
stitutions and organizations which 
cut at the root of disease, how the 
morals of San Francisco are being 
conserved by protecting the boys 
and girls and the womanhood of the 
city from pitfalls and rescuing them 
if they have stumbled. 

Already the organization to con- 
duct the yearly canvass is de- 
scribed by Community Chest leaders 
as 90 per cent perfected. The other 
10 per cent of finishing off is merely 
the rounding out of details to insure 
a smooth running of the machinery. 

Alfred GhirardeUi and Eli H. 
Wiel are vice chairmen of the cam- 
paign committee; Charles W. Mer- 
rill is chairman of the executive 
committee, on which are Selah 
Chamberlain, W. W. Crocker, Mil- 
ton H. Esberg, Colonel Filmer, Henry 
Q. Hawes, former Justice M. C. 
Sloss and Dr. Ray Lyman Wilbur, 
president of Stanford University. 

The personnel of other committee 
heads is as follows: 

Finance — W. W. Crocker, chairman; 
Charles W. Fay, vice chairman. 

Budget — Former Justice M. C. Sloss, 
chairman; Fred Dohrmann, Jr., 
vice chairman. 

Publicity — Henry Q. Hawes, chair- 
man. 

Co-Operation — Mrs. M. C. Sloss, 
chairman. 

Head(juarters — Howard Spreckels, 
chairman. 

Subscriptions, Organization — Colonel 
Charles E. Stanton, chairman. 

Speakers — Lloyd S. Ackerman, chair- 
man. 

On the board of directors, the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce is 
represented by President Clay Mil- 
ler and Captain C. W. Saunders. 
The president of the Community 
Chest is William H. Crocker; Wal- 
lace M. Alexander and Mortimer 
Fleishhacker are vice presidents, and 
Selah Chamberlain is treasurer. 

San Franciscans have been made 
more personally familiar with the 
work of the Community Chest and 
of the organizations it supports 
through a series of open houses at 
the various headquarters. Through 
these visits by the public, practical 
ocular demonstration has been given 
at first hand. 



Mr. Wiel, in issuing a statement 
on behalf of the campaign com- 
mittee, said: 

"The Community Chest has long 
since proved itself and there is no 
longer any argument as to its neces- 
sity. 

"Before the Chest was inaugu- 
rated, it cost approximately 25 per 
cent of what was collected to gather 
and administer the distribution of 
the money. Under the Chest system, 
it costs but 5 per cent. 

"This year we want ever}'one to 
contribute his or her just share. So 
will the needs of the Chest be amply 
cared for. 



"Last year more than 50 per cent 
of the total sum raised was paid in 
by 400 subscribers and 90,000 con- 
tributed only 9 per cent. This is not 
a fair distribution." 

It is largely because of this in- 
equality of support that the pro- 
posed method of a "square" dona- 
tion is finding favor as providing an 
equitable means of carrying on the 
great work. Many of the luncheon 
clubs have taken a vote on this 
method and it has been approved 
by a large majority. This so-called 
"referendum" has also been taken 
through churches, women's clubs 
and other public organizations. 



What Kind of an 
Audit? 

Audits vary in quality and scope. The Quality 
depends upon the experience, ability and appli- 
cation cf the auditor; the Scope is a matter of 
your instruction. 

Of course, Every Audit should be a Detailed 
Audit — which is an expert and independent 
stucy in defa;7of the items represented in mass 
by balance sheet figures. It discloses the many 
important facts underlying the figures; verifies; 
clarifies. It brings to light avoidable leaks and 
waste; finds the flaws in accounting, in credit 
and collection methods; points to possibilities 
for greater profits, and is free from qualified state- 
ments of balance sheet audit. 
The Balance Sheet Audit, in spite of obvious 
limitations, when properly made is more than a 
mere building up of statements from book fig- 
ures without careful analysis and substantiation. 

The Balance Sheet Audit can be ordered with a 
specification calling for a partial Detailed Audit 
covering a period sufficiently long to give at 
least a cross section of the business and a pic- 
ture of actual conditions. 

ERNST & ERNST 

AUDITS — SYSTEMS 
TAX SERVICE 




SAN FRAXCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 




( coDtinued from page 7 ) 

exerted along the Pacific Coast of 
the continental United States. 

ELr';\'ION years ago, at the very 
beginning of my connection 
with the Coast and Geodetic 
Survey it wiis ray duty and privilege 
to point out to Congress and the 
people generally that the early sur- 
veys along the Pacific Coast had 
been made to serve the sailing ships 
of that day. While they had been 
ade(iuate for their successors, the 
low-powered, shallow-draft coasting 
steamers wliose tracks lay close to 
the shores, they were not adapted 
to the needs of modern high-powered 
steamers plying up and down the 
coast without regard to wind or 
weather, steering courses which di- 
verged far from the curving shores 
and approached the latter only at 
the few major salients. 

The response by Congress was 
most gratifying. It provided in- 
creased funds enabhng the Survey 
to embark on an augmented pro- 
gram of work which has since been 
carried on continuously except for 
the interruption due to the war, 
when vessels and personnel were en- 
gaged on militarj' duty. The work 
was begun in the vicinity of the 
above-mentioned important salients, 
where the modern vessels approach 
the shore and, in consequence, dan- 
ger. Cape Blanco, Cape Mendocino 
and Point Reyes to the north and 
Points Sur and Arguello to the south 
were dreaded by the masters of 
coastwise shipping, a dread fully 
justified by the long record of dis- 
asters of which they had been the 
scene. It was, moreover, a dread 
augmented by the fact that in the 
case of the first two named the 
charts furnished the mariner to 
guide him past these dangers were 
almost devoid of soundings in their 
vicinities. These deficiencies have 
been in large measure rectified. The 
waters adjacent to these two im- 
portant points have been thoroughly 
surveyed; the insidious coastwise 
currents have been studied, and 
charts, sailing directions and cur- 
rent tables have been revised for 
the mariner's use, thereby greatly 
increasing the safety of maritime 
traffic along the coast. 

THE extent to which the re- 
sources of the Survey have been 
devoted to this task is indicated 
by the following comparisons. Dur- 
ing the ten-year period 1916-1925 
the Survey spent the following total 
sum per mile of shoreline of each of 
the sections named : Cahf ornia, S754, 
Pacific Coast, .S511, Atlantic Coast, 

[ continued on page 17 ] 



SAX FHANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



The fruit Center of the iN^tion 




l\l'IT cultivation is 
pidhably carried on in 
all lands which will sup- 
pi n't vegetable life and 
mature a crop. Never- 
tlielesK, laigiL- quantities of fresh 
fruit must be carried from regions of 
prolific production to population 
centers which consume more than 
they produce. 

The demand for fruit is not only 
seasonal but continuous, and storage 
of fresh fruit is difficult and expen- 
sive. As in so many other industries, 
necessity has mothered invention, 
and methods have been devised to 
preserve fruits for long periods of 
time. California is and has been for 
many years the world's most impor- 
tant source of canned and dried 
fruits, and San Francisco is the dis- 
tributing and financial center of this 
industry. 

Great shipments of preserved 
fruits go out of the Golden Gate, and 
not a few of them are bound for the 
very hearts of countries long famous 
for their fruit products, notably 
France, Germany, Italy and Switzer- 
land, Australia, New Zealand, etc., 
not to mention heavy shipments in 
the intercoastal trade to the East 
Coast of the United States. 

Long before the dawn of history 
primitive men discovered how to 
preserve fruits and other foods by 
drying them in the sun. The papyrus 
manuscripts of early Egypt mention 
sun-dried foods, notably raisins, 
which even then had long been used 
as food. The art of canning, on the 
other hand, goes back only a little 
more than a century when Napoleon 
offered a prize of twelve thousand 
francs for the invention of a way to 
supply fresh provisions for his sailors. 
Nicholas Appert collected the prize 
money in ISOft and made known to 
the world the art of canning in glass 
jars. Hand-soldered tin cans were 
patented in England by Peter Durand 
the following year. The art of can- 
ning was developed to its present 
perfection in the United States fol- 
lowing the pioneer American cannery 
established in Boston in 1820. By 
the time of the Civil War canned 
food was recognized as an important 
commercial addition to the human 
diet. Quantities of fruits, canned in 
California fruit-growing localities 
primarily for sale to the miners, 
were introduced in the East during 
the Civil War and there found a 
ready market. 



CALIFORNIA IS Ihe fruil pro- 
ducing center of the United 
Slaies and one of the greatest 
fruit districts of the world. An average 
of more than 60% of the totat produc- 
tion is preserved by canning or pack- 
ing, of which more than 25% is ex- 
ported. 

Foreign markets are tlie differential 
element containing ihe profits of the 
fruit grower and are therefore of ttie 
utmost importance. (At the Fourth 
Annual Convention of tlie Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council, to be held in 
.San Francisco, .March -l to ti, Ralph 
P. Merrill, president of the Sun- 
Maid Raisin Growers .\.^socialion. 
wilt deliver a paper on '\-\gricultural 
Products Ihe Basis of West Coast 
Prosperity — IWecessity for Their In- 
Creased Export.^') San Francisco is 
the distributing and financial center 
of ihe canned and dried fruit industry 
of California. 



The padres, and the pioneers who 
followed them, soon knew California 
as a prolific fruit producing area. 
The East received its first California 
fruits some preserved in hand- 
soldered tin cans, others dried and 
packed loose in gunny sacks. For- 
eign trade with Russia, Alaska and 
other Pacific countries had already 
begun. With the opening of the 
transcontinental railroads and the 
development of refrigeration, the 
East received fresh fruits from Cali- 
fornia and shipments of fresh fruit 
were sent abroad. However, the 
major part of the fruit production of 
California was, and is, sent out to 
the world either carefully dried and 
packed neatly in cartons and boxes 
or scientifically canned, attractively 
labeled and strongly cased. 

Agriculture is the leading occupa- 
tion and source of wealth in Cali- 
fornia with an annual production 
valued at nearly 81-150,000,000, fol- 
lowed by petroleum with .1250,000,- 
000 annual production. The impor- 
tance of agriculture to the Pacific 
Slope cannot be over-emphasized. 
At the Fourth Annual Convention of 
the Pacific Foreign Trade Council to 
be held in San Francisco March 4 to 
6, Ralph P. Merritt, president of the 
Sun-Maid Growers Association, will 
deliver a paper on "Agriculture 
Products the Basis of West Coast 
Prosperity — Necessity for Their In- 
creased Export. " Of the agricultural 
production, fruit crops constitute 
nearly 40 per cent, the remainder 
being distributed between field and 
vegetable crops, of which the former 



is bj- far the most valuable. The 
annual fruit crop is worth .8180,000,- 
000 and two-thirds of it is preserved 
by canning and dehydration. If 
we subtract $40,000,000 for the 
citrus fruits, w'hich are practicallj' all 
shipped fresh, we can estimate that 
six-sevenths, more than 85 per cent, 
of the deciduous fruits produced in 
California are either dried or canned. 
Tonnage reports compiled by the 
United States Department of Agri- 
culture in co-operation with the Cali- 
fornia State Department of Agricul- 
ture indicate that an average of 
approximately three and a half 
million tons of fruit is produced in 
California each year. Citrus fruits 
account for about seven hundred 
thousand tons of the total, and wine 
and table grapes for an equal amount. 
Of the remaining two million two 
hundred thousand tons of deciduous 
fruits, one million nine hundred tons 
are preserved by canning and drying, 
and only three hundred thousand 
tons are marketed fresh. 

FRESH FRUIT PRODUCTION 
IN CALIFORNIA 

(Estimate for an average year based on pro- 
duction of recent years) 

Raisin Grapes 850,000 tons 

Grapes, wine and table . 700.000 ' 

Citrus Fruits 700.000 " 

Prunes 400,000 " 

Peaches 380.000 " 

Apples 190.000 • 

Apricots 170,000 ■ 

Pears 140,000 " 

Plums 45.000 • 

Cherries 15,000 ■ 

Olives 10,000 " 

Figs 9,000 " 

Dried fruit protluction uses nearly 
eight times as much fresh fruit as 
does the canned fruit industry. 
More than 1,600,000 tons of fresh 
fruit are used for drying as against 
less than 250,000 tons used in 
canning. 

DRIED FRUIT PRODUCTION 









Tons of 






Tons 


Fresh 




Dried 


Fresh 


Necessary 




Product 


Fruit 








Dried 


dried 




. 225,000 


850,000 


3.8 


Prunes . 


. 1,10.000 


400.000 


3 




. 26,000 


155,000 


6 


Apricots . 


25.000 


135.000 


5.5 




10.000 




6 


Pears . . 


5,000 






Statistics i. 


re for an ai 


erage year 


based on 



Although dehydration uses nearly 
eight times as much fresh fruit by 
tonnage as does canning, the value 
of the canned product is nearly 40 
per cent of the total value of the 
industry. In other words the product 
of the canning and dehydrates in- 
dustries total about $150,000,000 
annually, of which fifty-five to sixty 

[ continued on next page ) 



iAX FRANCISCO Bl'SIN'E.SS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 




Nitrokote 

for Store and 
Office Floors 



Protect your floors with 
Nitrokote. Its lustrous, tough 

surface imparts an attractive 
appearance to wood, concrete 
or hnoleum floors and protects 
them from grueling wear. 

Proof against water, soap, oil 
and similar hquids^Nitro' 
kotc keeps floors dry. post- 
pones disintegration and 
makes them easily cleaned. 

Two coats can be applied 
overnight — it dries in half an 
hour — and is ready for morn- 
ing's work. Six pleasing shades 
and clear. 



W. P. FULLER G? CO. 

301 Mission Street 
San Franc rsco 



Branches in 26 Pacific Coast Cities. 

Factories in San Francisco, Los 
Angeles and Portland, 

Distributors of Valspar on the 
Pacific Coast. 



FULLER 

PAI NT S^P VARNISHES 



PIONEER WHITE LEAD 



77 yean expenence — your 
Fuiltfr qiwlitv. 



[ continued from preceding page I 

million dollars represents canned 
goods. 



C;isi 



tot 



Free . 
Apricots . 



Canned 

Fruit 

. 7,2(>0.000 

6.400,0<KI 

870.DOO 

1.400,000 

. 1.600,000 

S0,000 



Fre»h 
Fruit 
Used 
l«5,000 



4S 



35,000 

30,000 57 

1,000 45 

6,500,000 Packed In Hawaii, 80 
to 90 percent dlstrl- 



Other Fruits 

Eslln 



350,000 

70,000 

90,000 

80,000 
100,000 

average year based i 



ductlon statistics of recent years. 

The relative amount s of the variou.s 
fruits canned and dried varj- from 
year to year according to crop and 
market conditions. The stati.stics 
here given are estimates of average 
production ba^sed on crop reports of 
recent years. The ratio of tons 
canned to tons dried for each fruit 
also varies from year to year. Some 
authorities in the fruit industries go 
so far as to say that in 100 years 
dried fruits will take the place of 
canned fruits. In comparison with 
canned fruits the evaporated product 
is much less expensive to produce 
because the cost of the tin can is 
done away with and the much less 
e.\pen.sive cardboard carton is sub- 
stituted. The dehydration process 
itself is also less e.vpensive. One 
pound of dehydrated fruit has the 
same food value as eight pounds of 
canned fruit and it takes up much 
les.s space in warehouses, railway 
cars and ships with the result of a 
great sanng all along the line. 

On the other hand, canned fruit is 
ready for use immediately upon 
opening the can, while dried fruit 
ordinarily has to be prepared l)efore 
being consumed. Po.ssibly the rising 
standard of living will throw the 
balance of production the other way, 
and in the future a greater propor- 
tion of fruit will be canned than 
dehydrated. A statistical compari- 
son indicates that while both canned 
and dried fruit production has in- 
creased greatly since 1910, canning 
has registered a greater relative 
increa.se. The amount of dried fruits 
sent to foreign markets has increased 
in absolute tonnage since 1910. 
Relative to total production, how- 
ever, the foreign shipments have de- 
crea.sed. In 1911 foreign sales of 
dried fruit amounted to 28 per cent 
of the total crop. Of late years from 
18 per cent to 25 per cent has been 
exported. This indicates that much 
of the increase in dried fruit pro- 
duction has been for the account of 
the United States markets, although 
there have been phenomenal sales 
abroad of some of the dried fruits in 



certain years, notably raisins in 1919 
and prunes in 1924, 

Canned fruit exports have in- 
creased both absolutely and rela- 
tively since pre-war years. In 1911 
foreign markets took 19 per cent of 
the canned fruits produced. The 
present sales abroad account for 30 
per cent of canned production. A 
study of statistics reveals that both 
foreign and domestic demands for 
canned fruit products have in- 
creased greatly. 



Peaches, Cling 



. . 390,000 
. . 450,000 • 
2.100,000 ■ 
age year based on exports 



Canned cling peaches are much 
more popular than are the canned 
free stone variety. The free peach 
pack has shown a tendency to decline 
since the war, and is now at the 1910 
level, while the cling peach pack is 
four times as large !is it was in 1910. 

EXPORTS OF DRIED FRLIITS 

.\pples 6,000 tons 

.\pricots 10.000 

Peaches . , 3.000 

Prunes 50,000 

Raisins 40,000 - 

Estimate for an average year based on eiports 
of recent years. 

The proportion of total production 
sold abroad varies greatly from 
fruit to fruit. From 20 per cent to 
nearly 80 per cent of the prune pro- 
duction is exported, the normal 
foreign sales amounting to .30 per 
cent. In 1924, 110,000 tons were 
sold abroad, more than 78 per cent 
of production, due to large produc- 
tion, heavy carry over, low price and 
increased foreign demand. About 
half of that amount was exported in 
1925. An average of 25 per cent of 
the raisins are sold abroad. Nearly 
60 per cent of the small local dried 
apple production is marketed in 

[continued on pace I.tJ 



Montague Pipe & Steel Co. 

Riveted Steel Pipe. High Press 



Phone Kearny 698-699. San Fran 



DECKELMAN BROS., Inc. 

WhoUnaU and Retail 

Barbers' Supplies, Cutlery 

and Beauty Parlor 

Equipment 

Koken Barber Chairs 

48 Turk Street Franklin 2870 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1921) 



nued from pag«? 1 1 ] 



foreign countries; and about 40 per 
cent of the apricots. However, only 
10 per cent of tlie dried peaches are 
sold to foreign buyers. 

More than one-third of all canned 
apricots are sold abroad; a slightly 
smaller amount of canned pears and 
about 28 per cent of the large canned 
peach pack are also sent^to foreign 
countries, 

Not only do the demands for each 
type of canned and dried fruit vary, 
but study of the export statistics 
further reveals that each country 
has decided preferences for certain 
kinds of fruit. The United Kingdom 
and the Continent are the best 
markets, although Cuba and Canada 
in this hemisphere and some coun- 
tries in Australasia and the Orient 
are steady buyers. The tariffs of 
most Latin- American countries set 
a luxury duty on fruit imports and 
almost prohibit shipments. 

The United Kingdom takes 70 
per cent of all canned peach ship- 
ments. Cuba follows with 10 per 
cent and Canada with 8 per cent. 
India, France and New Zealand buy 
most of the remainder. From 80 to 
90 per cent of canned pears are also 
sent to the United Kingdom. Cuba 
receives from 8 per cent to 10 per 
cent and Canada the major part of 
other canned pear exports. 

The United Kingdom likewise 
buys 80 to 85 per cent of our canned 
apricot exports. France takes about 
one-third of the balance. About 70 
per cent of all other canned fruit is 
likewise sold to the United Kingdom, 
Canada takes 5 per cent, Cuba 3 
per cent, Java 3 per cent, Me.xico 2 
per cent and Australia 2 per cent. 
Small amounts are sent to almost 
every country in the world. 

Canada is the largest buyer of 
California raisins, taking about 30 
per cent of all exports. The recent 
Canadian-Australian tariff agree- 
ment, admitting Australian raisins 
free in Canada and increasing the 
duty on United States raisins, may 
possibly decrease Canadian demand 
for Californian raisins. At present 
the Canadian consumers are willing 
to take Californian raisins even at a 
higher price than Australian raisins 
because of quality. The largest 
demand centers at the Christmas 
holidays. Californian raisins are 
then fresh new stock, whereas 
raisins from the Antipodes which are 
harvested in February and March 
have to be stored through the sum- 
mer and held almost a year to meet 
the peak of demand. The United 
Kingdom takes another 20 per cent 
of raisin exports, Japan 10 per cent, 

[ continued on page 21 ] 




Via SANTA FE 

— transportation leadership an- 
ticipating every requirement for trans- 
continental travel. 

Fast daily trains on convenient 

schedules embodying newest travel com- 
fort features and providing choice of 
sleeping car accommodations. Santa Fe 
"all the way" to Chicago, Kansas City, 
Denver, Dallas and Galveston, with 
connecting Lines reaching all eastern 
points. 

FRED HARVEY SERVICE in Dining Cars 
and Station Lunch and Dining Rooms. 

Our facilities are at your disposal 

to assist in planning your trip. 

Information and folders 

on request. 



reservatums 
and details 



Santa Fe 'Hcket Offices & Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street • TiUphom Sutter 7600 • Ferry Depot 
SAN FRANCISCO 

OAKLAND BERKELEY SACRAMENTO SANTA ROSA 

434 13th Street 2134 University Ave- 1006 K Street 516 Fourth Street 

SAN JOSE STOCKTON 

15 East Santa Clara St. 221 First National Bank Bide. 



Santale 




.SAN FRANCLSCO BISINESS, FEBRUAKV 10. in2H 



^hat Furniture Afarket i^ek Means 



THE growing importance of San 
Francisco as an industrial and 
market center is being evi- 
denced this week in the gathering 
liere of several thousand retail 
furniture dealers and factorj' repre- 



What's Your 
Business? 

A letter from you will bring from 
us a list of the most important 
books covering every phase of 
your business. 

TECHNICAL and 
BUSINESS BOOKS 

OIL. PAINT. SOAP. PAPER. 
LEATHER. MINING. BANKING. 
ACCOUNTING. COMMERCE. 
CHEMISTRY. INDUSTRY. 
SCIENCE. ETC. 

TECHNICAL BOOK CO. 



sentatives for the semi-annual Furn- 
iture Market Week of the San Fran- 
cisco Furniture Exchange. 

These dealers are here from all 
parts of the West; the factorj' 
representatives and executives from 
practically every furniture produc- 
ing .'iection of the country. From 
the standpoint of attendance and 
from the quality and scope of the 
exposition the present market is 
said to be the most important held 
west of Chicago 

Displays Represent 
Over 500 Factories 

The displays alone represent more 
than half a thousand factories. The 
setting provided is one of the finest 
in any of the leading furniture 
markets. A progressive note is 
struck this time by the participation 
in the plans of the week of the retail 
dealers of San Francisco, Oakland 
and the bay cities. These dealers 
have designated this as furniture 
fashion show week. They have 
specially dressed their windows for 
the benefit of the visiting dealers 




and are staging liaily furniture 
fashion shows to which the dealers, 
their friends and the general public 
are invited. The stores in this con- 
certed plan have agreed to keep 
open Friday night in order that 
those dealers and the public at large 
may have one last opportunity of 
partaking of the stores' hospitality. 

"Better Homes" is to be the 
theme of the entire week. San 
Francisco takes a just pride in the 
"Better Homes" idea, for this move- 
ment, now national in .scope, had its 
inception and original presentation 
here. 

The furniture representatives in 
stressing the importance of "better 
homes" .see a direct relation between 
the breaking down of the home and 
increasing crime on the part of 
youth. 

"Make the home more attractive 
and it will serve as a magnet to at- 
tract the children to the fireside; 
allow the home to continue unat- 
tractive and the natural result will 
be ff)r children to seek their recrea- 
tion aw.iy from home." 

Luncheon Feature of 
Each Day's Program 

This is the appeal of the Furniture 
Market Week. Each day this week 
a special luncheon program has been 
provided in the ballroom of the 
Palace Hotel, and each of these 
programs has been designed to tie-in 
with the 'Better Homes" idea. 

On the opening day Rabbi Louis 
L Newman of Temple Emanu-El 
spoke on "The Better Home." On 
Tuesday the speaker was Fred H. 
Mantor, director of the Better 
Business Bureau of the San Fran- 
cisco Advertising Club, who had as 
his subject "Insuring Healthful 
Rest." 

The program for the remainder of 
the week as announced is as follows: 
Wednesday, Sketch by Rotary Club 
Players under the auspices of the 
San Francisco Rotary Club. Thurs- 
day, W. H. Wilson, general manager 
American Furniture Mart of Chi- 
cago, will speak on "The Uses and 
Development of a Market," and 
Friday, moving picture entitled 
"Happiness," illustrating the manu- 
facture of furniture from the tree to 
the finished product, which is being 
shown through the courtesy of the 
Rockford, Illinois, Furniture Manu- 
facturers' Association. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1026 



What Our Geodetic Survey Means to Us 



$259, Gulf Coast, $222. During the 
fiscal year 1925 the expenditures per 
mile of shoreline were California, 
$218, Pacific Coast, $111, Atlantic 
Coast, $26; Gulf Coast, $23. 

If we adopt as our yardstick the 
values of imports and exports, we 
find that in 1925 we spent, per mil- 
lion dollars of commerce, for Cali- 
fornia, $598; Pacific Coast, $294; 
Gulf Coast, $65; and Atlantic Coa,st, 
.$36. In order to see the complete 
picture, it is proper to recall that a 
much longer period had already 
been devoted to the surveys of the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts, and in 
consequence, at the time our com- 
parison begins, the first survey of 
those coasts was much nearer com- 
pletion. On the other hand, the 
sandy shores of the Atlantic and 
Gulf coasts are subject to constant 
changes by wave and current action 
which necessitate frequent resur- 
veys in order to keep the mariner 
informed of their prevailing condi- 
tion. In contrast with this situation 
the rocky shores which with a few 
local exceptions characterize the Pa- 
cific Coast are so resistant to erosion 
that once adequately surveyed no 
further work would be required for 
many years. 

A careful review of the whole situ- 
ation, which takes account of all 
these factors, justifies the conclu- 
sion that at the pr&sent time San 
Francisco Bay and the entire Cali- 
fornia coast are as well surveyed for 
navigational purposes as any other 
extensive section of our coasts, and 
that the effort begun ten years ago 
to accomplish a complete survey of 
the coast, which would also be final 
with respect to the unchangeable 
portions, is now well along toward 
completion. The work is being 
pushed vigorously at the present 
time; in fact, the program for the 
ensuing year calls for an even greater 
effort than during any preceding one. 

No mention of the contribution 
by the Coast and Geodetic Survey 
to the welfare of San Francisco 
would be complete without a word 
in reference to another aspect of 
the Bureau's work. In January, 
1925, the President approved an act 
of Congress charging the Survey 
with investigations in seismology, 
a subject probably of greater inter- 
est to California than to any other 
state. 

Mankind is powerless to prevent 
earthquakes, but scientists and en- 
gineers believe that a great deal can 



( continued from page 12 ] 

be done to minimize their disastrous 
effects. The first step toward the 
attainment of that desirable end is 
to learn everything possible regard- 
ing the nature of earthquakes, their 
causes, when and where they may be 
expected to occur, and the character 
of the earth movements which may 
be expected. 

The Coast and Geodetic Survey 
is the agency selected by the Federal 



Government to study these basic 
problems, working in co-operation 
with other interested agencies in 
this and other countries. It remains 
for the future to determine what the 
actual accomplishment will be, but 
the Survey has worked out a definite 
program for attacking the problem, 
which now awaits the Congressional 
appropriations necessary to putting 
it in operation. 




"Show us the romance in a paper towel' 

— was the challenge of a San Francisco paper manufacturer. 
We won! The photographic illustration above was but one of a dozen that 
were used in trade paper, catalog, maihng piece, house organ and news- 
paper advertising to put this particular paper towel in a leading place in a 
comparatively short time. 

As a by-product, we showed them how their salesmen could use these 
photographic illustrations in their sales books. 
We have yet to find a business, product or service that cannot be 

^^ photographic illustration 



Ask us to suggest methods of applying dramatued photography to your 
business. It can he done.' 

Lothers & Young Studios 

TT Illustrative & Commercial jr 

|[ PHOTOGRAPHY J) 

419 Sutter Street, San Francisco Garfield 5100 



SAX FRANCI.SCO Bl'SINE.S.S, FEBKLARY 10, 1926 



Henr>' S. Ives Talks on 
Government in Business 

GOXKKN-MICNT ownership is 
static and is an enterprise 
marked by many failures, ac- 
cording to Henry S. Ivo". -;ecrot:irv 



The Oldest bond house in America 
specialcing exclusively in Tax ExEXipr 

Irrigation District Manicipal Boixb 

Our cutiomcrs arc Sivinfes Banks. Life 

InaurancT Companies, and individuals 

who prefcriKc srcunivofsoodfarm land. 

Inurest 5ft to &y. List on application. 

J.R.MASON a-CO. 

Merchants E«chan«C.Sutirr6<>;0.San Frannaco 




COLLECTIONS 



No cal]«ctiao no charge 

We leinit day coUectxl 

R.l»: 15%. 8%, 4% 

A World-wide Service 



Automobile Accident Insurance 

N ON -CANCELLABLE 



Craig Carrier Company 

laaurance - Broken - Surety Boods 

MerchsDts EichaD«e Bulldloft 

SAN FRA.NCISCO 



bonds &nd ; 



classes of ioaurance and aurety 
actinf exclusively aa couoaelon 



THE YOKOHAMA 

SPECIE BANK 

Ltd. 

"Commerciar' 

HEAD OFFICE, YOKOH.\MA, JAPAN 

EstabUshed 1880 

Capital Subscribed . . Yen 100.000.000.00 

Capital Paid Vp Yen 100.000.000.00 

Reserve Fund 

Surplus Yen 83.500.000.00 



Exporters and Importei 
to avail themselves of 

especially with the Orien 



San Francisco Branch 

415-429 Sansome Street 
K. KOJI.MA. Manager 



of the Casualty Information Clear- 
ing House of Chicago and nationally 
known economist, in an address be- 
fore a joint luncheon of the Cham- 
her of Commerce and the Commer- 
cial Club. Ives' appearance had 
been made possible by the co-opera- 
tion of local insurance company 
repre.sentatives. 

Taking as his theme, "Govern- 
ment in Business," Ives declared 
that the "modern tendency is to- 
ward creating a plague of laws" and 
that this is the "jazz age of laws." 
He said: 

"It might be well to bear in mind 
that there are 100,000 persons in this 
country engaged in making laws — 
they are the 'hands' in a 'law fac- 
torj'.' 

''Our proclivity for law making is 
threatening many ancient rightjs. 
The tax bill for the United States in 
1913 was S2,919,000,000; in 1924 it 
was $10,250,000,000. This means 
that fifteen cents out of everj- dollar 
of the National income goes to taxes 
due to the pa.ssion for regulation and 
for telling the other fellow how to 
direct his business. 

"The big question of government 
ownership is whether the institution 
of private property is to be pre- 
served. 

"Government ownership simply 
means the substitution of a govern- 
ment deficit for private profits, for 
the Government never created any- 
thing except what private enter- 
prise started. 

"It is my belief that everj' in- 
vasion by the Government into a 
business injures that business. It 
often means the taking over by the 
Government of a business or utility 
started and operated profitably and 
adequateh' by private interests and 
enterprise and thereby causing an 
unfavorable economic reaction." 

Ives was introduced to the gather- 
ing by Clay Miller, president of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 



California Cotton 

SE^'ERAL bales of cotton grown 
in California, described as a 
".sample shipment" of the first 
crop of cotton grown in the central 
section of the state, left San Fran- 
cisco February 2 on the liner Taiyo 
Maru. consigned to the Orient. 

The shipment was designed merely 
to demonstrate to buyers in the 
Orient what grade of cotton can be 
raised in California. If the "sample" 
is acceptable the growers are pre- 
pared immediately to ship more 
than .3,000 bales on order. 

The average monthly shipment of 
cotton out of the port of San Fran- 
cisco averages about 5,000 bales of 
California - produced cotton. The 



shipment which is l>eing conveyed 
by the Taiyo is the first cotton to be 
produced in the upper valley dis- 
tricts of this state. 

The departure of the shipment 
was given recognition by an informal 
farewell party composed of repre- 
.sentatives of the cotton industry, 
business men and representatives of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 



fvfc pOMNELI. &rO . 



TJi?/C£ range circular, 1913- 
r^ 1 925. gi\nng yearly high and 
-*■ lozv with dividend rate of 2 74 
stocks listed on New York Ex- 
change, now available. Ask for it. 



Conservative Margin 
Accounts Solicited 

Special Mar ket Letters on Request 

Out-of-Town Clients 
Given Particular Attention 



SAN FRANCISCO : 633 Market St. 

Telephone Sutler 7676 

OAKLAND : 1404 FrankUn St. 

Telephone Oakland 1680 

New York Office : 120 Broadway 



Bring Him Here 

When you are look- 
ing out for a relative 
orfnendfromout-of- 
town, invite him to 
make this his bank- 
ing headquarters. 
We can ser\'e 
him well. 



'^^ American Bank 

Mrmh^ FtJ^^l gjncTx Syaem 

California Street at Montgomery 

2626 Mission Street at 22d 

SAN FRANCISCO 




3} Banking Offices -n San Fra 



8AN KRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10. 1926 



SanF] 



rancisco s 



i'oreign irade C( 



onvention 



FOREIGN trade is vital to Cali- 
fornia's prosperity. Most of the 
products of our soil and of our 
natural resources are exported in 
large volume, as, for example, petro- 
leum products; lumber; fruits-fresh, 
dried, and canned; wheat and flour; 
barley; cotton, etc. The curtailment 
of our exports would quickly affect 
the prosperity of our whole state. 
On the other hand, our expansion 
and increased production is very 
largelj' contingent upon increased 
exports. San Francisco, as the log- 
ical port and distributing center for 
the production of the great valleys 
of California, is quick to feel the 
effects of expanding exports. The 
total foreign trade of the port of San 
Francisco increased $50,000,000 last 
year over the year before. Clearly, 
this is directly related to the en- 
hanced prosperity which this cit}' is 
now enjoying. 

Convention Will 
Stimulate Foreign Trade 

The Fourth Annual Convention of 
the Pacific Foreign Trade Council is 
for the purpose of stimulating our 
foreign trade, and consequently of 
making more certain and permanent 
our prosperity. The Pacific Foreign 
Trade Council is the outgrowth of a 
feeling on the Pacific Coast that this 
section of the United States has com- 
mon foreign trade problems. Its 
geographical position in relation to 
the rest of the United States, its 
coastline and harbors, and the rapid 
development of the peoples within 
its legitimate trade area on the Pa- 
cific are the factors which have crys- 
tallized in the minds of Pacific Coast 
producers and merchants the desir- 
ability of common, unified action. 
Hence the slogan of the Pacific For- 
eign Trade Council, "Pacific Coast 
Unity for World Trade Expansion." 

The three meetings which have 
been held in past years have brought 
the trade interests of the Coast to- 
gether, have helped to visualize and 
solve their foreign trade problems, 
have educated the producers to the 
necessity of foreign trade to Coast 
prosperity, and have enabled the 
Pacific Coast cities to get behind 
Federal legislation beneficial to the 
Coast in a unified way. One form of 
this has been united Coast action 
on rivers and harbors development; 
another has been on trans-Pacific 
radio communication; and still an- 
other, on the amendments to the 
China Trade Act. 



"Pacific Coast Unity for World Trade Expansion" — Fourth Annual G>nvention 

PACIFIC FOREIGN TRADE COUNCIL 
San Francisco, March 4, 5 C^ 6, 1926 

Delegate Kegistratton 

Mr. Henry F. Grady, Secretary, Convention Committee, 
Merchants Exchange Building, San Francisco. 

Please register me as a delegate. 

Name 

Representing^ 

Address 

Only registered delegates will be admitted to Convention sessions and entitled to vote. 
Registration fee, including Official Banquet, Friday evening, March 5th, $7-50, which I 
will remit on receipt of bill. 

In order to perfect arrangements and prepare list of delegates, etc., you arc urged to send 
this application in as soon as possible. 



This present meeting in San Fran- 
cisco promises to be the most repre- 
sentative and best attended of any 
that has yet been held. Strong at- 
tendance at the Convention, which 
will be addressed by the ablest men 
on the Coast in the foreign trade 
field, will make possible its success 
and insure the accomplishment of 
its aims. 

Some of the important subjects 
and speakers on the program will be: 



Development of Inland Waterways, Marshall 
N. Dana, Portland. Ore. 

Polities of Trade, Chester H. Rowell. 

Building Up Our Industries by Exporting 
Finished Products of Our Native Raw Materials. 
J. J. Donovan, Bellingham, Wash. 

Importing as a Means of Inrreasing Export 
Sales, E. H. Sensenlch, Portland, Ore. 

Logical Pacific Coast Markets. A. F. Halnes, 
Seattle. 

Export Merchandising, the Need of Sound 
Policies. Stanley Powell. San Francisco. 

Manufacturing for Export from the Pacific 
Coast, O. S. Orrick. Oakland. 

Advantages of Organizing by Trades for Export. 
Dwi^t K. Grady, San Francisco. 

The Bank's Function in Foreign Credit Grant- 
ing. H. J. Harding, Oakland. 

PRESENT TRADE CONDITIONS 



CHINA. Hon. Julean Arnold, Peking. 

JAPAN, T. Komatsu, San Francisco. 

MEXICO. Hon. B. A. Aimada. 

FRENCH INDO- CHINA. Hon. Gaston 
Glraud. 

Foreign Trade Zones. William Kent, Eentville. 

Relation of the Railroads to the Development of 
Industries for Export on the Pacific Coast. Paul 
Shoup, San Francisco. 

Pacific Coast Influence on World Development. 
James A. Bacigalupi, San Francisco. 

Our Relations with the People of the Pacific Area. 
Robert Newton Lynch, San Francisco. 

Shipping and its Relations to Foreign Trade, 
Dean Stuart Daggett, Berkeley. 

Buying and Selhng on Standard Grades and 
Specifications, I. F. Laucks, Seattle. 

Banking Service for Foreign Trade. J. A. H. 
Kerr, Los Angeles. 

Developing Foreign Trade Personnel. T. E. 
Doreoius, Seattle. 



Selecting and Developing Foreign Trade Markets, 
C. Parker Holt, Oakland. 

Banquet Speakers; Robert Dollar. San Fran- 
cisco; Irving E. Vining, Ashland, Oregon. 

There will also be representatives 
from the Department of State, as 
well as those from the Department 
of Commerce, indicating the strong 
interest of the trade promotion agen- 
cies of the Government in this meet- 
ing. Secretary Hoover has wired 
Mr. R. I. Bentley, chairman of the 
Convention Committee, his ap- 
proval of the meeting. His telegram 
is as follows : 

Washington, D. C. 
Mr. R. I. Bentley, Chairman, 
Convention Committee, 
Pacific Foreign Trade Council, 
San Francisco, California. 

Notwithstanding progress made in 
American Foreign Trade during the past 
decade further expansion of overseas trade 
is essential to continued economicstability 
in this country. Therefore foreign trade 
conventions such as that called by the 
Pacific Foreign Trade Council are impor- 
tant in t hat they are instrumental in bring- 
ing about among the business public a 
realization of the advantages of foreign 
trade, thus securing added interest. They 
are particularly important through the 
possibilities offered for securing that 
concerted action which is so vitally essen- 
tial to success in the solution of common 
problems. Herbert Hoover. 

Those who register and attend the 
sessions of the Convention will not 
only aid in the accomplishment of 
the purposes of the Pacific Foreign 
Trade Council, but also will secure 
a great deal of very valuable in- 
formation which will be of dollars- 
and- cents service to them in con- 
ducting their own business. 



SAX FRANCISCO BISI.VESS, FEBRUARY 10. 1926 



ihafs always 

filled 

Consistent small space adver- 
tising, carefully worded and 
placed in the right mediums, 
has kept the Hotel Califor- 
nian filled to a high percent- 
age of its capacity all year 
round. 

If you have a prof>osition of 
merit, we can give you an 
equally profitable advertis- 
ing service. 

Harold /^WuRTS 

cAdvariisinQ Vi^^ cAgwcu 

Chronicle BIdg. ^^^Girficld 2654 



Follow the 
Industrial Develop- 
ment southward on 
the Peninsula — 
Do not wait until 
Prices advance. 
Sites available now 
5 to 15 cents a square 
foot. Spur track 
Privileges — 

South San Francisco Land & 
Improvement Company 



Telephone Sutter 2825 



[ continued from pace ti ] 

no evidence to indicate at this time 
that the Box Bill will be seriously 
considered. 

p^LRTHER restrictions on the Ainer- 
*■ ican merchant marine are being 
vigorously opposed by the Pacific 
Coa-st Shipowners Association. Cap- 
tain Walter J. Peterson, of San 
Francisco, manager of the Employ- 
ment Division of the .\s.'iociation, is 
here making the fight alone, without 
help from the -Atlantic shipowners, 
although they are just as vitally in- 
terested. Senator LaFollctte has a 
bill pending which Peterson .says 
will add more expense to .-Vmerican 
shipping. During the hearings of 
labor's side of the ca.se, Andrew Fur- 
useth of the Seamen's Union, testi- 
fied that the union now has about 
18,000 members. During the last 
strike they had 33,000 memliers. 
Captain Peterson says there are 60.- 
000 sailors operating on the Amer- 
ican merchant marine and he inter- 
preted Furuseth's testimony as an 
indication of a considerable drop in 
union membership. 

A A A A 

nPnK Public Building Bill, carrj-ing 
■'- authorization over a ten-year pro- 
gram for .S160,000,000 worth of now 
Federal buildings throughout the 
count rj-. has been reported favorablj' 
to the .Senate. This bill gives the 
Secretarj- of the Treasury authority 
to allocate the buildings. San Fran- 
cisco being on a preferred list, it is 
believed virtually assured of a new 
Federal building if the bill pas.ses. 

T^HE San Francisco Chamber of 
-^ Commerce joined with other 
Chambers of the Pacific Coast re- 
cently in opposing the Ecuadorean 
visa tax of 25 per cent on all exports, 
to take effect January 1st. Through 
the efforts of Secretarj- of State Kel- 
logg and representations made by the 
American ^linister, the Ecuadorean 
Government eliminated this tax. 



Coldwell, Cornwall & Banker 

REALTORS 
57 Sutter Street — Sutter 5420 



A T.VRIFF battle is coming which 
many believe will be the greatest 
tariff fight in the history of the 
countrj'. Democratic leaders are 
now ma.ssing their big guns on this 
issue. It will Ijc an i.ssue in the forth- 
coming Congressional elections, but 
a still bigger one in the Presidential 
campaign of 1928. 

D EPUBLICANS are in serious danger 
of losing control of the Senate 
in this year's elections. Every Dem- 
ocratic seat to be vacated is certain 
to have a Democratic incumbent 
after the votes are counted, because 
of that situation which comes once 
every sLx years when most of the 
Senators from the "solid South" are 
re-elected. Many Republicans are 
not only in serious danger in their 
own primary elections, but in dan- 
ger of being defeated by Democratic 
opponents in the finals. If the Re- 
publican control is maintained by 
as much as one or two votes, even 
counting the so-called Republican 
radical bloc, RepubUcan leaders will 
consider themselves fortunate when 
the new Congress is organized next 
March. 



'T'he revolt of Iowa Republican 
farmers has not created the stir at 
this session that it ha-s in the past. 
The crj' of "wolf" has been heard so 
often that it is losing its effective- 
ness. For a time it looked as if the 
Iowa threat was a serious menace 
to the administration, but it is be- 
lieved the Coolidge leaders have the 
situation in hand, as the result of 
their advocacy of strengthening the 
hands of the farm co-operative asso- 
ciations. A bill giving them more 
power and strengthening their hands 
in every way has been reported to 
the House. During the debate in 
the committee the California co- 
operatives were lauded by almost 
everj' speaker as shining examples of 
what can be accomplished bj' the 
growers through organized effort. 
"California is leading American ag- 
riculture out of the depths of over 
production and incompetent mar- 
keting methods," one speaker said. 



'T'he Senate Committee on Inter- 
■*■ state Commerce has again re- 
ported the Gooding long and short 
haul bill and the bill may pass the 
Senate. However, it is believed it 
wiU encounter insuperable opposi- 
tion in the House and that there is 
no immediate danger of its enact- 
ment. Seth Mann appeared before 
the committee as a representative 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 



v\N FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



California, the Fruit Center of the Nation 



Denmark 5 per cent, Netherlands 5 
per cent, New Zealand 5 per cent 
and China 5 per cent. Small one- 
cent packages of raisins for the 
Orient market have greatly in- 
creased the sales in the Far East. 
The natives find them a welcome 
addition to their bowls of rice. As 
with other dried and canned fruits, 
smaller quantities are shipped to 
almost every country listed in gov- 
ernment reports. 

France vies with the United King- 
dom for first place as a foreign 
market for California prunes. The 
French demand is subject to wide 
fluctuations, due to relative crop 
conditions in France and California 
and consequent price levels. France 
takes from 10 per cent to 30 per cent 
or even 40 per cent of prune exports. 
The United Kingdom is a much 
steadier market, taking 25 per cent 
to 30 per cent of the annual exports. 
Canada is also a good prune market 
and 15 per cent to 20 per cent of the 
foreign shipments are sold there. 
Sweden takes another ,S per cent to 
10 per cent, Netherlands 5 per cent, 
Germany from 5 per cent to 15 per 



[ continued from page 1.5 1 

cent. Belgium 4 per cent. The re- 
mainder of the exports are dis- 
patched in small amounts to a 
number of countries. 

Canada takes 35 per cent of dried 
peach exports, United Kingdom 25 
per cent, Germany 12 to 15 per cent, 
Sweden 10 per cent, Switzerland 5 
per cent and France 3 per cent. 
Netherlands, the Argentine and a 
number of other countries receive 
the small balance of other dried 
peach exports. 

Netherlands is Best Market 
for Dried Apples 

The dried apple exports find their 
best market in the Netherlands, to 
which countries 35 to 40 per cent of 
the foreign shipments are destined. 
Germany takes another 15 to 20 
per cent, Sweden 12 per cent, Eng- 
land 10 per cent, Denmark 8 per 
cent, France 8 per cent, and Belgium 
6 per cent. The United Kingdom 
does not buy any appreciable quan- 
tity of dried apples from California. 
It is, however, the best foreign 
market for fresh apple exports from 
the Pacific Coast. 



The Netherlands also take 15 to 
20 per cent of dried apricots, fol- 
lowed by Denmark with 13 to 17 
per cent. United Kingdom 12 to 15 
per cent, France 12 to 15 per cent, 
Germany 10 to 12 per cent, Norway 
8 to 10 per cent, Belgium 5 to 7 per 
cent, Sweden 6 per cent and Japan 
3 per cent. Smaller quantities of 
apricots are also sent to a number of 
lesser markets. 

From the growers' and packers' 
point of view, the 25 per cent of the 
canned and dried fruit production 
which must be marketed abroad is 
of very great importance as it con- 
tains the differential elements which 
spell net profit or loss for the annual 
crop. The domestic markets tend to 
be constant and steady and are se- 
cure from foreign markets by tariff 
protection. Abroad, the canned and 
dried fruits of the United States 
must face competition with local 
production and production from 
other countries, varying demand 
due to fluctuating currency, national 
industrial depressions and luxury or 
discriminatory tariff barriers. A 

[ continued next page 1 




Public Service 

TOWELS 

Give to Every User 
His Own Towel 

In buying towels you must consider two things 
—sanitation and economy. PUBLIC SERVICE 
TOWELS are not only sanitary but they are 
economical. 

One place where sanitation is important is 
the public washroom. To keep it neat, clean and 
sanitary is a duty as well as a credit to the one 
responsible for its condition. 

PUBLIC SERVICE TOWELS are interleaved in packages of 150 towels, and dispensed from an'attractive 
white enameled metal cabinet which is easily attached to any wall. Start the first towel through the slot in the 
bottom of the cabinet, and as each is withdrawn, the next towel is brought into position ready for use. 

These towels are made to quickly absorb moisture and yet withstand rubbing without leaving objection- 
able Hnt. They are doubled over at the pulling end to add strength. 

Let us send you prices on carton lots of PUBLIC SERVICE TOWELS. 

Manufactured by 

NATIONAL PAPER PRODUCTS COMPANY 

*^o Waste Tissue — Public Seryice Towels — Sop-O-zoN Liquid Soap 
1789 Montgomery St.. San Francisco Tel. SUTTER 7031 



Public Service Towels are automatically dispensed 

me at a time from a white enameled metal cabinet. 

They have a folded hem at the pulling end 

which adds strength 



SAX FRAXCISCO BT'SIXESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



[cuntinucd from prcoi-iling page J 

coal strike in Kngland, the proposed 
revision of the Japanese tariff, the 
adverse balance of trade in Germany 
and increased taxation in France are 
all of vital importance to an execu- 
tive in the California fruit industry. 
The men who direct the destinies of 
the California fruit industry are 
well qualified to cope with any situa- 
tion which may arise, as is evidenced 
in the increased and steady pros- 
perity of the industry ;is a whole. 

Some of the foreign shipments to 
Canada and Mexico go direct by 
rail, but the bulk of foreign ship- 
ments and many of the domestic 
shipments are transported via the 
Panama Canal. Direct shipment to 
Europe via the Canal has cut C.I.F. 
costs and greatly stimulated de- 
mand. The intercoastal domestic 
shipments are also very heavy. The 
Pananui Canal Record, for the 
year ending June 30, 1925, lists 
236,936 cargo tons, each ton of 
2,240 pounds, of canned fruit pass- 
ing through the Canal from the 



LINCOLN TAXI CO. 

Limousines sutxer 

De Luxe 
457 Powell Street 



SACRAMENTO 

and Sacramento Northam R. R. 

Pain la 

Observation and Parlor Cars. 
Dining Car leaves 5;00 p. m. via 



SACRAMENTO 

SH7RT LINE 



="CnppTAi. City 



^"^^^^ 




From 

Jackson Street Pier No. 3 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 
AT 6:30 P. IM. 

PALATIAL STEAMERS 

Suites with Bath — Barber Shop 

F.r. $1.80 On. W.y $3.00 «••""' Trip 

Try Our Famous 50 Cent Dinners 
Phone Sutter 3880 for Reservations 

California Transportation Company 



w-est coast of the United States. 
Hawaii sent 14,756 tons and the 
west coast of Canada 3,074 tons. 
For the same period 131,395 tons of 
dried fruit from the Pacific States 
passed through the canal. Canada 
also sent 4,219 tons of dried fruit. 
By far the majority of this canned 
and dried fruit cargo comes from 
San Francisco Bay. The destina- 
tions of canned fruits passing from 
the Pacific to the Atlantic are East 
Coast United States 152,145 tons; 
British Isles 68,371 tons; other 
ICurope 33,972 tons and smaller 
amounts of less than 500 tons to 
regions elsewhere. The east coast 
of the United States also takes most 
of the dried fruit shipments through 
the Canal with a total of 69,941 
tons, followed bv Cont inental Europe 
44,319 tons and British Isles 20,589 
tons. Smaller amounts are sent to 
the east coast of South America and 
the West Indies. 



Captain Dollar Writes for the 
"Nation's Business" 

Captain Robert Dollar, of San 
Francisco, president of the steam- 
ship company bearing his name, is a 
contributor to the February number 
of the Xation's Business with an in- 
teresting and instructive account of 
how his company started in business 
in 1893 with one small vessel and ex- 
panded its activities so rapidly that 
today it operates 27 ships, including 
the famous Dollar Company 
" 'Round-the-World" service. 

"The success of a steamship com- 
pany lies in the service it performs 
for both traveler and shipper," is 
line of the many pertinent comments 
in Captain Dollar's article. 

Captain Dollar also tells how he 
liuilt up his company's fleet and in- 
creased its scope of trade between 
twenty-one Dollar companies in 
ports of call throughout the world 
and how the " 'Round-the-World" 
service, now starting its third year, 
was inaugurated. 



Handling Charge on Import 
Oil Absorbed 

The Traffic Bureau of the Cham- 
ber is in receipt of advice that the 
United States Shipping Board has 
instructed Struthers & Barry, man- 
aging operators of the American Far 
East Line for the Shipping Board, to 
absorb 35 cents per ton of the han- 
dling and toll charge on import vege- 
table oil moving through the port of 
San Francisco in vessels of this hne. 

The Southern Pacific, Western Pa- 
cific and Santa Fe have authorized 
the publication of tariffs whereby 
these three rail lines will each absorb 



35 cents per ton of the handling and 
toll charges on vegetable oil import- 
ed through San Francisco. 

This absorption by the rail and 
steamer lines at San Francisco will 
place this port on a parity with 
Seattle, where the handling and 
wharfage charge on import vegetable 
oils is being jointly absorbed by the 
rail and steamer lines since Novem- 
ber 18, 1925. 



Customs Tarifi Revision 
Proposed to Japanese Diet 

General revision of the customs 
tariff of Japan has been proposed to 
the Japanese Diet, now in session, 
by the Imperial Government, ac- 
cording to information received by 
the Foreign Trade Department of 
the Chamiier of Commerce from the 
San Francisco office of the Consul 
General of Japan. 

Specific duties will be adopted as 
far as possible as a matter of con- 
venience, the message stated. Food 
stuffs, necessities and articles not 
produced in Japan will be admitted 
free or subject to only minimum 
duties. 

Competitive duties will be placed 
on foreign commodities which now 
are produced by established indus- 
tries in Japan. Infant industries 
will be protected and luxury duties 
remain intact. 



Motorists Save 27 Miles 

DIRECT FERRY 

Vallejo-San Francisco 

Fastest Boats on San Francisco Bay 

Dining Room. Barber Shop. 
Boot Black and News Service 

Monticello Steamship Co. 

Nortb End of Ferrr Biildinf Phone Snttcr 371 



CHECKER CAB COMPANY 



WHY? 

First: Checker drivers are the best paid cab 

drivers in the world. 
Second: S7% of Its personnel are stockholders. 

GRAYSTONE 400 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



TRANSPORTATION 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than February 18. 
Full information concerning the subjects listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket No. 6553— Reindeer meat, CL, east- 
bound; 6554, iron or steel wire. CL, westbound; 
6555, stove trimmings, LCL, westbound; 6556, 
canned fish, CL, eastbound; 6557, dry goods, LCL. 
eastbound, import; 6558, structural steel, CL, east- 
bound; 6559, grading and road making implements. 



Bishop & Bahler 



New Addr* 



i Pho 



369 Pi; 



eased business has compelled us to 
more apacioug quarters Our offices are 
Rooms 418 to 423 ETchange Block, 
Street. San Francisco, where, with our 
lented force of highly efficient traffic 

■ and Better" service than ever before, 
e consultation by all shippers and 
of freight. No charge unless 

oentative will call. 






BISHOP & BAHLER 

Incorporated September 16, 1914 

Traffic Managers 

Originators of 
"TRANSPORTATION ECONOMY" 




Recommended by 

James E. Power 

POWER RUBBER CO. 

670 Turk Street 
Prospect 69 



-♦o 



CL, westbound; 6560, lumber and forest products, 
CL, eastbound; 6561, copra, CL, eastbound, import; 
6562, kitchen cupboards, cabinets or dressers, CL, 
eastbound; 6563, damaged wheat, CL, westbound; 
6564, estimated weight on shipments of pears, east- 
bound; 6565, pinion nuts, CL, eastbound; 6566, 
bagging. CL, westbound; 6567, talking machines, or 
talking machines and radio sets combined, in 
straight or mixed carloads, westbound. 



U. S. Intercoastal Conference 
Westbound Rate Docket 

Bulletin No. 35, posting date February 3, 1926. 

The following subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than February 15, 1926. Full informa- 
tion concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Action on the subjects listed will not be restricted 
to the exact scope of the docket, but may include 
other commodities or recommendations varying 
from the changes proposed, if such modifications 
appear necessary or advisable in disposing of the 
subject. 

R-457 — Drawing tables; proposed addition to 
Item 1425 a clause reading "(Not Drawing Tables)" 
R-468, tubes, collapsible metal; proposed reduction 
in Item 3560 to SI. 75 per 100 lbs. A. Q. ; R-469, type, 
metal; request for reduction in rates to $1.50 LCL 
and SI, 00 CL, minimum weight 36,000 lbs.; R-470, 
paper cans; request for the establishment of any 
quantity rate of SI. 85 per 100 lbs.; R^71, tobacco 
unmanufactured (Porto Rican Origin). Now 
covered by Item 3500 at rates of $1.30 CL minimum 
weight 20,000 lbs. LCL $1.60. Request ia for the 
establishment of same rates as apply on domestic 
tobacco. Item 3490 viz. 70c CL, $1.00 LCL; R-472, 
machinery, used or second hand; proposed addition 
to Items 2385, 2390 and 2395 a note reading "On 
used or second hand machinery, shipments will only 
be accepted at owner's risk of breakage;" R-473, 
nickel silver sheets, nickel silver wire. Proposed 
addition to Item 480 an entry reading: "Nickel 
Silver Sheets," and another entry reading; "Nickel 
Silver Wire;" R-474, casings, sausage (pickled); 
request for reduction in CL rate to $1.10; R-475, 
para-dichlorobenzol (dichlorobenzene) ; request for 
reduction in CL rate to 60c: R-476, bodies of cabs, 
motor truck; proposed elimination of the words 
'completely K.D." in Item 3635; R-477, household 
goods, used furniture and emigrant movables; pro- 
posed addition of new Items to cover at specific 
commodity rates; R-478, leather, artificial or imi- 
tation; now covered by Item 2260 at $1.00 CL 
minimum weight 24,000 lbs., $1.35 LCL. Proposed 
reduction in rate to 75c CL, minimum weight 
20.000 lbs., LCL $1.15; R-479, drugs and medicines: 
proposed establishment of reduction in CL rate to 
75c with a minimum weight of 50,000 lbs. 



RESERVE SPACE 
NOW IN THE 
CHAMBER OF 
COMMERCE 
YEA R B O O K 

TRADE^INDEX 

OUT APRIL 14 



J^^^fc^ Storage Garage 
^^mm '"the City 



Cars Callfd 



Cor. Jackson and Polk Sts. 



^ 




GARAGE 



410 
Bush St. 



MONARCH GARAGE 

1361 Bush St, Near Polk St. 

Attractive Monthly IlatFH 

ManaR-ement of Vim. Saunders 



SURE-FOOTED 




KEATON Non- Skids 



Made in San Franclsc 



a for liberal offer t 



INGERSOL-KEATON SALES AND SEl 
Removed to 524 Van Nesa Are. 

Phone Hemlock 4774 

GEO. S. MERWIN CO. 
194i> Polk St.. Corner Pacific 



& TIRE CO. 

4600 Geary St.. Cor. 10th Ave. 



BEHRMANN TIRE & I 

1375 Golden Gate Av.. ni 



Phone Randolph 4135 

COLUMBUS VUL. & TIRE CO. 
704 Filbert. Cor. Columbus 

Phone Kearny 3794 

OAKLAND RIM & TIRE CO. 
2811 Broadway. Oakland 



SAN FHA.NCISCO BUSINESS. FEBRUARY 10, 1920 



n 



AVE you a place in your 
organization for a young 
man, 19 years old, of un- 
questionable character, 
loyal and a high school 
graduate? 

My experience covers ac- 
countancy, advertising, letter 
writing, etc. 

I am seeking a permanent con- 
nection where I can put my 
ability to full advanUge. Will 
start at $150 a month. 

Address Box 325 

San Francisco Business 



Foreign TRADE TIPS Domestic 



> Clianiber of Co 



PATENTS 

TR.\DE-M.\RKS, FOREICN PATENTS 

MUNN & CO. 

Suite COl Hobart BIdg., San Francisco 



'prompt 
service 



"Visible" Card Records 
provide instant, accurate, 
perpetual inventories — 
information always avail- 
able to any customer. 



Tavvrence 
Warehouse 

37Drumm Stieeb, San Fianc'uco. 



9977— Nice, France. Producers of OLIVE OIL 
Irish to appoint an agent to represent them in San 
Francisco. 

9978— Milan, Italy. ManufncturcFB of AUTIS- 
TIC FURNITURE AND CHAIRS dwire to ap- 
point a dealer or aecnt experienced iD this line to 
represent them in San Francisco. 

9979— San Diego, Calif. Party wishes to get in 
touch with wholesale shoe companies or jobbers 
interested in handling a line of SHOES made in 
Germany. 

9980 — Berlin, Germany. Forty desires connec- 
tion with California exporters of FRESH and 
CANNED PINEAPPLES. 

9981 — Hamburg, Germany. Gentleman wishes 
to represent a California exporter of DRIED 
FRUIT in Hamburg. 

9982 — Elberfeld. Germany. German manufac- 
turer of PATENT BUTTONS for leather goods, 
gloves, etc., want« a represenlativo in San Fran- 

9983— Vienna. Austria. Manufacturer of MEER- 
SCHAUM and MEERSCHAUM MASSAPIPES 
and CIGAR and CIGARETTE HOLDERS de- 
sires to communicate with San Francisco importers 
of these articles. 

9984— Vienna, Austria. Manufacturer of MEER- 
SCHAUM and IMITATION MEERSCHAUM 
PIPES wishes to appoint a repreaentutivc on the 
Pacific Coast, or to communicate with San Fran- 
cisco importers or wholesalers interested in hand- 
ling these articles. 

9985 — Braunau-Olbert, Ciechoslovakia. Large 
manufacturers of WHITE COTTON GOODS for 
bed and toble linen and clothing wish to secure the 
aerv-icea of a suitable agent in this market. They 
stat« that their products meet English and French 
competition. 

9986 — New York, N. Y. Firm exporting to 
Eastern Europe and importing from Germany de- 
sires to communicate with San Francisco exporters 
of AGRICULTURAL MACHINES and importers 
of FANCY and DRY GOODS and NOVELTIES. 

9987 — Copenhagen, Denmark. Old established 
firm of brokers, now representing several California 
fruit firms are seeking connections with a California 
firm making a specialty of exporting EVAPO- 
RATED APPLES. They operate on a commission 

9988— Denmark. Manufacturers of EXPLO- 
SIVES wish to communicate with San Francisco 
firms interested in importing their articles. 

9989 — Berne, Switserland. Firm wishes to estab- 
lish business connections with California suppliers 
of DRIED FRUIT. Are prepared to do business on 
their own account or on a consignment basis. 

9990 — Wellington, New Zealand. Exporter of 
New Zealand FROZEN VENISON desires San 
Francisco connection to handle same. Can export 
up to 1.000 carcasses monthly or hindquarters only 
if preferred. Sole right of importation for entire 
State of California if desired. 

9991 — Nogales. Arizona. Commission agent 
n-ishes to establish business connections with San 
Francisco commercial or industrial firms desiring to 
establish a market or extend the •^aXa of their 
products in Mexico. 

9992 — Monclova, Mexico. Exporters of CAN- 
DELILLA WAX desire to communicate ^vith 
actual or prospective consumers of thi^- commodity. 

9993— Torreon. Mexico. The City of Torreon is 
establishing a fire department and wishes to com- 
; with organizations in a position to furnish 
;a on thig subject, or with houses 
specializing in this line. Modern apparatus and 
methods are desired. 

9994 — Tokyo, Japan. Manufacturer and exporter 
of COTTON and SILK FABRICS, ANTIMONY 
WARES. TOYS, PAPER FANS and FANCY 
ELECTRIC LAMPS FOR CHRISTMAS TREES, 



desires to establish connocUonfl with San Francisco 
importers of these articles. 

9995 — St. I^uia. Mo. A novelty company de- 
eirea to get in touch with San Francisco importers of 
JAPANESE and CHINESE WOVEN and PAPER 
FANS. 

9996— Shanghai, China. RAGS— WIPERS- 
COTTON WASTES, Young man recently re- 
turned from China and Japan, holding exclusive 
agency on above commodities from the largest ex- 
porters in the Orient, wishes to establish personal 
agencies on the Pacific Coast. 

9997_New York, N. Y. Firm desires to com- 
municate with sardine packers, who could supply 
them with SARDINES PACKED IN TO.MATO 
SAUCE. 6 and 7 fish to the oval tin, 48 tins to the 
case, for export to the Far East. 

Domestic Trade Tips 

D- 1969— Wichita Falb, Texaa. A coffee shop 
desires to communicate with a San Francisco whole- 
sale sea food dealer regarding LOBSTER and SEA 
FOOD shipments. 

D-1970— Twin Falls, Idaho. Party wishes to 
communicate i*'ith San Francisco wholesalers or 
importers of READY-MADE SILK GARMENTS 
for ladies. 

D-1971 — Twin Falls. Idaho. Brokerage company 
desires to get in touch with San Francisco firms 
contemplating establishing a branch office in Twin 
Falls. 

D-1972— New York, N. Y. Manufacturers of 
HAIR ORNAMENTS and CELLULOID NOVEL- 
TIES for variety stores and chain stores counters, 
are desirous of appointing an agent for San Fran- 
[ continued on page 20 ) 









PROTECT YOUR 

TRADE MARKS 






Mida's Pacific Coast Trade Mark Bareau 

Affiliated with MIDAS. Incorporated 

Chicago. III. WashloSton. D. C. 

CompletcRecords todateof all U.S. Patent 

Office Rettlstratlona and Copyrights. 

Attorney Associates throughout the world. 

Have any of your Trade Marks expired } 

Are you using a trade mark or trade 

ioTCStlgated? If BO. can same be regis- 
tered? Is it being Infringed? Hart you 
had the records searched? Security 
costs but little. Send for literature. 
RAPID — RELIABLE — REASONABLE 
112 Market Street San Francisco 
Telephone Sutter 3199 

1 



MITSUI & 
COMPANY 

LIMITED 

(Mitsui Bussan Kalsha. Ltd.) 

Cable Address: "MITSUf 

GENERAL IMPORTERS 

EXPORTERS 

Coal Suppliers Ship Operators 

Shipowners Ship Builders 

Etc., Etc., Etc. 
Head Office: TOKIO, JAPAN 



Other Branches — New York, Londoo, 

Seattle, Portland, Lyons. Hamburg 

and all other Important corners 

of the world 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRU.AJRY 10, 1926 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 



C^ ' 

A new firm entering a new territory must mak 
new friends, and eetabliabed firms have a chance of, 
obtaining a certain amount of businesB from 
somen if "tipped off" at the proper time. Thia 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themaelvea without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce. Main Floor. Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Eeamy 112. 

A daily service available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m., at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes 

Architect — Arthur S. Bugbee, 22 Montgomery to 
58 Sutter. 

Automotive — Automobile Rotary Lift Co., 
Rial to BIdg. 

Auto Repairing — San Bruno Auto Repair Shop, 
2457 San Bruno; N. A. Engblom. 2255 Bush to 1755 
O'Farrell; A. E. Jones, 1143 Post. 

Auto Supplies — Western Auto Supply Co., branch 
37 Market. 



WANTED -Salesman 

Thorough knowledge pipe, 
fitting and valve business. 
State experience. Address Box 
320, San Francisco Business 



PHOTOSTAT COPIES 



Made from Letiers. Legal Doct 

ments, Maps. Blueprints, etc. 

Personal confidential service 

Standard Photoprint Company 

142 Sansome Street Sutter 1675 



Q) 



ID 



"MANY COPY" Carbon 

Li^t 4-lb. welftht, in black, blue, 
or purple, 8H x 13, per 100 sheets 

42 Grades Carbons and Ribbons. 

Moderate prices. Get samples. 



$2.33 



C. H. MILLER CO., 717 Market St. 



Phone Douglas 1898 



OFFICE HELP 



PHONE 

KEARNY 

2800 

67 SUTTER ST. 




K) 

Builders — McKiUop Bros., 235 Montgomery to 
46 Kearny, 

Candy— Frank Delporta. 865 Valencia. 

Cigars — H. Bercovich Cigar Co., branch 21st and 
Mission. 

Construction — Western Concrete Co., 1648 
Leavenworth. 

Dairy Goods — V. M. Pometta, 3274 Sacramento 
to 249S Fillmore. 

Dental Supplies — Liberty Dental Supply Co., 
Liberty Bank Bldg. 

Dolls— Travertina Art Co., 824 Florida. 

Drapery Hardware — Kroder & Reubel Co., 938 
Mission. 

Drugs — Forest Hill Pharmacy. 400 Dewey. 

Electrical Work— Shipman & Lauer (1318 Polk), 
343 4th. 

Engineers — Howe & Price, Margin Bldg. ; South- 
western Engineering Corp. (R. L. Hemingway, J. 
R. Cravath), Call Bldg. 

Felt Products— Pacific Statea Felt & Mfg. Co., 
60 Natoma. 

Furriers — Goldberg A Barnett, 406 Sutter. 

Grocer— Pat Buckley. 2681 21st to 198 CoUing- 

Importers — Connell Bros. Co., American Bank 
Bldg. to 351 California. 

Insurance — F. k. Corbusier and Richard Lockey, 
369 Pine to 433 California. 

Investments — E. R. Gundelfinger, Inc., 486 
Cahfornia. 

Leases — New tenant, 224 Kearny. 

Lumber — Kent Lumber Co., Chancery Bldg. to 
Sheldon Bldg. 

Manufacturers' Agents — H. F. Prien & Co., 417 
Market to Sheldon Bldg. 

Merchandise Brokers — Morris-Nellis Co., 230 
California to Newhall Bldg. 

Novelties— Barren's Trick & Novelty Shop. 962 
Market. 

Oculist — Dr. Percival Dolman. Flood Bldg. to 
490 Post. 

Organizations — San Francisco Machinery Dealers 
Assn., 230 California to 217 Front. 

Plumbing— J. Camp & Co.. 218 Grove to 1093 
Natoma. 

Publishers — Walker's Manuel of California 
Securities. Inc.. 519 California to 576 Sacramento. 

Radio — Marina Radio & Electrical Co.. 2241 
Chestnut. 

Real Estate— Valencia Realty Co. (B. S. Schless- 
singer. T. O. Treanor). 575 Valencia: Forrest & 
Layers. 515 Valencia St.; Rosenberg Realty Co., 
1305 dolden Gate Ave.; Sam Ephron. 2521 Taraval. 

Restaurant — Specialty Shop, 411 Montgomery to 
566 California. March 1 : Fred's Coffee Shop, to 346 
Bush ; Sandwich Lunch. 258 Kearny. 

Roofing— Perry Roofing Co., 1037 Golden Gate 
Ave. to 1496 Turk. 

Sand— D. T. Rogers Sales Co. (white, Silica). 
1186 Howard to 631 2d. 

Scalp Specialists — Hair-A-Gain Co.. 177 Post. 

Sheet Metal Works — Martin Welch. 40 Lizzie to 
1414 Valencia. 

» Sport Wear— May G. Walsh. 251 Post to new 
stores in St. Francis Hotel Bldg.. when finished. 

Taxidermists — Heist's Studio of Taxidermy. 561 
Valencia. 

Traffic Experts— H. F. Gittings (Wholesale 
Traffic .\ssn.). 22 Battery to 461 Market. 

Vacuum Cleanera — The Hoover Co.. district 
offices 696 Geary to 626 Golden Gate Ave. 

Miscellaneous — Meneley-Diederich Co.. Inc.. 
Call Bldg.; Servel Corp.. 447 Sutter. 



Twin Falls, Idaho, Plans 
Railroad Celebration 

The completion by the Union Pa- 
cific Railroad Company of a Kne be- 
tween Rogerson, Idaho, and Wells, 



Nevada, bringing the vast Snake 
River basin of southern Idaho three 
hundred miles nearer to San Fran- 
cisco, will be dedicated February 15, 
and the Pacific Northwest, notably 
Twin Falls, is going to give emphasis 
to the event, according to advices 
received by the traffic department 
of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. 

Twin Falls business men are going 
to Wells in a special train and, after 
participating in the dedicatory exer- 
cises, return to Twin Falls, where 
they will hold a celebratory banquet. 



ILLUSTRATE 

yowr Product 
in use 

7hat which the eye sees 
the mind best comprehends 

WE OFFER A COMPLETE 
ART SERVICE INCLUDING 

PHOTO-RETOUCHING. 
ILLUSTRATIVE PHOTOGRAPHS 
THAT HAVE 5ALESVALUE 



Jk 



(3~>J-_ 



LOUISA.LAUCK 

Company 



-M''^^ 




SAX KRANCLSCO BUSINKSS. FKBHUARY 10. 1926 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 

[ coDtiDUcd from p&ge 24 ] 
cisco and vicinity. Kindly Htat« exx>cnence, com- 
miMion desired and give referenreft. 

D-1973— New York. N. Y. Textile works are 
very dcatrous of appointing a suitable agent to 
handle the aalc of their line of SCRUB and SCOUR- 
ING CLOTHS, on a commiasion or agency baai«. 

D-1974 — Chicago. Illinoia. Firm in a position to 
make BANANA FLOUR wi«bf« to communicate 
with intercjtcd San Francisco fruit companies. 

D-197& — Moscow, Kansaa. Large grower of 
SHED^URED BROOM CORN, an well aa a 
dealer in nil grades, n-iahes to get in touch with 
buyers of this commodity. 

D-1976 — San Francisco, Calif. Firm is in a posi- 
tion to supply manufacturers of crown* for bottles 
VARIOUS SIZES OF PARAFFIN and NON- 
PARAFFIN CORK DISCS. 

D-1977 — San Francisco. Calif. A reliable man 
seeks connectionfi nith local 6rms as outjude or 
inside man in the following lines: MEN'S CLOTH- 
ING. GENTS' FURNISHINGS, NECKWEAR. 
MEN'S SHOES and HOSIERY. 

D- 1 97S— Berkeley, Calif. Reliable man. 35. «-ith 
executive and sales experience, wants local con- 
nection. Good personality and education. Not 
afraid of long hours and hard work. 

D-1979 — Nashville. Tenn. Manufacturers of 
RADIOS and AUTO LAMPS desire to appoint a 
suitable agent in San Francisco and surrounding 
territory. 



W. A. HALSTED. President 
PERCY L. HENDfcR.SON, Vice-President 

Tht- Old Firm 

H AUSTED «& CO. 



1 22 SUTTER STREET 

Telephone Franklin 123 



D-1 980— Phoenix. Arixona. Manufacturers' 
agents are desirous of securing representation io 
Arizona for articles manufactured in California that 
are steady selling and repeat t>'pe. Want articles 
that sell direct to business houses. Desire to com- 
municate directly with manufacturers! who have no. 
or unnatisfactory, representation in Arizona. 

D-198I— I>js Angele*. California. Manufacturers 
of an AUTO.MOBILE POLISH wish to communi- 
cate nith a firm or individual interested in handling 
the sale of this arriclc in San Francisco or the bay 

Specifications Available 

The following specifications covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

Bids arc invited for the purchase from the 
United Slates Government of 76 quarts of Jasmine 
Combined Copjing Ink. Bids are to be submitted 
to the Chief. Supply Section. U. S. Veterans' 
Bureau, Rwm 424. UHli Market Street. San Fran- 
cisco, and will be opened Februar>- 15, 1926. 

Bids are invited by the U. S. Veterans Bureau, 
791 Arlington Building. Washington. D. C, for 
supplying red wood water tanks at V. S. Veterans' 
Hospital No. 24, Palo Alto. California. Bids n-ill be 
opened March 2, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver^ 
ing to the U. S. Engineers, Rio Vista. California, 
lumber. Bids arc to be submitted to the U. S. 
Engineer Office, Second District, 85 Second Street, 
San Francisco, and will be opened February 15, 
1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, and deliver- 
ing at .\rmy Transport Wharf. Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, Calif., for use on U. S. .\rmy Transports, 
subsistence supplies. Bids arc to be submitted to 
the Quartermaster Supply Officer, Fort Mason, San 
FrancLnco, and will bo opened February 15, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, and deliver- 
ing at Posts on or about March 20, 1926, subsist- 
ence supplies. Bids arc to be submitted to the 



Quartermaster Supply Officer, Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, California, and will be opened February 

18, 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port) Canal Zone, 
Isthmus of Panama, with cable, transformers, steel 
desks, steel book-case, steel lockers, mattress filling 
machine, cotton opener machine, window glass, 
tagboard. bristolboard, and bond paper. Bids are 
to be submitted to the General Purchasing Officer 
of the Panama Canal, Washington, D. C, and will 
be opened Februar>' 19. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, and deliver- 
ing to the U. S. Engineers, Rio Vista. Cahfornia, 
coal. Bids are to be submitted to the District 
Engineer, 85 Second Street, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia, and will be opened Februao' 16, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, and deliver- 
ing at San Francisco, on or about March 20, 1926, 
for shipment to Panama. Canal Zone, subsistence 
supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the Quartei^ 
master Supply Officer, Fort Mason. San Francisco, 
and will be opened February 20. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone. Isthmus of Panama, n-ilh Diesel engines. 
Bids are to be submitted to the General Purchasing 
Officer of the Panama Canal, Washington, D. C, 
and will be opened Februarj- 23, 1926. 

For furnishing the Alaska Railroad, and deliver- 
ing on Pier in Seattle, Washington, with various 
machines and hardware supplier. Bids are to be 
submitted to the General Purcliasing Agent of the 
Alaska Railroad, Seattle, Washington, and will be 
opened February 18. 1926. 

For furnishing the Alaska Railroad, and deliver- 
ing on Pier in Seattle. Washington. 30,000 7-inch by 
9-inch tie plates. Bids are to be submitted to the 
General Purchasing Agent of The Alaska Railroad, 
Seattle, Washington, and will be opened February 

19, 1926. 



Place Your Order Today for Space in 
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

Trade Directory 

This publication, with commodity classifications, will serve as a BUSINESS GUIDE in both 
domestic and foreign trade. It will be in use by thousands of business men locally, nationally and 
internationally. It will be published APRIL 14. 

YEAR BOOK ORDER 



page advertising to be run in 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
465 California Street 
Please enter our order for 

'^' I Sfrectory'sTtions } °f y°- YEAR BOOK edition. April 14. 1926. 

Please list our name in bold face type, for which we will pay one dollar extra. 

Please enter our order for additional copies at $2.30 each (plus postage). 

Firm 

By 

Address . , 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. FEBRUARY 10, 1926 



Your ford 

DEALER IS RIGHT— 

"^ great car and zaorth 
giving the best of care \ 




Your pride in the new Ford's improved appear- 
ance will make you WANT to give it the best 
of care. 

Zerolene "F" for Fords reaches those crucial 
points requiring lubrication — the wrist-pin bear- 
ings and upper halt ot the cylinder walls so often 
"oil-starved" it the right oil isn't used. 

It not only costs less than mosi other Ford oils 
but it lubricates better! 

Your Ford — new model or old — is an A-i trans- 
portation investment. Protect your investment by 
using Zerolene "F" for Fords. Give YOUR 
FORD the BEST of care! 

STAXD.\RD on. COMPANY 

(c A r. I FOR XI a) 



ZEROLENEVFOH FORD: 





'HK BRST ADVERTISINt 
SERVICK IS THAT 
WHICH ACCOM PLISHKs 



THE MOST SALES FOR THE 
FEWEST ADVERTISING DOLLARS 



H. K. McCANN COMPANY 

SAN FRANC15CO LOS ANGELES 

NEW YORK CLEVELAND CHICAGO 

PtNVI R MONTREAL 

TORONTO 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FILE COPY 

INFORMATJON mfttfAif 



BUSINESS 

c^ ♦o 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volwne XII 



FKRHUARY 17, 1926 



INDUSTRY "BEGINS at HOME" 



Civic Expansion 
is Determined by 
Local Initiative, 
Expert Declares 



.& 



NDUSTRIAL expansion 
in a community must 
li i\ !■ its inception within 
till' community and be 
independent of outside 
sources, according to C'olvin B. 
Brown, head of the organization 
service bureau of the I'nitod States 
C'hamlier of Commerce. Mr. Brown 
is touring the country as the Na- 
tional Chamber's "contact man"and 
is to visit more than 20 chambers of 
commerce in this state. He was 
guest at a luncheon in the Commer- 
cial Club this week attended by ex- 
ecutive officers and staff members of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

"The growth of a city's indu.strial 
life," he said, "generally is deter- 
mined by its origin. I do not mean 
by this that a city should not be on 
the alert to induce so-called 'out- 
side' industries to locate in the city, 
but, fundamentally, when you speak 
of a city's industrial expansion you 
are i-eferi'ing to those industries 
which owe their existence to local en- 
terprise and initiative.". 

The one positive medium through 
wliich a city can develop all its attri- 
butes, according to Mr. Brown, is a 
chamber of commerce. Mr. Brown 
said he defined a chamber of com- 
merce as a big organization of busi- 
ness men who believe in the purposes 
of the chamber and who are united 



''San Francisco FirSt'' 



Bv C. Iv Ts 



IK, McnilnMslii|> Uii 



Sup|)osc you were left an iiu'ome of $100.00 a week fnr life? Where would 
\ oil live? 

A man who had this very thing happen to him wrote to the Editor of the 
Biisliiii f'lirst. "What city in all the world," he a.sked, "offers the beist advan- 
tages ill the way of economy of living coupled with the interesting and enjoyalile 
thiiiRs of life?" 

Here i.s the way P. D. King, world traveler and noted writer, sums it up, 
after carefully analyzing them all: 

"SAN FRANCI.SCO FIRST, Genoa second, and Shanghai third, 

for the man with .$100.00 a week, who is seeking a place where life at 

its fullest might be found." 

And that goes for the man who makes $30.00 a week, or $1000.00 a week 
(if anv one makes that much monev)— SAN FRANCISPO FIRST. 

Now lcf.« come down In l.r:l:-« tnrk=; This C'IkitoIht of f'nnimcrre is work- 
iliK must Mill I V f.ir S \\ fl; \ \( ' IS( 'l I IIKST ,n,,l IImt.- nrr -nil :i IV« .ill/,'!!, 

IlidillKlllll HriOMl-i- IHil \.I in.liii.r- \|ri, ulin lv;,ll\ 111 llirll lir.'irl- 1 « lliiil 

this ('h.-lllllirr of Culnliirlr,. is llir UTr.it .■liMniiK hnllsr U.T ^AS kl! .\ .\( ' I .^1 '( I 

FIRST - the most powerful factor in ilevclopmeni and prosiiprity. 

Of course, you are a member, but think a moment — are all of your business 
associates members? As your bit for SAN FRANCISCO FIRST, won't you 
fill in this coupon and mail it? 

Membership DeparlmenI, 
San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, 
Sun Franrlsni, Calif. 
If the folUnnnn arc I 



Smi 



hers Iheij should he: 



Signed.. 



m the common purpose of furthering 
the best interests of the city in which 
they live. 

"A chamber of commerce, " he de- 
clared, "is the one competent and 
effective factor in progressive civic 
endeavor. Membership in a cham- 
ber of commerce is tangible proof 
that the individual or firm member 
is interested actively in the welfare 
of the community; it is an emblem 
of good citizen.ship." 



6,182 Bales of Cotton from 
Madera County 

Madera County's contribution to 
the world's supply of cotton this year 
amounts, up to February 1.5, to 
6,182 bales, the amount handled by 
the county's four gins. This cotton 
has been of high quality and has 
brought a good price to growers. 
Some growers have not yet finished 
picking, having been delayed by 
foggy weather, and the total will 
probably reach about 6,500 bales. 



vVN KrjANCISCO Bl SINKSS, I-KKKrAHV 17. l!Wi 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Publilhed WCTkl> tjy (he San Francisco Chamber of 
Comm^TCt. 205 M«rchanu Exchange. Telephooe 
Kearoy 112. Subscnplion. H a year Entered aa 
•eoon4l-eIa» matter July 2. t920,atthe Poetoffice. San 
Franciaoo, California, under the act of March 3. 1879. 



Give S. F. Due Rank 
in Industry Census 

San Kranoisco manufacturers arp 
urged ti) co-dperatp in piving this 
city the representative showing to 
which it is entitled in an industrial 
survey ni>w being made by the C!ov- 
ernment. in an appeal issued b3' 
I.. M. Hyslop. of the Industrial De- 
partment of the San Francisco 
( "hamber of ( 'omnierce. Hyslop has 
l)een reapixiinted by the United 
States Department of Commerce at 
Washington as special agent of the 
Bureau of Census. 

The Bureau of Census now is en- 
gaged in collecting the data for the 
biennial ccn.sus of manufacturers, 
covering industrial operations dur- 
ing 1925. 

"Manufacturing concerns repre- 
sented in the government ceasus 
should aid in putting San Francisco 
in the rank it is entitled to among 
the manufacturing cities of the 
world." Hyslop declared. 

"All manufacturers should fill out 
and return their census schedules 
immediately. The first cities to 
complete their returns will he ac- 
corded a great deal of publicity." 

The schetlules or (|uestionnaires 
have been mailed to all local manu- 
facturers. Manufacturers who have 
not received their schedules can ob- 
tain them and whatever infonnr- 
tion is desired from Hyslop in his 
office at the Chamber of Commerce. 
Room 20.1. Merchants Exchange 
Building. 



FOREIGN TRADE GROWS 
San Francfco's foreign trwdp la.>it year amounted 
to S380.389.IS8, an inrrpa»e of S60..V12.o08 over the 
preceding year. Some idea of the rapid expansion 
of thi? port's foreign trade is disclosed by the 
following fieun«: 

192-1 $319,8^,680 

1923 327.598,210 

1922 315,915,870 

1921 226,625.4(M 

1914 134.779.309 



Foreign TRADE TIPS D 



omesttc 



MARINE BUREAU BUSY 
The Marine Departincnl of the San FraDcisco 
Chamber of Commerce during 1925 reported 6.655 
vessels, and delivered 2,25S docking orders to in- 
bound vessels without a single error being made and 
without one single complaint being registered. 
Aside from ite many other activities the department 
is receiving approximately 500 telephone calls everj* 



I FrancL>wyj Chamber uf Comn 



04 

rc.rt*'* — l.inciiln, NrbrSfika. Itoauly speriallicM and 
IvartHT Kuppliv?< ronipany are in the market for 
IMK>KTEn SILK CONK .SPtlNGKS. Would 
upprreiatr liearina from Sttn Krauriaeo Hupplien of 
thiK arlirlr 

f»9»9— Shangluii. China American iniporler. 
with estabtiithed buninev in China, desiree an aBK»- 
ciate in the Cnited Statu lo cu-openite an buyer 
anil !share in the bwrtneiwi. He w now in San 
Francisco 

lOOOU— Iam> Aogele*. Calif Milling company de- 
sir«« to communicate «~ith direct impnrterv of LIX- 
.•*EEII MEAL and COPRA MEAL. 

lOOOI— St I^ui^i. Mo Firm if in the market for 
apprnximately ten fhouMmJ >'ardii of JAPANESE 
PANAMA PeHtn-nirlitvt pr«w)l>le delivery 

\0002~\Attv\on. England Eetablif>hed manu- 
facturers' reprejwntative wislien lo act aA Kile Rcllinit 
agent in the United Kingdom, arnl pooeibb' in the 
European marketa. for a I'nited States manu- 
facturer of products for r«ady itale. mch a« artichw 
Uit domesitic or general cver>*dBy uite. Will fumiAli 
refercocvs. 

lOOa?— Havana. Cuba. t:etublii<>hefl commiiwion 
merchant demres to obtain reprewntalion« for the 
sale, in Havana, of FOOD PR( il>rCTS of all kind*. 

I00(>4— Havana. Cuba MiuiursrturerM' agents 
de»ire to e^tablinh connections with .Sun Francif>co 
packerr. of CANNED FRIITS AND VECJE- 
T.ABLES, particularly, peaches, pcarw and aspar- 
agus: also with producers or jobbers of BEAX.S. ff>r 
which product* there is a good niarkel in Cuba. 

lUOOo— Nuevitas. Cuba. Firm i» very desirous of 
getting in touch with California exp«>rten> of 
TOMATOES. 

10006 — AlamoA, Mexico Owner of a process of 
manufacturing FLAMELESS PINE Gl'M or 
RESIN, from waste maleriab. at exceptionally low 
production cart, dcaim to interest American capital 
in efitabliNhing a plant for the manufacture of thi9 
commodity in the United State?-. Procc«» and op- 
eration of plant is itiraplc. 

10O07— Buenfw Aires. Argentine. Supplier of 
guaranteed machim^^leaned BIRD SEED, con- 
taining not more titan -1 per cent foreign matter, is 
in a position to quote lowest prices on this com- 
modity to San Francisco importers. 

lOOOS— Venice. Italy. Established firm offers its 
ser\'iccs to San Francisco importcn< of Italian 
products. They have an excellent oi^anization 
covering Italy and the principal cilicw of Europe. 

10000— Trieste. Itab-. Exporters of MUSTARD 
and DRIED MUSHROOMS wish to establish 
bu^ness connections with large San Francisco im- 
porters of thcsie commodities. 

10010 — Barcelona. Spain. Firm is verj' desirous 
of representing a California exporter of PRUNES 
in Barcelona. - . 

1001 1 — Antwerp, Belgium. Wholesale DL\- 
MOXD manufacturer, in a position to ship at lowest 
market prices, wishes to communicate with in- 
terested importers of these stones. 

10012 — Solingen, Germany. German manu- 
facturer of HAIR CLIPPERS wishes icprtsenta- 
lives in San Francisco. 

10013 — \'ohwinkel. C*rniany. German manu- 
facturer of TEXTILE MACHINERY wants repre- 
sentative in California. 

10014 — Hamburg. Germany. Party wants to 
represent California exporter of FRl IT in Ger- 
many and also wants to act as buyer for importers 
of CHEMICALS and FERTILIZER. 

10015 — Leipzig. Germany. German manufac^ 
turer of FL.\VORING EXTRACTS. E.SSENTIAL 
OILS. etc.. wants representative in San FrancLero. 



"4^ 



10CI6~Hanitmrg. (;<Tnian> lmp<jrt<-r of canm-<l 
fish dmirea Ut c«tniniunieate wHth California packers 
and exporten. of SARDINES IN TttMATiJ 
SAUCE, packed in oval tin.- 

10017 — Hamburg. Germany E>ttablished coni- 
mitMon agent wixheH to represent a California 
packer or exp»iner of PRUNES 

lOOIK— I)n-j«len. Gerniany. Ijrge manufact- 
urers of C« IMPRESSED ASBESTOS FIBRE H. P 
STEAM JOINTING wish to esublish a market for 
their producta in San FrmDci«co. 

IOOI»~Kobe. Japan. Exportera of BUTTONS 
and BRUSHES ^rish to commuoieate with inter- 
ested importer* of the«e products. 

10020 -(>»aka. Japan. Member of an American 
Brm entablislied in Ja[Hin, now in the United States. 
dc&ireetorepresent American TCXJL. HARDWARE 
and LIGHT M.\CHINERV manufacturers in the 
Japanese markets. 

10021 — Osaka, Japan. Importcn and wholesale 
dealeni in t>-pem-riter«. office equipment, etc., are 
desirous of importing second hand and rebuilt 
NATIONAL CASH REGISTERS. 

10022— Osaka. Japan. M^nufacturm and ex- 
porters of IMITATION PEARIJ! wish to establish 
business connection!* with .San Francisco importers 
of these pearb>. 

1002;*— Tokyo, Japan. Firm is in U»e market for 
.SECOND HAND BUTTONS of all kiods; also 
TANNED LEATHER SCRAPS. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-19S2— Del Rio. Texas. Well recommended 
drug firm, improving and enlarging their store, are 
in the market for DRUG^and kindred linev. 

D-1983— Navajo. Arizona. Party is in the mar- 
ket for WOOL BAGS and desires to communicate 
directly with San Francisco manufacturers. 

D-19S4— Crows Ijinding. Calif. Firm will soon 
bcin the market for twenty tonsofHALFGROUND 
SALT for hay curing punMiFcs. and desire* to com- 
municate with wholesalers of this commodity. 

D-I9S5— Houston, Texas- Party wishes to com- 
municate with San Francisco firms handling all 
kinds of SOlVENIItS. such as are sold at 
and mountain resorts. 

D-19S6— Calexico. Calif. Established 
sion agents wish to represent San Francisco manu- 
facturers. 

D-19S7 — New York, N. Y. Firm having process 
for fireprooBng and drying lumber desire to com- 
municate with a progressive San Francisco lumber 
man who would be interested in equipping a mill for 
fireproofine and drying lumber to have the exclusix'e 
right to use their process in this territor>-. 

D-1988 — .Salt Lake City. Utah. Party desires to 
represent a San Francisco manufacturer of 
CANDIES, particularly NOVELTIES AND 
PENNY CANDIES, in Salt Lake City and vicinity. 

D- 1989— Los Angeles. Calif. EstablishodCANDV 
manufacturers desire lo establish a branch store in 
San Francisco, or desire to sell their business, trade 
mark and formulas to the proper San Francisco 
fij-mor indixndual. 

D-1990— New York. X. Y. Finance corporation 
desires to communicate with San Francisco corpora- 
tions desirous of raising additional capital through 
the sale of their securities. 

D-1991 — San Antonio. Texas. Mercantile brok- 
erage firm, covering the San Antonio trade territory. 
wishes to represent San Francisco industries looking 
for an outlet for their products in Texas. They arc- 
particularly interested in grocery lines. 



8AX FRA\CISC<» BISIXESS. FEBRrAUY 17, 1926 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 



c-*- 

A new 6rm entering a new territory' must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a ceriain amount of business from newr 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions- 
Business men can enhance the value of this ser\'- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department. Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor. Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A daily ser\ice available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a, m., at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes. 



Adiusters — W. G. Da%-is (insurance). Russ Bldg. 
to 660 Market; Western .adjustment & Appraisal 
Co . 4KG California. 

Advertismg— Ira Zalinger. 90 Eddy. 

Advertising Maps—The W. C Eubank Co., 60,5 
Markfl 

Ammoma — Michigan Ammonia Works (H. F. 
rriciL * C, . Rep.). Traders Bklg. to Sheldon Bldg. 

Aprons — Apron & .Smock Shop, 35 Montgomery 
to Ifi.'! Sutter. 

Architects — T- L. Pftueger and J. R. Miller, .35 
Montgomery to Hobart Bldg. 

.Artist— Fred Glauser (commercial). .576 Sacra- 

Attoraeys — Encenio Bianchi. 163 Sutter to 235 
Montgomery: Carroll McXear, Humb-.ldt Bank 
Hide to Alaska Commercial Bldg : W A Boekel. 
2(«l Bu,.h to 233 Sansome: Warren H. Pillsbury. to 
-Mills Bldg. 

Auto Supplies — Levins .\uto Supply Co., opening 
\ an .\ess Ave and Market. 

Badges Etc — IrvtiK & Jachens, 1027 Market to 



Miasi 



Bags and Bagging— I.. L- Levy. 68 Post to 
M.rrha-it, Exchange Bldg. 

Bakeries— Abram«on's Bakery. ! 100 McAllBter: 
Ni-w business. 230.* Mission. 

Barbers — Werner Bros, to 121 Montgomery. 

Beauty Parlors — Cit.v of ParLs opening Hotel 
<li(l. (;i-ar\ .iml Taylor; .Manx Hotel Beauty Shop, 
225 P.,w.-M 

Beveraoes — Orange Products Co., 225 Leaven- 
worth. 

Brass Goods— Golden Gate Bra's Mfg. Co., Inc. 
<0. W. Herber, Albert Goodman and Harry Rea- 
side), 12.39 .Sutler to 259 2d. 

Brokers— Bowers & Co.. 1060 Bryant: .Arthur 
Boyles. Grant Bldg.; Newman Bros., Inc., Insurance 
Exchange Bldg: Ellis .1 Levy Co.. 68 Post to Mer- 
chants Exchange Bldg.; Harold Naehlrieb, 112 
Mark.t- 

Building Materials — Celite Products Co. (.\ngeIo 
CiossMian, Mgr . M.-.nadnock Bldg. to 140 Spear. 

Candy— riin.. Paki. 4 Co., 13C1 Market: Wm. 
.Schmidt. -171 HarriM.n 

Canned Goods — Santa Cruz Fruit Packing Co., 
25 Calilonua 

Chemicals — Central Chemical Products Co., 
basement, Monadnock Bldg. 

Cigars— Harry L. Tubbs, 2551 Mission: The 
Cigar Box. :i46 Bush: Dimniick Cigar Co.. 112 
Market- 
Cleaners— Adams A Penn, 2144 Clement: Wald's 
Cleuiiiai! i- Dyeing Co.. 70 Turk- 
Cloaks and Suits— Chringer Co., 130 Sutter. 

Clothing— Daniel Marks (used), 1126 to 1160 
Uolden Gale Ave-: David S, Mittelman (1248 
OoUleii Gate Ave). 957 Webster, 



hP 

Cloth Uhels— Iniversal Label Weaving Co 

(Xew Vorki. Hansford Blk. 
Contractors- R. B. Macdonald 4 Co. 7C3 

Market to 140 .Spear. 
Corned Meats — Theisen & Kaiser. 221 I4th to 

2,S5 6tli- 

Cotton Goods— Victor Ulman (Standard Mills, 

Inc I. .-,.VI -\Ii.^,ion to 53 Fremont- 
Dental Laboratories — L. G. Kettenburg and F. 

J Crawford. 240 Stockton. 

DenUl Supplies — S. F. Dental Supply Co., 94S 

.Market. 

Dentist— Dr. A. M- Appelbaum, 1990 Sutter. 
Diamonds— .1- H- .\mes. Whitney Bldg. 
Draying- Kan.'iom 4 Co.. 44 to 61 Xatoma. 
Dresses— Jos. T. and W B. Malouf, 130 Kcarny. 
Dry Goods— O'Keeffe & Co. (wholesale). 7SS 

MLwion. 

Electrical— J- L. Taix, 223 9th; Keystone Elec- 
tric Co-, 70S Mission: Electric Supply Co., 1063 

Howard- 
Engineers — Engineering Service Corp. ami H W. 

Carkon (consu'ting). 351 California to Flatiron 

Bldg ; Paul C Berkefeld (mining). Chancery Bldg- 

to Mills Bldg. 
Express and Drayage — Lark Transfer Co., 476 

Eddy- 
Finance— Pacific States Finance Corp. 1241 

\an X»« Ave- 
Forest Expert — J. H. Tucker, 681 Market. 
Furniture — De Luxe Upholstering Co.. ,327 

Hayes to 394 Hayes: Roamers Supp1.v Co. (beds). 

2880 25th to 1450 Army. 

Puis- M. Strauss & Co., 821 Market to 259 

Grain— Herbert Jones 4 Bro., 210 California to 
Kohl Bldg. 

Grocers— R P Hendrickson, 6301 Geary: A. L. 
Wallace. 699 Webster: Jenny Wren Stores, Inc., 
1527 Fillmore; Piggly Wiggly, Hyde and Bush, soon; 
V. Lazzarini, 1800 Mason. 

Hardware— Inion Hardware Co., 2086 Inion 

Hosiery— Noe-Equl Textile Mills. Inc.. 406 
Cieary to S21 Market. 

House Movers — Hatch & Swanson, 180 Jessie. 

Importers — .-Vndersou Cameron & Co.. 560 Sacra- 
Information Bureaus — Hawaii Tourist Bureau. 
681 Market to 451 Montgomery. 

Inks— Jasmine Ink. 200 Da\TS. 

Insurance — .\ndrew J Galtigher Co.. Call Bldg- 
to Grant Bldg : James W- Arott. Ltd.. 315 Mont- 
gomery: West American Insurance Co . 1336 to 
1431 Van .Vess .\ve.: San Francisco Insurance Serv- 
ice Co., Ill Sansome. 

Investments — W. M. Kosenblum, 155 Montgom- 
ery: G. W- Keene, Hewes Bldg- 

Laboratories — National Canners .Assn. (Research 
Laboratories). 322 Battery. 

Ladies* Apparel — New business opening 795 
Market. 

Leases— .New tenant. 430 Powell, soon. 

Lighting Fixtures-Edwin F- Guth Co- (St- Louis 
Mo). .5.55 Bush. 

Linen Goods — L. P. Thomson (John C. Sleater 4 
Co. and .McCruni. Wataon 4 -Mercer). Commercial 
Bldg. to Pacific Bldg 

Machinery- H- H Plummer. Monadnock Bldg. 
to Traders Bldg 

Manufacturers' Agents — Fay and .Suchy Co-. 
.5.340 Geary: Norman P- Shacker. Commercial Bldg- 
to 742 .Market; W. T- Pidwell Co-. 112 .Market to 
Traders Bldg-: W- G- Abbott, 24 California. 

Manure Spreader — A. Starbuck (The New Idea 
Sprrader Co I. 200 Da\TS. 

Merchandise Brokers — Samuel & McCreadie. 
274 Spear to 946 Howard. 

Millinery — Mabel LaDurig. 625 Post. 

Mining — United Trinity Mines. Chancery Bldg 
to I12.Steuart 

Moving and Hauling— J. Clausen A Co . 643 
.McAIILster, 

Notary Public— Martha .Sanders 1033 Franklin 
to 1.50(1 I'olk 



Organizations^Soutbern Promotion Assd.'(.Aii<I- 
.Irow J Galkfclien. Call Bldg. to Grant BJda- 

Oyster Stands -Golden Gate Oyster Cii. (696 
Mission I. 475 Pinc- 

Painters and Decorators — .Specks 4 Miser, 3822 
19th- 

Paints — Metaiized Lacquer Corp-; 20,34 Van 
Ness -Ave- ; .\risto Painting Co., to 169 Hltss. 

Paints and Oils — A. I.. Greene, to ISlli and 
Potrero. • 

Paint Spray Machines — Dunn Paint Machine 



Co.. 



I Ru 



Plate and Window Glass — Mr- Benoff opening 
200 Davis- 
Plumber— Geo- A. Wara. 6140 Geary. 

Printing — Ferrari Printing Co., 612 Sacramento. 

Publicity — Fred S. McWilliaras. Monadnock 
Bldg. 

Publishers— Pacific Shipper (Geo. E. Martin), 
Dollar Bldg. 

Radio— Pioneer Radio Shop (Chas. S. Cohn), 
1700 Polk. 

Real Estate— R E. Wood 4 Co . to 105 .Vlont- 
gomery: Thomas Magee 4 Sons, 135 Sutter to 70 
Post: J. L- Mesple and L. G. Lauray, 110 Sutter; 
F- W Mosher, 381 Bush; Fred Braun Co-, 510 
Valencia to 518 Valencia. March 1: T. H. Anthony. 
124 .Mason: M- Fisher 4 Son, Pacific Bldg- to .MilU 
Bldg-; Standard Realty Co-. 1641 Taraval; Chas. 
J. GrUez Co.. 41 Sutter; R. C. Harrison. .32 Mont- 
gomery to 58 Sutter; Brockway-Tahoe- Vista Corp.. 
693 Sutter; M- Laurie 4 Co., 1305 Golden Gate 
Ave to 1 1 16 Fillmore: Investment Properties Corp.. 
1.55 Montgomery. 

Reed and Rattan Work — Hughes Rattan Co., to 
new factory, 16.59 Market- 
Restaurants — Fred's Coffee 4 Lunch House, to 
.344 Bu.>li: Hour.. Dining Room. 519 Clement- 
Road Equipment — Kennedy Dump Truck Co-. 
388 5th: He:.sler Locomotive Works, Rialto Bldg. 
to 681 Markrt- 

Roofing— Hibcrnia Roofing Co.. 995 Folsoni- 

Roofing and Flooring— Robt- F. Smith, 433 
Clementina to 31 Hubbell- 

Shipping and Limiber — C. .\- Hooper 4 Co- 1 W, 
E- Creed). 351 California to .Matson Bldg. 

Signs— E. F Twomey Co., 690 Market: Gold- 
berg Electric Awning Sign Co.. 242 Sutter. 

Smoked Pish— H. Bedey, 768 Foerster. 

Stationery— Harry Cohn (2101 Fillmore), I46I 
Polk. 

Tailors — Delson 4 Mannes (vest makers), 690 
Market: T. W. Duncan (coat maker), 617 Mont- 
gomer>-; Louis Klein, to 1710 Laguna; -Aaron 
.Siddell. 6 Turk to 2416 Fillmore. 

Tax Expert— J- S- Wallace. 681 to 582 Market. 

Toys — Kenneth Stedman. 320 Market to Furni- 
ture Exchange. 

Underwear — Munsing Wear Corp.. Crocker Bldg. 
to 742 Market 

Vegetable Oils— Aspigren 4 Co. (W. T. Pidwell). 
112 -Mark.t to Tnid.T-- Bldg- 

Welding Supplies — Cuniniercial Acetylene Sup- 
ply Co . Iiie . and Co,. .\Ifg. Co., 681 Market to 
Traders Bldg 

Miscellaneous — Pacific Air Transport, Inc., 593 
Market: Lambort Mfg. Supply Co., 22 Battery; 
Thrce-In-One Chemical Co.. 10 3d to 446 Eddy; 
Underwriters Utilities Corp.. 593 Market; Scott 
Sales Co. (F. A. Emmett). 171 2d; Rol-Ton Labora- 
tories, 465 California to 617 Montgomery: O. W. 
Hancock's Sales Co.. 821 Market; J. 4 M. Novelty 
Mfg. Co., 3044 Fillmore: House of Italian .Art. 565 
Sutter to 1378 Sutter; Florence .Art Gallery, 457 
Broadway; Silco Mfg. Co.. 1013 Mission; Sunshine 
Polishing Co.. 32 Montgomery: P>Tamid Sales Co., 
249 Minna; Canada Dry Western Sales, Inc., Mar- 
vin Bldg-; Hutchins Organizations, Golden Gate 
Bldg- to 1039 Harrison: John H- Mulholland Co-, 
.593 Market; British American Health Institute (R- 
T- Boundford). 1319 to 1171 .Market: Dardier 4 
Richardson. Hobart Bldg 



SERVICES AVAILABLE 

Electrical and Mechanical Engineer seeking con- 
nection with local manufacturing or sales organi- 
zation- Member A. A- I- E- Eight .years with last 
position. 



<AN FRANCISCO BISINKSS. FICHUIAKY 17, HI'.T. 



Power Device Display to 
be Held by Swiss 

The I'oroipn 'Irado Departiiifrit 
ha.s been adviw'd that an Inter- 
national Exhibition for Inland Navi- 
fjation and L'tilization of Hydraulic 
Power will ho helil intheeityof Basle. 
Switzerland, from .luly 1 to Sep- 
tember 15. 1926. Exhibits by mariu- 
faeturers of all kinds of machinery 
iiserl for harbor installations, con- 
struction of dams, docks, ships, 
drednes, cranes, etc.. as well as all 
kinds of electrical machinery u.sed 
for production of power and other 
power station and transmission 
e<|uipment, will be features of the 
exhibition. A meeting of the World 
Power Conference, with representa- 
tives of thirty nations in attendance, 
will al.so be held in the city of Ra-sle 
from .-VuKUst :il to September 12. 
An extensive agen<la is scheduled for 
the conference, including the discus- 
sion of power production and inland 
navigation, exchange of energj- l)e- 
tweon countries, relations between 
thermic and hydraulic electricity, 
electricity in agriculture and electri- 
fication of railroads. 



TRADE AT A GLANCE 

QonduHed by the Information Department of the £hamber of Commerce 



Poland Grants U. vS. TariflF 
Preferentials 

I'ndor the most- favored-nation 
clause of the tariff ajjreeincnt be- 
tween Poland and the United States, 
certain pnxkicts originating in this 
country are granted tariff prefer- 
entials of 25 to 50 per cent upon 
entry into Poland, according to ad- 
vice received by the Foreign atid 
Domestic Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. A certificate of origin is 
necessary to secure the advantages 
of these differentials, which are of 
special interest to exporters of Cali- 
fornia fruit products. The certifi- 
cate of (jrigin is signed by the For- 
eign Trade Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce, as is the 
practice for France and other coun- 
tries, and must be visaed by the Con- 
sul of Poland, who charges a fee of 
1 per cent of the net value of the 
products named in the certificate. 



Express Rates Lowered 



Railways of Me: 

"To assist and promote the development of 
poultry raising in Mexico, our Express Department 
will apply the lowest express rates on shipments of 
imported poultry for breeding purposes, from any 
of the border crossings, Ciudad Juarez, Chih., 
Piedras Negras, Coah.. Xuevo Laredo, and Mata- 
moros. Tamps., to any station on our System. 



Saa Francis 
Los Angele! 
Seattle 
Portland 
OaJiUnd 



SAN FRANCISCO 
Number Failures 
Net Liabilities 

LOS ANGELES 

Number Failures 
Net Liabilities 

SEATTLE 

Number Failures 
Ne: Liflbi'iies 



CURRENT VOLUME OP BUSINESS INDEX 

Week Ending Previou-. 

Feb. 13 Week 

»3M.»24.000 $280,141,000 

314,090.000 210 362,000 

45.576,000 47 346,000 

41 913.000 40,266.000 

39.612000 38,2S8.000 
(Federsl Reserve Bank! 

BUSINESS FAILURES 

Week Ending Previous 

Feb. 10 Week 



»13,704 

R. G Dun & Co 



Onr Year 

$185,501,000 
167,613 000 
35.504.000 
34.415,000 
24.848,000 



This eoncemion mil only be in effect durinK the 
six mootlui from JanuaO' ^^^ I<*t this year. 

■"Please conxxy this information to thoRe of your 
a-ssociaten dealers in fine poultry for breeding, who 
may be interested in extending their market into 
Mexico. 

"Further information and rates, will be gladly 
furnished on rcquefit by thi^ office. 

"F. N. PuENTF., General Actiit.*' 



United States Intercoastal 

Conference Westbound 

Rate Docket 

Bulletin .\.. :iii. p.v.tinKd;Hc F.l.ruary 17. 192«. 

Thr following pubjccte have Iw^n referred to the 
.Standing Rate Committee and will be diapoecd of 
not rarlior'than March I, 1926. Full information 
concerning the subjcrts listed may be had upon 
inquio' at the office of the Traffic Bureau. San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

R-ISO — Elevator guides, fish plates and bolts for 
same. Request for reduction of 10c per 100 lbs in 
Items 2170 and 2175; R-18I. desk slides. Request 
for addition fo Item 1645 an entr>- reatling 'Desk 
Slides;" R-182, rivets and staples. Proposed quali- 
fication of the entries in Item 470 covering rivets 
and staples by adding thereafter the word ■■.Shoe;" 
R-183. galvanized ridge rolls. Docketed for Uriff 
clarification; R-4S4. plumber's goods — china or 
earthenware. Proposed establishment of a new item 
reading "Plumbers' Goods. China or Earthenware. 
X. O. S. boxed or crated, owner's risk of damage;" 
Rates CL 90c. LCL $1.30. Minimum weight 24,000 
lbs.; R^85, blackboards and desks combined so- 
called 'Children's." Docketed for tariff clarifica- 
tion; R-J86. cake turners.- Docketed for tariff clari- 
fication; R-487, building erection braces (building 
shoresi. trade name "Rooshors." Proposed addition 
of a new Item 476 reading 'Braces, Building Erec- 
tion Braces (Building Shores), wood and iron or 
steel combined." Rates CL 55c, LCL $1.00. Mini- 
mum weight 24.000 lbs. 



Revenue Freight Loading 

Loading of revenue freight the week ended Jan- 
uary 30. totaled 925.263 cars, according to the car 
service division of the American Railway Associa- 

This was an increase of 27,895 cars over the 
corresponding week in 1925, but a decrease of 
4,360 cars under the corresponding week in 1924. 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The xubjecte listed below will be con;^idercd by 
the Standing Rate Committw of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than February 
25. Full information concerning the subjects listed 
may be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Docket N'o. 6564— EMtimnted weight of ahip- 
nii-nts of pears, eastbound; 6565, pinon nuts, CL,. 
eastbound; 6566. bagging, CL, westbound: 6567, 
talking machineK. or talking machines* and radio 
seta combined in straight or mixed carloads, west- 
bound; 6568. lumber to Sturgeon Ray and Algoma, 
Wis., eastbound; 6569, liqufied chlorine gas, CL, 
westbound: 6570. paper basins, cups, dishe*, pails, 
plates, flower pots, tra>'s and baskets, CL. west- 
bound: 6571. soap material in tank cant, eastbound^ 
6572, fruit", melons and fresh vegetables, CL, east- 
bound: 6573, liquid cleaning and washing com-> 
pounds, CL. eastbound; 6574, woolen fume hag», 
CL, eastbound; 6575, vanity boxes, LCL. west- 
bound; 6576. Marshfield and North Bend. Ore.: 
request that Tariff 30-M be amended to provide for 
the application of the ratcn named therein from 
Mar?bfield and North Bend, Ore: 6577. miso. 
LCL. eastbound; 6578, hand pumps and power 
pumps in mixed carloads, westbound; 6579, miso, 
LCL, eastbound import; 6580, peas. CL, east- 
bound: 6581, beach umbrellas. CL. westbound: 
6582. paper or pulpboard cans. CL and LCL, west- 
bound: 6583. locomotives on own wheels, west- 
bound: 6584, wire rope. CL, westbound; 6585, cab- 
bage. CL, eastbound, 6586, .Sanioan Islands; Pro- 
posal to amend Tariff 30-M to provide for Jmport 
rates on traffic originating in the Sanioan Islands; 
6587, wallboard. CL, westbound; 6588, automobile 
runways nith hoisting device, CL. westbound: 6589, 
import rates to eastern Canadian destinations: 
6590, bale covering and cotton baling ties. CL. 
westbound: 6591. insecticides, CL and IX'L, west- 
bound; 6592. crushed or granulated iron, LCL, 
wefitbound; 659:i. confectionery and candy. CL and 
LCL, eastbound; 6594, street sweepers fself-propel- 
lin?), CL. westbound; 6595, pajamas, wool and 
cotton mixed, CL and LCL. westbound; 6596. hay. 
CL, eastbound; 6597, bituminii.ed burlap, CL and 
LCL, westbound; 6598. cocoa paste, caramel 
sundae, butter scotch and walnut sundae, CL, east- 
bound; 6599. lumber and forest product, CL. 
ea.<itbound: 6600, animal and poultry regulator, 
CL. westbound. 



INFORMATION BUREAU 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUSINESS 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XII 



FEBRUARY 24, 1926 



Number 7 



Chamber of Commerce Scores in 
Long-Fought ''Trap Car" Case 




HE importance to ship- 
pers of freight in Cali- 
fornia of the decision of 
the Raih-oad Commis- 
sion in the so-called 
"trap car" case is emphasized in 
a statement from Seth Mann, 
attorney and manager of the traffic 
bureau of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. The Chamber 
of Commerce was the complain- 
ant in the case so far as it related 
to the Southern Pacific and Atchi- 
son, Topeka and Santa Fe railroads. 
The decision of the Railroad Com- 
mission in favor of the shippers and 
the Chamber of Commerce ended a 
fight instituted two years ago. 

As a result of the commission's 
decision, it is said by shippers, the 
existence of discrimination between 
this city and Oakland and other 
East Bay cities in the matter of 
"trap car" rates has been elimi- 
nated. 

"The commission," Mr. Mann a.s- 
serted, "has ordered the Southern 
Pacific Company and the Atchison, 
Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Com- 
pany, who were the only railroad 
defendants in the suit of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce, to 
estabHsh on or before March 15, 
1926, on notice of not less than ten 
days, a charge of $2.70 per car for 
trap car service, subject to a mini- 
mum line haul revenue of $15 per 
car, and to cancel items now in the 
tariff in conflict with this adjust- 
ment." 

The commission's decision also 
will affect the Western Pacific, Los 
Angeles & Salt Lake, the San Diego 
& Arizona, and Pacific Electric raQ- 
way lines. In commenting on this, 
Mr. Mann said: 

"This further order should result 
in the establishment at all stations 
in California of this service, so de- 
fined, and at all stations where there 



Bay District Should be 

Well Represented at 

Buyers' Session 

The National .Association of 
Purchasing Agents will hold a 
convention in Los Angeles June 
9 to June 12 and the Purchasing 
Agents' .Association of Northern 
California wants San Francisco 
to be adequately represented at 
the meeting. 

As the first move in this direc- 
tion the association has inaug- 
urated a vigorous membership 
campaign. 

"We particularly want con- 
cerns whohavepurchasingagents 
who are not members of our or- 
ganization to join the associa- 
tion," states Harry F. Kolb, 
president of the association, in 
a letter to the Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

More than 300 members are 
listed at the association's offices 
at 433 California street. 



are interchange tracks between these 
different roads a reciprocal trap-car 
service — that is to say these carriers 
are authorized to establish a service 
by which one carrier will receive 
from or deliverto aconnectingcarrier 
a trap car originating at spur tracks." 
"The trap car service has many 
advantages to consignees and con- 
signors in the convenience of dispo- 
sition of the tonnage and elimination 
of the drayage charges," the com- 
mission's order read. "On the other 
hand there are benefits to the carrier 
of which sight must not be lost, par- 
ticularly where large shippers em- 
ploy for outgoing less than carload 
movement the equipment reaching 
the industry tracks carload freight. 
Carrier also has the benefit of a cur- 
tailment of space at its local termi- 
nal freight depots and the elimina- 
tion of vehicular congestion during 
the peak of the shipping hours." 



Resale Vote Canvass Figures 
Made Public 

The results of the preliminary 
canvass of the balloting on Referen- 
dum 47, which bears on legislation 
respecting resale prices, hiis been re- 
ceived by the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce from the Chamber 
of Commerce of the United States of 
America which is conducting the 
canvass. 

In accordance with the by-laws of 
the United States Chamber of Com- 
merce, each referendum closes at the 
end of forty-five days after the ques- 
tions have been submitted to the 
organizations in the membership. 
Immediately after the balloting 
closes, at midnight of the forty-fifth 
day, a preliminary canvass is made 
of the votes which have been cast. 
At the first meeting of the Board of 
Directors, or of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Board of Directors, 
which follows, the canvass is re- 
viewed and made final. 

The results of the preliminary 
canvass of the balloting in Referen- 
dum 47 which closed on February 2, 
follow. A detailed statement of the 
votes which were cast will later be 
prepared. 

I 

Should there be federal legislation per- 
mitting the seller of identified merchan- 
dise sold under competitive conditions 
under a distinguishing name, trade-mark, 
or brand to control the resale price there- 
of? 

Votesinfavor, 1079. Votes opposed, 911. 

II 

If there is to be such legislation, should 
the legislation take the form of permitting 
contracts for the maintenance of resale 
prices on identified merchandise sold 
under competitive conditions under a dis- 
tinguishing name, trade-mark, or brand? 

Votes in favor, 1116}2- Votes opposed, 
576M. 

[ continued on page 2 1 



SAN FKANCISCO BUHI.VEfiS, I-EBRUAKV 24. 1920 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Published wetkly by the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce, 205 MercfaafiU Exchance- Telepboae 
Kearny 112. Subscriptioo. %A a year- Entered as 
•eoond-class matter July 2, I920,atthePoBtoffic«,SaD 
>. California, under the act of Nfarch 3. 187fl. 



Foreign 1 IvAJDry 1 li S Domestic 



> the Trade Department of the 



Resale A'ote Canvass Figures 
Made Public 



tinued from page I ] 
III 



If there is to he such legislation, would 
the restrictions in the report of October 5, 
1925, Ix" proi>er restrictions? 

Votes in favor. lOCOl^^. Votes opposed, 
564>2. 

IV 

In addition to such le^slatton, should 
Congress enact legislation bringing under 
the law of unfair competition tne cutting 
of the seller's declared price which results 
in misappropriating or injuring good-will 
attaching to articles identi5ed as to their 
ori^? 

\ otes in favor, 875. Votes opposed. 765. 
\' 

Instead of such legislation, should Con- 
gress enact legislation bringing under the 
law of unfair competition the cutting of 
the seller's declared price which results 
in misappropriating or injuring good-will 
attaching to articles identified as to their 
origin? 

Votes in favor, 22Z]4. Votes opposed, 
12473^. 

Under the by-laws the United States 
Chamber is committed on a proposition 
submitted to referendum by a two-thirds 
vote representing at least twenty states, 
providing at Ica.st one-third of the voting 
strength of the Clmmber has been polled. 

The preliminary canvass indicates that 
the Chamber has no position on questions 
I to IV inclusive, while the Chamber is 
committed in opposition to proposition V. 



Two Philippine Ports are 
Given New Status 

The ports of Uavao and Lc'ga.spi. 
Philippine Islands, have been ereated 
.sul>ports of entry, according to in- 
forniatifin received by tlie Foreign 
Trade Department of the Chamber 
of Connnerce from the Bureau of 
Insuhir Affairs, War Department, 
Washington. 

The creation of ports of entry at 
these cities will assist in bringing 
about direct commerce between the 
Philippine Islands and foreign coun- 
tries, as an expensive trans-shipment 
at Manila is avoided. Trade be- 
tween San Francisco and the Philip- 
pines will be further stimulated by 
this action. The port of ^lasbate 
will not be opened to foreign trade 
as the office of the Governor General 
of the Philippine Islands did not be- 
lieve that its commercial importance 
warranter! this step for the present. 



c^ 

1(X)24 — San Francisco, Calif. Local manufnc- 
turera of FIXE LEATHER GOODS dwire to ca- 
tablijib connections n-ith one or more San Francisco 
export houses for the purpose of exporting their 
leather Kooda. particularly to Central and South 
.America and the Hawaiian lalands, 

]002.'> — N'ew York. N. Y. A buying and sellinjt 
rcprciHontativc for foreign firms w-isbcs to establiab 
connections with San Francisco suppliers and 
dealer* in OLD GrXNY BAGGINGS. SECOND 
HAND BAGGINGS and BUHLAP BAG 
PATCHES for export, 

10026 — Alamob. Mexico. New procem, fotest 
and desert waste for the recover>' of extracts, inks, 
oila. RUtn", from any plants or trees. Tests carried 
out for any variety of waste material. Terms 
moderate. Party is alflo in need of an experi- 
mental AUGER PRESS for use in the above 

10027 — Culiacan, Mexico. Gentlemen wishes 
to communicate with San Francisco LAPIDARIES. 
Wishes catalogB and price* on GRA\'E HEAD- 
STONES. 

1O028— Cclaya. Mexico. Wholesale and rcUil 
STOcers desire to establish busiuora connections with 
San Francisco GROCERY exporters. 

10029 — Nucvntas. Cuba. Commission agents, 
interested in all products from California, wish to 
get in touch with San (Yanciii-co exporters of 
CANNED TOMATOES. 

10030— New York. N. Y. Importers of Ru«ian. 
Baltic nnd Central European products, specialising 
in RUSSIAN FISH PRODUCTS, particularly 
CAVIAR, wish to secure the (.er\*ices of a San 
Fmiicisco cumniUxion house or an individual to 
ffpreseni them in this territory. 

10031— Shanghai. China. Importer of GRO- 
CERIES AND CEREAI^ dofires to communicate 
with San Francisco grocery exporters. Wish abo 
to get in touch with manufacturers of FLY 
SWATTERS. 

10aJ2— Now York, N Y. Buyers of JAPANESE 
RAPE SEED, MANCHURIAN SUNFIX)WER 
AND HEMP SEED, in carload lots or less for 
prompt Mhipment from the Pacific Coattt, or for 
shipment from the Orient, are open for offers from 
San Francisco firms. 

1003:{ — ^Royal Oak, Michigan. Manufacturers 
of chutney desire to get in touch with San Fran- 
cisco direct importers of CHINESE PRESERVED 
GINGER. 

10034— Tientsin, China. Young man with 
older brottier and father in established shipping 
business in Tientsin, North China, returning to 
Tientsin nnthin a few weeks, is willing to conduct 
business for anyone interested in China, also willing 
to talk business with any individual or business 
firm not at present connected with China exports 
but considering establishing connections there. 

10035 — .San Francisco, Calif. Young man well 
acquainted with the Orient, recently arrived from 
Shanghai and shortly returning, would like to rep- 
resent a San Francisco firm and make connections 
for exporting CHINA PRODUCE. 

10036 — New Orleans, La. Dealers in advertis- 
ing novelties, premium specialties, etc., are in the 
market for a large quantity of imported UNIQUE 
ORNAMENTED BOXES, made of wood, vul- 
canized or mechanical rubber, celluloid, or any ma- 
terial other than metal, inside measurement of the 
boxes is to be 4J-i x 7^4 inches, and the larger 
size, ZH X 714 inches, to be used in packing fruit 

10037 — Nagoya, Japan. Manufacturer and ex- 
porter of FISHING NETS, TWINES, FISHING 
TACKLE AND ALL FITTINGS FOR NETS, 
desires to establish connections with San Francbco 
dealers in these articles- 

10038 — Kobe, Japan. Experienced manufac- 
turers' representative, verj' closely connected with 
the various business hou.ses in the port of Kobe, is 



fO 

very desirous of securing the reprenentation of Saii 
Francisco companios, which are not now repraented 

10039 — Hiroshima, Japan. Gentleman contem- 
plating cslabliahing a plant for the manufacture of 
Sour from rice and various kinds of beans, wishes 
to communicate with manufacturers and exporters 
of MACHINERY suitable for such a mill. Solicits 
catalogs and price lists. 

10040 -London. Canada. Party having an UN- 
BREAKABLE .MILK BOTTLE fnot paper), in- 
expensive enough that it can be used once and 
thrown away, wishcfl to interest a California dairy 
or creamer>' in thi&. product. 

10041 — London, England. Manufacturers of an 
ELECTRIC BOILER SCALER wish to appoint 
on agent to handle the sale of this article in this 
territory. 

10012 — Ixindon. Engbind. Manufacturers of a 
DEVICE FOR REMOVING DENTS FROM 
AUTOMOBILE FENDERS desire a suiUble repre- 
sentative on the Pacific Coast 

10043 — Melbourne. Australia. Exporter^ of 
EUCALYPTUS OIL. containing 70 to 75 per cent 
Cineol. wi«h to establish connections with San 
Francisco importers and dealers in this commodity. 

K»044 — Hamburg. Germany. Gentleman wishes 
to r«»pre*ent California exporters of DRIED 
FRUITS in Germany. 

10045 — Hamburg, Germany. Firm wishes repre- 
sentative in San Francisco for CHINA, EARTH- 
ENTV.\RE AND ENAMELWARE. ALUMINUM 
GOODS. 

10046— Frankenthal. Pfatz. Germany. German 
manufactiircr of SE.MI-ROTARY WINGPUMPS 
wishes '■cprcrtoiitatix'e in San Francisco. 

10047 — Magdeburg, Germany, Firm wishes 
connection with manufacturers of porcelain and 
earthenware for supplying them with raw material. 

1Q04S — Cassel-B,, Germany. Gerinan manu- 
facturer of COPPER KETTLES wishes repre- 
sentative in San Francisco. 

10049 — Thuringen, Germany. Manufacturer of 
JUTE RUGS AND RUNNERS, etc.. wishes 
representative in San Francisco. 

10050 — Sanremo, Italy. Party is in the market 
for CARNATION SEEDS and would appreciate 
hearing from suppliers of these seeds. 

10051 — France. Established French importers 
arc desirous of representing, on a commis'^ion basis, 
American exporters of RAW MATERIALS AND 
FINISHED PRODUCTS. Are in a position to 
establish branch offices for American firms in which 
they might invest some capital. This firm will also 
act as buying agents for American importers of 
FRENCH SPECIALTIES 

10052 — Valencia. Spain. Firm desires to com- 
municate with American manufacturers of MA- 
CHINERY FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF 
SAUSAGES AND PRESER\^D MEATS. Alao 
wishes to get in touch with refinenes of MEDIC- 
INAL DRUGS and PERFUMES. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-l 992— Gallup, New Mexico. Large U. S. 
licensed Indian trader is in the market for large 
quantities of BUCKSKIN and wi.she3 to com- 
municate with tanners of this leather. 

D-1993 — Buhl, Idaho. Owner of large apiary 
desires to get in touch with extensive handlers of 
HONEY. 

D- 1994— Pasadena, Calif. Party is in a position 
to supply a very high grade domestic BAUXITE 
and will send sample-analysis and quotation to 
interested parties. 

D-1995 — Seattle. Washington. Gentleman is 
anxious to get in touch with firms dealing in 
AL.\SK,A, IVORY, particularly those sending 
trading ships into the Far North, operating out of 
San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 24, 1926 



LEADS fer NEW BUSINESS 



o^ 

A new firm entering a new territory must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up. as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing bouse for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor. Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A daily service available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m.. at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes. 



Advertising — Ira Zalinger, 90 Eddy. 

Architects— T. L. Pflueger and J. R. Miller, 35 
Montgomerj' to Hobart Bldg. 

Attorneys — Carroll McNear. Humboldt Bank 
Eldc. to .Maska Commercial Bldg. 

Automotive — General Motors Acceptance Corp., 
DoII;ir Bldg. to Federal Reserve Bank Bldg. 

Auto Painting — Polk St. Auto Painting Co., 39 
Polk. 

Auto Supplies — Le\'in3 Auto Supply Co., opening 
Van Ness Ave. and Market. 

Auto Tires — Lido Vulcanizing Shop, 782 Colum- 
bus Ave.; Avenue Tire Exchange, 628 Golden Gate 

Bakeries — .\brarason's Bakery, 1100 McAllister. 

Beauty Parlor — City of Paris opening Hotel 
Clift, Geary and Taylor: Manx Hotel Beauty Shop, 
225 Powell. 

Brokers— Bowers i- Co.. 1060 Br>ant: Newman 
Bros. Inc., Insurance Exchange Bldg. 

Candy— Chris Pakis & Co., 1301 Market. 

Chiropodist- Dr. W. A. Roberts, 1990 Sutter. 

Chiropractor— Edna Taulbee, Golden Gate Bldg. 
to ITL'S Ellis 

Cigars— Buffett Cigar Store, 627 Post. 

Cloaks and Suits — Chringer Co , 130 Suiter. 

Cloth Labels — Universal Label Weaving Co. (New 
York) Hansford Blk. 

Cotton Goods — Victor Ulman (Standard Mills, 
Inc.), 554 Mission to 53 Fremont. 

Dentist— Dr. S. L. Walton. 323 Geary to 490 Post. 

Dresses— Jos. T. and W. B. Malouf, 130 Kearny. 

Electrical — Snyder Electric Co., 401 4th. 

Express and Drayage — Lark Transfer Co., 476 
Eddy. 

Furniture — Roamers Supply Co. (beds), 2880 
25th to 1450 .\rmy. 

Grocer— Adolph Schleuter (199 HcnrjO, 1293 
Union. 

Importers- V. E. Scott & Co , Marvin Bldg. to 
112 .Market. 

Insurance — West .\merican Insurance Co.. 1336 
to 1431 Van Ne.9S Ave. 

Machme Work— Reichlin, Martin & Co., 539 
Cough to 400 Fulton. 

Market— Keyuold's Market, 1077 Valencia. 

Meat Packers — Carstens Packing Co., 325 Da\'is 
to 25 Crook, 

Millinery— -Mabel La Durig. 626 Post. 

Mining and Oil— H. Z Peters. 321 Grant Ave. 

Newspapers and Publications — Referee Publish- 
ing Co., Pantages Bldg. to 690 Market : Pacific Ports 
and California Boatman, Chronicle Bldg. 

Optometrists — J. J. Richard, 613S Geary. 

Radio— W. G. Frundt, 5923 Geary. 

Real Estate — GiUer & Westwater, 1325 Ocean 
Ave.: T H. Anthony, 124 Mason. 



Restaurants — Paul Smith, 398 7th: Grant Ave.: 
CofTee Shop, 401 Grant Ave. 

Road Equipment — Heisler Locomotive Works, 
Rialto Bldg- to 6S1 Market. 

Stoves and Ranges — Estate Stove Co., 37 Drumm 

Tailor— T. W. Duncan (coat maker), 617 Mont- 

Techmcal Pubhcations — The Technical Book Co. 
Mills Bldg to Underwood Bldg,. 525 Market. 

Tourist Agents — Mack Travel Service, 593 
Market: Dean & Dawson, Ltd., Flatiron Bldg. 

Toys — Kenneth Stedman, 320 Market to Furni- 
ture Exchange. 

Miscellaneous — Dr. Frederick G. Linde, 380 
Post; Hamilton College of Law (S. Dunn), 1112 
Market: Pacific .4ir Transport, Inc., 593 Market: 
O. W. Hancock's Sales Co., 821 Market: Pyramid 
Sales Co., 249 Minna: John H. MulhoUand Co., 593 
Market. 

Local firm of Manufacturers Representatives, 
handling Furniture Line have opening for partner 
with small amount of capital. 



Specifications Available 

The following specifications covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign & Domestic Trade Department. 

The U. S. Veterans' Bureau, .San Francisco, in- 
vite bids for the purchase of the following property 
of the United States Government; 2 adjustable 
airplane arm splints, 1 Thomas leg splints, 1 
special shoulder and arm steel brace, 1 steel and 
leather elbow brace, 1 steel leg and ankle brace, 
1 leather and iron knee brace, 1 steel back brace 
Bids are to be submitted to the Chief, Supply Sec- 
tion, Room 424. 883 Market Street, San Francisco, 
and will be opened March 5, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at Fort Mason. San Francisco, Miscellaneous 
Supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer, S. F. G. I. Depot, Fort 
Mason, San Francisco, California, and will be 
opened March 8, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at Fort Mason, San Francisco, Miscellaneous 
Supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the Quartei> 
master Supply Officer. S. F. G. I. Depot, Fort 
Mason, San Francisco, and will be opened March 1, 
1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at posts on or about March 25, 1926, and as 
called for during the month of April, 1926, Sub- 
sistence Supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the 
Quartermaster Supply Officer, S. F. G. I. Depot, 
Fort Mason. San Francisco, and will be opened 
March 5, 1926. 

For furnishing the Alaska RaiU-oad, to be de- 
livered, free of all charges, on Pier in Seattle. 
Washington, Machinery Parts, Sash Locks, Drills. 
Air Brake Equipment, Rail Clamps, Pitch Core 
Compound, Upright Rim Lock Sets, etc. Bids are 
to be submitted to the General Purchasing Agent, 
The Alaska Railroad, Seattle, Washington, and 
will be opened March 4, 1925. 



Local Artists, Printers, Can 
Show Work Gratis 

San Fr.incisco concerns wishing to 
display commercial axid other posters 
at a fair to be heW at Zagreb, King- 
dom of the Serbs, Croats and 
Slovenes, March 21 to March 28, 
can do so without paying any 
charges, according to a message to 
the Chamber of Commerce from the 
local Consulate of the Kingdom. 

"Besides a display of agricultural 
products, harvesting machinery, 
automobiles, radio apparatus and 
other articles, there will be an inter- 
national exposition of commercial 
and other posters," the statement 
said. 

"All posters from foreign coun- 
tries will be displayed absolutely 
free of any charge." 

The executive committee of the 
fair, according to Consul Yovano- 
vitch, is particularly anxious to have 
American advertising posters on dis- 
play "as they consider American 
advertisements in pictures superior 
to any others and of distinct artistic 
value and they expect them to have 
a beneficial influence." 

Posters can be mailed postpaid 
and marked "Samples Without 
Value to Zagrebacki Zbor, Zagreb, 
Kingdom of the Serbs, Croats, and 
Slovenes, Europe" or sent through 
the local consular offices at 244 
Kearny street. 



New Cable Service 

The Western Union Telegraph 
Company has established a new di- 
rect cable connection between Em- 
den, Germany, and their Western 
Union London office for the better 
handling of German traffic, pending 
the laying of the new German Trans- 
Atlantic cable some time this year, 
which will connect with the Western 
Union Company's system. 



Trade Council Here to 
Weld Interests 

"Pacific Coast Unity for World 
Trade Expansion" will be the theme 
of the fourth annual convention of 
the Pacific Foreign Trade Council 
to be held in San Francisco, March 
4 to 6. The meeting will represent 
the greatest co-ordination of foreign 
trade effort ever accomplished on 
this coast, according to tho.se in 
charge. 

Leaders in manufacture, agricul- 
ture, shipping and finance will par- 
ticipate in the three-day conference. 
As an evidence of the interest of the 
Government in the success of the 
conference, prominent Federal offi- 
cials will join in the councils. Secre- 
tary Herbert Hoover in a pre-con- 
ference message to Western business 
interests sounds the note that the 
constant expansion of overseas trade 
is essential to continued economic 
stability. He believes that the com- 
ing conference can do much to ad- 
vance and stmiulate this develop- 
ment. 



SAN FRAXCISCO BUSINESS, FEBRUARY 24. 1926 



The Chamber of Commerce — an old institution in principle — is 
founded upon the idea that a city can be as big as the men in that 
city. Individuals working alone can do little. Many working as a 
unit can do much. This Chamber of Commerce is growing every 
week in membership strength, as indicated by the following list of 
new members : 



MYSELL MOLLER & CO. Inc. 

Investment Bankers — First National Bank 
BldK. 



HELLER-BRUCE & CO. 

Investment Bonds — Mills Bldg. 

E. R. GUNDELFINGER, Inc. 

Investment Securities — Kohl Bldg. 



JOHN NOESK 

Tailor to the trade, 617 Montgomerj- St. 
High-class men's tailor and importer of 
woolens. 



GEORGE GOLDWIN 

Manufacturer of high-grade ladies' bags. 
279 Post St. Makes beaded, brocaded, silk 
embroidered and tapestry bags. The only 
concern in America manufacturing this 
style of bag. 



GEORGE W. LEWIS & CO. 

Investment Bonds and Stocks — Kohl Bldg. 

JOSEPH C. TYLER & CO. 

Stocks and Bonds — Kohl Bldg. 

SVEN PHILIP & COMPANY 

Stocks and Bonds — Alexander Bide. 



WORLEY & CO. 

Steel lockers, steel shelving and enamel. 
Room 306, 525 Market St. Mr. W. P. 
Crilly in charge. 

FRED W. BULLOCK 

Landscape gardener, 1804 Claus Spreckels 
Bldg. Beautiful gardens for private grounds, 
churches, schools and parks. 



THE EQUITABLE TRUST CO. OF 
NEW YORK 

Representative office at 485 California St. 
Mr. Thos. M. Patterson in charge. 



JUDAH BOAS FINANCE CORP. 

Brokers^^54 Montgomery St. 

MATHILDE KAHN 

Insiu-ance — Room 1328,315 Montgomery- St. 

MILLS & WHITE 

Packers' Supplies— 268 Market St. 



COMMERCIAL TRADING CO. 

Wholesale dealers in paper at 235 Clay St. 

LEWIS ROTHE 

Art and advertising ser\ace, 1805 Glaus 
Spreckels Bldg. Original ideas and illus- 
trations for business, entertainments, in- 
teriors, costumers and displays. A com- 
plete service. 

ALMA BUTLER WAUGH 

Commercial coaching school and office em- 
ployment service at 40 Sansome Street. 
Public stenography, mimeographing and 
direct mail advertising. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



FILE copy 

INFORMATION BUBg/^Q 



BUSINESS 

Cs# fO 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XII 



:\IARCH 3, 1926 



Number S 



Taxpayers to Benefit by New 
Internal Revenue Law 



M 



Many Exemptions 
granted in U. S. 
Tax Assessment 



'OWK than 190,000 in- 
come tax returns will lie 
I the hands of residents 
I the San Francisco 
metropolitan area this 
week, ilecent modifications of the 
1926 Internal Revenue Act include 
provisions which will benefit tax- 
payers materially. S.\n Francisco 
BusiiNE-is, through the courtesy of 
Collector of Internal Revenue John 
P. McLauglilin, has compiled the 
following summarization of the 
salient requirements of the 1926 
income tax law; 

The income tax return niu.st be filed 
with the Collector of Internal Kevenue by 
March 15. It must be accompanied by at 
least one-fourth of the entire amount of 
the tax. A recent ruling of the Treasury 
Department provides an extension of time 
to May 15 to individuals whose net in- 
come exceeds $5,000 and domestic corpo- 
rations, provided tentative returns are 
filed on or before March 15 accompanied 
by one-fourth of the estimated tax. 

Income taxes may be paid in four in- 
stallments; one when the return is filed, 
the second on the fifteenth day of the 
third month, the third on the fifteenth 
day of the sixth month and the fourth on 
the fifteenth day of the ninth month after 
the time fi.\ed by law for filing the return. 

The Act provides for personal exemp- 
tions and credits. A single person or a 
married person not living with husband 
or wife may claim a personal exemption 
of $1,500. A person who, during the en- 
tire taxable year, was the head of a family 
or was married and living with a husband 
or wife may claim an exempticn of $3,500. 



The former exemptions were, respectively, 
$1,000 and $2,500. 

An estate or trust may claim an exemp- 
tion of $1,500 instead ofSl,000 astormerly. 

The "head of a family" is defined to be 
one who actually supports and maintains 
ahousi'h'ild (if one or more persons closely 
Conner- 1 < d w i 1 1 1 1 1 i i r i i ly blood relationship, 
marriage ur ;Hiii[i(i'in 

If a husl-'aml and wife who are living to- 
gether have an aggregate net income of 
$3,5(X) or more or an aggregate gross in- 
come of $5,000 or more, a return shall be 
made Ijy each, or the income of each shall 
be included in a single joint return. 

The tax rate and amount of tax on a net 
income, subject to normal and surtax in 
the case of a personal exemption of $3,500, 
for example, would l)e: 

Amount of net income, $3,500; normal 
tax, nothing; normal tax plus surtax, 
nothing; gross tax, nothing; net amount 
of tax, nothing. 

A further provision of the Revenue .\ct 
provides a twenty-five percent return to 
the taxpayer on what is known as an 
''earned income." The amoimt of "earned 
income" has a fi\.'d miiiimum of -So. 000 
and a fixed maMinnin uf S;L'li,nilO. 

The law pr.. VI. Irs ilci ili.- tax of an in- 
dividual shall lie rndilni with twenty- 
five percent of the tax which w'ould be 
payable if his "earned net income" con- 
stituted his entire net income. 

If the taxpayer's net income is not more 
than $5,000 his net income shall be con- 
sidered to be earned income; if his net in- 
come is in excess of $5,000 his earned net 
income shall be considered to be less than 
$5,000. 

The "twenty-five percent earned in- 
come credit" in no instance can exceed 25 
percent of the taxpayer's normal tax, plus 
25 percent of the taxpayer's surtax if his 
earned net income constituted his entire 
income. 

"Earned net income" is "earned in- 
come" minus "earned income deduc- 
tions." Under this heading is included 
\vages, salaries, professional fees and 
other sums received for personal services 
actually rendered. 

A special notice issued by Collector 
McLaughlin fixes the surtax rates for 1925 
as follows: 

[ cyutinued on page 4 1 



NATIONAL BUSINESS 
SHOW WILL ATTRACT 
THOUSANDS TO CITY 



I;ADING this year in' 
national business shows, 
San Francisco is "all 
si't" to entertain next 
week the men who make 
the office paraphernalia of the coun- 
try. The show, which is the first 
one this year in the United States, 
marks the fourth such event re- 
corded in the history of San Fran- 
cisco. It will be held in the Exposi- 
tion Auditorium, beginning Monday 
and continuing until the following 
Saturday. 

While scores of inventors and 
originators of new office systems, as 
well as men of capital who back the 
office supply industries, will gather 
here from elsewhere, there will be 
many San Franciscans taking a 
leading part in the exposition. The 
citj^'s status as a manufacturing 
center has caused it to loom high in 
the office supply field as well as in 
other industrial classifications. 

"EXECUTIVES' DAYS" 
Arrangements have been made 
for two "executives' days" at the 
exposition, at which departmental 
heads and owners of firms will be 
the only persons admitted. These 
occasions are set for Tuesday and 
Thursday. Members of purchasing 
agent associations will be welcomed 
particularly on Friday and out of 
town business men on Saturday, the 
final day. 

[ contiiiueil on page 4 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO IUSIM;SS, MARCH 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Publuihpd weekly by the San Krancuco Chamber of 
Commerce. 205 Merchanu ExchanRc. Tetephooe 
Kearny ]12. Subncription, S4 a year. Entered as 
aeeond-claas matter July 2, 1920, at the Poatotfice.SaD 
Francisco. Cahrornia. under the act of March 3. 1879. 



River and Harbor Growth 
Program Up for Action 

For the fir.st time in hi.story a con- 
certed movement is being made to 
bring together all Pacific CV)a.st in- 
terests in the adoption of a program 
for the development of rivers and 
harbors of the Coast states. 

The rivers ami harbors program 
was the subject of a one-day con- 
ference held Wednesday, March 
3rd, in conjunction with the 
fourth annual convention of the 
Pacific Coast Foreign Trade Coun- 
cil, at the Hotel Whitcomb, Thurs- 
day, Frida\- find Saturday. All in- 
terests affected, from the Canadian 
line tfi the Mexican border, have 
been brought into the movement. 

Chamber of Commerce execu- 
tives, .shipping and transportation 
interests, representatives of the 
United States Coast Guard Service 
and Geodetic Survey will be in at- 
tendance. 

There is a growing realization, 
according to tho.se in charge of the 
meeting, that only through the adop- 
tion of a unified program of develop- 
ment can Pacific Coast ports and 
river cities hope to compete with the 
Atlantic seaboard and other sec- 
tions demanding Federal aid. 

With the formulation and adop- 
tion of a river and harbor program 
there is every assurance now that 
the Pacific Coast will have the ad- 
vantage of solidarity in its demands 
on Congress. Norman F. Titus, 
assistant manager of the McCormick 
Steamship Company of San Fran- 
cisco, is chairman of the Rivers and 
Harbors Committee, calling the con- 
ference, and Arthur G. Ai'nold, sec- 
retary-manager of the Los Angeles 
Chamber, is secretary. 

The first meeting of the Rivers 
and Harbors Committee was held a 
year ago in Seattle. Since that time, 
however, the movement has won for 
itself a hundred per cent representa- 
tion of Pacific Coast interests. Lead- 
ers are looking forward to the San 
Francisco meeting as marking the 
greatest stride to date in Pacific 
Coast unity. 



Foreign 1 rvAUil/ 1 ll S Domestic 



San Francisco Chamber of Conirr 



ot- 



KKl.Vi — ParkpmbiirK. W. Va. Proprietor of a re- 
tail Kift shop is interested in purchnsinK GIFT 
.SHOP ARTICI.KS. FOREIGN NOVELTIF>S.Mc . 
from San Francijico importpni of such Oriental goods 

l(M)54 — Portland, Oregon. Salra company, hav- 
inx orden* for KAPOK, desire to get in touch with 
5!an Franciww* direct itnpfyrters of this commodity 
which can make lowest possible quotation. 

10056 — Seattle. Washington. Firm wifthes to get 
in touch with meal parkers who can nupply MIXED 
HOUSE RUN CATTLE HOOFS for export ship- 
ment. Thi« material must be packed in stout sacks, 
well sewed, and nmrketj and delivered f. a. s. vessel 
Ten ton shipments desired. 

10056 — Siailtle, Washington Importers of Chi- 
nese product*, such a» RUGS. WALNUTS. FURS 
and SKINS, BRISTLES. WOOL. etc.. and buyers 
of MACHINERY. SCRAP IRON. OLD BALED 
NEWSPAPERS, etc.. desire to appoint a San 
P'rancisco agent or representative to handle their 
urders here and to secure orders for them on a eoni- 

10057 —Tientsin, China. Novelty company ig in 
the market for several SOUND-MAKING MA- 
CHI.NES for uae in moving picture hounos. Ma- 
chine* to make the »ourKl of rain falling, thunder, 
breaking of waves, etc. arc de«ircd. 

10058— Clarkson, Nebraska. Party n-ishes to 
communicate with Snn Francisco importers of 
JAPANESE GOLD FISH. 

10059— Wnkayama. Japan. Manufacturers and 
exporter* of INSECT FLOWERS. INSECT 
POWDER, MOSQUITO EXTERMINATORS. 
CRUDE PEPPERMINT OIL, etc , wish to com- 
nunlratc with interested San Francisco importers 



of th« 



[Xlilil 



10060 — Osaka, Japan. Exporters of BAMBOO 
BASKETS, MATS AND MATTINGS. PAPER, 
SILK and COTTON PARASOLS, PORCELAINS. 
LACQUER WARE, COTTO.N TABLE CLOTH. 
etc. wish to get in touch with San Francisco im- 
porters of these articles. 

U«)6I -Hongkong. China. Firm exporting 
RICE, PRESERVED GINGER, MACHINE and 
HAND-CUT REEDS. RATTAN and SE.\GRASS 
FURNITURE. CASSIA and ANISEED OILS. 
GRASS MATS, wish to communicate with San 
Francisco importers of these and other South China 
products- This firm is also interested in importing 
American FRESH FRUITS and VEGETABLES. 

10062— Auckland. N. Z. Quotations on New 
Zealand products, such as CHINA CLAY (finest 
quality). MANGANESE. DRIED MILK POW- 
DERS and PURE WOOL STEAMER RUGS, will 
be gladly furnished on receipt of inquiries by San 
Francisco resident agent. 

10063 — New Orleans. I-A. Import-export house, 
ha\'ing extensive conneotione in South America, is 
iu the market for CALIFORNIA BLACK BEANS. 

100C4 — Argentina. Gentleman, very highly 
recommended by numerous responsible parties, 
having cxcelleut business record and experience, 
wishes to become foreigo sales representative for a 
San Francisco firm in any of the Latin-American 
countries. Supplies excellent references. Gentle- 
man is temporarily in New York. Other details nn 
file with Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

10065 — Nacozari, Son., Mexico. Branch of an 
Arizona firm is interested in JAPANESE CHINA- 
WARE and wishes to communicate with direct im- 
porters of this line. 

10066 — Monterrey. N. L.. Mexico. Gentleman, 
having several years selling experience in Central 
and South America, desires to establish business 
connections with San Francisco exporters wishing 
a sales representative in Latin America. 

10067 — Hermosillo. Son., Mexico. Firm is very 
interested in obtaining catalogs and prices on all 
kinds of material for the manufacture of brooms; 
also catalogs and prices, directly from factories, on 
BOTTLES. FLASKS and JARS. 



^O 

10068 — Minden, Germany. Manufacturer of 
SAFETY FUSES wishes repnwenutivc in San 
Francisco. 

10069— Alt heide. Germany, ^ranufacture^ of 
CRYSTAL GLA.SSWARE wishes to be represented 
in San Francisco. 

10070 — Caasel, Germany. Manufacturer of 
OPTICAL G(X)DS and RADIO ARTICLES wants 
representative in California. 

10071 — Hamburg, Germany. Established com- 
pany wishes to represent a packer of CALIFORNIA 
DRIED FRUITS in Germany References are 
furnished. 

10072 — Hamburg, Germany. Firm wishes to 
establish connections with a California packer or 
exporter of DRIED PRUNES and EVAPORATED 
APPLES not already represented in Germany. 

10O7.3 — Hamburg, Germany. General export 
and import merchants, with 20 years experience, 
offer their services to .San Francisco firms, as buy- 
ing and shipping agents to work on commission 

10074 — Hamburg, Germany. I^arge supplier of 
IRON. STEEL. METALS, MACHINERY, and 
HARDWARE, wishes to get in touch with interest- 
ed San Franci^ro importers of this tine. 

10075— Stuttg-trt-Cannstatt. Old established 
monufactu«-r of ORNAMENTAL BOXES OF 
PRECIOUS WOODS. CHINESE DESIGN 
TRAYS, ARTISTIC INLAID WALL DECO- 
RATIONS, and PICTURES, wishes to oommuni- . 
cate with Snn Francisco firms interested in these 
articles. Illustrated circulars on file with the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

10076 — Gublonz. Bohemia. Large manufacturer 
and shipper of GAHLONZ GOODS, such as GLASS 
BEADS. ARMLETS. JEWELRY, NECKLACES. 
CHAINS, SHOE BUCKLES and ORNAMENTS, 
wishes to get in lunch with impftrter^ of this line of 
merchandise. 

10077 — Brussels. Belgium. Manufacturers of a 
high grade of ARTIFICIAL PORTLAND CE- 
MENT wish to establish connections with San 
Francisco buyers of this commodity. 

10078— Brussels. Belgium Manufacturer of 
CEMENT, WHITING and OCHRE COLOR.S, 
desires to establish connections with San Francisco 
importers of these commodities. 

10079— Macassar. Maly Arch. Exporters of 
GUM COPAL. SPICES. RATTANS, HIDES and 
SKINS. SEA SHELLS. HORNS. et«.. wish to ap- 
point a suitable representative for the sale of this 
Colonial produce in the Pacific Coast States. 

10080 — Grundy Center. Iowa. Party desires to 
get in direct touch with San Francisco firms inter- 
ested in purchasing Italian ARTICLES IN CORAL 
and MOTHER-OF-PEARL. TORTOISE SHELL 
and CAMEOS. Have direct connections with 
Italian sources. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D- 1996— .Seattle. Washington. Manufacturers of 
Pacific Coast HARDWOODS desire to establish 
connections with San Francisco furniture manufac- 
turers and users of this stock. 

D-1997— New York, N. Y, Firm wishes to secure 
the representation of some shellers of CALIFOR- 
NIA ALMONDS, not now represented in New York. 

D-1998— New York, N. Y. Firm desires to get in 
touch with several San Francisco manufacturers 
wishing a selling agent or representative in New 
Y'ork. Would consider any line. 

D-1 999— Chattanooga, Tenn. Foundry produc- 
ing CERTIFIED MALLEABLE IRON CAST- 
INGS and ELECTRIC STEEL CASTINGS of 
very high grade wish to get in touch with San Fran- 
cisco buyers of these products. 

[ continued on page 3 | 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 3, 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



Domestic Trade Tips 



tinued from page 2] 



C^ 

A new firm enterinn a new territory must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
h. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor, MerchantsExchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A daily ser\*ice available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m., at the desk of the Information 
Department. 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes. 



Architect— L. H. Pries. Atlas Building. 

Art Needle Work— Venetian Art Shop (Libbey & 
Glenn). 251 Post. 

Attorneys— Russell T. .Ainsworth, 315 Mont- 
gomery to 582 Market: Simeon E. Sheffey, 369 
Pine to Mills Bldg. 

Auto Accessories— Ride Air Sales Co.. 1365 Cali- 
fornia; Grjiy .Auto Equipment Co.. 1432 Van Ness 
Ave.; Levin's Auto Supply Co., 301 Van Ness Ave. 



nn Xei 



Purchasing Agents Urged 
to Join Association 

roncernshavingpurchasingagents 
who are not members of the Pur- 
chasing Agents' Association of 
Northei'ii C'aUfornia are urged to 
join the organization so that San 
Francisco can make a representative 
showing at the convention of the 
National Association of Purchasing 
Agents in Los Angeles, June 9 to 
June 12, according to Harry F. Kolb, 
president of the Northern California 
association. 

The National Association of Pur- 
chasing Agents' convention, Kolb 
declared, will act on issues of para- 
mount interest to purchasing agents 
and he wants the San Francisco 
metropolitan area adequately repre- 
sented. 

Applications for membership in 
the Purchasing Agents' Association 
of Northern California can be sent 
to the organization's headquarters 
at 433 California street. 



Auto Repairing— Ed Saunders. 570 Ellis. 

Autos— Willie Bros. Auto Rental Co., 1460 
Market. 

Bakeries — Brewer's Cake Shop. 212S Mission. 

Cigars— R, J. Boyd. 3398 26th. 

Contractors — Hamilton Construction Co., 5332 
Geary. 

Drugs — New business, S. E. Cor. Jones and Eddy. 

Finance — Realty Mortgage Corp., 114 Sansome. 

Fuel— Custle Gate Coal Co. (100 Brannan), 1652 
Stockton. 

Furriers— J. Stevenson Co., 175 O'Farrell to 150 
Powell. 

Grocers— Patrick Sullivan, 4399 24th. 

Heating and Ventilating — Acme Heating Co., 
1365 California. 

Hosiery— Everwear Hosiery Co. (130 Bush), 
Santa Fe Bldg. 

Machine Work— L. W. Aff Cylinder Works, 56 
Sth to 231 9th: S. v. Freitas, 3070 23d to 359 
Potrero. 

Manufacturers Agents — Fay & Suchy, 5340 
Geary; Coffman & Gaskill, 149 California. 

Millinery — New business, opening 1635 Clement, 

Radio— New Way Radio Laborat6ries. 2433 Cle- 
ment ; Rutherford Rau (Reliable Radio Service), 
5417 Geary. 

Real Estate— Doherty Co., 1209 Taraval; J. P. 
Bonds, 7100 Mi.ssion; V. E. Haley Realty Co., 5000 
Geary; Edmunds Realty Co., 5156 Geary; T. W. 
Kennedy, 321 Bush. 

Restaurants— The Chateau, 181 O'Farrell; Home 
Dining Room (Mrs. Ella E. and Mabel B. Webb), 
519 Clement; Tasty Sandwich Shop, 1157 Market. 
Stocks and Bonds — Logan & Bryan, 401 Mont- 
gomery to Market and Post. 

Washing Machines — Champion Washing Ma- 
chine Co.. 943 Post, 

Waxed Paper — ^Kalamazoo Vegetable Parchment 
Co., 267 7th. 

Miscellaneous — American Society of Viviolo- 
gists, 988 Market; International Art Co., 14 Mont- 
gomery; .\ew Metal Products Co., 445 2d 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than March 11, 
Full information concerning the subjects lifted may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket No. 6608— Lumber to Torrington and 
Cottier. Wyo., CL, eastbounci; 6609. rates from 
stat'ons in Iowa on the Illinois Central System. 
Request that Tariff 4-V be amended to provide 
Group "F" basis of rates from stations in Iowa on 
the Illinois Central System; 6610. roasted coffee, 
CL, westbound, 6611. flour, CL, eastbound; 6612, 
potassium Xanthates, CL, westbound; 6613, carbon 
bisulphide, CL, westbound; 6614, caustic potash 
(concentrated lye), CL. westbound; 6615, wall 
cases (wall cabinets). CL, westbound; 6616. lumber 
carriers (self-propelhng), CL, westbound; 6617, 
lettuce, CL, eastbound; 6618. aqua ammonia, CL. 
eastbound; 6619, rates to Eastern Canadian desti^ 
nations: Proposal to amend Tariff 3-S by cancelling 
commodity rates to Eastern Canadian destinations 
under which there is no movement; 6620, dried peas, 
CL, westbound; 6621, water heating garbage burn- 
ers, CL, westbound; 6622, ground mica, in metal 
cans, LCL, westbound; 6623, copper-coated red 
cedar shingles, CL, eastbound; 6624, fancy pack 
mixture, viz. : dried fruits, glace fruit and nut meats, 
LCL, eastbound; 6625, burlap bags, second-hand, 
CL, westbound; 6628, locomotive and wrecking 
cranes, CL, westbound; 6627, pulley blocks and 
pulleys (not machinerjO. No. S., LCL, westbound; 
6628, cabbage, CL, eastbound; 6629. goats, CL, 
westbound; 6630, return transportation for care- 
takers in charge of live stock; 6631, filter tanks, CL, 
westbound; 6572, (cor.) fruits, melons and fresh 
vegetables, CL, eastbound. 



D-2000— Saginaw, Michigan. The Saginaw 
Board of Commerce, erecting a large storage ware- 
house to be completed about October 1, would-like 
to communicate with California FRUIT PACKERS, 
DRIERS and SHIPPERS, who would be interested 
in taking advantage of this storage space, 

D-2001— Portland, Oregon. Commission mer- 
chants desire to get in touch with California pro- 
ducers or brokers of RAMANELLO CHEESE. 

D-2002— Ontario, Calif. An experienced CRATE 
MAKER desires to establish connections with 
Alaskan fish canners having San Francisco dis- 
tributing offices. 

D-2003 — San Francisco. Calif. Trading company, 
incorporated for $50,000 under the laws of Alaska, 
has been organized for the purpose of bringing a 
cargo of coal from Anchorage to Portland, or San 
Francisco and take on a cargo of merchandise on 
return trip. Return cargo is assured and operation 
cost small. $25,000 has been subscribed in Anchor- 
age so far and it is desired to place about $20,000 of 
the stock with reliable San Francisco wholesale 
houses interested in such a venture. More complete 
information on file with the Foreign & Domestic 
Trade Department. 

D-2004 — Richmond. Virginia. Manufacturers of 
a PULVERIZING CAKE SOAP DEVICE, a de- 
vice to be attached to the wall, which will pulverize 
cake soap when handle is turned — a sanitary and 
economic method of using toilet soap, wish to ap^ 
point a suitable agent in this district to market and 
sell their product. 

D-2005— New York, N. Y. Manufacturers of a 
NU-METHOD BUILDING i\L\TERIAL (com- 
posed of concrete blocks already assembled in 
standardized si^es and shapes) desire to appoint a 
suitable firm or individual to represent them in this 
territory. 

D-2006 — Danvers. Mass Old established manu- 
facturers of WAX and CHALK CRAYONS are 
very desirous of introducing their products in Cali- 
fornia and wish to appoint an energetic selling rep- 
resentative. 

D-2007— Seattle, Washington. Owner of a 
SHOE and HOSIERY STORE wishes to sell his 

D-200S— New Rochelle, N. Y. Party desires to 
represent a California manufacturer of PAINT and 
VARNISH ill the East. 

D-2009— New York, N, Y. Manufacturers of an 
ELECTRIC HAMMER, driven by alternate cur- 
rent, suitable for use by sculptors, marble and 
cement workers, machine works, etc., desire to es- 
tablish connections with a San Francisro individual 
or firm to represent them on a 10 per cent commig- 

D-2010— Amarillo. Texas. Inventor of an 
AUTOMOBILE SIGNALING DEVICE wi.shes to 
place it with some good concern in San Francisco 
Blue print and copy of patent specifications of this 
device are on file with the Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Department. 

D-2011— Sixes, Oregon Owner of crop of PO- 
TATOES deeires to get in touch with San Francisco 
buyers of Oregon-grown potato seed. 



Revenue Freight Loading 

Loading of revenue freight the week ended Feb- 
ruary 13, totaled 917,144 cars, according to reports 
filed by the carriers with the car service division of 
the American Railway Association. 

This was an increase of 13,209 cars over the cor- 
responding week in 1925, but a decrease of 18,445 
cars under the corresponding week in 1924, The 
total for the week of February 13 also was an in- 
crease of 2,240 cars over the preceding week, in- 
creases being reported in the total loading of all 
commodities except grain and grain products, coal 
and merchandise and les,s. than carload-lot freight. 



SAX FUANc:i.Sf'o BisiNKSs. .\rAUf'ii :j, irtji; 



United States Intercoastal 

Conference Westbound 

Rate Docket 

Bulletin Nm. :if>, [ju^ung date Murch li. IM^G. 

T^he followinit subiwts havp been referred to the 
Staodinc Itntc Committee and w-ill be disp«je«(I of 
not earlier ihao March 15, 1926. Full informatioD 
conoerninit tbe subject* listed may be had upon in- 
quiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San Fran- 
ci»co Chamber of Commerce: 

R-104 — Monet meUl shot. Proposed additioD to 
Item 4S0: R-195. Oavorinit syrups, fruit juices and 
preserved fruits. Request for the establishment of 
a mixe<l carload rate of 50c per 100 pounds; R-496. 
slwl lihelvinx K. D. Bat. Request for a CL rate of 
COc. LCL 85c: R-107. copper vnn and cables. Rc- 
qucnt for the e«tablishment of a CL rate of -lOc per 
100 poumls: R-198, cotton fabric enameled or im- 
pregnated with waler-proofinjt compound. Request 
to (Mid to Item 800; R-499. bathinettes. Request to 
estabtbth same rates an carried in Items 1355 and 
1360: R'.VIO. flac!! on sticks. Request for the eatab- 
lUhnient of a CL rate of $1.0l>. minimum »-ci«ht 
10.000 pounds. LCL $1.25; R-501, woven paper 
fabric baics. Docketed for tariff clarification: R-502. 
J LCL unreleased 



INCOME TAX 

r continued from page 1 ] 



$10,000 
14.000 
16.000 
IS.OOO 
20.000 
22.000 
24,000 
28,000 
32.000 
36.000 
40,000 
44,000 
48,000 
52,000 
56,000 
60,000 
64.000 
70.000 
80,000 
100,000 
100,000 



The tax rates and amount of tax on net 
income subject to the normal and surtax 
in the case of a taxpayer entitled to a per- 
sonal exemption of $3,500 are indicated 
by the following table: 

Highest Rate of Tax 
Amount 
of net Normal 



1 


WO 


$40 


1> 


40 


SO 


3 


BO 


140 


4 


80 


220 


5 


100 


320 


6 


120 


440 


7 


280 


720 


8 


320 


1,040 


9 


360 


1,400 


10 


400 


1,800 


11 


440 


2,240 


12 


480 


2.720 


13 


520 


3,240 


14 


560 


3,800 


15 


600 


4.400 


IB 


640 


5.040 


17 


1,020 


6.060 


18 


1,800 


7,860 


19 


3,800 


11,660 


20 . 







Price, Utah, C. of C. Wants 
Local Members to Call 

Members of the .San Francisco 
Chamljer of Commerce who visit 
Price, Utah, will Ix- accorded a 
hearty reception, accordinc to a 
letter to the local Chanilxr from the 
Price Chanilwr of Commerce. The 
Utah organization is particularly 
eager to be advi.sed in advance of 
any visits to be made by meml>ers of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce who could address the Utah 
members. The letter stated: 

"It is our adopted purposj' to ob- 
tain this year a.s freiiuently as possi- 
ble men from other communities to 
address our Chamber. Of course, 
we shall be pleased if the.se are 
speakers, but we also are anxious to 
have men visit us on their business 
trips through our section. 

"Whenever you know of any of 
your people planning a trip through 
or to Utah we would lie very gla<l if 
you would inform us of it that we 
may arrange a congenial get-to- 
gether . . . why not give them a 
double opportunity whereby they 
may meet with the Chamber and 
obtain a little social pleasure along 
with the business to be attended to?" 

Price, according to the communi- 
cation, is located on the D. & H. G. 
Railroad and is the principal city of 
Western Utah. 



MARINE TRAFFIC GROWS 

Five hundred and four veaiwls with an asgrcgate 
tonnage of 1.308.677 arrived at the port of San 
Francisco during February. reKv-^tcring a big in- 
crease in both the number of ships and tonnage over 
a corresponding period in 1926, according to figures 
compiled by the Marine Department of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 

During February, 1925. 476 ships of 1.074,355 
tons arrived here. 

Five hundred and five ships sailed out of this port 
last month, representing a tonnage of 1,207,918. 
For the same month in 1925 there were 586 de- 
partures with a total tonnage of 1.065,494. 



Specifications Available 

The following specificatioas co>'ering bid« re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department 

For furnishing the War DepartmL-nt and deliver- 
ing to the U. S. Kngineero. Rio Vista. Califumia. 
miscellaneous paekingM, gaskotfl. etc Bi'ls are to be 
submitted to the t'. S. Engineer Office. Seeood 
DLotrict, 85 Heeond street, San Francu>co, Calif., 
and will be opened March H. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing to the U. S. Engineers, Rio Vi-ta. California, 
mtiuyllaneous castings, etc. Bids are to be sub- 
mitted to tlie r S. Engineer Office. Second District. 
85 Second street. San Francisco, Calif., and will be 
opened March 10, 1926. 

For furnishing the Alaska Railroad, to be de- 
li%'ercd, free of all ehargce, on Pier in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, wool yarn wafte. colored cotton waste, air 
brake equipmen*, and paint in barreU. Bids are to 
be submitted to Cieneral Purcha.Mng AReni. Alaska 
Kailroa^l, Seattle, Washingtoo, and will be opened 
March 10. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charge*, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or BulbfM (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone. IsthmuH of Panama, with stet'l. pipe, conduit, 
chain, wood ncrcws, cable wire, generator, concrete 
mixen'. saw machine, Rur\'eyoni' level, filinit cabi- 
nets, trench braces, wheel barrows, door locks, 
hinges, hasps, barrel bolts, drawer handlee, termin- 
nal blocks, cut-oul>i, resistance unit«. wall recepta- 
cles, !HK:kets. reflectors, receivers, tape, eash cord, 
brupht*. glovex, pencil jtharpcner*. paper clipa, 
typewTiter ribbonn. blue-print paper, memorandum 
books, paper, and brL^tol board. Bids are to be sub- 
mitted to the General Purchasing Officer of the 
Panama Canal, Washington, D. C and uill be 
opened March II. 1926. 



NATIONAL BUSINESS SHOW 

[ continued from pii«e 1 ] 

Frank E. Tapper, president of 
the National Business show organi- 
zation, who is here ft)r the e.\press 
purpose of putting over the show tfi 
a big succe.ss, .said in all his dealings 
in the principal cities of the United 
States, he has yet to find a more 
energetic group of business men than 
those he has encounteretl in San 
Francisco. The show, which in a 
sense is a convention and therefore 
invariably acts as a tremendous ad- 
vertisement for whatever city it 
occupies, was imniediately accepted 
here. 



TAX RATES 



Gross Amount of Tax 



ToUl 



Earned 



earned 



unearned 



$3,500 

3.600 

3,.S00 

4,000 

4,200 

4,500 

4.S0O 

5.000 

5.200 

5..500 

6,000 

0,500 

7,000 

7,500 

8,000 

9,000 
10,000 

From $10,000 



None 

m 
m 

m 
m 
m 
m 



None 


None 


1^% 


$ 1 50 


IH 


4 50 


m 


7 .50 


m 


10 .50 


lJ-2 


15 00 


iM 


19 SO 


VA 


22 50 


m 


25 50 


11-2 


30.00 


m 


.37.50 


m 


45 00 


ij-4 


52 50 


I'i 


60 00 


3 


75,00 


3 


105.00 


3 


135.00 



None 
$ 1 50 

4 SO 
7 .50 
10 50 
15 00 
19 50 
22.50 
25.50 
30.00 
37.50 
45.00 
52. 50 
60.00 
75 '00 
105 00 
135 00 



None 
S 1 13 
3 38 
5.63 
7.88 
11 25 
14.63 
16 88 
19.13 
22.50 
28.13 
33.75 
39.38 
45 00 
56 25 



None 
S 1.13 
3 38 
5 63 
7.88 
11.25 
14 63 
16.88 
19.88 
24 38 
31.88 
39 38 
46.88 
54 38 
69.38 
99 38 
129. 3S 



FILE COP 

INFORMATION BU 





March lO ^ 1926 



;a\ I'KANCisco BrsiNi;ss. maucii hi, kilt, 




RADIOGRAMS 




Order Silk - in Japan 



Annually Japan exports more than 
$275,000,000 worth of raw silk- 
double the raw silk exports of her 
nearest competitor. 



American silk importers, turning to 
Japan for their supplies of raw silk, are 
relying more and more on Radiograms 
for speedy, accurate transmission of 
their orders. 



Always mark your Radiograms 




File messages to Hawaii, Japan and the Dutch East Indies 

at any Western Union office; or phone for a Western Union 

messenger. And to Europe, the Near East and SouthAmerica 

at anyJRCA or Postal Telegraph office; or phone for 

an RCA or Postal Telegraph messenger. 

Radiograms go direct from America to: 
Hawaii. Japan and the Dutch East Indies 

England Poland Norway 



Radio Corporation of America 



SAN FRANCISCO 
28 Geary Street Garfield 4200 



LOS ANGELES 
453 So. Spring Street— TUcke 



SEATTLE 
e Building— ELiot 3719 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10. 1920 



A CROWNING AG«tlEVEMENT 

OF NMRty HALF:ISenTURY 






OF PiltflAIN PENiSiOI^REMACY 










OUR San Francisco Service Station is now installed in the new 
Waterman Building at 609 Market Street. 

Waterman Service Stations, all located in Waterman-owned 
buildings, are an individual Waterman feature. They act as 
insurance of perfect satisfaction both to merchants who sell and 
consumers who buy Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens. 
Being located in Boston, New York, Montreal, Chicago, and now 
in San Francisco, they circle the United States just as the influence 
of Waterman's Fountain Pens circles the globe. 

There is a big advantage in purchasing merchandise that has 
behind it a real and substantial organization. 

You are cordially inrited to call and inspect the new Waterman Building and show ; 



L. E. Waterman Co., 609 Market Street, San Francisco 



DISPLAY 



B U S I X E S S 



cTlladc &aMV 







VISIBLE INDEX 

Offset cards signal for attention. The 
most practical and positive plan of Oj^- 
setting or grouping record facts results 
from the G-W Metal Card Holder. An 
invaluable principle for follow-up 
work in all departments of business. 
This is only one of the many superior 
features of the Globe-WernickeVisible 
Index. Let us demonstrate its advan- 
tages. 

On display at the Bustitess Shoiv. 



H. S. Crocker Company, Inc. 

565-571 Market Street 242 Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



DISPLAY 



BUSINESS 



SAN FKANCISro BUSINESS. MARCH 10, 1926 



Meeting the foreign Traders 



By RALPH J. SCANLON 




HE Pacific Foreign Trade 
Council was organized in 
Seattle at the close of 
the war period by a 
group of clear-sighted 
l>usiii(<^ men who realized that the 
Piicitic Cuast is a commercial unit 
and that there are special foreign 
trade problems peculiar to this re- 
gion which cannot by their very 
nature be given adequate considera- 
tion at the sessions of the national 
organization. 

Four conventions have been held, 
one each at Seattle, Tacoma, Port- 
land and San Francisco. At the 
fourth convention, in San Francisco, 
March 4 to 6 of this year, of which 
R. I. Bentley of the California Pack- 
ing Corporation was chairman and 
Henry F. Grady, director of the 
Foreign Trade Department of the 
San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, was secretary, the delegates 
decided to "follow the birds to Vic- 
toria," British Columbia, for their 
ne.xt convention accepting the in- 
vitation of the civic bodies there as 
another token of the friendly rela- 
tions existing between the peoples 
of the United States and Canada. 
Further conventions will undoubt- 
edly take place at other important 
and growing foreign trade centers of 
the Pacific Coast such as Los 
Angeles, Oakland and San Diego. 

Tangible Results 

It may well be asked and it has 
been asked, does a foreign trade con- 
vention of this nature produce 
tangible results sufficient to justify 
its existence? Emphatically it does, 
as can be abundantly demonstrated. 

The West has problems with re- 
lation to production and distribu- 
tion apart from other sections of the 
United States. Port cities of the 
Pacific Coast and interior cities of 
the West should work out these 
problems together for the best in- 
terests of all concerned. Other sec- 
tions of the United States are organ- 
ized for the promotion and protec- 
tion of their own interests and east- 
ern business men are engrossed with 
their own immediate needs. There- 
fore it falls to the lot of the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council, which has 
the co-operation of all the commer- 
cial organizations in the Pacific 
Coast-Rocky Mountain region, to 
initiate and carry on the work of 
uniting the states affected. 



The intention of the program for 
organization is not to be provincial 
in scope or attitude, but to aid in 
developing the West and at the same 
time insure the confidence of the 
Middle West and East, thereby 
strengthening the position of all 
three great divisions of the United 
States on national and international 
matters. 

The problems of international re- 
lations and adjustments are so tre- 
mendous that Americans as individ- 
uals, and the nation as a whole, can- 
not succeed unless there is behind 
them an enlightened public opinion 
and the co-operation of their govern- 
ment. It is therefore the aim of this 
organization to enlightenitsmembers 
and the public in general on matters 
of mutual importance to the country 
west of the Rooky Mountains and 
to have it known throughout the 
world that it is a substantial and 
permanent structiu-e. 

Awakens Interest 

The Pacific Foreign Trade Coun- 
cil includes the following states, 
provinces and territories: Alaska, 
British Columbia, Washington, 
Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Oregon, 
California, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, 
Arizona, New Mexico and Hawaii, 
with an area of two million square 
miles. The foreign commerce for the 
United States Pacific Coast for 1925 
amounted to one billion dollars, as 
compared with but 130 milhons in 
1900, showing an average increase of 
35 million dollars per year; and 66 
million tons of foreign, intercoastal 
and coastwise cargo was moved by 
water to and from Pacific Coast 
ports in the year 1925, or eight 
thousand eight hundred shiploads. 

Nothing is more instrumental in 
awakening an interest in foreign 
trade than foreign trade confer- 
ences, such as this, from time to 
time. This brings together business 
men, bankers, manufacturers, farm- 
ers, railroad and steamship men, im- 
porters and exporters, all of whom 
are equally interested, and assists 
them to become better acquainted 
and to form contacts for concen- 
trated action in dealing with na- 
tional and industrial policies. 

Many conventions are mainly 
social and vacational in character 
and whatever benefits may accrue 
from them cannot be readily gauged. 
While the personal contacts between 



those engaged in a common occupa- 
tion in the same commercial area are 
a not inconsequential by-product of 
the recent convention, the main 
business of the convention was busi- 
ness. Sessions started promptly on 
time and consisted of authoritative 
monographs on subjects of technical 
foreign trade interest. There were 
no dilatory recesses. The luncheon 
speakers confined themselves to 
topics vital to the life and growth of 
commercial prosperity. Group ses- 
sions were held in the evening to 
cover specialized subjects on coun- 
tries, credit and entrepot trade. Even 
the banquet had an atmosphere of 
serious business interspersed with 
the entertaimnent features. The 
banquet speakers each had a real 
contribution to make to the sum 
total of thought and ideas brought 
out during the convention. Also the 
boat trip around the bay on the 
steamer Angel Island, by courtesy 
of John D. Nagle, Conunissioner of 
Immigration, and the auto rides 
in San Francisco and the East Bay, 
included a survey of the harbor 
facilities and industrial development 
of the San Francisco Bay district. 

Lots of "Shop" Talk 

Perhaps it may seem to an on- 
looker that the convention "talked 
shop" with a vengeance. It did. 
That was its business. But it was 
not common ordinary shop talk. 
Matters of group interest as well as 
items of individual significance which 
do not ordinarily come to the fore- 
front in the course of daily trade but 
which have a distinct bearing on the 
sum total of all trade, rendered the 
program one of intense interest to 
the delegates. "Agricultural Prod- 
ucts the Basis of West Coast Pros- 
perity, Necessit}' for Their Increased 
Export," by Ralph Meri'itt, presi- 
dent of the Sun-Maid Raisin Grow- 
ers' Association; "Relation of the 
Railways to the Development of 
Industries for Export on the Pacific 
Coast," by Paul Shoup, vice-presi- 
dent of the Southern Pacific Co.; 
"Pacific Coast Influence on World 
Development," by Jas. A. Bacigalupi, 
president of the Bank of Italy; "Im- 
porting as a Means of Increasing 
Export Sales," by C. C. Colt, vice- 
president of the First National Bank 
of Portland — in fact, the entire pro- 
gram might be quoted, but the afore- 

[ continued on page 19 ] 



S.\N FR.\NC;iSCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 

H CLAY MILI-ER. PrtMml C W, SArNDERS. Vice Praidml PHILIP FAY. Viu Praidenl 

ROBERT NE«TON LI'XCH. Vice PraUenl ctd Manner W. W. STETTHEIMER. Tretuurtr 

Published weekly by the San Fraocisco Chamber of Commerce. 205 Merchants Exchange. Phone Kearny 112. 

Subecripti 

Bt Office. Sa 

Vol. XI r Sax Frastisco. CAHFORNi.t. Mnr.h 10, 1926 No. 9 

CURRENT EVENTS IN WASHINGTON 

''By C. B. DODDS, liepresetitatiye San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



OAX FRANCISCO .stands at the 
^ head of the priority hst prepared 
by the Trcasurj' and Post Office De- 
partments for the construction of 
new Federal Iniildinps in Cahfornia. 
Trea,sury antl post office e.\i)erts 
have estimated that the new FVderal 
buildinp for San Francisco will cost 
$4,310,000. Oakland is on another 
list, but is lielieved to be assured of 
a new building in view of the fact 
that its present post office structure 
and site can be sold for sufficient 
funds to erect one. Other California 
cities on the preferred list are Los 
Angeles, 83,000,000; Sacramento, 
$1,275,000; Stockton, 8510,000. The 
PubHc Buildings Bill, making the 
necessarv appropriation for 8165,- 
000,000 worth of public buildings all 
over the United States, has been 
passed by the House and is now 
pending on the Senate calendar, 
where early and favorable action is 
anticipated 

'T'HE ARMY'S big gun program 
-*■ has been altered to provide four 
of the new 16-inch rifles for the de- 
fense of San Francisco Bay instead 
of two. It costs nearly one million 
dollars to install one gun, so that the 
department is proceeding slowly in 
developing this big gun program. 
Most of the weapons themselves are 
supplied bj' the Naw from guns 
built immediateh' after the war. 

pHAIRMAX ^^TIITE, of the sub- 
^ committee handling radio legis- 
lation in the House, has decided ad- 
versely on the request of the Pacific 
Foreign Trade Council's committee 
on trans-Pacific communication that 
action be taken in the present Con- 
gress giving the Na\'y more author- 
ity in the use of its radio faciUties in 
the communication of commercial 
messages. ^\Tiite has not permitted 



NOTICE 

Copies of the recent Tax 
Revison Law are on file in 
the Information Depart- 
ment of the Chamber of 
Commerce and are avail- 
able to members and others 
who may desire to consult 
them. 



anj^ reference to the matter to ap- 
pear in the pending Radio Bill, on 
the ground that it is desired to keep 
the Nax-y out of the commercial 
business uidess facilities cannot be 
offered by private companies. 

'C'OL'R counties in California pro- 
^ duccd last year more than one- 
half of the magnesite production in 
the United States, according to 
figures just given out by Secretary 
Hoover. Six operators at seven 
mines produced 64,600 tons of 
magnesite, valued at 8872,100. 
Magnesite importations still remain 
greatly in excess of the domestic 
production. Those interested in the 
industrj' say this wiU be the case 
until the tariff rate is increased so 
that the American product can be 
marketed at a profit. 

TPHE Civil Ser\'ice Commission is 
-*- about to install a finger-printing 
service in San Francisco with the co- 
operation of the police department. 
The commission wiU then proceed to 
take the fingerprints of everj" Fed- 
eral employee in San Francisco and 
of every appUcant for appointment. 
This system has been tried out suc- 
cessfully in New York, Chicago and 
half a dozen other eastern cities, 
where fonner convicts have been 
found handling valuable mail in the 



postal .service and performing other 
confidential services. The com- 
mission reports it has no objection 
to engaging a man with a criminal 
record if he will acknowledge and 
frankly .set forth all the facts, that a 
full investigation may be made. 

AAA 

T ALFRED HALL, a chemist from 
" • the California Fruit Growers' 
Exchange, is working with the 
L'nited States Bureau of Chemistry 
on the development of orange juice. 
The ultimate objective is to make 
orange culls worth as much in the 
bottle as the large sun-kissed ripe 
fruit sold in the East. Hall and the 
Government chemists have carried 
their experiments to such an extent 
that they have reduced ten thousand 
gallons of orange juice to less than a 
half pint to the gallon. 

CONGRESSMAN CARTER of 
^^ Oakland is investigating the 
prospect of erecting cotton miUs in 
California. During a recent trip to 
North Carolina he discovered a 
numl>er of the largest mills working 
largelj' on California cotton. He 
believes that despite the less favor- 
able labor conditions as to hours and 
hours the cotton-mill business would 
be profitable in California. 

"TilRECTOR MATHER of the 
National Park Service has re- 
cently ordered drastic cuts in the 
entrance fees to all National Parks. 
This is the first step in the ultimate 
elimination of fees at all parks. 

AAA 

A LL chance of California benefit- 
ing by way of refunds from the 
Federal Treasury, should the Su- 
preme Court later reverse its de- 
cision and hold with the California 
contention on community property, 

[ continued on page 10 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



yrom Artichokes to jCj 



innias 




CURTIS REDFERN 




NKNOWN to most San 
Franciscans a great and 
growing industry invades 
San Franciscoeach morn- 
ing before dawn. Almost 
un-iM'ii it f' lids its wares into packing 
brixes wliieh are hurried across the 
bay to waiting trains to be carried to 
the far-away markets of the Atlantic 
Seaboard cities, into Canada, and 
south into Mexico. 

This business of cut flowers began 
in 1915 and in ten years has grown to 
such an extent that it is the largest 
customer of the American Railway 
Express Company in San Francisco, 
paying that company as much as 
$5,000 a day for its services. The 
flower business itself is a ten-million- 
dollar one and is increasing 25 per 
cent a j'ear. 

Flowers and Plants 
Beautified Exposition 

The year 1915 lingers in the mem- 
ories of San Franciscans as our 
dream year — the Exposition Year, 
when the city by the Golden Gate 
staged her mammoth comeback 
from the staggering blows of 1906. 

Of the many factors that made 
our exffosition better and different 
than former expositions, one was the 
prodigious use of flowers and plants. 
There was a gala procession of 
flowers from the millions of daffodils 
and hyacinths of the opening week, 
through the colorful changes as each 
month brought her floral offerings of 
pansies, violas, orange blossoms, 
irises, gladioli, sweet peas, roses, 



chrysanthemums, to the triumphant 
blaze of glory of the many-hued 
queen of autumn flowers, the dahlia. 
Visitors to San Francisco were 
hard pressed to find superlatives 
enough to go around and the wiser 
ones contented themselves by feast- 
ing their eyes on the glorious pro- 
fusion of beauty and did not try to 
describe it. 

Nothing Unusual to the 
Home Follis 

The home folks looked on this dis- 
play as a matter-of-fact affair; to 
them it was nothing new, the street 
flower vendors and the florists' win- 
dows blazoned with each season's 
choicest contributions from Flora, 
and Golden Gate Park always had a 
wealth of bloom. Their homes if not 
their gardens always had flowers, and 
they had the reputation of spending 
more per capita for flowers than any 
other city in the world. Flowers 
were on the hst of the day's pur- 
chases as regularly as food for the 
table. 

Artichokes appear in the title to 
this article for a very good reason, 
for this vegetable was a forerunner 
of the cut-flower industry of today. 
In 1915, the American Railway E.x- 
press Company's representatives in 
San Francisco, as an experiment, 
placed a refrigerator express car into 
service between San Francisco and 
the East and invited the local arti- 
choke growers to use the service. 
Fresh artichokes were soon being 
served in New York cafes. They 



stood the trip so well that within a 
few months they were going east by 
fast freight instead of by the more 
expensive express. It was then that 
Mr. W. A. Lewis, commercial agent 
of the company, was detailed to 
solve the problem of finding a sub- 
stitute for the wayward artichoke. 
On St. Anne street, jast off of 
Bush street, several wholesale florists 
had stores where the local florists 
came for their supply of flowers. 
Business had been none too good; 
overproduction seemed always to 
threaten the growers, and, in an 
effort to maintain prices, the day's 
unsold stock was literally guillotined. 
Thousands of beautiful chrysanthe- 
mums were being decapitated like 
criminals one day when Mr. Lewis 
happened by. The economic and 
esthetic waste occasioned by this 
ruthless destruction caused him to 
pause and ponder, ^\^ly not ship 
'mums in those refrigerator cars? 

Eastern Market 
Instantly Created 

The destruction was halted, and 
as an expermient several boxes of 
chrysanthemums were consigned to 
the express company's eastern 
agents. A market was created almost 
instantly. The splendid service ren- 
dered by the express and railway 
companies delivered the flowers to 
the eastern markets in fine condi- 
tion. The flowers themselves were 
superior to any grown elsewhere, as 
our long cool growing season brings 

[ continued on page 9 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1!)2G 



Cyinother i\ew jkymark 




IAN FRANCISCO has 
not entirely lost the in- 
dividualism of the pio- 
neer times. Kven in these 
days of Community 
Chest and the teamwork for which 
the Chamber of Commerce stands, 
individualism does not yet walk on 
crutches. 

In many other 
cities such a great 
project as the con- 
struction of the 
largest and tallest 
office building on the 
Pacific CJoast would 
have called for citi- 
zens' mass meetings 
and sought the sup- 
port of "endorse- 
ments." 

Not so in San Fran- 
cisco, where the new 
Russ Building will 
soon rise thirty 
stories from Mont- 
gomery street, mark- 
ing the financial cen- 
ter of the West. 

The two invest- 
ment-bond houses 
that conceived this 
great undertaking 
have underwritten 
all the securities and 
offer them to the 
public, thus creating 
the new precedent of 
public ownership. 
Building on pioneer 
ground — this block 
between Pine and 
Bush streets has been 
in the ownership of 
the Ru.ss family since 
1847— E. H. RoUins 
& Sons and Blyth, 
Witter & Co. have 
shown the true pio- 
neer spirit in working 
out all the prelinii- 
nar}' difficulties with- 
out calling for help, 
or the endorsement 
that would readily have been given. 
This great structure means much 
to San Francisco, for it establishes 
the metropolitan character of the 
San Francisco financial district. It 
is also interesting to learn that on 
the initial day of the offering the 
Rollins Boston office sold $60,000 of 
the certificates representing pre- 
ferred and common stock to New 



England investors, and reports from 
other parts of the East indicate a 
similar desire to join in the owner- 
ship of this outstanding piece of real 
property in San Francisco. 

Evidently Easterners recognize 
the fact that property in the heart 
of the San Francisco financial dis- 
trict is pretty certain to grow in 




value, and that it is a good invest- 
ment. San Franciscans can hardly 
have less confidence in their own 
city. The fact that the Russ Build- 
ing will be a tremendous benefit to 
San Francisco has not been urged 
by the underwriters of its securities ; 
for it is a money-making project. 
The Russ Building is conceived and 
will be constructed for the primary 



purpose of making money for its 
stockholders. 

One feature of the new Russ 
Building that will add greatly to its 
rentability and the certainty of its 
earnings is the garage that will care 
for 400 tenants' cars. Parked end 
to end on both sides of the street 
the motor cars that will be housed 
within this building 
wouldrcachforeleven 
city blocks on both 
sides of the street. 

How the Russ 
Building will domi- 
nate the skyline may 
be appreciated from 
the fact that the 
windows in the 
upper stories of the 
tower will give a 
glimpse of the Pacific 
Ocean. There will be 
eight acres of rent- 
able floor space, ex- 
clusive of the ground 
floor and garage, the 
occupancy of which 
will add greatly to 
the rental value of 
the ground-floor 
stores. And, great 
as it will be. San 
Francisco needs the 
new Russ Building. 

Never in the his- 
tory of San Francisco 
has the skyline taken 
on so many rapid 
transformations as 
during the last year. 
The completion of 
the Telephone Build- 
ing, the Huntington 
Apartments and a 
half dozen relatively 
important structures 
has given a new im- 
petus to building ac- 
tivities that promises 
to establish a new 
record during the 
current year. 

Mammoth hotelf, 
apartment houses, theatres and 
office buildings are being planned, 
and several are alreadj- under con- 
struction. Landmarks are fast dis- 
appearing such as the historic struc- 
ture at California and Montgomery, 
and being replaced by the finest 
buildings in the West. 

San Francisco is forging ahead, 
industrially and financially. 



SAN FRAXCISro BI'SIXEt<S. MARCH 10, 1026 



San Francisco FldYver Business 
Amounts to $10,000,000 

a I eaV [continued from page 7] 

them to perfection as to size, form, 
color and long-keeping qualities. 
Some varieties keep fresh as long as 
six weeks after cutting. 

From this small beginning in 1915, 
the chrysanthemum cut-flower busi- 
ness has grown until in October of 
1925 the express company trans- 
ported eighty-two full refrigerator 
cars, each holding 12,500 large 
chrysanthemums — more than a mil- 
lion blooms. These flowers carried 
San Francisco's message of beauty 
to cities on the Atlantic from Maine 
to Florida, in the north to Canada, 
and south into Mexico. 

November 1st, All Saints Day, is 
observed in New Orleans as a local 
Memorial Day, and last October ten 
carloads of chrysanthemums, the 
equivalent of a standard passenger 
train, left San Francisco for the 
Crescent City, and were there re- 
tailed at $1.50 a stem. 

These chrysanthemums are all 
grown within trucking distance of 
San Francisco by Japanese who 
know how to grow them to perfec- 
tion. They are packed dry in boxes 
and taken to Oakland pier where 
thej- are loaded into refrigerator 
express cars. 

Three years ago the business had 
outgrown the space available in St. 
Anne street, and larger quarters 
were secured on Fifth and Howard 
streets. The market is in fact three 
distinct markets, one for the white 
growers, another for the Japanese, 
and the third for the Chinese. The 
floor space is divided into booths 
where the individual growers display 
their stocks. About 250 growers 
comprise the market, and consider- 
ing the money value of the turnover 
the acreage planted is surprisingly 
small. It has been estimated that at 
this time 100 acres are planted to 
the large-flowered chrysanthemums, 
and a similar acreage to both the 
small oi- button varieties and the 
large Chinese asters. Fifty acres 
are planted to straw-flowers, and 
probably not more than that to 
roses. Within half an hour's ride 
from the market there is one range 
of greenhouses planted to 100,000 
rose bushes. Rose culture permits 
of such close planting that the esti- 
mated .50 acres gives no idea of its 
important place in the industry. 

The movement of chrysanthe- 
mums east was so successful that it 
was not long before experiments 
were made with other varieties of 
flowers. An experimental consign- 

[ continued on page 11 1 



oAn Insurance 

'Department Store 



THE Fireman's Fund writes not only the well-known 
coverages under the head of Fire, Automobile and 
Marine Insurance, but also many other related classes, which, 
taken together with the primary forms of insurance, afford 
more complete protedion to the insured. 

The Fireman's Fund might be considered a department store 
of proteftion, with fire, automobile and marine insurance as 
the big staples in stock, but with the following large variety 
of forms of insurance to offer: 



FIRE 

Leasehold 
Rent 

Rental "Value 
Use and Occupancy 
Profit 

Contingent Liability 
Explosion 
Riot and Ciril 
Commotion 
Falleti Building 
JVindSlorm 
Sprinkler Leakage 
Open Policy 
Blanket Coverage 
General Cover 
Excess 
Provisional 



MARINE 
Hulls 

Cargoes 
Transportation 
Baggage 
Parcel PoSl 
Salesman's Floaters 
Motor Transit 



AUTOMOBILE 

Fire and Theft 
Liability 
Collision 

Property Damage 
Dealer's Open Policy 

and Lease ContraS 

Coverages 
Embezzlement 
Confiscation 
Earthquake, Sxplosion 

or Water Damage 
Riot, InsurreSion 

or Civil Commotion 
Tornado, Cyclone 

or Windstorm 
Hail Coverage 
Tradors, Trailers 



oAsk Your 'broker 




FIREMAN'S FUND 

■ -. INSURANCE COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1920 



CURRENT EVENTS OF INTEREST I N WASHINGTON 

I coDtinued from pace 6 ] 



went glimmering when the H<^use 
and Senate conferees adopted an 
amendment to the Revenue Bill pro- 
viding that refunds shall not be 
given taxpayers who "elect" to 
pay on the non-community property 
basis. Assistant Secretary Winston 
cleverly kept this item out of the bill 
until it had gone to conference, mak- 
ing it virtually impossible for the 
California members to obtain its 
elimination without endangering the 
whole Revenue Bill. 



JUDGE A. E. GRAUPNER of San 
" Francisco, a member of the Board 
of Tax Appeals, came to the rescue 
of traveling salesmen when he held 
that money spent in entertaining 
customers is a legitimate charge-off 
as expenses in fiUng income tax re- 
turns. 

1\/T RS. KAHN and the other mem- 
■'•'■^ bcrs of the California delega- 
tion are making a determined effort 
to obtain enactment at this ses,sion 



cAssociated for Three Generations 'with the 'Best Progress of the West 



e 



HARACTER ot service, 
rather than quantity of 
service, is the manifest 
measure of merit. 

Sixty years' experience 
in financing the commer- 
cial and industrial devel- 
opment of the West has 
made this institution one 
of the largest in sheer 
power of resource; but to 
merit this big volume of 
business it has constantly 
adhered to sound bank- 
ing principles. 




'^BANKOF CALIFORNIA 



COMMERCIAL 



San Francisco 

Capital, Surplus and 
Undivided Profits, over 
$17,000,000— 
a guarantee fund for 
the protection of our 
depositors. 



of a Congressional reapportionment 
bill which will result in at least 
three new Congressmen for Cali- 
fornia. The situation is not regarded 
as hopeful, in view of the reported 
opposition of House Republican 
leaders. a * a 

'T'HE nex-t maneuvers of the coin- 
■*■ bined fleet of the Na^'>' will 
probably he held in the Atlantic, 
according to plans recently an- 
nounced by Chairman Hale of the 
Senate Naval Affairs Committee. 
Hale made the point that the ma- 
neuvers in the last three years have 
all been held in the Pacific and he 
thought it was time the fleet navi- 
gators were learning something of 
the Atlantic coasthne. 

'T'HE further development of Cres- 
■*■ cent City Harbor has been post- 
poned by action of the Board of 
ICngineers for Rivers and Harbors in 
sending back to the District Engi- 
neer all papers in the ca.se, with the 
retjuest that further facts be re- 
portetl. The board particularly 
wants information regarding the use 
which might be made of Crescent 
City as a harbor of refuge, inasmuch 
as it is the only harbor that can be 
used for that purpose between Port- 
land and San Francisco. 

pALIFORNIA legislators are 
^ standing behind Pennsj-lvania 
Congressmen in their effort to ob- 
tain appropriations for the .Se.squi- 
centennial Exposition in Philadel- 
]ihia this year. The California raem- 
Ijers have not forgotten how the 
Pennsylvania delegation, thirty-two 
strong, stood by San Francisco in its 
contest with Xew Orleans for the 
Panama-Pacific International E.x- 
position. AAA 

pONGRESSMAX ARTHUR M. 
^^ FREE of San Jose has been 
transferred from the Subcommittee 
on Radio to the Subcommittee on 
Navigations Laws, within the Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries Com- 
mittee of the House. The change is 
considered a promotion, inasmuch 
a.s Free's new subcommittee is held 
to be more important than the Radio 
Committee. ^ ^ ^ 

CAN FRANCISCO-BORN Chinese 
^ have been taking an active part 
in the hearings before the House 
Immigration Committee on the pro- 
posal to permit American citizens 
of Oriental extraction to return to 
the Orient for the purpose of bring- 
ing back wives of their own race. 
The committee has taken no action. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



$^,000 a Day Spent to Ship 
San Francisco Flotvers East 



tinucd from page 9 ] 



ment of violets was made to an ex- 
press agent in Maine. The agent 
took the box to the town's florist and 
asked him to try them out. The 
florist was waiting on a customer 
and had the agent put them in the 
refrigerator room, which is the 
largest part of an Eastern florist's 
establishment. A week later the 
agent returned to learn what success 
the florist had had with the violets. 
The incident had been forgotten and 
the unopened box was still in the 
refrigerator. It was opened, and the 
violets were found to be in splendid 
condition. Today San Francisco 
violets find a ready market through 
the entire East. Their season is from 
November to March. Each bunch is 
wrapped tightly in waxed paper and 
packed closely into a wooden box 
into the top of which is put a few 
pounds of cracked ice; the lid is then 
nailed on. 

A year or so ago acacia was tried, 
and today the East will take all that 
San Francisco can send. The light 
feathery beauty of the yellow plumes 
are a welcome relief in the ice-bound 
East, where in February there is 
little or nothing in the way of locally 
grown flowers or foliage. 

Heather, too, has become a stand- 
ard cut flower for shipment through- 
out the country. A few miles down 
the peninsula there is an 80-acre 
tract planted entirely to heather for 
cutting. Other growers of heather 
send small plants east for the Easter 
trade. 

Roses cannot be shipped as far as 
New York, but find a ready market 
in Oregon, Washington, Canada, 
Illinois, and to the south as far as 
San Diego, and Pasadena at New 
Year's draws heavily on San Fran- 
cisco's supply of roses for her Rose 
Carnival. This is a secret known 
only to a few, but the truth will out, 
and Pasadena is not the only culprit 
guilty of wearing borrowed finery. 
Most of the better flowers and all of 
the maidenhair fern sold by South- 
ern California florists are grown in 
the San Francisco territory. 

San Francisco-grown maidenhair 
fern is in demand all over the coun- 
try; other greens that leave San 
Francisco by the carloads are the 
Woodwardia fern from Santa Cruz 
and Marin counties, the Redwood 
burl, Oregon grape, the so-called 
wild lemon, Mexican ivy, and 
huckleberry. 

One grower of straw-flowers reaps 
three crops a year from his 42-acre 
garden, and he cannot supply the 



demand. He has a big advantage 
over his eastern competitors as he 
gathers three crops a year to their 
one and his flowers cure to a more 
intense color than those grown else- 
where. 

The last holiday season served to 
introduce our California Toyon or 
red Christmas berry to the East. 
An early and very severe winter 
made it impossible to harvest the 
Michigan and Delaware holly crops 
and many carloads of our berries 
were used to furnish the necessary 
red in the eastern Christmas deco- 
rations. 



The early spring flowers, anemo- 
nes, ranunculi, and daffodils ship 
well, and are in great demand as far 
east as St. Louis. 

San Francisco-grown gardenias 
seem superior to those grown else- 
where, and recently created a sensa- 
tion at a flower show at Hartford, 
Connecticut, where they were easily 
prize-winners. Roses, too, grown 
in San Francisco have received 
prizes in shows in Kansas City. 

In this aiticle mention only will 
be made of the large and thriving 
nursery, seed, bulb, and tuber busi- 

[ continued on page 17 ] 



Constructive 
Auditing 

An independent audit is to be regarded always 
as the means to valuable advice from the audi- 
tor or auditing firm. 

Too often, auditing service ends with the report 
of the financial condition of (name) as of (date). 
Auditors should be equipped— and should be 
employed— to offer recommendations in con- 
nection with method, policies, financing, etc.; 
to furnish comparative statistics intelligently 
prepared; to point out how mistakes and waste 
may be eliminated, and pitfalls avoided. 
Of course, every audit should be a Detailed 
Audit. But whether it be Detailed, Semi- 
Detailed or Balance Sheet, itcan, and should 
be made to, serve as the basis not only of the 
financial report, but also of constructive help. 
With the business man's appreciative under- 
standing of this help, and the cooperation of 
progressive Public Accountants, Auditing be- 
comes Constructive and offers its greatest 
value. 

ERNST 6c ERNST 

ACCOUNTANTS AND AUDITORS 
SYSTEM SERVICE 



,<AN FRANCI.SCO IUSI.\E:<.S. MAKCH 10. H)2ij 





The Government 
In Business 

By HENRY SWIFT IVES 



(From an oidrtts dtUirrtd at o joint meeting 

of tkt Son Franeiaco Commercial Club and the 

Son Francisco Chamber o/ Commerce.} 



ijRESroENT COOLroCE 
has furnished the best 
text I know anything 
about for a discussion of 
the subject which has 
been assigned to me. In one of his 
recent addresses the President said: 
"When the Government enters the 
field of business, with its great re- 
sources, there has Ijeen a tendency 
to extravagance and ineflBciency, 
but having the power to crush all 
competitors likewise closes the door 
of opportunitj' and results in monop- 
oly." That is an e.xact expression of 
my opinion in regard to government 
ownership, and it is a much briefer 
and more concise statement than I 
could ever hope to make. 

I am not one of those people who 
Ijelieve that this country is going to 
the dogs. I think America is sound 
at heart and at core. I am quite 
sure, however, that there are some 
di.sturbing tendencies mingled with 
our methods of conducting our polit- 
ical institutions that must be taken 
into consideration by all business 
men, and by the people generally, if 
this country is to remain sound. 
These tendencies are dangerous 
chiefly because thej- are likely to 
lead to a condition of dn,--rot at the 
center or heart of our institutions. 

We are hving in the midst of an 
age of miracles. We are at times dis- 
turbed, and even badly frightened, 
by the sudden changes in conditions. 
Every day new situations confront 
us of which we had no conception 
the day before. These things are af- 
fecting our whole method of li^Tiig, 
our economic systems, and our 
political de\'ices. Because of the 
somewhat chaotic environment in 
which our existence is ordered, there 
has been considerable uncertaintj' 
in regard to the settlement of many 
of the great problems of the modern 
world. I think, however, that the 
pains which the body-politic seems 
to be suffering from are, in reahty, 
the growing pains of democracy, and 
not the dying pains of democracy. 
One of the greatest troubles con- 
fronting us, in trj'ing to ascertain 
what is good for the soul and the 
phj'sical well-being of the body- 
politic, is the general misconception 

[ continued next page ] 



;Ai\ I'ltAXCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 192G 



I continued from precediDg page 1 

of the two words which are used as 
labels for our conflicting political 
tendencies, viz. : Liberal and Re- 
actionary. ^Ye are today applying 
the term "liberal" to all of those who 
believe in the extension of power of 
the State over business and over 
human conduct, and we are apply- 
ing the term "reactionary" to those 
who are opposing this extension of 
governmental authority. In doing 
this we are using false labels. The 
modern Liberal is in fact a direct 
descendant of the Reactionary of a 
century ago, who believed in State 
Feudalism, while the modern Re- 
actionary is really a descendant of 
the Liberal of a century ago, who 
believed in the greatest possible in- 
dividual freedom. 

Tliis modern and so-called liberal 
tendency towards the superstate 
has led to the burdening of democ- 
racy with all sorts of strange and 
inconsistent laws, rules and regula- 
tions. Our system of government was 
not created to meet economic situa- 
tions, and I do not think it is fitted 
for that kind of work. If the Govern- 
ment is to go into business, the only 
consistent procedure is for us to dis- 
card democracy and to use the 
Socialistic system in carrying on 
such endeavors. 

I am quite convinced that there 
can be no half-way measures in the 
burdening of democracy. I do not 
believe that this country can exist 
half socialistic and half free, any 
more than it could have existed half 
slave and half free. There can be no 
dividing line. We must either be all 
free or all socialist, if we expect to 
maintain a satisfactory government. 
The worst situation that con- 
fronts us today is the tendency to- 
ward too much government. We are 
living in the midst of a plague of 
laws. We are trying to keep our 
law factories abreast of the wonder- 
ful economic and social progress of 
the age. In trj'ing to make our laws 
keep up with this social and economic 
progress, we forget entirely that this 
progress has been due chiefly to the 
fact that our law-making machinery 
has not had time as yet to catch up 
with it. It is this failure to regulate 
progress completely that has made 
progress possible. Quantitative 
government is the besetting sin of 
this generation. The old qualitative 
theory, which held that the govern- 
ment which governed least governed 
best, is rapidly being scrapped, and 
we are substituting for it the theory 
that to be governed is the chief end 
of man. 

This is the Jazz Age of law. There 
are in existence in America today 



appro.ximately 2,100,000 laws and 
ordinances of all kinds and descrip- 
tions, for the purpose of regulating 
our goings and our comings, what 
we do, how we do it, and our cus- 
toms and our privileges. There are 
100,000 people in America engaged 
in the business of making laws. They 
are the hands in our law factories. 



As a result of this orgy of law- 
making — this great desire for the 
regulation of our fellow human 
beings — a great many of the ancient 
rights and traditions of the Ameri- 
can people are being sacrificed, and 
it is also true, as you probably all 
know, that a large majority of these 



1 page H ] 




The New Improved 

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Through nrst class sleepers only ^V 



Meal stops at Eted Harvey Dining 
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early momtna arrival in Chicago 
'Tkjithdind amnedionsjoraJl easum 
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Rillman 
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Santa Fe Ticket Offices & Travel Bureaux 

601 Market Street • TcUjjhone Sutter 7600 • Ferry Depot 



SAN FRANCISCO 

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2134 University Ave. 10U6 K Street 

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516 Fourth Street 



'A.N FRANCLSCO BL'.SIXESS. MARCH 10, 1926 




NEW 

FLOORS 

OVER NIGHT 

USE 

NITROKOTE 
FOR FLOORS 



Shabby, old 6oors tonight 
— bright, new floors by morn- 
ing. That's the miraculous 
transformation NITRO- 
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without interfering in any 
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store or office. 

This new lacquer Finish — 
made by W. P. FULLER &> 
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Distributors of Valspar on the 
Pacific Coast. 

FULLER 



PA I N T S 1^ VARNISHES 

PIONEeR WHITE LEAD 



■ assurance of 



[ continued from preceding page ) 

regulatory schemes are the products 
of distorted imaginations and va- 
grant yearnings. 

People who desire legislation in 
their on-n behalf are inclined to rush 
to the legislative halls and secure 
the introduction of a bill to cure a 
pretended evil or to meet a particu- 
lar need. A few of these are good, 
most of them are bad, and some are 
indifferent. The business men of the 
nation are so deeply taken up with 
their own affairs that they often pay 
little attention to these movements. 
They would pay more attention to 
them, however, if they realized that 
exces-sive law-making always leads 
to excessive ta.xation. The tax 
burden has increa.sed enomiou.sh' in 
.\merica during the la.st few vears. 
In 1913 the total tax for all Federal, 
state and local purposes was $2,- 
919.000.000 In 1924 the total tax 
collected in this countrv for all pur- 
poses wa-s $10,250,000,000. The 
war, naturally, had something to do 
with this rapid inerea.se, but during 
the la.«t few years the expenditures of 
the Federal Government have de- 
crea-sed considerably, while state 
expenditures Ix'tween 1923 and 1924 
increased 7.6 per cent. We are 
spending in .\merica today fifteen 
cents out of everj- dollar of the an- 
nual national income for taxes. The 
national income, according to the 
latest estimates I have been able to 
secure, is about $68,000,000,000. 
Most of the increa.se in the tax bur- 
den, and practically all of the future 
proposed increases, are due to the 
extension of the powers of state or 
municipal governments in various 
fields. We have been paying a heavy 
bill for the privilege of being ruled, 
and we are p.aying a still heavier bill 
for exercising the desire of the aver- 
age American to tell his fellow 
human beings how to V)ehave and 
how to earn,- on their business. 

The tendency toward government 
ownership has been verj- marked in 
the last ten years, and while it has 
not made any surprising headway, 
there is still considerable agitation 
in all parts of the country along that 
line, and, in my opinion, it is the 
most dangerous of all the socialistic 
tendencies, because it is so exten- 
sive. There are and have been, as 
you know, surprisingly extensive 
demands for either Federal, state or 
municipal ownership of railroads, 
public utilities, coal mines, oil wells, 
meat packing and shipping, food 
handling and distribution, cement 
manufacturing, and the operation of 
mills and warehouses. Most of these 
demands concern business enter- 
prises said to be affected with a 



public interest. It is hardly neces- 
sary to say that none of the.se ex- 
periments when tried have been suc- 
cessful financially. The Govern- 
ment has never created anj-thing 
that it has not taken from private 
enterprise. Every time the Govern- 
ment enters into any sort of a busi- 
ness operation it robs private enter- 
prise of what it previously has de- 
veloped and makes a government 
operation out of it. It is essentially 
a .selfish operation, too, because it is 
simply taking what the people, in 
their private capacities, have built 
up, and turning it into a great 
bureaucratic machine. 

Do you renieml)cr reading in the 
second part of Shakespeare's "Henry 
the Sixth" of that ver>- delightful, 
but altogether irresponsible, rascal, 
Jack Cade? Jack started a revolu- 
tion of his own along about the same 
lines as some of our modern Radicals 
are proposing, and he caused the 
king a lot of trouble. In my opinion, 
Jack bears a very close resemblance 
to some of our modem demagogues. 
In one of his discussions of what he 
proposed to do when he seized the 
power of government. Jack said, 
"My mouth shall be the Parliament 
of England." There are a great 
many people in this country today 
who have the same opinion of their 
power as Jack Cade had back in the 
time of Henry the Sixth. 

One of the greatest difficulties en- 
countered in opposing the govern- 
ment ownership movement is the 
fact that a great many of our .so- 

[ continued n<?xt page ] 



JS/JcJ^ONNELL 
&L r^ OMPANY 

MEMBERS 
Ne"w York Stock Exchange 

Conservative Margin 
Accounts Solicited 

Special service to 
out-of-town clients 



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OAKLAND 

Telepho 



1404 Franklin St. 

■ Oakland 1680 



New York Office : 120 Broadway 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



called hard-headed and responsible 
business men arc supporting various 
government-ownership schemes 
and in this connection permit me to 
say that I know of no business man 
who is supporting the government 
ownership of the industry in which 
he personally is engaged or in which 
he has money invested, but these 
same business men are very much 
inclined to support the government 
ownership of everybody's else busi- 
ness, and the country is full of that 
kind of citizens. You have them 
here in San Francisco, you will find 
them in New York, and you will find 
them in Chicago. No community is 
free from them. 

I know there are a great many of 
my insurance friends here, but let 
me ask all of you — did you ever hear 
of one of these insurance men sup- 
porting government ownership, or 
partial government ownership, of 
the insurance business? You did 
not, but I know of insurance men 
who have supported the govern- 
ment ownership of the other fellow's 
business, and I can say the same of 
men engaged in nearly every other 
line of endeavor. I know of an opera- 
ator of a steel mill back East who 
has been much interested in having 
the Federal Government take over 
the coal mines so that he may be 
assured of his steady supply without 
the difficulties he has been having. 
I know a man in the harvester busi- 
ness who has been much interested 
in the price-fixing schemes in behalf 
of the farmers and in the taking over 
by the Federal Government of the 
distribution and handling of grain, 
but that same man has been in years 
past a bitter opponent of the making 
of threshing machines in the State 
Penitentiary at Stillwater, Minne- 
sota. There are many other illustra- 
tions of this same kind, and I want 
to emphasize the fact that if it were 
not for the support of the solid and 
substantial business man, the gov- 
ernment ownership movement in 
this country would not be much 
more than a theory. You who are 
advocating the government owner- 
ship of the other fellow's business 
must be prepared in the due course 
of time to have your own business 
confiscated. When you learn that, 
you will be more consistent. 

Concerning the orgy of law-mak- 
ing of which I have previously 
spoken, I would like to add that 
much of the demand for more legis- 
lation and more regulation comes 
from the business men of the coun- 
try. They are always about the 
legislatures asking for some law or 
some new rule, either to help them- 
selves or to regulate somebody else. 



There has been altogether too much 
of this from these business interests, 
and I think it is about time that a 
halt be called. I am sure that more 
laws are due to the activities of busi- 
ness organizations, trade associa- 
tions and the like, than to the many 
agitations carried on by the socialists 
and the so-called radicals. 

In every discussion of this kind I 
try to impress upon my hearers this 
axiom: that no single industry or 
business can be lifted out of the 
common mass of privately conducted 
enterprises, endowed with the at- 
tributes of sovereignty, subsidized 
by taxation and operated by a politi- 
cal bureaucracy, without eveiy other 
business and enterprise feeling the 
painful and depressing effects of such 
a procedure. 

In all of our talk about govern- 
ment invasion of the business field, 
I think we have ignored one of the 
fundamentals. The main issue to- 
day really is not whether the Gov- 
ernment shall own the railroads, the 
utilities or the insurance business, 
and the like, but whether the institu- 
tion of private property is to be pre- 
served. To me it does not make any 
difference whether the Government 
can operate any business more eco- 
nomically than can private enter- 
prise. That is not the question at 
issue. The question is: is it in ac- 
cordance with our democratic in- 
stitutions that such a procedure be 
permitted? I think you will agree 
with me that there is no justification 
in a democracy for excessive state 
interference in the private affairs of 
the individual, even though the 
state might possibly be able to do 
the work cheaper — which it never 
has done. I think aU of us would be 
opposed to living in community 
barracks, even though it could be 
demonstrated that the cost would 
be 50 per cent less than our present 
method of living. Such a saving docs 
not justify the destruction of the 
home, and no saving that the Gov- 
ernment might make in business 
justifies the destruction of democ- 
racy. 

As you know, I represent the 
stock insurance busiiiess. I will not 
bore you by telling you about our 
troubles as far as government own- 
ership is concerned, but we have 
them — and plenty of them. I do not 
think the average man understands 
what a great institution insurance is. 
I do not believe he understands that 
insurance is the guardian of modern 
progress. Indeed, if it were not for 
the protection that insurance af- 
fords, modern commerce could not 
be carried on in its present way. In- 
surance also is the foundation of 

[continued on page 22 ] 



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Director Industrial Department, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 




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A.MMOTH as it is, the 
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Thirty-one freight cars standing 
end to end would be only slightly 
longer than this new South San 
Francisco plant. 

"I believe you only need to look 
at this building," said R. D. Plage- 
man, sales manager for the Western 
Pipe and Steel Co., with head- 
quarters at 444 Market street, "to 
know what we think of San Fran- 
cisco and the peninsula as a manu- 
facturing and distributing center, 
and yet this deep-water side of the 
bay is only a beginning to what it is 
going to be. With natural deep 
water hugging the west shore and 
with acres upon acres of waterfront 
land upon which to build industries, 
the peninsula has untold po.ssibili- 
ties for industrial and residential 
growth. 

"And perhaps you would be inter- 
ested in where some of the product 
that is to be made in this new plant 
is to go. 

"It is going to the Fairbanks Ex- 
ploration Co., there to bring water 
from the melting glaciers in summer 
and wash out gold on the company's 
properties. This placer mining can 
be carried on only in the summer, 
but curiously enough since the pipe 
has to be taken to the development 
section over Alaskan tundra, or 
mossy marsh land, which can be 
traversed only when it is frozen, the 
shipment must be conveyed to the 
property in the winter." 

This San Francisco product, ac- 
cording to Mr. Plageman, can be 
sold and shipped successfully from 
San Francisco to the eleven western 
states because of its comparatively 
light weight. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



San Francisco Now a National 
Market for Flowers 

[ continued from page 11 ] 

ness. That business is of enough im- 
portance to merit a separate article. 

The San Francisco district has 
become world-famous for the fine 
dahlias created by our local hybridi- 
zers, many of them with gardens no 
larger than a vacant city lot. The 
dahlia has not appealed very much 
to the florist as it has been considered 
.a poor keeper. This reputation, how- 
ever, is unwarranted and as the 
proper way of cutting and curing 
the blooms is better known, it will 
undoubtedly be in great demand, 
for it is the most colorful and gor- 
geous of all our fall flowers. 

That it is a good cut flower the 
writer proved conclusively when, in 
September, 1924, he put a bo.x of 
dahlias to the severe endurance test 
of the trip by air mail to New York, 
where they were exhibited at the 
American Dahlia Society's show and 
also at the Short Hills Show in New 
Jersey, after a 34-hour trip in the 
cockpits of fourteen air-planes. 
Fully half an hour of this time the 
flowers were subjected to stiff jolts 
as the planes rose from and returned 
to the ground. Thej' were shipped 
dry in much the same way as chry.s- 
anthemums are expressed, and eight 
days later, after the .34-hour trip and 
four days in the .stuffy atmosphere of 
e.xhibition rooms, one was still pre- 
sentable. 

The climate of the bay counties is 
unsurpassed for the growing of fine 
flowers, and there are hidden in the 
back yards of thousands of San 
Franciscans gardens that are a riot 
of color the greater part of the year. 
These gardens, like the flower mar- 
ket, are seldom .seen by visitors. It 
is regretted that this has to be, be- 
cause this April the Garden Club of 
America, composed of more than 
seventy Garden Clubs throughout 
the countiy, is to hold its annual 
meeting in Santa Barbara. Most if 
not all of these visitors to California 
will spend a few days in San Fran- 
cisco. They will not be shown our 
secret gardens as few know of their 
existence, and San Francisco, which 
furnishes the whole United States 
with most of its cut flowers, has no 
Garden Club to act as host to the 
visitors. This is a condition which 
should be remedied. Every city of 
any size in America has a Garden 
Club which fills a well-defined place 
in the civic life of the community. 




"^ photographic illustration 



When the Dollar Steamship Lines inaugurated their round-the- 
world service they called upon us to DRAMATIZE the joy of 
travel. This is one of the photographic illustrations which occupy 
about two-thirds of nearly every page of their beautiful booklet. 
The "passengers" are our models. The scenes were taken aboard 
ship. When Mohammed cannot come to the Studios, 
we take the Studios to Mohammed. 

Our files contain over 300 models of all types 

LOTHERS & YOUNG STUDIOS 

^ lUustrathe & Commercial It 

\ PHOTOGRAPHY J 

419 Suner Street, San Francisco Garfield 5100 

Out of town campaigns efficiently handled by mail. 



SAN FRANCISCO mSINKSS, MAIiCH 10. 1026 



TRANSPORTATION 



IMPORTANT 
TRANSPORTATION MEETING 

CHAS. E. VIRDEN, General Chairman of the Pacific Coast 
Transportation Advisory Board, is calling shippers' and their 
traffic representatives' attention to the importance of attending 
the next regular meeting of the Board, which will be held in the 
Palace Hotel at 10 o'clock A. M., Friday, March 19. 

Transportation matters of interest in this territory will be 
reported on and discussed. 



Revenue Freight Loading 

Loading of revenue freight the week ended 
Febmarj' 20 totaled 931,743 care, according to re- 
ports filed by the carriers with the ear 8e^^'ice diW- 
«ion of the .\inericun Railway .Association. 

This was an increase of 5.857 ears over the corres- 
ponding week in 1925 and an increase of 86.044 cars 
over the cnrrC5ponding wrek in J92-I when loadings 



Motorists Save 27 Miles 

DIRECT FERRY 

Vallejo-San Francisco 

Fastest Boats on San Francisco Bay 



Monticello Steamship Co. 

North End of Ferrr Bai]<linf Pboae Sutler 371 



SACRAMENTO 

and Sacramento Northern R. R. 
Points 

<lbM■r^,Hic,n .ind Parlor Cars. 
Dininu (:.lr^ have 7:40 a. m. and 5 p. m. 



SACRAMENTO 

SH9RT LINE 



F<3R.T SuTTEn."=^"CnpiTAi. City 




Front 

Jackson Street Pier No. 3 

DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY 
AT 6:30 P. M. 

PALATIAL STEAMERS 

Suites with Bath— Barber Shop 

f^'" $1.80 <>"• ""V $3.00 "'""I Trip 

Try Our Famous 50 Cent Dinners 
Phone Sutter 3S80 for Reservations 

California Transportation Company 



were materially reduced duo to ttic obsen-aDce of a 
holiday. The total for the week of February 20 aLw 
was ao increase of 14,509 cars over the preceding 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be coiuiidercd by 
the Standing Rate Committee of tlie Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than March 18. 
Full information concerning the nubjecta listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Ilureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket No. 6632 — Paper napkins. CL. West- 
bound; 6633. mosaic tile, CL, westbound; 66.14. 
solvent naphtha and toluol. CL, westbound; 663.5. 
rubber or brass stoppers, CL and LCL, westbound ; 
G636. automobile seat boards, CL, eastbound; 6637, 
rough rolled glass. CL. westbound; 66.38. truck tank 
iMxiy parts, CL and LCL. westbound; 6639, rates to 
•■and from points on the Northwestern Pacific R. R. 
north of Willite, Calif. Proposal to amend TarifTs 
1-Y and 3-^; 6640, grand pianos, CL, westbound; 
0641, blacksmith coal, CL, westbound; 6&42, plaster 
and plaster productf, CL, eastbound; 6643, wood, 
built-up or combined, veneered, CL. westbound; 
6644, stakes, CL, eastbound: 6645. mining machin- 
pr>', CL. westbound; 6646, cereals and cereal prod- 
ucts, CL, westbound: 6647. machiner>-, CL, west- 
bound; 6648, lumber to stations in Wisconsin and 
Minnesota, CL, eastbound; 6649, cement, liquid or 
paste. CL and LCL, westbound: 6650, grain and 
grain products, CL, westbound; 6548. Amended — 
Flavoring extracts, spices, tea and baking powder, 
in mixed carloads, eastbound. 



United States Intercoastal 
Conference Westbound 
Rate Docket 

Bulletin No 39, posting date March 10, 1926. 

The foUowine subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than March 22, 1926. Full information 
concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquir>' at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

R-.503 — Crude rubber compound (so-called Rex 
Blak), request fpr establishment of specific LCL 
rate of SI. 30 per 100 lbs.; R-504, scaler, request 
for reduction in LCL rate from S5.00 to S2.50 per 
100 lbs.; R-505, automobile frame parts, viz., gear 
frame side or cross bars, frame gussets, frame 
brackets, frame supports, K. D. loose or K. D. in 
packages. Item 3646, request for reduction in CL 
rate from 40c to 30c; R-506, metalware. Item 3435. 
request for reduction in CL rate from $1.00 to 90c, 
LCL rate from $1.25 to $1.10; R-507, machines, 
vending, request for reduction in LCL rate to $1.10 
per 100 lbs.; R-50S, coffee, roasted. Item 860. re- 
quest for reduction in CL rate from $1.00 to 75c and 
reduction in minimum weight from 24,000 to 12.000 
lbs. also reduction in LCL rate from SI. 25 to $1.00. 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 

Accountants— D. L. R. Pratt, Pacific Illdg.; Old 
A- V:iuKhan. to 233 Sansome. 

Adjuster— G. F. Roberta, 433 California. 

Attorneys— Geo. K Whitworth, 564 Market; O. 
M. \ an Duyn. Dollar Bldg. to 233 Sansomc; Jordan 
& Brann, Mills Bldg. to 233 Sansome; W. M. 
H olden, 485 California. 

Auctioneers — Goodman's Auction House. 530 
Sutter: Bakke & Oilling, 1774 Geary. 

Automotive — Perfection Slidins Curtain Co., 
4142 Gcar>-. 

Auto Repairing— Geo. L. Hackett, 2020 Van Ness 
Ave. to 600 Fulton. 

Broker -Myron S. Wall (insurance), 315 Mont- 
gninc-rj'. 

Collection Agencies — National Law d: Collection 
Co . 251 Kearny to 564 Market. 

Dentist— Dr Robert E. Smith. Flood Bldg. to 
490 Post. 

Klectric Work— Unger Electric Co., 1749 Hyde 
to 1045 Mission. 

Excavation Equipment — Industrial Works, 455 
Monadnock Bldg. 

( continued on page 21 ] 



LINCOLN TAXI CO. 

Limousines suxter 

De Luxe 
457 Powell Street 



Bishop & Bahler 

New Address 369 PINE STREET 
Same Pbone Sutter 1040 

Our increased business baa compelled us to 
move to more spadoua quarters. Our offices are 
Rooms 418 to 423 Exchange Block, 
e Street. San Francisco, where, with our 
augmented force of biKhly_ efficient traffic 
Jent. we are in po«ti< 
I'Biggerand Better" 

t will call - 



369 Pine Street. San I 
augmented force of .. . 
talent we are in position to offer t 

by all I 

(onn a paying service. Phone o 



BISHOP & BAHLER 

Incorporated Scplembir 16. 1914 

Traffic Managers 

OHftloators of 
"TRANSPORTATION ECONOMY" 



CHECKER CAB COMPANY 



WHY? 

First: Checker drivers are the best paid cab 

drivers in the world. 
Second: 87^ of its personnel are stockholders. 

GRAYSTONE 400 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



( continued from page 5 ] 

mentioned were typical subjects of 
broad interest. 

The work of the recent convention 
was not directed toward codifying a 
large list of formal resolutions. Only 
two resolutions were passed, one 
favoring foreign trade zones, the 
other favoring better and cheaper 
trans-Pacifie cable and radio com- 
munication in order to foster better 
international understanding by more 
news interchange and increased 
trade. 

It is true that the United States is 
one of the two countries of the world 
best adapted by abundance and 
variety of natural resources to fol- 
low a policy of strict natural seclu- 
sion. China is the other country 
similarly situated, and China did in 
fact adhere to a seclusionistic policy 
untU very recently and with pro- 
gressive ingrowing weaknesses. The 
average American, since the post-war 
depression at any rate, is convinced 
of the desirability of e.xport, and 
views foreign trade in terms solely 
of export trade. It is a problem of 
simple arithmetic to demonstrate 
that truism that you cannot export 
unless you import. 

Many otherwise intelligent citi- 
zens do, however, strenuously object 
to any imports of commodities which 
are or can be manufactured in this 
country, despite the lower price of 
the foreign goods, "so long as there 
is a single American workman look- 
ing for a job." 

The purpose to insure employ- 
ment of American workmen is highly 
laudable. The only mistake is that 
the home industry enthusiast is apt 
to defeat his own ends. It must not 
be forgotten that agricultural prod- 
ucts are the basis of Pacific Coast 
prosperity and that further expan- 
sion of producing areas depends 
largely on increased export. Roughly 
25 per cent of specialized agricultural 
production is already exported. 
Any action calculated to discourage 
use of materials produced abroad, 
to discredit foreign manufactured 
commodities or to bring pressure to 
bear to prevent their consumption is 
a direct invitation for retaliation by 
foreign countries. The loss of our 
foreign markets would throw many 
more men out of employment than 
could find jobs by producing articles 
that may be logically imported. 
Import also gives a two-way cargo 
which is necessary for profitable 
ship operation. Ships in ballast can- 
not support an American merchant 
marine. These and many other 
points dealing with the economics 
and politics of foreign trade were 
brought out by the convention 



The purpose of the Pacific Foreign 
Trade Council in its program of 
"Pacific Coast Unity for World 
Trade Expansion" may be briefly 
summarized as follows: 

To solidify Pacific Coast senti- 
ment so that there will be a concord 
of thought and action. 

To stimulate commerce by every 
possible means, and extend the for- 
eign market for Pacific Coast prod- 
ucts. 

To bring about a greater under- 
standing between peoples living in 
countries bordering on the Pacific. 

To inform citizens living inland 



from the Coast cities that foreign 
trade is not a matter of concern only 
to Coast cities, but that foreign 
markets are necessary to absorb the 
country's surplus if our agricultural 
and industrial life is to prosper; and 
that we cannot export unless we 
import. 

To fuse together farmers, manu- 
facturers, business men, bankers, 
transportation interests and other 
groups which must be correlated to 
extend this foreign trade. 

To make of the council an organi- 
zation truly representative and 
worthy of lasting endurance. 




It takes in ALL three 

The three manifests of service in gasoline are: (l) satisfactory quiclc 

starting according to seasonal demands, (2) full stride of power, (3) 

mileage. 

Juggle these three essentials around as you wish; put them in any order 

you want, to secure what 999 out of 1000 motorists really want in gasoline 

results, you must get all three in perfect coordination. 

Associated Gasoline, through its distinctive range of boiling points, gives 

the three service essentials in ideal degree. Associated Gasoline is always 

associated with "more-miles-to-the-gallon." 



MOTORMATES 



CYCOL MOTOR 
OIL— for thorough 
lubrication at low cost. 
It cushions the moving 
parts of your motor. 
Comes only inonequal- 
ity-in grades to fityour 




Sustained Quality Products 



SAX FRAXCIsrO RUSINESS. .MARCH 10, 1926 



Foreign TRADE 1 IPS Domestic 



-♦o 



FOREIGN TRADE TIPS 

lOOSl — New York. N. V. ForcUn Irsdins corpor- 
ation are io tbp market annually for Bmall quanti- 
Ues of OATS. BR.V.S" and H.A V. They wish the osta 
crushed and the bran and hay in highly eompnaecd 
bales for export to the Far East. 

100S2 — San Francii>co. Calif. Import-export 
house desires to coniniunicate with irnpurtinc 
brokers handlinE merchandise such ns 3HKLL.\C, 
MIC.\. W(X)D-OIL. PE.tNITS. WAL.Nl'TS, 
LENTILS. MUSTARD and LINSEED OIL. and 
CASTOR OIL. 

I(X>83— Kaneoh. Oahu. T H. Party desires to get 
in touch with San Francisco firms handlioc SHARK 
OIL. SHARK SKINS and SHARK FERTILI- 
ZERS. 

10081 — Oslo. Norway. Exporters of CANNED 
GtX>DS desire to communicate with San Francisco 



I AM GOING TO EUROPE 

Experienced Business Man 
Offers His Ser\'ices 



agencies. 

I have been en^Aed for the past ten 
years in the Import-Export and Mer- 
chandise brokerage business In this 
city and have earned a reputation for 
capability and dependability. Illgheitl 
references. 
J. D.. Box 340. San Francisco Business. 



MITSUI & 
COMPANY 

LIMITED 

(Mitsui Bussao Kalsbe. Ltd.) 
Cable Address: ■■.MtTSUI" 

GENERAL IMPORTERS 

EXPORTERS 

Coal Suppliers Ship Operators 

Shipon^ers Ship Builders 











P R « T E <; T ^• O L R 

TRADE MARKS 






Mida'i Pacific Coasi Trade Mark Boreau 

Affiliated with MIDAS. Incorporated 

Chicafio. 111. Washington. D. C. 

Complete Records lo dale of all I'.S. Patent 

Office ReiUsiratJons and Cop>Ti(lht6. 

MtorocT Associates throughout the world 

Have any of 3 our Trade Marlu expired ? 

.Vre you usIoS a trade mark or trade 

Inrestlcatcd ? If so. can same be regis- 
tered ? Is It iMjioft infringed? Hare you 
had the records searched? Security 
cosis but little. Send for llicrature. 
RAPID — RELI.\BLE — REASONABLE 
112 Market Street Sao Francisco 
Telephone Sutter 3199 





Seattle. Pori 



importers interested in handling this merchandise 
and io a position to develop business for them here. 

ICO80 — Hamburg, Germany. A firm of commis- 
sion agents and broken are very desirous of repre- 
senting a Califoroia exporter of DRIED FRL'ITS. 

I008G — Hamehn, Germany. Manufacturer of 
LEATHER GLOVES n-ants a reprewoUtive in 
California. 

10087— Wahetwlorf. Germany. Manufacturer of 
LINEN GOODS Mish-cloths. toweU. napkins, etc.) 
wishes reprfsentalive in San Francisco. 

lOOftS— Gluckstadt, Germany. Manufacturer of 
MINERAL and CHEMICAL PAINTS wants a 
representative in San Pranciseo. 

10089 — Rheda, Germany. Manufacturer of 
HINGES wishes reprewrntative in California. 

10090— Rotterdam. Holland. Firm is very de- 
sirous of cntablishinjc eonnections with a California 
packer and exporter of DRIED FRL'ITS. particu- 
larly prunes, apricots and apples. 

10091 — Amsterdam, Holland. Lante art dealer, 
havine a collection of ETCHINGS by DITCH 
ARTISTS, in New York City, wishes to jtet in touch 
with San Franidsco art dealers who might be inter- 
ested in these etchings. 

10092 — Monnikcodam, Holland. Owners of an 
ancho\*>- salting plant wish to get in touch with Sao 
Francisco importers of ANCHOVIES. 

10093— Paris. France. Supplier of TERPEN- 
TINE wishes to get in touch with interested San 
Francisco importers of this commodity. 

10094— Madrid, Spain. Manufacturers of a ver>' 
complete and artistic line of SPANISH STYLE 
LANTERNS, for rooms, gardcos, churches, etc.. 
arc interested in getting in touch with San Francisco 
dealers handling this line of merchandise. Illus- 
trated catalog «-ith prices on file with the Foreign 
and Domefitic Trade Department. 

10095 — Detroit. Mich. Eirm is in the market for 
J.U'ANESE BAMBOO FOUNTAIN PENS. 

10096 — Tokyo. Japan. Import-export house id 
in the market for AUTOMOBILES. MACHIN- 
ERY, TCMJI-S. TOILET GOODS, CURIOS. 
WOOLENS. FURS, etc., and is in a position to 
export LACQUERED WARE. BAMBOO GOODS. 
JAPANESE ORANGES. FURS. MATTING, 
STR.\W AND CHIP BRAIDS. FIXE ART 
CURIOS. PORCEL.\INS. TEA, SILKS, etc. 

10097 — Yokohama, Japan. Exporters of DIS- 
INFECTED. BLEACHED COTTON RAGS wish 
to establii^h bu^n(«s connections with San Fran- 
cisco importers and users of these rags. 

10098— Me xicali, Mexico. Exporter of GUANO 
wishes to get in touch nith buyers of this commod- 
ity. 

10099 — Nuevitaa, Cuba. Hrm desires to com- 
municate with San Francisco buyers of CANE 
MOL.\SSES. 

10100— Havana, Cuba. Established commission 
merchant is interested in representing in Havana, 
San Francisco exporters of DOMESTIC BEANS. 
CANNED SARDINES and SALMON. 

10101 — Brussels. Belgium. ■ ^fanufacturers and 
exporters of WALLPAPERS wish to appoint suit- 
able San Francisco business houses to act as their 
selling agents in this territor>*. 

10102 — Ahmedabad. India. Established firm is 
ver>' desirous of representing in India. California 
manufacturers of TOILET SOAPS. SHOE POLISH. 
TOOTH PASTE, LOCKS, and PATENT MEDI- 
CINES. 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 

D-2012 — Phoenix, Arizona. Manufacturers of 
mattresses are in the market for NEW WASHED 
and STERILIZED FEATHERS and DOWN. 

D-2013 — Seattle. Wash. Luggage manufacturers 
are desirous of getting in touch with San Francisco 
or Oakland woodworking plants equipped to turn 



out U*CK C<tHNERED BOXES for SUIT CASE 
FRAMES. 

n-20M— Portland. Oregon. Firm winhes quota- 
tion.s f. o. b. PortUnd. on 500 tons of a mixture con- 
taining 80 per cent WHEAT BRAN and 20 per cent 
STOCK MOL.\SSES. for delivery during April. 
May and June. 1926. This stock molasses feed to 
be put up in gunny sacks, 80 pounds to a sack. 

D-2015 — Nogales, Ariiona. Firm desires to get 
in touch with San Francisco handlers of HIGH 
GRADE CHARCOAL in carload lots 

D-2016 — Portland, Oregon. Ladies' appirel firm 
wishes to communicate with manufacturers of 
R.AYON -OT TRICO SHAM LINGERIE in San 
Frantasco. 

£>-2Cl7— La Madera. New Mexico Mineral coi^ 
poration desire:! to get io touch with San Francisco 
dealers in MICA. PUMICE and CLAYS. 

D-2018 — Rome. Georgia. Organisation withes to 
find a small coastwise vessel to transport a cargo of 
bauxite from some Gtilf or South Atlantic port con- 
venient to Rome, to San. Francisco. A ship taking a 
cargo to that section might take on a return cargo 
of bauxite. 

D-2019— Lindsay. Calif. Olive growers have 
cured 1.200 gallons of OLHTS Spantsli green style 
and wish to dispose of them in the San Francisco 
markets. This fruit is of extra size and high quality. 

D-2020— Oakland. Calif. Party mining GA- 
LENA ORE in Nevada has several tons ready for 
shipment and desires to communicate with inter* 
ested manufacturers of radio cr>'9tala. 

D-2021— San Mateo. Calif. Manufacturer' 
agent desires to represent Eastern manufacturers 
in FOOD lines on the Pacific Coast. 

D-3022 — Ooeano. Calif. Owners of an unlimited 
supply of CLEAN FINE S.\ND. suitable for 
foundry use as a molding sand, or in the finish of 
asphalt-ooncrcte pavement, are desirous of getting 
in touch with San Francisdo buyers of this com- 
modity, preferably wholesale dealers. 

D-2023— Detroit. Mich. Established broker 
wishes to establish connections with large San Fran- 
cisco distributors of BURLAP. Is in a position to 
secure targe orders for this material. 



(inued on page 21 ] 



PATENTS 

IRAIiK-MARKS. FOREIGN PATE.STS 

MUNN & CO. 

Suite GDI Hobart Bldg., San Francisco 



THE YOKOHAMA 

SPECIE BANK 

Ltd. 

"Commercial" 

HEAD OFFICE. YOKOH.\MA. JAP.VN 

Established 1880 

Capital Subscribed Yen 100,000.000.00 

Capital Paid Up Yen 100,000.000.00 

Reserve Fund 

(Surplus) Yen 83,500.000.00 



Exporters and Importers are invited 

to avail themselves of our services, 

especially with the Orient. 

San Francisco Branch 

415-429 Sansome Street 
K. KOJIMA, Manager 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 10, 1926 



DOMESTIC TRADE TIPS 

[ continued from page 20 ] 

D-2024— New York. N. Y. Manufacturers of 
electrical LAMPS. FIXTURES and NOVELTIES, 
are interested in securing the eer^-icea of an energetic 
manufacturer's agent in San Francisco to handle 
their line here. 

D-2025— New York. N. Y. Old established firm 
of manufacturers' representatives, having excellent 
domestic and foreign connections, offer their serv- 
ices to San Francisco manufacturers desiring to 
establish new markets for their products. 

D-2026— Long Island, N. Y. Manufacturers of a 
line of ELECTRICAL ELEVATOR CONTROL 
EQUIPMENT, SPECIAL PANEL BOARDS for 
BAKING MACHINE MANUFACTURERS. 
PUMP STARTERS. REFRIGERATING PANELS 
and THERMOSTATIC CONTROLS, PRES- 
SURE REGULATOR-PANELS, etc., are very 
desirous of appointing a suitable agent to handle 
the sale of this equipment in San Francisco. 



Specifications Available 

The following specifications covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department: 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing to the U. S. Engineers, Rio Vista, California, 
groceries. Bids are to be submitted to the U. S. 
Engineer Office. Second District, 85 Second Street. 
San Francisco, and will be opened March 15. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing F. O. B. Stables. Clackamas and Corvallis. 
Oregon, forage. Bids are to be submitted to the 
Commanding Officer, Seattle Quartermaster Inter- 



Office and Sales Executive 

Past 15 years in local office of National 
Corporation, manufacturinft basic com- 
modities, who advanced to important 
managerial position through account- 
ing, credit and finance departments, 
seeks connection In productive capacity 
where his experience can best be util- 
ized and where exists fairly defin 



jobbers, wholesalers and large con- 
sumers. Is energetic, broadgauged and 
adaptable. Has initiative and accus- 
tomed to assuming major responsibili- 
ties and discharging duties efficiently. 
Free to travel or locate elsewhere. Mar- 
ried. Age 37. Kindly communicate 
with Box 330, San Francisco Business. 



Montague Pipe&SteelCo. 

Riveted Steel Pipe. High Pressure Pipe 
Lines, Oil and Water Tanks, Steel Flumes. 
Syphons, Stacks, Montague Well Casing. 
Water Tube Safety Boilers. 
Works: 17th and Kentucky Sts. 

Phone Market 6909. San Francisco 
Office: Hobart Building 

Phone Kearny 698-699. San Francisco 



"MANY COPY" Carbon 

Light 4-lb. weight, in black, blue, $7 'I'l 
or purple, 8)2x13. per 100 sheets - '^^'^^ 

42 Grades Carbons and Ribbons. 

Moderate prices. Get samples. 

C. H. MILLER CO., 717 Market St. 

Phone Douglas 1898 



PHOTOSTAT COPIES 

Made from Letters. Legal Docu- fTt 
menfs. Maps, Blueprints, etc. Ill 
Personal confidentia! service yj 

Standard Photoprint Company 

142 Sansome Street Sutter 1675 



mediate Depot. 405 Bay Bldg . Seattle, Wash., aod 
will be opened March 16, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deli%'er- 
ing at Fort Mason. San Francisco, miscellaneous 
supplies. Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer, S. F. G. I. Depot, Fort 
Mason, San Francisco, and will be opened March 
20. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deUver- 
ing at posts, on or about .-Vpril 1. and as called for 
during the month of April. 1926, subsistence sup- 
plies. Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer, Fort Mason, San Francisco, 
and will be opened March 16. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing F. O. B. stables at points named, forage. Bids 
are to be submitted to the Commanding Officer, 
Setittle Q. M I. Depot, 405 Bay Bldg., Seattle, 
Wash., and will be opened March 16. 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at .\rmy Transport Wharf. Fort Mason. San 
Francisco, as required during the month of April. 
1926, subsistence supplies. Bids are to be submitted 
to the Quartermaster Supply Officer. Fort Mason, 
San Francisco, and will be opened March 15, 1926 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal Zone, 
Isthmus of Panama, with steel bars, staybolt iron, 
copper tubing, gaskets, screws, nuts, nails, cable 
clips, anchors, stocks and dies, taps, reamers, bits, 
shovels, pipe tongs, poultry netting, tackle blocks, 
mortise locks, lanterns, levels, "zigzag" rules, plani- 
meter, glass cutters, grommets. broilers, Coaton 
distress outfits, tennis nets, billiard cloth, soccer 
balls, napkins, drawing paper, bond paper and 
asbestos wood. Bids are to be submitted to the Pur- 
chasing Officer of the Panama Canal, Washington, 
D. C 

For furnishing the Alaska Railroad, and deliver- 
ing, free of all charges, on pier in Seattle, Washing- 
ton, galvanized bolts, oak brackets, glass insulators, 
square galvanized washers, galvanized steel guy 
wire, iron wire, copper wire, telephone batteries and 
flashlight batteries. Bids are to be submitted to the 
General Purchasing .\gent. The Alaska Railroad, 
Seattle, Washington. 

For furnishing the California State Institutions 
with fresh fish. Bids are to be submitted to the 
Purchasing ,\gent, Capitol Building, Sacramento, 
Cahf., and will be opened -March 15. 1926. 

For furnishing the California State Institutions 
with smoking and chewing tobacco, pipes and 
cigarette papers. Bids are to be submitted to the 
Purchasing Agent, Capitol Building, Sacramento, 
California, and will be opened March 15, 1926. 

For furnishing the California State Institutions 
with various groceries and food stufi's. Bids are to 
be submitted to the Purchasing Agent, Capitol 
Building, Sacramento. Cahf.. and will be opened 
March 17, 1926. 



LEADS for NEW BUSINESS 

[ continued from page 18] 

Feed — Nolan Hay Co., Merchants Exchange 
Bldg., 465 California. 

Finance — North American Investment Corp., 
315 Montgomerj'. 

Fish— Pacific Fish Co.. 215 Market to 101 Cali- 

Fumiture— .\rata & Lagomarsimo, 3366 Mission; 
Key Furniture Co.. 421 Sutter, April 1. 

Hardware — Blair's Hardware Store, 1556 Ocean. 

Knit Goods— A. H. Cobden. 742 Market. 

Lamps — Wuelker's Kitten Lamps Co., 288 1st. 

Leases— Store, 430 Sutter. 

Life Insurance — Conser^'ative Life Insurance Co. 
of W.st Virginia (Marshall W. Woodson, Mgr.),402 
Gillette Bldg. 

Light in g Fixtures — Safety Electric Products Co., 
255 Golden Gate Ave. 

Lingerie — Gussi2 A. Hirschbcrg, 133 Geary; W. 
G. Abbott, Marvin Bldg. 

Loans— Wm. R. Gates, 114 Sansome: H. J. Ed- 
wards. S. N, A>Tes. C. C Bowen and J. M. Hender- 
son, 114 Sansome. 

Manufacturers* Agents — Clapp & La Moree, 
1139 Howard to 625 3d; J. J. Brady, 650 Howard; 



Thos. M. Gardiner. 41 Drumrn to 112 Market; Ben 
H. Lummis, 112 Market. 

Packing— Beldam's Steam & Water Packing Co , 
133 Steuart to 37 Spear. 

Printing— Nebraska Printing Co., 128 Halleck, 

Publications— Iron Trade Review. 681 Market tc 
Marvin Bldg.; Pacific Coast Press, 351 California. 

Public Stenographer- Mae J. Johnson, 16 Ca! 

Real Estate— Liebert Realty Co. (J. M. Liebert) 
704 Clement; Geo. T. Plummer, 125 Sutter to Alex 
ander Bldg,; B. A. Orengo, 2971 Mission; I. H. 
Goldmeyer, Russ Bldg, to 82 Sutter. 

Rugs— .\rt Fluff Rug Mfg. Co., Inc.. 1923 Fill 

Stocks and Bonds— W. H. Combs, 341 Mont- 
gomery. 

Traffic Manager— Wm. J. Haas. 525 Market, 

Waste Materials — Saml. L. Cohn, 1230 Harrison. 

Weather Strips — Athey Clothlined Metal - 
Weatherstrip Co., 34 Harriet; Monarch Metal 
Weather Strips, 4328 Geary. 

Welding Apparatus — Bastian & Blessing, 200 
Davis to 215 Bay. 

Wholesale Credit Manager, with eight years ex- 
perience in credits, is seeking connection with local 
business house. Excellent references. Bond. 

Young man, 32, desires some business connection. 
Would make small investment with 
would accept a position with adv 



OFFICE HELP 



PHONE 

KEARNY 

2800 

67 SUTTER ST. 




COLLECTIONS 

No colUclion no chargt 

\V. icmil day co1Ik1«1 

Rales: i 5%, STo. 4% 

A World-wide Service 

JOHN J. H. GROSSMAN. Mtr 
68 Post Street 




PIJRITY 

\tCE 

\ !PJtone 
MARKET op 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 1(1. IflL'ti 



The Oldest bond house in America 
specializing exclusively in Tax Exempt 

Irrigation District Municipal Bonds 

Our cusiomcr) are Siviniu Bmki. Life 
IniuranctComranicj. and individuals 
who prefer ihe secuntyofsoodl'aim larul. 

IntCTt'sr 5% to &/(. List on application. 
J. R. MASON «" CO. 

McKhanti Exchange. Sutter 6630. San Ffand«co 



DECKELMAN BROS., Inc. 

WhoUiale and Rtlail 

Barbers' Supplies, Cutlery 

and Beauty Parlor 

Equipment 

Koken Barber Chairs 

48 Turk Street Franklin 2870 



SURE-FOOTED 




KEATON Non- Skids 

Made Id San Franelsco 

A high-crade tire built for the severe requircmer 
^< .!.„ nf„.. __j — 1— dying the Sure-Footed Keat 

- See us for liberal offer to t 



INGERSOL-KEATON SAEES AND SERVICE 

Removed to 524 Van Ness Ave. 

Phone Hemlock 47 74 

GEO. S. MERWIN CO. 
I'>4fi Polk St.. Corner Pacific 

Phone Grayetone 792 

REG.\N TIRE & REPAIR CO. 
(>88 Turk St.. Near Van Ness 

Phone Prospect 6485 

GERARD B.\TTERY & TIRE CO. 
4600 Geary St.. Cor. lOlh Ave. 

Phone Evergreen 2144 

BEHRMANN TIRE & RIM CO. 
1375 Golden Gate Av., or. Fillmore 

Phone Walnut 2663 

VIADUCT TIRE CO. 
4298 Mission St., Opp Silver Av. 

Phone Randolph 4US 

COLUMBUS VUL. & TIRE CO. 
704 Filbert. Cor. Columbus 

Phone Kearny 3794 

OAKLAND RIM fit TIRE CO. 
2811 Broadwav. Oakland 

Phone Lakeside 126 



{ continued from pace 1A j 

credit. Before insurance Ijecaine the 
basis of credit, however, it will be 
rememliered that credit was only 
extended in any considerableamounts 
by the pledging of a definite security 
of some kind or other. That was the 
pawn-shop stage of credit. Insur- 
ance now has taken credit out of this 
pawn-shop stage of its existence and 
has made a great department store 
of it, where all the world may 
shop. 

The insurance business has suf- 
fered a considerable invasion by the 
Ciovernment. Sixteen states are 
operating workmen's compensa- 
tion funds, and in seven of these 
states private companies are pro 
hil)ited from competing. In nine 
states where competition is per- 
mitted, private companies — despite 
the fact that they charge more — 
write 8.5 per cent of the business and 
the state-owned funds write 1.5 per 
cent o! the business. That ought tii 
be ample indication that the average 
business man does not want any- 
thing to do with state insurance. 
There are also a great many state 
insurance funds for hail insurance, 
fire insurance on public buildings, 
and for providing surety bonds for 
state officials and the like. The 
people back of these movements for 
state insurance do not seem to ap- 
preciate the fact that the invasion 
Ijy the state into the insurance busi- 
ness is perhaps the most dangerous 
type of government ownership. 

If you will consider the billions of 
dollars in insurance investments to- 
day, j'ou will find one of the re;isons 
whj' the socialists are so keen upon 
taking over the iasurance business. 
They know that if they can confis- 
cate insurance they will have an op- 
portunity to get control of all the 
property represented by these enor- 
mous insurance investments. That 
is one of the out.standing dangers 
which the ordinary person does not 
realize when he thinks of state in- 
surance funds. 

I have tried to give you some of 
the outstanding points in regard to 
the government ownership move- 
ment, as far as my observations go, 
and please keep in mind the fact 
that government ownership is noth- 
ing more than a substitution of 
government deficits for private 
profits. It is taxation for confisca- 
tion; it makes politics instead of 
business the national dividend pro- 
ducer; it represses the reproductive 
processes of capital and then at- 
tempts to revive them by the tax 
gland operation. 



M AUSTED & CO. 



nd Embulmers 



Follow the 
Industrial Develop- 
ment southward on 
the Peninsula — 
Do not wait until 
Prices advance. 
Sites available now 
5 to 15 cents a square 
foot. Spur track 
Privileges — 

South San Francisco Land & 

Improvement Company 

465 CaUfomla Street 

Sao Franiriaco 

Telephone Sutter 282S 




Recommended by 

James E. Power 

POWER RUBBER CO, 

670 Turk Street 
Prospect 69 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSI.NE.SS, MARCH 10, 1920 



What Does Your Liquid Soap Cost You ? 



THE COST PER WASH IS FAR MORE 
IMPORTANT THAN THE PRICE 
PER GALLON 

Bobrick's Liquid Soaps 

only cost from 1/40 to 1/25 

of a Cent per wash 

Bobrick's Sop-O-zoN contains a larfjc 
amount of true soap and a small amount of 
water — that is why the cost is less per wash. 

A little Bobrick's Sop-O-zoN goes a lonj; 
way because it contains such a large amoimt 
of pure soap. It not only lathers quickly but 
it cleanses thoroughly. 

Let the Factory advise you as to the grade 
that will best suit your requirements and cost 
you the least per wash. 

It has been proven bv test that the Sop-O- Sop-O-zoN Gravity Liquid Soap System 

ZON Gravitv SvStems'and Sop-O-ZON Dis- Advantage over single Dispensers apparent. Tank supplies al 

^ One tilling lasts a long time. Saves janitor s time. 

penSCrS save soap. Eliminates waste. No breakage. 

Convince yourself by trying Sop-O-zoN Service. 

Manufactured by 

NATIONAL PAPER = PRODUCTS COMPANY 




BOBRICK CHEMICAL 



COMP.^NV DIVISION 



111 Garey St., Los Angeles, Calif. 



■Tel. VAndike 64 H 



1789 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Calif. 

■TW. SUTTER 7031 



To All Members of the Chamber of Commerce: 

If you have not taken advantage of the opportunity to present your 
business message in the CHAMBER OF COMMERCE TRADE 
DIRECTORY, please do so by Monday, March 15. 

Advertising Copy closes April 1. 

The Trade Directory, containing a membership index and commodity 
classifications, will serve as a BUSINESS GUIDE in both foreign 
and domestic trade. 

Telephone KEARNY 112 



Trade Directory Order 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 465 California Street 

Please enter our order for page advertising to be run in 

the I News Sections 1 j TRADE DIRECTORY edition, April 14. 1926. 

\ Directory oections J ■' 

Please list our name in bold face type, for which we will pay one dollar extra. 

Please enter our order for additional copies at $2.50 each (plus postage). 

Firm 

By 

Address... 



Circle the United States 



Pacific and Atlantic 
Oceans 

Great Lakes and 
the Gulf oj Mexico 

Two Foreign 
Countries 

14 States 

l<ieu' York Harbor. 
Puget Soujidand 
San Francisco Ba\ 





Greatest 

Summer Travel Bargain 

—plan noiv to take advantage 
of it in vacation-time this year 



Around the I'nited States for but a few dollars more 
than the round trip direct route fare to New York! 

Make it in a few weeks or spend all summer en- 
mule; stopover privileges and long return limits on 
.M)ur ticket permit your traveling at your own con- 
venience and desire. 

Roundtrip summer excursion fares will soon be 
announced. Start when they become effective; 
return any time before October ilst. 

California 

In California you see San Francisco, Oakland, the 
Golden Gate, side trips to Lake Tahoe and Yo- 
semite National Park— the ,San Joaquin and other 
leautiful valleys as you travel southward. The coast 
line 100 miles of it along the ocean, Santa Barbara, 
l.os .\ngeles, Pasadena, Hollywood, the beaches and 
tl-.c mountains, the orange groves and old missions. 

Go on to San Diego and thence over the Carriso 
Gorge to Phoenis, the .\pache Trail, the Roosevelt 
Dam, Tucson. 

El Paso offers a sidetrip into old Mexico, Juarez 
Icing just across the Rio Grande. San -\ntonio, Hous- 
ton, New Orleans, cities full of romance and beautv. 



At Sea 

Go by steamer down the Mississippi, 
through the Gulf of Mexico and north- 
ward on the .\tlantic to New York. Meals 
and berth on the boat included in the 
one fare. 

From there you may enjoy side-trips 
to Boston, Philadelphia, Washington and 
-\tlantic City. 




W cstward you may go through beautiful New Y'ork 
State to .\lbany, Buffalo, Niagara Falls, a trip through 
Canada, and then Detroit and Chicago. Here are the 
Great Lakes with all their summer fun. 

Milwaukee and Madison, .Minneapolis and .St. 
Paul then you may continue westward through the 
I'nited States or C^anada. 

The former route takes you through North Dakota, 
Montana a sidetrip to Yellowstone Park — and 
Idaho to .Spokane and .Seattle. The latter allows you 
to visit Winnipeg, Lake Louise, Banff, Jasper National 
Park, ,Mt. Robson, Vancouver and Victoria before 
arriving at Seattle. 

Then Puget Sound, Tacoma a sidetrip to Mt. 
Rainier National Park, the great valley of the 
Columbia River, Portland and the green Oregon 
country. In Oregon is Crater Lake. Then southward 
through verdant valleys and over tall mountain 
ranges to Sacramento and San Francisco. 

Here is the trip of all trips. No matter where you 
live or from where v ou wish to start you may connect 
with trains to carry you over the Big Circle Trip. 

Lou- Summer Fares 
Plan now for this most wonderful of all 
your vacations. Make this summer a 
liberal education for your children and 
yourselves. See and do more this vaca- 
tion than ever before. 

.\sk for literature covering this tour of 
the United States. See .\merica First— 
and see it in this easy, comfortable, con- 
venient way. 



Southern PacificLines 



See 

Sdn Franasco 
Odhfand 
Berkeley 
Sayjta Barbara 
Los Angeles 
Pasadena 
Long Beach 
San Dit'go 
Tuma 
Phoenix 
Tucson 
El Paso 
Sdn Antonio 
Houston 
J^ew Orleans 
T^eiv "York 
Albany 
Bujfalo 
T^iagara Falls 
Detroit 
Chicago 
Milwau\ee 
Madison 
Minneapolis 
St- Paul 
Seattle 
Tacoma 
Portland 
jr Sdcramento 



F. S. McGINNIS 

PASSENGER TR.A.FFIC MANAGER 

SAN FRANCISCO 



FILE COPY 

INFORMATION BUREAl 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BUSINESS 

c-« ♦o 

Published Weekly by SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Volume XII 



MARCH 17, 1925 



Number /" 



THE BAY BRIDGE SITUATION 



Proper Considera- 
tion Must Await 
Ruling of the War 
Department 



r 



HI-: 



laiiciscd ( 'haiii- 
I of ( '..III iiierce is 
(Illy iiitcicstpd in the 
iistruction of a bridge 
tween San Francisco 
anil the < >akland side of the bay. 
Proper coni-ideration of this matter 
must await the determination of the 
War Department as to the location 
of such a bridge. It is at once appar- 
ent that it is impossible to advocate 
any particular bridge project until 
tlic \Var 1 )('partment has announced 
the location and the character of the 
bridge it will permit. 

The financing and operation of the 
various projected bridges arc of the 
utmost importance, and as s<j(jn as 
the location and character of the 
bridges are determined by the War 
Department it will be necessary to 
determine whether they are tcj be 
operated privately or publicly, and 
whether the promoters of various 
projects are able to finance their 
enterprises properly. 

This statement from President 
Clay Miller reaffirms the policy of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce and answers questions ad- 
dressed to that f)rganization recently 
by those interested in one or more of 
the various bridge projects. 

To make the position of the San 
Francisco Chamber of Conunerce 
clear it may be recalled that in 1921 
the War Department enunciated a 



INVITATIONS to the 1926 
National Foreign Trade 
( 'inivcntion, which will be 
hi'lilat Charleston, S. C, April 
28, 29. 3(J, have been received in 
San Francisco with copies of 
jireliminary program and regis- 
tration card. 

In a letter to the Foreign 
Trade Department of the San 
Francisco ('hamber of Com- 
merce, Secretary O. K. Davis 
says: "Our convention will be 
up to the standard you set in 
Seattle. We particularly want 
the West to meet up with the 
new South at this convention." 

San Franciscans contemplat- 
ing this trip can get all neces- 
sary information concerning 
fares, accommodations, etc., 
from Henry F. Grady, Dii-ector 
Foreign Trade Department. 
San Francisco Chamlier of 
( 'iimmercc. 



pohcy embodying the following 
points : 

(1) That no bridge of any kind 
will be approved north of Hunters 
Point. 

(2) That no low bridge will be 
approved north of San Mateo. 

(.3) That a tunnel crossing the 
bav will be approved in any location, 
pro\-ided that the highest ixirt of the 
structure is placed at least fifty feet 
below mean lower low water and 
proper compensation is made for 
obstruction of cross-section as affect- 
ing tidal flow. 

(4) That a combined bridge and 
tunnel will be approved at a location 
south of the proposed Alameda 
Naval Base site, provided that the 

[ continued on page i I 



Express Firms to 

Charge Storage 

for Undelivered 

Merchandise 



~n^ 



X"llF>-iS companies are 
|ilaiiiiing to establish a 
-\.-t(ni of chargesfor the 
.storing of express ship- 
iiii-iits that are uncalled 
for or icfuseil when tendered for de- 
livery. This is the announcement 
of W. C. Kiefcr of the .\merican 
Railway Express Company. 

A docket outlining the proposal 
has been issued for the information 
of the public, and in due course it 
will be filed with the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission as an addition to 
the IC.xpress Classification to become 
iffective on or about May 1st. 

The rules and charges will apply 
to business nf this character which 
the local office has to store owing to 
the refusal of the consignee to accept 
it when a tender of delivery is made 
or which for any other reason not 
the fault f>f the express company 
can not be delivered. Three days 
"free time" will be allowed, after 
which the storage charge will be 10 
cents for the first day, 5 cents for 
each of the next eight days, with a 
maximum of 50 cents a month for 
each shipment weighing 100 pounds 
or less. There will be a regular 
monthly charge thereafter of 50 
cents per month or fraction thereof. 
On shipments weighing more than 
100 pounds this storage charge will 
be assessed proportionally, any 

( continued on page 2 \ 



SAX FRANCISCO BISINESS. MAHCH 17, IKl'li 



SAN FRANCISCO 

BUSINESS 



Publijhfd «wkly by the S«n Fr«iici.-co Chamber of 
Commerce. 205 Merchanu Eichangc Telephone 
Ke&rny 112, Subscription. S4 ft year Kotered aft 
>econd-cl»«5 matter July 2. 1920. at ihePosloffice. San 
FranciftCO.Cftliforrtia, under the act of March 3. 1879. 



Owners May Hereafter Pay 
Express Companies for 
Storage of Goods 

I r„..t.n...-.l (r..„, ,,:«. 1 | 

fractional part of 1(X) pimnds to ho 
computed as 100 pounds. ('. c, on 
shipments weighing more than 100 
pounds and not more than 200 
pounds the storage charge will be 
twice that shown above on a 100- 
pound shipment. The carrier is i-e- 
(|uired to give proper arrival notice 
to the consignee, such notice to lx>ar 
the same address as appears on the 
shipment, and to retain in its files a 
duplicate copy of such notice. 

In the course of business, many 
controversies arise, during which a 
consignee may prefer to refuse ship- 
ments sent to him. The carrier has 
no alternative but to store the gootis 
and cannot relieve it.«elf of the ship- 
ment fir of all responsibility for it 
until the parties involved adjust 
their differences. This may take 
several months in which the carrier 
is an innocent bystander having been 
in no wise responsible for the non- 
delivery. 

Assessment of storage charges on 
unclaimed shipments has long been 
a practice with freight and baggage. 
The contention now is that the ex- 
pense and extra labor involved 
should be borne, not by express 
patrons generally, but by the owners 
of the goods so stored. 



Foreign rivADE 1 IPS Domestic 



I. C. C. Denies Plea of Rail- 
roads for Terminal Rates 

The Interstate C'nninierco Com- 
niission. in a decision just announced. 
1)V a vote of 7 to 3. denied the trans- 
continental rail lines' application for 
reductions on variou.s commodities 
from Chicago territory to Pacific 
(.'oa^t terminals which would not 
apply at intermediate points. 

The application of the carriers 
was filed for the purpose of allowing 
the rail lines to compete with the 
intercoastal steamer lines on west- 
bound transcontinental business. 



c^ 



-♦o 



lOltKJ— ChicHKM. ftli[i<.i>. ManufttriurcrB uf 
CHOCrH.ATK BAHS. CII<)riH.ATK COATKI) 
CANDIKS »nd HABV lU TH BARS, are vcr>- do- 
sirou}< of ^ftHl>lu«hing businm connrctioiw with a 
San Frsnciwo export house which »-ouId be inter- 
cstod in pushinB the itale of this confectioner^' in 
foreign countrie*. 

10104 — Chicaco. Illinoi», Party npemtinjc in 
Chicago ait a general merchandise broker, in anxinun 
to get in touch with San Francisco import and 
export houMv handling merehandue of an>; kind, 
including f'lod products. 

lOIO.^— Detroit, Mich. Gentleman denirea to get 
in touch with San Francisco direct importers of 
PORTO RICAN HANDWORK. j.uch a«. I-INEN 
TOWEI-S. LIN'OHKOX SETS. LADIES' 
rXDEKWEAK. HANDKERCHIEFS, etc. 

lOIOG — Victoria, B C Lumber company d«ure» 

could be put into the I.l'MBER-carr>'ine trade. 

10107— Vancouver. B. C Party in n p4«i(ii>n to 
supply a coiuiderablc quantity of SILICA SAND, 
08 i>er cent pure and free from iron. wiMtiea to get in 
touch Kith (irm.^ or individuals interested in pur- 



chai 



(this 



i>odit 



lOII'K— Honolulu. T H Inventor of HlLl' 
Df>LI> dof*ire« to get in fnueh nilh papier mache 
doll nianufnctureni regardins making thewe dolU. 
also making a mould from a woodco model which 
he will t-ubrnit. Also desires to coniDiunicate with a 
manufacturer of small CIX)CK WORKS for doll 
novelties. 

10109— Habana. Cuba. General commintion 
merchant b interested in repre«K>nting a San Fran- 
ci-ico exporter of SODA ASH. SODA CRYSTAL, 
CAT'STIC SODA. etc. Will operate on a eoni- 

101 10— San Salvador. C. A. Conimis»ion agent 
and representative desires to cstabliith businean con- 
nections with San Francisco exporters of 0.\S(>- 
LIXE. APPLF>; and GRAPES. PRESERVES IN 
TIXS. 

101 11 — Ruemw Aires, Argentina. .Argentina offcnt 
excellent poseibilitiex for the eunsuniptiun of 
FRESH and DRIED CALIFORNIA FRLITSand 
firms there are very d(aiirou.s of establishing con- 
nections n-ith California fruit pro<lucen< and shippers 
not already represented in Argentina. 

10112 — Chiclayo, Peru. Importers of large 
quantities of RfKiFiXG PAPERS dcsure to com- 
municate with California manufacturers of this 
material, 

10113— II nienau. Germany, Manufacturer of 
THERMOS BOTTLES wanta'to be represented in 
San Francisco. 

10114— Berlin. Germany. Gentleman, for U 
yeanii manager of the firm of inventors of the ther- 
moe bottle, has recently retired and offers his serv- 
ices to American firma as buying agent and even- 
tually as soles representative. Can furnish first- 
class references. 
^ 101 15 — Copenhagen, Denmark. Experience*! 
foreign trader, with connections in Denmark, re- 
turning to Denmark early in April, wishes to lake a 
line of CALIFORNIA GLACE FRUIT. FRl IT 
JUICES. DRIED FKl IT. etc 

10116— Oslo, NorwTiy. Importer of FOOD 
PRODUCTS wishes to represent CaHforma pro- 
ducers or exporters in Norway. 

10117 — Oslo. Norway. A well established agent 
in the brewing trade desires the representation fur 
Norway of a first-class San Francisco firm desiirous 
of exporting BREWING BARLEY. 

lOllS — Kerman, Persia. Established general 
merchant desire? to act as agent in East and South 
Persia for exporters of FORD AND DODGE 
CARS. MOBILE OIL. GREASE. CANDLES. 
CYCLES. PIECE GOODS. EMBROIDERIES, 
HOSIERY, RAINCOATS. COTTON YARN. 
CIGARETTES, CIGARS, COMBS. DRUGS. 
MEDICINES. HARDWARE. LAMPS. LEAD 
PENCILS, NAPHTHALINE. SECTION PAPER 



FOR THE PURKtSE OF DESIGNS OF CAR- 
PETS. WATCHES and SUGAR. He also export* 
the following Pervian products: DATES. PISTA- 
CHIO NUTS. ALMOND.S.GUMTRAGACANTH. 
SHEEP GUTS. PURE SILK HANDKER- 
CHIEFS. KER.MAN CARPETS and RUGS. Will 
operite on conmiission basis. 

10119 — Georgetown, British Guiana. Firm of 
commission merchants and agrntA. operating on a 
commisBion basis, as well as buying on their own 
account, wish to establish busincw connections with 
San Francisco firms desiring to market their prod- 
ucts in BritLxh Guiana. 

10120— Holland. Well recommended firm de- 
sires to represent a California packer and exporter 
of DRIED FRUITS. 

10121 — Sofia, Bulgaria Bulgarian house, dealine 
in differeot products of the State, desires to enter 
into relatioDf with important manura'-turvrs. 
Eventually this firm will eot^r into large public 
undertakings, state loans, mining eoncewions, pur- 
chase of tobacco, essence of roses, and tanibskini . 
Firat-claas references will be supplied. 

10122— Venecia. Italy Manufaetur^-t* of HIGH 
CLASS DECORATED LEATHER GOODS, such 
a^ EMBOSSED and GLAZED LE.VTHER IN 
COLORS. ARTISTICALLY" DEC<jRATED IN 
ANCIENT BRONZE. \K>SAIC and GOLD, desire 
to appoint a suitable firm or agent to handle the 
sale of their products in this territorj*. They manu- 
facture coin purses, card c&s«<. bill iolda. pocket 
books, cigar aud cigarette cases, purscfi. handbags, 
trinket boxes, chests, jewel ca^cB. book covers, desk 
set", etc Catalog and price list on file with Foreign 
and Domestic Trade Department. 

10123— Osaka. Japan Importer? of SOUTH 
AMERICAN COFFEE desire to get in touch with 
San Francbco shippers of this commrxlity. 

10124 — Kobe. Japan. Exiwirter and importer 
desire*^ to establLih connectionn wHth .San Francisco 
exponent of CATTLE BONES. HOf>FS. HORNS, 
etc.. and with importers of FURS, such as MINK 
and OTTER SKINS. 

10125— Tokyo. Japan. Exclusive importers of 
automotive equipment and replacement parts, de- 
Hireto import FORD GENUINE PARTS di.eetly 
from San Francisco authorized Ford dealers. 

10126— Chefoo, North China. f)ld established 
exporters of SHANTUNG HOG CASI NGS. export- 
ing $2,000,000 worth of this product yearly, wish to 
communicate with San Francisco importers and 
users of this commodity. They guarantee their 
cjisings to he c'ear.. fresh, well selected and salted, 
and lower in price than their Tientsin competitors. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

I)-2f.l27— Los Aneelt-^. Calif. Manufacturers of 
ticedlepoiut tapestries are in the market for CAN- 
VAS to be used in this work. Sample of canvas 
required on file with the Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Department. 

D-2028 — Los Angeles. Calif. .Manufricturers of a 
new type of gas heater dej^irc to get in touch with a 
San Francisco firm in a poftition to manufacture the 
METAL CABINET complete and METAL 
FRONT FOR FIREPLACE OR WALL TYPE 
HEATERS. These cabinets and fronts are con- 
structed of -Steel, similar to that used in the metal 
filing cabinets and bank fixtures. They nnll forward 
complete details to interested parties. 

D-2029— Baltimore. Md. Manufacturers of 
WELDING and CUTTING APPARATUS used in 
the Oxy- -Acetylene proces;>. including ACETY- 
LENE GENERATORS. PREHEATERS. OIL 
BURNERS. CARBIDE LIGHTS and OTHER 
BUILDERS' and STEEL WORKERS' ESSEN- 
TIALS, desire to appoint a suitable representative 
to handle the sale of their products in this territorj'. 
[ continued on page 3 ] 



SAN FHA.NCISCO BUglXESS, .MARCH 17. 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



O^- 



jw territory must make 
new friends, aod established firniB have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from new- 
comers if tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes rcnorta of removals and expansions. 



Architect— C. E. Perry, mo Mwrkt-t to 460 Mont- 
gomery. 

Attorneys — Alma M. Meyers. 310 Sansome: A. 
Avenson. Mar\-in Bldg.; I.. H. Shapiro. Balboa 
Bldg. to L'nited Bank Bldg.; Homer Lingenfelter, 
Balfour Bldg. to United Bank Bldg,; B. C. Mickle. 
315 to 220 Montgomery. 

Batteries— City Batter>- Ser^-ice Station. 168 
Valencia. 

Beauty Parlor— Park Beauty Shop. 1986 Page. 

Broker— H G. Renebome (coffee), 320 Market 
to 21 Pine. 

Campaign Headquarters — ^Rex Goodcell ifor 
Governor). 702 Market. 

Candy— Chesterfield Sweet Shop, 3754 Geary. 
Candy Import Co, (P, L. Davis. Jr.), Underwood 
Bldg. 

Cloaks and Suits— Henry Bloom. 130 Sutter. 

Contractor— Wni- Fischer. 1265 9th Ave. 

Delicatessen — New Mission Delicatessen Store 
(Miss Julia Xemeth). 2776 to 2828 Mission. 

Drugs— Caao Drug Co.. 895 Bush. 

Engineers^ — Business Engineeriog Service (con- 
sulting). 417 Montgomery. 

Flooring— Pacific Floor Co. (P J. Rudenko). 
2747 Mission to 2805 22d. 

Fruit— Hood River Apple Assn.. Fife Bldg. 

Hardware— Rothschild's. 3141 I6th. 

Heating — Electric Steam Radiafor Corp.. 742 

Hotels— Governor Hotel, now open, Turk and 

Imports and Exports — A. .\venson Co.. Marvin- 
Bide. 

Insurance — J .^ Brennan. 235 Montgomery to 
369 Pine. 

Machinery — Schutte &. Koerting Co.. .i5 to 74 
New Montgonierj'. 

Manufacturers* Agents — Schroeder Bros.. Mar- 
vin Bldg.: Bergstrom & Bruce, 760 Market. 

Market— Irving Fruit Market. 926 Irving. 

Messenger Service — Transbay Messenger Con- 
cern. 24 California. 

Photographers- Enos Photo Studio, 258 3d to 
2268 Mission: Salazar Art & Photo Studio. 839 

Planing MUls- Balboa Mill Co.. 100 Havelock. 

Plasterers — Johnson & Jacobsoo. 3786 Mission- 
Polish— Sphinx Products Co., 510 Van Ness Ave. 
to Pacific Bkig. 

Real Estate — R A Wilson. 119 Montgomer>- to 
369 Bush: Gross Real Estate Co.. 1951 48th Ave ; 
Wolf & Nelson. 26 Montgomery: Trevor & Co.. 22 
Montgomery to 71 Sutter; Fahey & Rich. 57.i0 
Mission: J. N Grant. 1 Montgomerj': Aetna Realty 
Co., 1!>40 Irving: Fred Linz, 1940 Irving. 

Restaurant— Waffle Grill. 62 Taylor. 

Retinning -E I Hackett. 102 Langton. 

Sheet Metal Works— .A ndrews & Beerman. 3.J9.^ 
Mission; r^liIi^. t -Sheet Metal and Heating Co. (C. 
R. Bell. T L Quaiuitrom), 1253 9th Ave. 

Stationery— Pacific Stationer>' & Specialty Co., 
577 Market to 599 Mission. 

Tags — Acme tag Co., 760 Market. 

Tailors— Br occhini & Vannucci. 4:^5 to 444 
Broadway; \'ictor Verdramini. 2558 3d. 

Theatricals— Players Guild School (Rexton 
Reed), 1846 Gough. 




Transportation — Independent Steamship Co- 
Fife 4$lde-■'IndepeHderlt-6.~&.-A^6taer iiine.'-724 



Wire — Kerite Insulatetf Wire & CableCo.', In 



Domestic Trade Tips 

( continued from page 2] 

D-2030— Carnarvon. Iowa. .Supplier of POP- 
CORN, shelled, cleaned ami sacked, desires to sell 
this commodity in carload lots to San Francisco 
firms which distribute to the retail trade. 

D-203I— New York, N. Y. Manufacturer of a 
NEW ELECTRICALLY DRIVEN HAMMER, 
particularly suitable for use in sculpturing and 
car\'ing on stone, desire to appoint some San Fran- 
cisco firm or individual to take over the sole agency 
for the state of California for the sale of this hammer. 

D-2033— Crescent City. Calif. Party U in the 
market for the follon-ing lumber-sawmill machinerj-. 
good second-hand: PLANER AND MATCHER 
(4 side. 1st choice; 3 side, 2nd choice) si/e about 6 
inches by 24 inches complete; and a TRIMMER 
complete. 

D-2033— St. Joseph, Mo Clothing house offers 
for sale a large quantity of SLIGHTLY USED 
SAMPLE TRUNKS and TELESCOPES, which 
they will ofler at 



Specifications Available 

The following specifications covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

For furnishing Orthopedic and Prosthetic .ap- 
pliances to the United States Wterans' Bureau. 883 
Market Street, .San Francisco, during the period 
July 1. 1926. to December 31. 1926. Bids will be 
received at that office until 2:00 P. M. Monday. 
March 29. 1926. 

For furnishing orthopedic shoes, arch supports, 
and the modifying of shoe£ for beneficiaries of the 
United States \'eterans" Bureau. 883 Market Street, 
San Francisco, dbring the period Ju!y 1. 1926. to 
December 31. 1926. Bids will be received at that 
office until 2:00 P. M., Monday, March 29, 1926. 

For furnishing hearing devices to the United 
SUtes Veterans' Bureau. 883 Market Street, San 
Francisco, during the period July 1, 1926, to De- 
cember 31, 1926. Bids will be received at that office 
until 2:00 p. m., Monday. March 29, 1926. 

For furnishing optical supplies to the L'nited 
State.-* Veterans' Bureau. 883 Market Street, Sao 
Francisco, during the period July I, 1926, to De- 
cember 31. 1926. Bids will be received at that office 
until 2:00 p. m.. Monday. March 29, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, for delivery 
at San Francisco for shipment to Honolulu. T. H., 
subsistence supplies. Bids are to be submitted to 
the Purchasing and Contracting Officer, S. F. G. I. 
D., Fort Mason. San Francisco, and will be opened 
April 7, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department, for deliver>* 
at San Francisco, on or about April 16, 1926. for 
shipment to Manila, P, I., subsistence supplies. 
Bids are to be submitted to the Quartermaster 
Supply Officer. Fort Mason, San Francisco, and will 
be opened March 25. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone, Isthmus of Panama, cylindrical valves, iron 
valve castings and rubber seals for overhaul of 
Gatun Locks. Bids are to be submitted to the 
office of the General Purchiising Officer of the 
Panama Canal. Washington. D. C . and will be 
opened March 26. 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(.\tlantic portJ or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone. Isthmus of Paoania, lathes, shapers. electric 
drills, grinders, sheet steel, nionel metal, brass, 
bronze, pipe and tubing, steel mid phosphor-bronze 



■trafts, balL,ioiat»t^ \ii)y«"».*sli_«vclsp v^e 
haiw-saw blqdes, elailipe, K^u« hSo^.^Ui 
ours, »hacklps. drinking giassf^. drills, fi 
screws, nuts, hose, rubber boots, canva 
cloth, sheeting, toweling, artificial leather, tapes, 
card^c^os. lanyard, copper cloth, bojvling ~^)^, 
papbr cups. lags, and coVer paper. Bids arV'to W* 
subnolti-d to tfte General Purchasing OfficG?" *f-^li6 
Panama Canal, Washington, D. C, and will be 
opened March 27, 1926. 

For furnishing the Alaska Railroad, to be de- 
livered, free of all charges, on Pier in Seattle. Wash- 
ington, 25,000 standard Douglas fir ties, 7x8 inches 
X S feet. Bids are to be submitted to the General 
Purchasing Agent of the Alaska Railroad, Seattle. 
Washington, and will be opened March 22. 1926. 



Transcontinental Freight 
Bureau Docket 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than March 25. 
Full information concerning the subjects listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce: 

Docket No. 6651— Diatomaceous earth, CL, 
eastbound: 6652. derricks (gas or oil welh. K. D.. 
CL. eastbound; 6653. malleable iron and gray iron 
castings, CL, westbound; 6654, cereals and cereal 
products, CL. westbound: 6655, wheat. CL. east- 
bound; 6656. agricultural implements, hand, in 
mixed carloads «ith agricultural implements other 
than hand, westbound; 6657. eggs. CL, eastbound: 
6658. stove furniture. CL, westbound: 6659. jacks 
and jack screws. CL. westbound: 6660. rail or track 
door or carrier, CL, westbound; 6661. door hangers 
and hay loft equipment, CL, westbound; 6662. 
power pumps, pump Jacks and working heads. CL. 
westbound: 6663, sad irons. CL, westbound; 6664, 
grindstones and frames, CL. westbound; 6665, 
stoves, CL, westbound: 6666. chain, ling belting. 
CL, westbound: 6667, handles, scoop, shovel and 
spades and scoops, shovels and spades, N. ,0. S., 
CL. westbound; 6668. wire cloth. CL. westbound; 
6669. tubs and pails, CL, westbound; 6670. wheel- 
barrows and trucks (non-self-propelling), CL. west- 
bound : 6671 . automobile tire chains and extra 
parts. CL. westbound; 6672. fine stops and thimbles, 
LCL, westbound; 6673. drills, hand, or hand and 
power combined. CL, westbound; 6674. tools, CL, 
westbound: 6675, churns, hand and power. CL, 
westbound: 6676. conductor pipe. CL, westbound: 
6677, andirons, CL. westbound; 6678, wTingers, 
CL. westbound: 6679, builders* hardware, CL. 
westbound: 6680, dried beans, CL. westbound; 

6681, paper boxes, nested, LCL, eastbound. import; 

6682. floor polishers. LCL. eastbound: 6683. paper 
felt carpet. LCL. westbound; 6684. pastry boards, 
cutting boards, clothes rack material and washboard 
material, CL, eastbound; 6572 (2nd Cor), apples, 
CL. eastbound- 



United States Intercoastal 

Conference Westbound 

Rate Docket 

Bulletin No, 40. posting date March 17. 1926. 

The following subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and will be disposed of 
not earlier than March 29. 1926. Full information 
concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

R-509 — Gold decorated glassware. Request for 
the establishment of an LCL rate of S2.40, actual 
value not to exceed $50.(K) per 100 lbs.. Item 1525; 
R-510. paper. Items 2745 and 2760. Proposed CL 
mixture of shipments of toilet paper, paper napkins 
and waxed ^Tapping paper: R-511, carbon tetra- 
chloride. Item 1070. Request for a reduction in the 
CL rate to 75c per 100 lbs.; R-512, paper printing, 
paper wrapping in straight CLs.Item 2760. Request 
for a reduction in the straight CL rate to 60c per 
100 lbs. 



SAX FRANCISCO BISIXESS, MARCH 17. 1(I2(. 



Another Factory Branch Arrives 




BIG SPRING COMPANY 

SELECTS SAN FRANCISCO 

AS DISTRIBUTING 

POINT 

DIKKT t'iu'tory braiifh 
of tho Harvey Spring 
and ForRing Company. 
Kacino, Wisconsin, hits 
iH'en secured for San 
Francisco. 

"We have .selected San Francisco," 
said T. H. \'an Horn, general sales 
manager at Racine. Wis., "for our 
Western distribution of Harvey 
springs, after making a thorough 
study of West Coast cities, liecause 
of San Francisco's central location 
and ideal facilities for e.\pediting the 
handling of our product. 

"From our new San Francisco 
headfiuarters, to be located at 489 
(lolden C!ate avenue, we shall serve 
the entire Pacific slope and the 
Islands, our firm being prepared to 
ship from San Francisco any one of 
fifteen hundred types of springs for 
automol)iles or trucks in addition to 
a line of wagon hardware and 
bumpers. 

"Kvery Flastern manuacturer is 
looking to the Pacific Co.ist more 
and more, knowing that if he has not 
already provided a factory or dis- 
tributing branch out here, it is one 
of the steps to be taken in the future, 
and with .San Francisco's obvious 
advantages a great many of these 
branches will be located here. 

"With your deep water and ex- 
tensive industrial acreage e.\tending 
to the soutii of .San Francisco down 
the peninsula, it takes no prophet to 
see that the future of .San Francisco 
is great indeed." 

The Harvey spring is a nationally 
adverti.secl product and specializes 
;n replacement spring work. Mr. 
George F. Howe will be the manager 
in charge with Mr. G. R. Waddell 
local sales representative. 



Story of Hetch Hetchy 
t^^w Out in Book Form 



Students Entertained 

Twenty-five graduating members 
of the hi.story class of Tracy High 
School were given close-ups of his- 
toric spots in San Francisco Friday 
afternoon as guests of the Hospital- 
ity Bureau of the San Francisco 
Chamber of Commerce. An auto- 
mobile tour of the city included 
Portsmouth Square, Chinatown, 
Tlie Presidio, Palace of the Legion 
of Honor and other points of inter- 
est. 



The complete >iiny nf llctch 
Hetchy is told in an interesting book 
by Ray W. Taylor, San Francisco 
newspaper man. which has just been 
published by Hicardo .). Orozco. 

"If the people control public 
utilities, why own them'.'" is one of 
the verj- vital subjects discussed by 
the author. He ilescribes the vast 
problems involved in transporting 
water 1.50 miles from the Sierras to 
San F'rancisco and the enormous 
sums of money expended in develop- 
ing the Hetch Hetchy project; the 
famous spring V.\ Polin, believed to 
be responsible for the fecundity of 
the Spanish garrisons at the I're- 
sidio, and the formation of the 
Golden Gate. 

Mr. Taylor's book is a valuable 
contribution to the historical litera- 
ture of San Franci.sco and embodies 
an interesting and connected ac- 
count of the development of the 
cit\'*s long struggle over water. It 
can be purcha.sed only from the 
publisher. 



The Nation's Editors to See 
Our Redwoods 

Plans for the routing of individual 
members of the National Editorial 
Association party to and through 
the Redwood Highway luupire in 
July, in the form of po.st-con vent ion 
tours, are being worked out liy the 
Redwood Highway Association, 
under the direction of Frederick H. 
Meyer, president. 

Since every minute of time is 
taken up during the N. E. A.'s stay 
in Central California, between July 
11 and 1.5, it has been found impos- 
sible to route the entire party of 750 
people any farther north than 
Sonoma County, according to 
officials of the Editorial Association. 

However, the Redwood Highway 
officials are now planning itineraries 
for independent and conducted tours 
over the Retiwood Highway for 
those members of the N. E. A. who 
do not immediately return East, as 
well as for those planning to continue 
on to Portland before going East. 

The Association hopes to route 
the bulk of parties bound for Port- 
land over the Redwood Highway, 
either via railroad, motor stage, or 
automobile. 



THE BAY BRIDGE 

[ c-<,nt!nu<-d from pagp 1 ) 

tunnel is so placed as to leave the 
channel along the San Francisco side 
unobstructed to a depth of fifty feet 
at mean lower low water for a width 
of a.OOO feet measured from the 
nearest point of the pier-head line, 
and provided that proper compensa- 
tion is made for obstruction of cros.s- 
section as affecting tidal flow. 

(.5) That not more than one 
cro.ssing will be approved at present 
in any location north of San Mateo. 

Major John W. N. Sehulz. in 
charge of the Firet Division, Corps 
of llngineers, with headquarters in 
San Francisco, is now preparing a 
s<'cond report on the bridge situation 
which will be sent to Washington in 
the near future. This report may 
result in reaffirmation of the policies 
enunciated in 1921, or they may be 
modified. 

No less than nine different projects 
have been presented and are now 
pending before the Board of Super- 
visors. It is believed vmlikely that 
any of them can properly be con- 
sidered until the Army Board of 
Engineers in Washington receives 
the .second Sehulz report and it is 
definitely established which, if any. 
meets with Government require- 
ments. 

With these facts taken into con- 
sideration it is olniously the part of 
wisdom for the Chamber of Com- 
'merce to withhold specific endorse- 
ment of any particular project until 
such time as the es.sentials are defi- 
nitely determined. When these are 
determined the Chamber will play 
an appropriate part in the realiza- 
tion of an improvement that is very 
urgently needed by .San Francisco 
and her neighboring cities. 



Americans Abroad Relieved 
of Taxes 

American foreign trade repre- 
sentatives abroad are relieved of tax 
upon their incomes while resident in 
foreign countries, according to the 
revenue act of 1926 approved by 
President Coolidge on February 26. 
The Foreign Trade Department of 
the Chamber of Commerce has sup- 
ported this proposal for several 
years. This action relieves American 
business representatives from a 
handicap and places them in equal 
position to representatives of other 
nations who have long been exempt 
from home taxation. 



SAN FRANCISCO •■—--■ 

BUSINESS 



Piibliihctl U cckly by Scin Fnunisco Chamber of Com merce 



Volume XII MARCH 24, 1926 Number 11 




A City Without Limitations! 

ATURAL resources and facilities have been a great factor in San Fran' 
Cisco's past and present prosperity and growth. 
'.% & * 
Vast industry and shipping have developed as the result of our deep 
' ^^t^"^- ^: .t & 

A great deal of industrial waterfront in the southern portion of the city j-//7/^/!<'^z>j 
nclamation and devtlopnnnt. This will increase the industrial waterfront property 
WITHIN THE CITY LIMITS by many hundreds of acres. 

ft •$; * 

There are still hundreds of acres of industrial property WITHOUT waterfront 
facilities available for industry within the city limits. Islais Creek Reclamation District 
will alone produce 291 INDUSTRIAL ACRES. 

& -Si s*i 

Deep water means shipping. But if the city is to grow, shipping must res/tit in industry 
—the fabrication into finished products of the raw materials that go through the port. 

'.% 1% I*) 

Hundreds of Eastern concerns are looking to San Francisco as the CENTRAL 
POINT for manufacture and distribution to serve a population oj five and one-half million 
people ivithin San Francisco's trade territory. 

S*i * * 

Aside from industrial property within the city, acreage for vast growth and devel' 
opment of the future is to be found down the Peninsula, where 4g miles of industrial 
waterfront with thousands of industrial acres adjacent are favored with deep tvater. 

* 1% •* 

For the most part this acreage is virgin, although the San Francisco Bay Terminals 
has announced a development program for one portion of it. 

a * sft 

The San Francisco Peninsula affords a most ideal location for an urban community 
with Its metropolis, its vast virgin industrial acreage, its home sections, hills, parks, 
beaches, country clubs and golf courses. 

* * v% 
San Francisco is a City Without Limitations ! 



SAN FRANCISCO Bl'SINKSS. MAHCH J(. 1920 



Foreign 1 rvAUll/ 1 Ir S Domestic 



)ulH be ma.Je U< 
, Kearoy 112, Vu 



TrBde Pcpartiiient 



Foreign Trade Tips 

10127— North Fork. Calif. Store wi»liCH to pur 
cha»p in Sun Francwco I\rPORTED INDIAN 
SEKD BEADS 

10128— NVw York. N. Y. Exporters of DRIF.D 
and CANNED FRUITS and APRICOT KER- 
NELS domirc to ttitnbiiMh connections with a San 
FranciAOo firm for dhipnu-nt of thne commodities, 
lit nttmctivo pricCM (juotcd F. O. B. steamer San 
FranciAco, Lon Ansptm, or other Pacific Coaot porl» 
for nhipnimt direct to Europe. 

10129— Vnner.uver. B C The Chinese reprt- 
»entative!i of n Britif<h Cohimbia firm wish to estab- 
lish business conneetiona with California packers of 
SACRAMENTO RIVER SALTED SHAD and 
puckere of C(nJFISH FLAKES and BRICKS, 
Offers should be iimde F. A, S. San Friinci»cr). 

10]30~-8t. I^uiH, .VIo. Druff manufacturers de- 
sire to coninmniente with San Francisco representa- 
tives of Japani*e TOOTH BRISH manufaclurew. 

HH:J1— .Siui Franci^eo. Calif. Firm i& in the 
market for IMPORTED JAPANESE PORCE- 
LAIN BIRDS, brightly colored 

10132 — Osuku, Japan. Manufacturer*! and ex- 
porters of a NUTRITIOUS HEALTH FOOD for 
infants, dMire to entablish a market for their prod- 
uct in San Francisco. The food is known as'NURT- 
IX)GEN" and ia composed chiefly of maltose and 
dextrine. Sample is on file with the Foreign & 
Domestic Trade Department. 

10133— Bari. Italy. Operators of a large OLIVE 
OIL mill in Southern Italy desire to appoint a nuit- 
ablp firm or imiividual to represent them in this 



10134 — Lisbon. Portugal. Export(>rs of S.AR- 
DINES IN OIL wish to appoint some San Fran- 
cisco firm to represent them in the sale of this 
commodity. Rcferencra are supplied. 

lOlS.") — San Francisco, Calif. Gentleman, leaving 
for France in May, now representing 25 leading 
furniture fuctori<>s of France, offers his services to 
San Franciscu importers or buyers interested in pur- 
chasing FURNITURE. He claims he can save 
local firms 150^^ by purchasing direct from the 
French manufacturera. Has illustrated catalogs 
from which one can make selections, and furniture 
will be shipped directly to buyer. 

10136— San Francisco, Calif. American, formerly 
with the U. S. Consular Service in Siberio. and 
.thoroughly acqunintetl with that countr>', desires 
to meet manufacturers ar firms interested in intro- 
ducing their goods into Siberia. 

10137 — Cottbus. Germany. German chocolate 
manufacturer wishes representative for COCOA. 
CHOCOLATE and CANDIES. 

10138— Berlin. Germany. Manufacturer of 
LIFTING JACKS wants representative in San 
Francisco. 

10139 — RheinpfalR, Germany. Manufacturer of 
LINOLEUM wanta representative in San Fran- 

10140— Muenchen, Bavaria. Manufacturer of 
HIGH PRESSURE LUBRICATOR wishes repre- 

10141 — Berlin, Germany. Importer is interested 
in establishing connections with San Francisco ex- 
porters of SHOES, LEATHER. FOODSTUFFS, 
FRUITS. RUBBER TIRES, and COTTON. 

10142 — Plauen. Germany. Manufacturer of 
LACES desires to appoint a selling representative 
in San Francisco. Would prefer someone already in 
the lace trade having connections with blouse and 
dress makers. Sample of lace on file with Foreign 
and DoD.estic Trade Department. 

10143 — Germany. Manufacturers and exporters 
of TOYS wish to get in touch with interested San 
Francisco importers. 

10144 — Kyoto. Japan. Motor dealers wish to 
purchase SECOND-HAND BUICK MOTORS 
from San Francisco dealers. 



K> 

10145- Darwrn, KiirIhiuI Large iii.-iiiiifiicUir'-r^ 
of PIGMENT COLORS for painta, lilhogniphic 
and printing inks: also Pl'LP COU^RS for wall- 
papers, paper coaters. enamellen>, etc., dotire to get 
in touch with interested San Francisc<» buyeni. Will 
send samples to prospective buyeni. 

10146— Ciabloni. C«-choslovnkia, Gentleman 
desires lo find a San Francisco market f<»r TINY 
CRYSTAL BEADS, such as are now used on lamp- 
shad<>s. draprricH. etc. He is also in a position to act 
OS buying ageni for San Francisco* importers of 
BEADS. NECKLACES and all kinds of IMITA- 
TION JEWELRY Sampl.- of the ■Ballotini" 
cr>-Btal beads for lamp shade making is on file with 
the Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

I0I47— United Kingdom. Producers of the fin«.t 
grade English PILPST(^NES are desirous of find- 
ing a market in this district and thev state that they 
are in a position to eflect c. i. f, deliveries at an 
attractive price. 

10148— BuenoB Aire*. Argentina. Trading cor- 
poration is very desirous of representing San Fran- 
cisco Mianufacturrrs or exporters in the Buenon 
Aires market. 

10 1 49— Granada. Nicaragua. C. A. Firm wishes 
to get in touch with San Francisco dealers in 
MACHINERY FOR FELLING and SAWING 
TREES. 

10150— Mexico City, Mexico. Firm is in a p<wi- 
tion to supply large quantities of ALLICMTOR 
HIDES at any time. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

I>-2U:fl— Boston. .Miuw. Firm of miles agents, or 
distributors m the eastern United States, offer their 
services to San Francisco manufacturers wishing to 
develop a market for their products in the East. 
Will consider any product of merit. 

D-203O— Philadelphia. Pa. Manufacturers of a 
PERFECT" FURNITURE PAD. made from 
best olive drab drills on both sides and having sht-et 
Cotton filling, in various siws. desire lo appoint 
some San Francisco firm to represent them either on 
a commission or discount basis. 

D-203fi -Venice. California. Party is in the 
market for 100.000 WAX BAGS to put in a carton 
2 7/8 inches by l}i inches by ti inches, allowing 1 )^ 
inch extra in length for sealing. Bags to have square 
bottoms and to be waxed on both sides. 

D-2037— Loe Angeles, Calif. Gentleman wishes 
to purchase UNREFINED RAW CANE SUGAR 
in 100-lb. to oOO-Ib. lots in sacks. Wishes price F. 
O, B. San Francisco. 

D-2038 — Sau Fernando, Calif. Nurseryman de- 
sires to purchase STRONG PAPER BOXES direct 
from manufacturers. Boxes must be suitable for 
mailing chrysanthemum plants. 

D-2039 — Hoquiam, Washington. Supplier of 
MOSS and SPHAGNUM MOSS wishes to com- 
cate with nurseries, green houses, or dealers inter- 
ested in purchasing same. 

D-2040— Boulder Crock, Calif. Manufacturer of 
redwood burl novelties, som-enirs and curios is in 
the market for a quantity of FELT. FELT CLOTH, 
or POWDERED FELT for use on the bottoms of 
vases, lamps and bowls. 

D-2041— EI Paso, Texas. Wholesale junk dealers 
offer for sale a quantity of WHITE WIPING RAGS 
and wish to communicate with San Francisco users 
of this article. 

Dn2042— Pasadena. Calif. Supplier of industrial 
ore, minerals, and earths, can furnish a large 
quantity of POTASH MARL, which is excellent for 
soil improvement and for raising all kinds of plants, 
trees, flowers and grasses. 

D-2043— Rainier. Oregon. Supplier of YEW 
WOOD wishes to -get in touch with buyers in San 
Francisco. 



THE .SA.N FR.VNCISCO 
DOLLAR 

IF VOtarp lucal.-,lanvwhcroiii 
(he ilciwn-town area today you 
can hear the clank of a stcam- 
shovcl at work on excavations or 
t he Iju.sy rat t le of a pneumatic rivet- 
er high up in a skeleton of steel, 
Thi.<i noise may irritate you when 
you are trying to telephone— but 
it's progress. The sidewalks are 
housed over with contractors' 
hoar<lin>Es. Huge trucks carry away 
dirtand carry hack concrete mixers. 
Wherever you go it's going on— 
progress. 

Cio ui>-town a little farther into the 
hotel and apartment hiiu.sc district 
and you are still in the thick of it. 
On every side is evidence of prejia- 
ration and expansion. Preparation 
for a greater population— expansion 
for prc.s.sing needs. The men who 
arc jiutling their money into these 
structures know what they are rick- 
ing. They arc hacking up sound 
Imsincss judgment with action, 
which lirings us right square down 
to the San Francisco Chamber of 
('iinuniTce and to the man who is 
not yet a member of it. 
The San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce is the one central body 
working for the advancement of 
this city !us a whole and the Cham- 
ber of Commerce dollar comes 
straight back to San Francisco and 
becomes the San Francisco Dollar 
in which we all share. 
Head tlic wording on this coupon — 
then send it to someone who is not 
a member: 
^teHlbership Department, 

Han Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce: 
I am convinced thai a membership 
in the San Francisco Chamber of Corn- 
merce is an invest iticnt in San Fran- 
ciscu and I iiisl, l„ Imili 111, lliis soumi 
husiness jvllymi nt inlh nction. Yuu 
may consider this as my apphmlicn 
for membership. 

Signed 

BiL^incss .. 
Address 



D-2044 — Columbus. Ohio. Manufacturers of 
•EBCO" STEEL TOILET P.\RTITION.S and 
VENTIL.\TED TOILET FI.XTURES. WASH 
BOWLS and DRINKING FOL'NTAIN.S, draire lo 
secure repre-sentation in San Francisco for ttie sale 
of tlieir products. Illustrated leaflet is on file witli 
tlie Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 



Specifications Available 

The following specifieations covering bids re- 
quested for various supplies are now on file at the 
Foreign and Donie-stir Trade Department. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal Zone, 
Isthmus of Panama, cement gun, air compressor . 
motors, electric hoists, steel, pig iron, wire rope, 
cable, electrical wire, telephone terminals, condu- 
lets, switches, resistance units, outlet boxes, fuses, 
plugs, lamp guards, coke, bricks, asphalt cement, 
prepared roofing, kerosene, oils, turpentine, paint 
remover, acetone, paints and ingredients, shellac, 
carbonizer, rock salt, wiping rags, rubber matting, 
paper and lumber. Bids are to be submitted to the 
General Purchasing Officer of the Panama Canal, 
Washington, D. C, and will be opened .\pril 6, 1926. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 24. 



^^■^^^T T^TTOT>.T-I?CC TELEGRAPH SERVICE 

T F ADS for NEW BUSIN ESb between u. s. and 

Ljt^rS.L^O jor L^M^ ^ MEXICO IMPROVED 



A ne« 6im entering « ne« territory must make 
new friends »nd established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of bns.ne«. from new- 
eomer. U -tipped off" at the proper lime. This 
department was created -^th the mtention of de- 
veloping new bu.ine«. for members of the Chamber 
of Commeri-e It is a compilation of the names of 
ew commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is rele«,ed »nth- 
out specific check-up. as firms generaUv prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de^ 
tailed verification. In addition to new concern, the 
list includes report, of removal, and eipamions. 

BuBnCM men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house lor 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop. Industrial Department. Chamber of 
Commerce. Main Floor. Merchant. Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny 112. 

A daily service available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m.. at the desk of the Information 
•Department. 451 California .treet. or if desired, 
list, will be maUed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with rtamped and addressed envelopes. 



Fountain Pens— Parker Pen Co.. Wells Farco 
Ulilg. t" 4(51 Market 

Groceries— Piggly Wiggly, 1644 Haight. 
Imports— .Vrenson * Co.. 200 Davis to Marvin 

Investments-Robert S. Odell & Co., 225 Buih. 

Jewelry-DeRoy Jewelry Co., 928 Market, 

Ladies' Furnishings— Goodwin Corset Shop. 449 
Mllsmi, to V.H Pott. . 

Lumber— McFaul Co., Flood Bldg. to St. Clair 
lil.lg Hall Timber Co., 112 Market, 

Machinery— T. L. Smith Co. 829 Folsom. 

Manufacturers' Agent-W. B. Schmidt, 660 



Mo 



y Brokers— H. Landecker. 403 Pine to 457 



Accountants-Western Institute of AccouiitaiicN', 
74 New Montgomery to Underwood Bldg. 

Ad'USters-P. S- Truitt and Paul Henderson, 1 14 
Sansonio to 332 Pine. 

Amusements-West Coast ,\m..sement Co., 

Grant Bldg. , 

Antiques-I.ee Eleanor Graham, now open, 441 

"""Lhrtects-M. H. Merrill & Co , Fife Bldg 
Attomeys-S. A. Abrams, H™''-''' f^g. to 10. 

Montg<.nier>-; Pembroke Gochnour. 681 Market M 

W. Mcintosh, 681 Market to 114 Sanson.e; A. i-. 

Black, 681 Market to 114 Sansome. 

Auctioneers-St. Clair 4 Lee, Grant Bldg 
Auto Finances— Motor Acceptance Corp., Sob 

Golileii Gate Ave. , , „ , :„ A-p 

Auto Repairing-Henry M. Hackmaier. 62 

° AuTo" Sunnlies-C. F. Pratt (Sphin. Products 
Corp. and National Equipment Co.). 510 Van Ne.ss 
Ave. to Pacific Bldg. . t- 

Automobile Springs-Harvey »?'■"«& Forgint 
Co of Racine Wis. (Geo. F. Howe. Mgr.; G K. 
Waddell. sales' director), 489 Golden Gate Ave, 

Automobile Tires-The Rosenblatt Co., 1171 
Market, to open a chain of tire stores. 
Antos-Fred Wright and C. H. Edsen, 466 Eddy. 
Beverages- Denver Bottling Co., 1049 Sansome 
to 104 Vandcwater. 

Broker-.l Kullmann; 220 Montgomery. 
Buildmg Materials-General F.rcproofing Bu.ld- 
,„e Pr.«lii.'ts Co., Sheldon Bldg. 

candy- M...ropoUtan Candy Co., 955 to 936 
Fillmore: P. Argyes. 101 Embarcadero: Cana> 
Import Co. (P. Lionel Davis, Jr.,), Lnderwood 

"'ctgars-Rudolto Cigar Co. (Rudolph Schwart.), 
441 PiiiP t<i -156 Commercial. 

Citrus Products-Citrus House, 217 Drunim. 
Cleaners -\ B. C, Cleaning Co., 315 Minna: 
N^w 1 >i.lv Dye Works, 1290 Sanchei: Art Cleaning 
A- DviioK Wurks, 229 Leavenworth. 

Clothing-Triangle ..pparel Co.. Gillette Bldg^ 
Commission Merchants-Lenios & Hanscom, lo9 
to 429 Washington. 

Concrete Contractor-John ftpargo, Russ Biag. 

to 3:i3 Kearny. ,,q, 

Dentist-Dr. C. R. Flagg, Butler Bldg. to 291 

Geary. „ rn 385 

Drayage-Paeifie Highway Express Co., 

Taylor to 343 t)'Farrell. 

Drugs -General Pharmacy, 1201 Geneva. 
Electrical -Smith Electric Co.. 50 Natonia 

'■''Engrrvmg-Conrinental Engraving & Colo, 
Plate Co., 156 2d. 



* Newspapers and Journals— San Francisco News 
Letter (Fred A. .Marriott), Russ Bldg. to Hanford 
Filk. .„ 

Paper-Butler Paper Co. (C. G. Sparrow). .18 
Slitter to ^5 Mission. 

Phys.cian-Dr. O. R. Lunger, 3009 16th. 

Plumbers-Ed. Rosenbaum. 115 Waverly Place; 
,1 II ,I„n.-.s(Meohanical Service Co), 1854 to 1812 

PrmtoT Presses-Automatic Printing Devices 
Co 05 Minna to 543 Howard, 

Radio^Brewster & Waterburv and Echophone 
Distributors, In, ,, 270 6th. 

Real Estate- Henry A Kopt, Jr., MilU Bldg.. 
E I Downing. 105 Montgomery; Mildred Breit- 
man' (Golden West Development Co.). 105 Mont- 
gomery; Lester & Lester, Russ Bldg. to 58 Sutter; 
A E Brune, 308 Bush to Charleston Bldg.; Thos. 
DavU, 403 Pine to 457 Montgomery; Pottery 
Really Co. 3421 Fillmore; A. J. Dalton. 5378 

^'Restaurant-Clinton Coffee Shop. 48 Market. 

Sand and Gravel-Sonoma Gravel Co.. Flood 
Ride to St, Clair Bldg. , . 

Saulage Cases-Western Casing Co.. 470 Jack- 



"securities-A B. Leach & Co. (Ross Thompson 
M„r 1 4,si,-, Calil.jmia. 



Sheet Met^l Works-Lincoln Park Sheet Metal 
W rka I'.llo Clement; Western Furnace & Cornice 
Cn it)" Brannan to Lansing and Essex. 

Show-Cards-Sykes Show Cards Co.. Russ Bldg. 

to 46 Kearny. . , ^ 

Stationery-Pacific Stationery and Speeia ty Co. 
,r rTlioell Vincent Co.), 577 Market to 599 M«sion. 
S ocks and Bonds-P. D. Kahn 4 Co., 308 Bush 
to Alexander Bldg.: W. H. Hannan and W. S 
Hoelseher. 235 Montgomery to 15o Montgomerj . 
Moeiscini. Montgomery': 

MeCreery Finnell Co.. ISO to 111 . » 
Edward R Elliott. Inc., Exchange Blk.; A. B. Leach 
& Co , American Bank Bldg. 

Tax Experts-Hageman 4 Hogan, Flood Bldg. to 

Tobacco-Paul Leonhardt (Leaf)^ 312 Cla.v. 
Typewriters and SuppUes-C. W. Kastner, 235 
Montgomery to 153 Kearny. 

Washing Machines-Gainaday Electric Co., 

440 Market. M„.iii,,,.r 1175 

Walchmikers— Kayser & .mc-vmimh, 

"wolns-Hutchings 4 Co., Baldwin Bldg. .0 

212 Sutter. I ;,man 4 Co., Insurance 

Miscellaneous— F. J. L^man o: ^ . 
Exchange Bldg.; Pacific Commercial Co Glume 
BUg to Balfour Bldg.; Special Servrce Sales Co^ 
fvacuo Static Carbon Co.), Russ Bldg. to lo3 
(vacuo o Davies, Wells Fargo Bldg. to 760 

trl"'; Collomb 4 Oldemeyer, Grant Bldg.; 
Market: CollomD oi. ^ ctone-Tex 

Source Research Bureau, Hearst B'-il- f """^^^ 
Cra Lmen. 785 Market; Walter E. F"lf»rd. !■>=■■ 

?r^^!::-^:f::=^-— ^ 
s:r:;:nir:»ees^-'-^i^S;.^f: 

Tiedeman, district manager W estern lac 

^ Di-i™ ■ F V Masterson Co., Monaa 

Wells Fargo BMg.. t-. ^J"-^^^: „ o, civdc; 

„„ck Bldg.; ^^^^^^l^fiZZ: 2^ sLk: 

. rGrSl'^rlco.. Hewes Bldg.; Investors 
Bureau. 486 California. 



UNDER new arraiig;oments 
entered into with the Mexican 
Government, the Postal Tele- 
graph Commercial Cables Systein 
will hereafter render a telegraph and 
cable service into and out of Mexico, 
according to the following announce- 
ment by Clarence H. Mackay, presi- 
dent of these companies: 

"For about fifty years there has 
been a monopoly of the telegraph 
service between the United States 
and Mexico, which prevented my 
company from introducing compe- 
tition. On several occasions we have 
made efforts to introduce competi- 
tive service, and, in fact, in 1897 did 
actually establish a connection with 
Mexico, but after a few months we 
were compelled to discontinue this 
service in consequence of the then 
existing monopolies. 

"The new arrangements with the 
Mexican Telegraph Administration, 
to which my company is a party 
have resulted in the cancellation ol 
the old-time monopolies, and the 
Postal Telegraph and Commercial 
Cable Companies are thus able to 
offer the public a competitive tele- 
graph service to and from Mexico. 
This will undoubtedly result m a 
superior and enhanced telegraph 
service with Mexico, which goes 
hand in hand with mcreased com- 
mercial intercourse." 



A TIMELY SERVICE 

HERE is a little record of serv- 
ice It is only one of many 
similar services that are con- 
stantly being rendered by the Cham- 
ber of Commerce to its members, 
but of which little is ever heard. 

A San Francisco firm had been 
unable for several months to get a 
check from M'ashington for goods 
delivered to the Government. A 
number of complications had caused 
the delay. The firm, being a member 
of the Chamber of Commerce came 
and stated its case and asked if any- 
thing could be done about it^ Ihe 
Chamber's repre.sentative '" Wash- 
ington was immediately notified and 
he took the matter up with the 
Comptroller General. Things were 
qSy straightened out and the 
check is now in the mail heading 
west That was one little service to 

a member. 



UX FHANCISCO BtSINKSS. MARCH 24. Mi 



The Rapid Growth of a Local Industry 



IN the Pioneer Rubber Mills the 
Pacific ("oast has one of the 
leading manufacturers of me- 
chanical rubber goods in the United 
States. Starting in the rubber manu- 
facturing business in 1888 this com- 
pany has built up a world-wide dis- 
tribution on its various lines of 
rubber belting, hose and packing. 

The principal products manufac- 
tured are transmission, conveyor 
and elevator belting, rubber hose of 
all kinds, rubber packing and bat- 
tery jars. A single order for dredg- 
ing sleeves recently manufactured 
amounted to over S30,000 in value 

Develops New Process 

Five years ago the Pioneer Rub- 
l)er Mills developed a new process 
for the manufhcture of garden hose 
which turned out so satisfactory' a 
product that today Pioneer hose is 
sold all over the world and the com- 
pany is recognized as one of the 
world's largest garden hose manu- 
facturers. At the present time one 
million feet of garden ho.se is being 
manufactured iier month. This 
production will be increased in the 
near future to take care of steadily 
growing sales. 

In manufacturing garden hose 
huge moulds are u.sed in which 
.500 feet of hose is vulcanized at 
one time. A total plate pressure of 
one and a half million pounds is 
applied to these moulds in mammoth 
hydraulic presses, each press weigh- 
ing appro.xiniately l.iO tons. 

Modem Equipment 

The Pioneer Rubber Mills is 
modernly equipped throughout for 
manufacturing rubber transmission, 
conveyor and elevator Ijelting and 
hose of all kinds. 

Rubber transmission . belting is 
used in practically every industn,-. 
the sawmills of the Pacific North- 
west purchasing large quantities 
annually. Rubber covered convej-or 
belts are widely used in sawmills for 
conveying hogged fuel, in the cement 
and rock crushing industries, in 
fiour and sugar mills, in mines, in 
grain elevators and in even,' indus- 
try where costs can be reduced by 
supplanting manual labor with me- 
chanical equipment. 

Engineers of. the company are 
constantly studying the po.ssibilities 
of conveyor and elevator belting for 
reducing costs and speeding up pro- 
duction in a wide range of industries. 

The Pioneer Rubber Mills has 
supplied many of the leading cities 




of this and other countries with fire 
hose and has records of some of this 
firehose having been in active service 
for over twenty years. Much of the 
oil hose used by the large oil com- 
panies in the United States. Mexico 
and South America is made by the 
Pioneer Rubber Mills. Steam, water, 
suction, pneumatic and rotary drill 
hose are manufactured and sold in 
large quantities. 

The Pioneer Rubber Mills fac- 
tories are located at Pittsburg, Cali- 
fornia, and are constantly being 
added to on account of the growth 
of the business. The company has 
branches in the leading industrial 
cities of the country and handles its 
foreign trade through sales agencies 
located in the principal foreign 
countries, contact being maintained 
with these agencies through travel- 
ing representatives. 



From a New Member 

"We are proud to become mem- 
bers of the Chamber of Commerce 
and hope to do our share in the 
building of a greater San Francisco." 

That is the message of the Sterling 
Hardware Company. .535 Mont- 
gomerj- Street, just admitted to 
membership in the Chamber of 
Commerce. This firm supplies build- 
ings, garages, hospitals and steam- 
ship companies with cleaning ma- 
terials of all description. 



Revenue Freight Loading 

Loading of revenue freight the 
week ended March 6 totaled 9(>4,681 
cars, according to the car- service 
division of the American Railway 
Association. This was an increase 
of 52,023 cars over the preceding 
week, when freight shipments were 
reduced somewhat, due to the ol)- 
servance of Washington's birthday. 
Compared with the corresponding 
week last year, the total for the week 
of March 6 was an increase oi 32,637 
cars. 

Transcontinental Freight Bureau 

The subjects listed below will be oorisidcred by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Fi^ight Bureau not earlier than .April 1. 
Full information concerning the subjects listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau. San Francisco Chamber of Commerce; 

Docket No. 6685 — .\utomobite wheels. CL. west- 
bound: 6686, mail boxes. CL. westbound: 6687. 
packing, sorting and stora^e-in-transit of pearf. 
eastbound: 66SS. crude graphite (paint filler base), 
CL. eastbound. 6689. bone ash. CL. westbound: 

6690. croustads or pastry cups. LCL. westbound: 

6691. bee hives. K. D.. boxes, honey section. K. C, 
material, box or crate, wire and wood woven, in 
straight or mixed carloads, westbound; 6692. glass 
portable electric lamps. LCL. westbound; 6693. 
steel racks. CL and LCL. westbound; 6691. metal 
ironing board cabinets. CL and LCL. westbound; 
6695. paper cups. CL. westbound; 6696. wood 
batter>' separators. LCL. eastbound; 6697. aw-ning 
arms. LCL. eastbound; 6698. asbestos products. 
CL, eastbound and westbound; 6699. cottonseed 
cake and meal. CL, eastbound; 6700. railway equip- 
ment. CL and LCL. westbound; 6701. canned beans, 
CL, eastbound; 6702. furnaces and furnace parts, 
CL. w-estbound; 6703. furnaces. CL. westbound: 
6701. compounded paint oils and linseed oil in 
mixed carloads with paints and varnishes, west- 
bound. 



SAN FRANCISCO ^^^^^^^ 



JNrORMATlON BUfll 



BUSINESS 

Published IFeekly by Sail Fnuicisco Chamber of Com i?iene 



Volume XII 



MARCH 31, 1926 



Number 12 



Our New ^250,000,000 Neighbor 




A group of Twin Falls, Idaho, Trade Delefiatc 
Rogerson-Wells Cut-off. They wire t 



New Trade Opportunities Revealed at Chamber Luncheon 

The Idaho delegates were met at 
the ferry by representatives of the 
Chamber of Commerce on their ar- 
rival here last Sunday. They were 
escorted to their hotel, driven about 
the city, entertained at luncheon, 
and finally met by representative 
business men in trade conferences 
that undoubtedly will result in a 
closer relationship between this city 
and its new neighbor. 

.lohn VV. Graham, prominent at- 
torney of Twin Falls, voiced the 
enthusiasm of his fellow delegates 
ovei' the reception tendered them by 
local business men. He reiterated 
the statement of Mr. Wilson that 
much of the business of Idaho is San 
Francisco's for the asking, and urged 
that a party be organized in the very 
near future to visit Idaho and see the 
vast possibilities for industrial and 
agricultural development. 



IAN FRANCTSC( ) is and 
will henceforth be the 
li'y,ical market for .?250,- 
0110,000 worth of annual 
products that have here- 
tofore traveled from 2,000 to 2,.500 
miles eastward to other cities. 

This was the message brought to 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce la.st Monday by a trade dele- 
gation from the Twin Falls County 
Chamber of Commerce, celebrating 
the opening of the new railroad cut- 
off from Rogerson, Idaho, to Wells, 
Nevada. 

Asher B. Wilson, who headed the 
Idaho partv and spokesman for his 
associates at a luncheon tendered by 
the local Chamber in the Conmier- 
cial Club, presented striking figures 
descriptive of the development of 
his state during recent years. Here 
are a few. 

Idaho's agricultural income in 



1S,S9 was S3.8S4,930. The popula- 
tion of the state at the time was 
166,772. 

One j'ear later, or in 1900, the 
agricultural income had more than 
doubled, being $8,951,440. 

In 1925 these figures had jumped 
to $121,710,000 for agriculture alone, 
while other factors, such as wool, 
lambs, cattle and hogs, bees, mining 
and lumber, added another $108,- 
000,000, making the imposing total 
of .§229,000,000. 

Idaho looks to San Francisco as 
its logical market. In actual mileage 
the distance is little more than 700 
miles. In time, which is even a 
greater factor in the shipment of 
cattle and other perishable freight, 
the distance is hardly twelve hours. 

These are the people who want to 
do business with us and who have 
come to the Chamber of Commerce 
to tell us what they have. 



SAN FRANCISCO UUSINESS, MAUCH :il. 1026 



Foreign TRADE 1 IP S Domestic 



. ChamtH-ruf CoMirr 



-♦O 



Foreign Trade Tips 

10i:»I— Auslniliii. flfntli-tnanwdiMirniwofboinfl; 
pliicwl in toiipli with n linn in Snn Frnnrb^o wliirh 
would h«mllf ADIANTl'M FERN or ClANT 
MAIDF.NIIAIK FEUN for dyeing purpiwM. Can 
nine nupply iiM utlior vnriolicN of Australian fern in 
large (|i>"i>t>li<^ u'<(l would be 8ln<l to riubinit 

10152 — London, Enitlnnd. MunufncluriTK of 
higli (trade BRIAU PIPES arf open for affenttt in 
this l<'rritor>'. I >e»'criptivi« circular of thefic pipe* on 
file with lilt Fon'ixn and I>nnie«tic Trade Dcpart- 

10l5.V-I,ondon. Ennlnnd. Manufacturers of 
CHILDREN'S SOOTHERS wish to establigh con- 
n<>ctioiiri with Culifornta firmn intere«ted in the wale 
of thcw- iirticIcM 

l(U;Vl-Middl<-»l>rnu8h. Knitlund. I^me manu- 
fiirturf-n. -f STKKI. JOJSTS. SECTIONS. 
ROINDS. FIATS. SHICET PILING. RIVET 
MARS. FKRRO-CONCRETE BARS. RAII^.elc. 
are in a poi-ition to supply interested San Franciseu 
importem of thtfi nmterial. 

lOIoft— New York. N Y. Fimi *ishc? to com- 
niunicatr with San Franeiaco importTH interested 
in iniportinR RLOCK MARBLE in the rough litBtr 
from Europf. 

lOl.SlI— Praitur- Cti-clxiKlovakia. Manufacturers 
of OLO\'ES u'i*ih tt> appoint a »uitabU> sales aRCnt 
to represent thetii in thin .srdion. 

10157 — Sopron. Hungary. ManufacturcfH of 
PAPER and (JCILL CIGAR and CIGARETTE 
HOLDERS, de-ire to coninmnicate with San 
Franciwco iniportf-n* of tliew artictea. This firm if 
aim in u position to supply GOOSE QI'lLLS for 
brush niiiiiufiicturinR purposcM. 

lOloS — Hanover. Germany. Manufacturer of 
ASBESTOS CEMENT SLATE PLATES for roof- 
ing and wall covering wiuhM connection with 
buildinit hrnix. imporliTn, etc. 

101'>9— Ahrenhbum. Harabunc. Ccrinany. Ex- 
porter of FLt:>WER SEEDS wishes connection with 
San Franriseo iniimrtcr^ or floris(«. 

10160— Kneln a/Rh,. Germany. Company 
wishex to rt'prewnt a CHlifornta exporter of CAN- 
NED PEACHES. CANNED PINEAPPLES, etc . 
for confectionpre: ako CANNED MILK, in 
Germany. 

10161 — Hiiiuburg. Germany. Gentleman wialicM 
to reprcweni Cii.ifornia exporter of DRIED FRUIT 
in CJcrmtiny, 

10162— Ftillniun. Washineton. Gentleman wishes 
to g)-t in touch witli San Franciisco direct importers 
of KAPOK for iiiattreM ftlling. 

101G3— Oslo. Norway. Firm i» very desirous of 
represent infE u California exporter of DRIED 
FRllT. CANNED FRIIT. FRESH FRl'IT. 
COFFEE. SA?,MON and BANANAS, in Oslo. 

10164 — Sydney. Australia. Merchant desires to 
obtain the .Australian aeency for a line of HOG 
CASINGS from u California firm 

10165 — Srinagar- Kashmir, India, Manufactur- 
ers and exporters of INDIAN ART GOODS. 
EMBROIDERED YARKANDI and KASHMIR 
NfMDAS, SILK EMBROIDERIES. SHAWLS. 
LEATHER GOODS. TURQl'OISE CHIP WORK 
(set in bra.-s). JEWELRY. LACQUER WORK, 
WOOD CAR\-INGS and SKINS, dpsire to get in 
touch with San Francisco firms interested in the 
importation of such merchandise. 

lUIifti — Kobe. Japan. Old established dealers in 
ship machinery and naval stores wish to purchase 
PINK TAR acdTURPENTINEfrom San Francisco 
uxporteis. and desire to export STEEL ' WIRE 
HOPES from Japan. 

10107— Tokio. Japan. Exporters of PYRETH- 
Rl'M FLOWERS and MENTHOL desire to 
e8tabli.sK business conncctioni^ with interested San 
Francis... irnprnters of thcst- cuiimioditip- 



10168— Chicnso. Illinois. Firm d.-»ir.-> l» i^rl in 
touch with San F>anci«eo jobbem and importers of 
BRONZE POWDER and aHunJ pnxluclf. .^'ich w 
SCHLAGMETAL. GOLD and ALUMINUM 
LEA\'ES. used for picture frames and by lamp 
manufacturers. 

10160— San Luia PatoHi. Mexico, Supplier of 
BAT GUANO wialies to get in touch with San 
Franriaco coiufumcni. 

10170 — Panama and Colombia. Broker, in San 
Francwco, retuminit to Panama City, desires to 
leprcsent maniifncturen> of California products in 
the Pananta and Colondiin markets, Exp4.*tienced 
in CANNED FRUITS. VEGETABLES. MILK. 
DRIED FRUITS. FLOUR. LARD. BEANS, 
PRODUCE, SARDINIS LUMBER, CEMENT. 
HARDWARE and PLUMBING SUPPLIES. 
SOAP. ALFALFA and Himilar linc». Ix>ail 
references. 

10171 — Cartagena. Colombia. Firm U interested 
in !<ecurinR cataloRf and prices on REFRIGERAT- 
ING MACHINERY for ICE CREAM MAKING. 

10172 — Navojoa. Mexico. Firm wiahtai to accure 
cataloes and pricm ou MACHINERY FOR 
CEMENT MILL. 

10173— Nogales. Mexico. Company in in the 
market for the foDowinn raw material!* f<fr the 
manufacture of »oap: TALLOW. COCONUT OIL, 
SILICATE OF SODA. SODA ASH. and BOXES 
in which to pack soap. 

1017-1 — Mayanuex, Porto Rico. Commiiwion 
agent wishes to cHtabish eunneetionK with uu ex- 
porter of CALIFORNIA PINK BEANS. 

10175— Havana, Cuba. Manufacturcrv' a«ent 
desires to establish connections with California 
packers of CANNED FRUITS and VEGE- 
TABLP'.S. and with producers or jobbem of BEANS. 

10176— San Francisco. Calif. Manufacturers of 
■ELKONITE.- a NATURAL CLEANSER, su- 
perior to soap, which lathers in fait and hard water, 
free of animal fats or chemical compounds, desires 
to establish connections with export houttcH who 
will market the product abrnnd 



D-2l).-,l l'nrthii..i.(tM-n.>n f-^i.d.-iniin ..(T-is l.is 
ffi vices to San Franeihco firms wishing road repr*- 
^■entation in Orecon and surrounding territory. K 
rNirticutarly intercfiled in WOMEN'S and CHII,- 
DREN'S LINES, but will e-msider otheri^. 

D-205a— I^ Angel.s. Calif Gentleman desires 
to communicate with manufacturers of T(X)LS. 
etc, with a view to representing such manufacturers 
iu Los Angeles and v-icinUy, 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-2045— Detroit. Mich. Manufacturer of a 
NEW TYPE OF WICKLESS KEROSENE OIL 
HEATING and COOKING STOVE and WATER 
HEATER, embodying the "last word" in oil burner 
construction, desires to establish local representa- 
tion in counties of the Bay District and throughout 
the State of California. Representative of the firm 
now in San Francisco. 

D-2046 — Oakland, California. Party owning the 
California manufacturing rtiihu for a SECTIONAL 
CAMP HOUSE, deeirea to interest an individual in 
investing a small amount of capita) ne 
start the manufacture of these houses, Ct 
is not difficult and practically no plant equipment is 
required. 

D-2047 — Hoboken, New Jersey. Manufacturers 
and distributors of AUTOGRAPHIC REGISTERS 
and CONTINUOUSLY PRINTED STATION- 
ERY are very desirous of ajlpoJnting a suitable firm 
or individual to represent them in this territory in 
the sale of their products. 

D-2048— New York. N. Y. Manufacturers of 
"Mid West Air Filters" for building ventilation, and 
for electrical equipment, wish to secure the scr\'ices 
of a suitable manufacturers' representative in this 
territory. Illustrated circulars of this equipment 
on file with the Foreign and Domestic Trade De- 
partment. 

D-2049 — Cohoes. N. Y Manufacturers of 
TWINE and ROPE desire to secur 
a San Francisco commifsion house having i 
tions in tilts trade. 

D-2050 — Los .'\ngeles, Calif. Manufacturers' 
agent, in constant contact with the general building 
contractors in his territory, desii es to obtain one or 
more agencies for representation there. 



Specifications Available 

Th.- fulI-.wn.K sper.tieations covering bids r(- 
quested for variou-s supnliw are now on file at the 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Department. 

For furnishing the War Department and deliver- 
ing at various army stbtions. during the period 
beginning July I. 1926, and ending June 30. 1027. 
fuel. Bids ore to be submitted to the Quartermaster 
Supply 0flie4r, S F. G I. D.. Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, and will be opened April 30, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department with coal, to 
be delivered at %'arious army stations, during the 
period beginning .July 1. 1926. and ending June 30. 
1927. Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer. S. F. G. I. D.. Fort Mason. 
San Oancisco, and will be opened April 14, 1926. 

For furnishing the War Department with fuel. 
t<) l>e d('liv(-re<l at various army elations, during the 
peri«Ml beginning July 1, 1926. and ending June 30. 
1927. Bids are to be submitted to the Quartermaster 
Supply Officer. S. F G. I. D.. Fort Maaun. San 
Francisco, and will be opened April 12. 1926. 

For furnuthing the War Department with general 
supplies, to be delivered at points named later. 
Bids are to be submitte<l to the Commanding 
Officer, Seattle Q. M. L Depot. 405 Bay BIdg . 
Seattle. Washington, and will be opened April o, 
1926. 

For furnishing the War Department with sub- 
sisicnoe atorer. to be delivered, at various army 
p06t8. Bids are to be submitted to the Quarter- 
master Supply Officer. S. F. G. I. Depot, Fort 
Mason. San Francisco, and will be opened .\pril 5. 
1926, 

For furnishing the War Department with sub- 
sistence supplies, to be delivered at posts on or about 
April 25. 1926, and as called for during the month of 
May. 1926. Bids are to be submitted to (he Quarter- 
master Supply Officer, S. F G. I. D . Fort .Mason. 
San Francisco, and will be opened .April 5, 1926. 

The U. S Veterans' Bureau. 883 Market Street, 
San Francisco, request bids for the purchase of the 
following surplus United States Government sup- 
plies: Jasmine ink. drawing instruments, tools of all 
kinds. Bids are to be submitted to the Chief, 
f^upply Section, Room 425. above address, and will 
be opened Apri! 6. 1926. 

Bids are requested by the United States Veterans' 
Bureau for burial services and preparation of 
bodies of beneficiaries of the L*. S. \"eteran.*i' Bureau 
for shipment. Bids are to be submitted to United 
States Veterans' Bureau. 8S3 Market Street, San 
Fnuicisco. Calif., and will be opened April 7, 1926. 

For furni.shing the Alaska Railroad, to be de- 
livered, free of all charges, on pier in Seattle, Wash- 
ington, high speed tool bits, plow steel cable, rail- 
road pick handles, zinc cask, hack saw blades, air 
hose, steam hose. etc. Bids are to be submitted to 
the General Purchasing Officer, the Alaska Rail- 
road, Seattle, Washington, and will be opened 
April 5, 1926. 

For furnishing the Panama Canal, by steamer, 
free of all charges, on dock at either Cristobal 
(Atlantic port) or Balboa (Pacific port). Canal 
Zone, Isthmus of Panama, with panel boards, 
generating plants, switches, oil meter, wire, lamp 
cord, steel conduit, batteries, spark plugs, blinker 
keys, conduit elbows, lead sleeving, bolts, nuts, 
rivets, washers, crushed shot, valves, glass, wood 
handles, mop heads, brushes, tires and tubes, hose, 
gaskets, packing, oakum. linoleum, leather belting, 
harness, leather, diving dresses, fire extinguishers. 
wheelbarrows, coin eafe^s. lye, soap, soap polish, 
paper towels, wrapping paper, oats, and hay. Bids 
are to be submitted to the General Purcha^iing 
Officer of The Panama Canal. Washington. D. C 
and will be opened .\pril 14. 1026. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, MARCH 31, 1926 



LEADS /or NEW BUSINESS 



A new firm entering a new territory must mak« 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of business from npw- 
comers if "tipped off" at the proper time. This 
department was created with the intention of de- 
veloping new business for members of the Chamtier 
of Commerce. It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many sources. It is released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer tp 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new concerns the 
list includes reoorts of removals and expansions. 



Architects — Roller-West Co., I Montgomery; W 
I,. Schmolle, 235 Montgomery to Clunie Bldg.; 
Harold G. Stoner. 1st National Bank to 39 Sutter: 
F, E. Barton, 620 Market. 

Art Goods— Old Venice Shop, 517 Sutter, 
Artist — R. Kendrick, 617 Montgomery. 
Attorneys — W. .S. Solari, de Young Bldg. to 5.50 
:Montgnniery: J. J. Miller, 201 Sansome to Standard 
Oil Bldg.: .\aron Vinkler, American Bank Bldg. 

Auto Accessories — Champion Auto Bed Co.. 340 
7th 

Automobiles — Hudson Essex Sales Co. (680 
Valencia), leased salesrooms to be erected E. 
Mission S. 2.5th: Brown & Quinn, 5S35 Geary: 
Keough A Wise, 445 Castro. 

Auto Repairing — .\uto Repair & Brake Co., 76S 
Golden Gale Ave. 

Auto Tires— Auto Tire Credit Co., 692 Valencia. 
Barbers — Tip Top Barber Shop, 146 Mason to 
S. W. .Mason and Ellis, in May. 

Beauty Parlor — Blossom Beauty Shop, 2803 
Greenwich. 

Billiards and Pool— Geo. J. Heath, 2952 16th to 
2011 Folsom. 

Brokers — Leon Goldman & Co. (stock), 235 
Montgomery to Clunie Bldg.; D. W. Ward (insur- 
ance), Russ Bldg. to 333 Kearny: George Searle 
(stock), Russ Bldg. to Alexander Bldg.: Robinson 
Kahn Co. (stock), 308 Bush to 155 Montgoraerj'. 
Building Material— H. W. Cookson, 55 New 
Montgomery to 447 Hampshire; Mastercraft Tile 
& Roofing Co., 136 McAllister. 

Building and Loans — Union Bldg. & Loan Assn., 
41 Montgomery to 224 Kearny; Citizens Bldg. & 
Loan .\s.sn. (Fremont Wood), 405 Pine to 165 

Candy— Wm Lucchesi, 505 Divieadero. 

Carbon Paper and Ribbons — Vacuo Static 
Carbon Co., Russ Bldg. to 153 Kearny, 

Children's Wear — Infants' and Children's Clothes 
Shop, 432 Clement. 

Cigars — A. H. Wagner, 235 Montgomery to 341 
Bush : Xative Cigar Store, 4212 3d. 

Citrus Products — H. Wurgaft «V Son (Citrus 
House), 217 Dninim. 

Cleaning and Dyeing— 7th .\venue Cleaners. 
1356 7th Ave., April 1. 

Clothing— Knit Toggery, 2541 Mission to 2450 
Mis-~ion, June 1; Federal Outfitting Co., 2565 
Mission. 

Contractors— P. L. Burr, 549 Market to 320 
Market: -los. Dunn, 235 Montgomerj" to Clunie 
Bldg. 

Delicatessen— Charles Freis, 1245 Fillmore. 

Dentists— American Dental Laboratory, Hewes 
Bldg. to 323 Geary. 

Dressmakers— .\strahanzeff & Knopoff, 1930 
Sutter. 

Drugs — Jonas Drug Co., Cor. Union and 
Buchanan, -\pril 1. 

Engineers — Gallagher Co. (display), 102S Mar- 
ket to 166 Eddy: Norton Ware (civil), Crocker 
Bldg. to 1 Montgomery; Wallace C. Riddell (chem- 
ical), .55 New Montgoriiery to 760 Market. 

Engravings — Continental Engraving & Color 
Plate Co., 156 2d. 

Exterminators — Pacific Coast Exterminator Co., 
113 Carl. 

Fruits and Vegetables— Oak Market, 842 Taraval. 



Furniture — Desk Exchange, 531 California to 
469 Pine, In April: Gaines-Walrath Co. (A. D 
Pitts, Mgr), opening 366 Post. 

General Merchandise — Nam King Co., 35 Went- 
worth. 

Gravel— .Sonoma Gravel Co., Flood Bldg. to 16 
California. 

Grocer— Jenny Wren, 1841 Irving, April 1. 
Insurance — California Insurance Credit Bureau, 
235 Montgomery to 142 Sansome. 

Jewelry — Diamond Palace Jewelry Co., 797 
Market: Henry Rothcnberg. 1106 to 7S2 JIarket. 
Leases — Store, 1026 Mission. 
Linotype Composition — H. H. Harmon, 1216 
Folsom to .348 Sacramento. 

Lumber— Jones Hardwood Co., 4S5 Beale to 712 
Bryant. 

Machinery— P. H. Reardon, 592 to 575 
Howard; H. H. Plummer & Co., Inc. (Oliver Ma- 
chinery Co.), 681 Market to Traders' Bldg. 

Markets— StanfordMarket, 2003 FiIImore,-April3. 
Metal Furniture — General Fireproofing Co.. 20 
Beale to 324 California. 

Mineral Waters— A. M. Spiers, 68 Post. 
Oil— Tiger Oil Co., 976 Indiana to 576 Sacra- 
Paper — National Paper Import Co., 235 Mont- 
gomery to 268 Market. 

Plumbing Supplies — Mission Plumbing Supply 
Co. (Schiele & Menoggie), 1607 Mission 

Printing — Suey Won, 516 Pacific: Plank-Rossi 
Printing Co. (Rigsbee Printing Co.), 347 Clay; Bay 
City Printing Co., 345 Battery to 151 Minna; 
Golden Rule Priuting Co. (L. G. Garbe), 1030 
Folsom. 
Pubhcations— Hokushin Weekly. 1631 Post. 
Publishers— Sunset Press, 460 4th to 1045 San- 
some; Fairchild Publishers (Carl Gross, Mgr.), 681 
Market, 
Radio Equipment— Thos. A. File Co., 24 I2th. 
Radio Supplies — Edw. Ezekiel, 125 Mason. 
Ravioli — Liberty Ravioli Factory, 2607 San 
Bruno Ave., .\pril 1. 

Real Estate — Jos. Steinhart, 235 Montgomery to 
105 Montgomery; Chas. I. Berger, 235 Montgom- 
ery to 110 Sutter: A. J. Dalton, 5378 Mission; A. J. 
Galbrcath Realty Co., 4430 San Bruno Ave.; 
Pringle Co., 235 Montgomery to 332 Pine; Jos. 
Palisi and Elmer B. Stone, 235 Montgomery to 582 
Market; Welsh & Stanley, 1291 20th Ave; Tormey 
& Ryan, 235 Montgomery to 369 Pine; Robert X. 
Ryan, 235 Montgomery to 369 Pine; Shannon's, 
Russ Bldg. to Alexander Bldg.; V. J: A. Key, Kohl 
Bldg, to 576 Sacramento: R. L. Lewis & Co., Irving 
near 21st; Welsh 4 Stanley, 1382 20th Ave,: R. T. 
Goldsmith. 20O7 Irving; A. T. Davinroy, 2009 
Irving; Cox Bros., 1.309 9th Ave. to 1950 Irving, 
April 1; Henry Doelgor, 2219 Irving: Aetna Realty 
Co., 1940 Irving; .\nder8on & Nelson, 1948 Irving; 
Ed O'Neill, 1983 Howard: E. J. Mahoney, 68 Post; 
Jos. Palisi, 215 to 220 Montgomery. 

Restaurants — Sunset Coffee House. 1831 Irving; 
Treat Dairy Lunch, 2950 21st: Restaurant, 2001 
Fillmore: LaSalle Cafe, 240 Turk. 
Sausages— Elevi Bros., 5030 3d. 
Shoes — C;. H. Baker (succes,sor to Rosenthak, 
Inc.), 241 Geary. 

Signs— Jefferj- Show Cards. 2537 Mission to 297 
Cumberland. 

Stocks and Bonds— De Fremery & Co., 341 
Montgomery, opening branch 3004 16th. R. J. 
Robischung will manage. 

Tags and Labels— Bergstrom & Bruce (Acme 
Tag Co), 760 Market, 
Tailor— Stella Bayer, 416 O'Farrell, 
Terrazzo Work- California Terrazzo Marble Co., 
20S5 San Bruno Ave. 

Tires— Auto Tire Credit Co., 3192 21st; Coast 
Tire 4 Rubber Co., 1332 \'an Ness Ave. 

Typewriters— The TypewTitoriuni, 225 Mont- 
gomery to 157 Market. 

Waterproofing— Minwax Co., Postal Tel. Bldg. 
to 136 McAllister, 

Wood Turner— Wm, H, Taylor. 479 Bryant to 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO 
IMPORTERS 

The Foreign and Domestic 
Trade Department has received 
word from tlie Bureau of Animal 
Industry that foot-and-mouth 
disease is prevalent in Man- 
churia, and importers are re- 
quested to inform their agents 
to immediately discontinue the 
use of second-hand containers 
for hempseed originating in 
Manchuria. 



Notice of Proposed Change 
in Ratings 

The Traffic Bureau of the Cham- 
ber is in receipt of a copy of Consoli- 
dated Classification Committee 
Docket No. 26, proposing changes 
in rules and ratings of Consolidated 
Freight Classification No. 4. 

Hearings on the proposed changes 
have been assigned for New York on 
April 13th: Ciiicago, April 20th, and 
Atlanta, Ga., April 28th. 

The copy of the docket is now on 
file with the Traffic Bureau for the 
use of all interested shippers. 



Car Loadings Show 
Increase 

Loading of revenue freight for tlie 
first eighteen weeks of this year, 
January 1 to May 1, will exceed that 
for the corresponding period last 
year by .53 per cent, and by 3.4 per 
cent that for the similar period in 
1924, according to an estimate sub- 
mitted by the car service division of 
the American Railway Association 
at a meeting of the board of directors 
in New York. 



TRANSCONTINENTAL FREIGHT 
BUREAU DOCKET 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Committee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau not earlier than April 8. 
Full information concerning the subjects listed may 
be had upon inquiry at the office of the Traffic 
Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

Docket No. 6705— Saw blades, in chests, LCL, 
westbound; 6706. whole and cracked corn, CL. 
westbound: 6707, iron valves, CL, westbound?670S, 
carbon paper, LCL, eastbound; 6709, fiax straw, 
threshed, CL, westbound; 6710, sodium sulphite, 
"CL, westbound; 6711, chloride of zinc, CL, west- 
bound: 6712, rubber clothing, CL and LCL, west- 
bound; 6713, glass caster cups, LCL, eastbound; 
6714, wooden shoe lasts, LCL, westbound; 6715, 
oleomargarine, CL, westbound; 6716, sewing ma- 
chine and cycle oils. CL. eastbound and westbound: 
6717, napkin holders or di pensers, LCL, west- 
bound; 6718. Absorption of Terminal Charges: R<^ 
quest that Tariff 30-N be amended to provide for 
absorption of 35 cents per ton terminal charge on 
carload shipments of oils pressed from imported 
copra or seeds: 6719, cast iron pipe, LCL, west- 
bound; 6720, woodenware, CL, westbound; 6721, 
filing cabinets, desks, lockers, safes, etc., CL and 
LCL, westbound: 6722. cedar shingles, in mixed 
carloads with lumber and millwork, eastbound; 
6723, International Railway Company: Request 
for representation as a participating earner in 
Tariffs 17-G and 27-1: 6724, cullet (broken glass), 
CL, westbound: 6725. flour sifters, CL, eastbound. 



SAN FKANCISCO Br.SI.\K.S.S, MARCH 31. 1926 



San Francisco is the Terminus Of All Lines 




Our Bay is NOT a Barrier 
to Industrial Transportation 

HAN rUANCISCO RAY 
lilt a barrier to San 
iiicisco's industrial 

((X^i^v^l transportation. Twenty 
1 minutes by water is the 
.same as twenty minutes by rail." 
This is the statement of George Gay, 
chainnan of the Industrial Com- 
mittee of the Chamber of Commerce, 
emphasizing the fact that San Fran- 
cisco's possibilities for industrial 
expansion are equal to those of any 
other bay point. 

"Sometimes the impression is 
given that the bay is an obstacle to 
our transportation communication 
with eastern points. As a matter of 
fact, space with intervening water is 
not different from space with inter- 
vening land. Time is the factor. 
Considered in the light of the time 
element the bay is only twenty 
minutes wide and this is a vital point 
to have in mind when explaining the 
industrial advantages of San Fran- 
cisco to our visitors. 

"Marketing facilities form the 
most important factor in the loca- 
tion of industry, and market means, 
first, immediate proximity to the 
greatest number of people, and. 
second, ea-sy access for shipment to 
the lesser number. San Francisco is 
highly favored from both stand- 
points. In the switching limits of 
San Francisco there is 68 per cent 
greater population than in the 
switching Umits of any other San 
Francisco Bay point. This means 
that from the doors of industries 
located in San Francisco a greater 
number of people can be reached 
without freight haul than from any 
other point on the entire Pacific 
Coast north of Tehachapi; and it 
means further that San Francisco's 
industrial product that is sold else- 
where is subject to excellent delivery 
facilities. 

"In this connection it should be 
clearly borne in mind that when 
mail, parcel post or express is left in 
San Francisco with the railroad for 
shipment, it is delivered to the train 
at its starting point, as San Fran- 
cisco is the terminus of all lines 
serving this section. This means 
that goods delivered to transporta- 
tion companies at points outside 
San Francisco must await the ar- 
rival of the train from San Francisco 
before going forward. San Fran- 
cisco is the terminus." 



NEW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE MEMBERS 

RISSEI.I. COl.MN (:O.VIP.\NY 

256 Montgomery St. — Investment bankers dealing in high class 

B G SANDWICH SHOPS, INC. 

1022 Market St. — "A meal a minute." This concern operates attractive 

sandwich shops in forty cities, the chain extending from California to 

.Now York. 
BARG LUMBER & SHIPPING CO. 

311 California St. — Lumber. Operators. Exporters and Importers. 
C. C. BUTLER & CO. 

690 Market St. — General importers and manufacturers' agents. 
CANEDY-OTTO MFG. CO. 

955 Folsom St. — Manufacturers of forges and foundry equipment. 

blacksmith tools, auto tools anrl drills. 
COLONIAL L.\W & ADJUSTMENT CO. 

1211-12 Humboldt Bank Bldg.— Collection specialists. Mr. C C 

Connor is in charRe. 
FRED HOL.MES & SON 

235 Montgomery St. — Ship brokers and agents. 
KEE LOX MANUFACTURING CO. 

25 Kearny St. — Extensive manufacturers and distributors of carbon 

jiapcr. 
NORTHERN COUNTIES TITLE INS. CO. 

374 Bush St.— Title insurance. 
E. P. BARTLETT 

Bar Pilot— Pier No. 7. 
C. FELIX BUTTE 

Butte Electric Equipment Co., 530 Folsom St. — Contractors 

and i-nginccrs. 
CENTURY ELECTRIC CO. (of St Louis. Mo.) 

171 Second St. — Electric motors an'i fans. Mr. R. J. IJavis is Pacific 

Coast Sales Manager. 
CONSOLID.\TED .MOTOR FREIGHT LINES 

651 First National Bank Bldg. — Freight shippers and forwarders. 
HAMBLETON & CO. 

Kohl Bldg. — 1 >cakrs in stocks and bonds. 
KINSEY BROS. & HOFFMAN, INC. 

883 Market St. — Carbon paper and typewriter ribbons. 
MRS. E. RIBITSKY 

133 Geary St. — Stringing of pearls and beads. 
ERNEST F. RIXON 

Flatiron Bldg. — Steamship agency and travel bureau. 
MYER SIMON 

820 Mission .St. — General merchandise, imrxirt and export. 
\VM. R. THORSEN 

1107 First National Bank Bldg. 
TURNER BROS. 

470 Post St. — Well known dealers in men's wear. 
L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

742 .Market St.— Tvpew-riters. 
K. ISHIHARA Co. 

510 Battery St.— Importers and exporters. 
PACIFIC PAINT & VARNISH CO. 

85 Second St. — .Manufacturers of paints, varnishes and lacquers. 
WILLIS POLK & CO. 

277 Pine St. — .\rchitects and engineers. 
W. R. SIBBERT, JR., CO. 

329 Daggett St. — Wiping rags and waste. 
STERLING HARDWARE CO. 

535 Montgomerj' St. — Hardware and janitors' supplies. 
M. D. CROOKSTON 

854 Pacific Bldg.— Publishers. 
NEW YORK LUBR1C.\TING OIL CO. 

947 Brannan St. — Lubricating oils and greases. 
PE.\RSONS TAFT CO. 

Mills Bldg. — High class securities — stocks and bonds. 
THE TYPEWRITER CO. 

739 Market St. — Typewriters — sales and service. 
THE JAMES H. BARRY CO. 

1122 Mission St. — Printers and publishers. 
BLUMBERG & KEHLENBECK 

348 Bush St. — Investment bankers — stocks and bonds. 
HENRY D. DEWELL 

55 New Montgomery St. — Consulting and civil engineer. 
YELLOW -CHECKER CAB CO., CONSOLIDATED 

Graystone 400, Graystone 4500 — Owners and operators of the 

Yellow and Checker Cabs. 



SAI\ FRANCISCO 



FILE COPY 



INFORMATION BUREaI 



BUSINESS 

Published Weekly by San Fraticisco Chamber of Commerce 



Volume XII 



APRIL 7, 1926 



XlMBKH 13 



Speeding the Municipal Airport 



Another Palatial Liner 
for the Pacific 

GAI.IF( )KXIA aiul particularly 
San Francisco has a direct 
vital interest in the keel-layint; 
at Xewport News recently for the 
new thirty thousand ton displace- 
ment liner for the Panama Pacific 
Line. 

This ceremony not only marks the 
l)eginning of one of the largest and 
most palatial liners ever to be built 
in an American shipyard but initi- 
ates a new era in steamship pas- 
senger and freight transportation 
between California and New York. 
The builders promise delivery on 
the ve.ssel in the autumn of 1927. 

The Panama Pacific Line was 
represented at the ceremony by 
Captain Roger Williams, formerly 
of the U. S. Navy, who will be in 
charge of the construction. 

The propulsion of the big steamer 
will be turbo-electric drive. In- 
terior design and decorations will 
strike a strong original AiBerican 
note without the introduction of 
foreign ideas. The newly opened 
American wing in the Metropolitan 
Museum of .Art in New York has 
furnished the decorators with in- 
spiration for the treatment of the 
principal rooms aboard. 

Mural paintings which will em- 
body the spirit, romance and ad- 
venture attending the discovery and 
development of the West, will be 
featured. 

Among the novel features of the 
new steamer will be a veranda cafe 
and a cabaret ballroom with a stage. 
Practically an entire lower deck is 
to be occupied as a garage for auto- 
mobiles of passengers which have 
been shippetl as baggage. 



THE 192 6 
YEAR BOOK 

General Wealth 

Industry and Finance 

Foreign Trade 

Port Growth 

Chinatown 

Climate 

These and many other sub- 
jects appropriately illus- 
trated — a compendium of 
facts describing the re- 
markable development of 
San Francisco, will be pre- 
sented in the igzC Year 
Book edition of San Fran- 
cisco Business, which tvill 
be published by the San 
F ranciscoChamber of Com- 
merce this month. 

Persons desiring extra 
copiesofthis edition are ad- 
vised to place their orders 
noiv with the Publicity 
Department of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce. The 
book ivill be in circulation 
Wednesday, April 14. 
Single copies to non-sub- 
scribers S2.J0; postage 
extra. 



Proposed Sites to be Visited 
by Committee 

ABICi step toward the realiza- 
tion of a municipal airport for 
San Francisco is lieing initiated 
by the Chamber of Commerce this 
week in the arrangement of a meet- 
ing on Thursday between the Cham- 
ber's Airport Committee and mem- 
bers of the Board of Supervisors wlio 
are .studying the project. 

With Supervisor Kent and others 
the committee will meet at lunch- 
eon in the Commercial Club, follow- 
ing which the party will make a trip 
of inspection of four proposed sites. 
Realizing the urgent necessity for 
a municipal airport as the first step 
in the development of commercial 
aviation in San Francisco, the 
Chamber of Commerce has been 
actively engaged for several months 
in the accomplishment of this as one 
of its major jsrojects. In this con- 
nection it has invited the coopera- 
tion of other civic organizations and 
there is every hope that Thursday's 
meeting will be fruitful of imme- 
diate results. 



Three Big Developments 

During the last week there have 
been three developments of vital 
interest to all San Franciscans. Each 
of the.se is the direct result of Cham- 
ber of Commerce initiation. They 
are: first, federal apiiropriation of 
•SoO.OOil for the appointment of three 
new foreign trade commissioners to 
promote trade between Pacific Coast 
ports and South America, Central 
America and the Orient: second, 
federal appropriation for the im- 
provement of the harbor of 
Kahului; and, third, initiation of a 
movement to improve San Fran- 
cisco's traffic conditions. 



-AN IRANCISfO BISINES 



Foreign TRADE TIPS Domestic 



Foreign Trade Tips 



ii»ii. 



10177— NVw Orl.-!»i.». I.:i 
chwc JAPANESI-: NOXKl.TIKS. ART GOfJDS. 
pIc. clirrctly from San Francwco innK>rleni and 
wbule5alrn> of thi^* srtidw. Th*y pcnuert inlcr- 
tstlwl wupplirn* of Jupanwe rnxtdn to B^nd th<'ir 
cstatopt ttt once to furilitiitr thi- B«U-ction of met' 

I0I7K— 0«ka, Japan. Manufacturer* of an 
INSECT POWDEK particularly suited for mw in 
orctuuth *i»h to crt in touch m-ith interested dealer* 
and importerv of this product. 

10179— Dairen. Miiochuria. Importer and ci- 
porter of medieal and sursical suppHeB demrw to 
communirate with San FrunriJtco manufacturenv 
and deaten. in the followins: MKDICAL and 
srUGICAl. ^^A\ITAHY INSTUIMEN'TS; 
CHEMKAI.. I.ABORATOKY and PHYSICAL 
APPAUATI'S. HOKNTOKS X-KAY APPARA- 
rrSand X-RAY ACCESSORIES; X-R\Y TIBE. 
EI,ECTR«»-MEI>ICAI. APPARATIS: MICRO- 
SCt)PES; MICKOTKMES; POLA ItlMETERS 
ANI> SACCHARIMETERS. NEPHEI.oMK 
TERS. CAI.OKIMETER: SlROICAL OPER- 
ATING TABLES: GENERAL HOSPITAL SUP- 
PLIES: CHEMICAL I»ORCELAIN; MEDICAL 
and CHEMICAL THERMOMETERS, etc. 

1(IIS(» -I'liiti-d Kinndoni. Firm reprtwentinr 
f<ntTal Hrilifih munufnrturent in looking for con- 
nection.', in thi- district to represent them for 
WATERPROOF CLOTHING ANO PIECE 
GOODS. j.uch ail OILSILK SLICKERS and other 
special vurieties of I^adiex' and Gentlemcn'n Water- 

lOlSl— Vernon. B C. Fruit company wishes to 
dispose of :. BIKH<HGIIS ELECTRIC B(M>K- 
KEEPING M.VCHINE. original price of which 
waa SI.HWJ. Owing to a change in their offiw »y»- 
leni. which ctinitnatcs the necessity of thU machine, 
they will ilinpopc of it at a low price. 

10182 — Stttvanger. Norway. Packcw and ex- 
porters of SARDINES. BRISLING. SILD IN 
OLIVE r)II. «nd TONL\TO. KIPPERED HER- 
RINGS. MACKEREL. CRAB MEAT. etc.. arc 
very anxioux to appoint a suitable firm to represent 
them in California. 

10183 — Suhl. Thueringcu. Germany. Firm wishes 
representiitive in San Francisco for SPORTING 
GINS. AUTOMATIC PISTOLS, etc. 

lOIM -Mutochen. Germany. Manufacturer of 
PRISM TELESCOPES wishes represenUtive in 
San Francisco, 

10185— Con.-4tantiiiople. Turkey. Exporter of 
TURKISH and PERSIAN RUGS desins to get in 
touch with interested San Frsnciaco importers. 

1018«>— Calcutta. India. Firm is interested in a 
new type process of manufacturing egg products. 
other than by vacuum drying machine^'. Solicits 
cntalogs and full information regarding such a 
process. 

10187 — Amritsar, India. Exporter of Indian raw 
materiaU and manufactured products, such as 
OILS. FIBERS. KERNEI^. PEPPER. DR.A- 
PEIUES. PRINTS. BRASSWARE. KASHMERE 
EMBROIDERIES. RUGS, etc.. desires to estal>- 
lish connections with San Francisco importers of 
these product.'*. 

101 88— Gand. Belgium. Exporters of ASBESTOS 
CEMENT Gt)ODS. such as ROOFING SLATES 
in all sizes and shades: CORRUGATED SHEETS, 
PLAIN SHEETS in all sijtcs and thicknesses, desire 
to get in touch with San Francisco importers of these 
nialerials. 

1U1S9 — Havana. Cuba. Commission house wishes 
to establish business connections with San Fran- 
cisco packers and exporters of CANNED FRUITS. 
PEAS. BEANS. .VPPLES. ONIONS. RICE. SAR- 
DINT:s. SALMON and HARD DRIED COD- 
FISH. 

10190 — Monte\-ideo. Uruguay. Established man- 



ufacturers' reprrwntative. with ext^nsiive f-x\H'T- 
iencc in the Montevideo market, wishes to become 
the sole celling agent of an American manufacturer 
of a good article in which he would be sufficiently 
Hupported by sampler and a small stock. Reference? 
supplied 



D-206.7 -Detroit. Mich. Mftnufacturen« of a 
HRA.-iS WEATHER STRIP wi«h to secure the 
-iri'ice.t of a general contractor or a weather strip 
iiiiin to represent them in the sale of their attach- 
rij.iit in thi.- territorj 

I >-20i'>)>— Rochet- ter. X. Y*. Old established manu- 
f irturcrK of BUTTONS deeirc to appoint a suiuble 
- ili-aniao to call upon thedr>- goods and department 
j.tore trade in thia territory. 



Domestic Trade Tips 

D-SO-Vi— San Franci»co, Calif- A Christian 
education board wiahe* to get in touch with i.up- 
plier« of HARD WOOD BLOCKS 12 x 12 x 4 
iochcA. even grain, free from cracks or eheclw, iiuit- 
able for making wooden collection plate^. 

D-2«'»4— Nehawka. Neb Manufacturer* of con- 
crete mixers are in the market for PLAIN STEEL 
BARREI^. USED. BILGE TYPE, ranging in 
sixes of 120 galloitf and upward. 

I >-20.'i5— Denver. Colo. Company is interested in 
complete supplier for a new mining camp, ^ueh as 
.\I.\CHINERY. STEEL. TIMBER. TANKS. 
PIPE. ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES. POHTABIJC 
W(rtH) HOUSES. TRANS.MISSION MACHIN- 
ERY, etc. as well as BUNK ami BOARDING 
HOUSE SUPPLIES. 

D-2056 — San Franraco, Calif. Business woman, 
having extensive experience as traveling sjilestady 
and demonstrator, desires to reprcwot California 
nianiifiicturrfK wishing to market their products in 
the middle w»ttern or eastern Uoite<l State? Would 
be intereste<l in specialty articles, noveltie^, Cali- 
fornia food products or confectioncr>', such as glaced 
fruits, etc. References furnished. 

D-20.'i7— Baltimore. Md. Manufactureni of 
WELDING and CUTTING APPAR.\TUS USED 
IN THE OXYACETYLENE PROCESS, wwh to 
appoint a suitable agent to handle the sale of their 
products in this territory. 

D-2058— Portland. Oregon. Firm wishes to get 
in touch n-ith concerns or manufacturing plants 
having PULVERIZERS. FKINGERS. PEBBI£ 
or BALL MILL.S, BATCH MIXERS and PRES- 
SURE COOKERS for sale, either new or second 
hand. 

D-205W~ Mercedes. Texas, Fruit and vegetable 
distributor wishes to communicate with San Fran- 
cisco manufacturers of BOXES and SHCK)KS: alw 
with MANUFACTURERS OF WRAPPING 
PAPER for tomatoes and citrus fruits. 

D-2060— Twin Falls, Idaho. Gentleman, exper- 
ienced in both the wholesale and retail trade in 
general and having extensive acquaintance with the 
Southern Idaho trade, is very desirous of reprewnt- 
ing San Francisco merchants or manufacturers 
wishing to establish a market for their goods in his 
territorj-- 

D-2061 — Pittsburgh. Pa. Industrial supply com- 
pany, having a number of No. 3 COIL WINDING 
LATHES, desin» to dispose of same in San Fran- 
cisco at a reduced price. Cut and description of 
these machines ou 6le with the Foreign and Domes- 
tic Trade Department. 

D-2062— Philadelphia. Pa.. Manufacturers of 
solid steel windon-s, fireproof windows and doors, 
desire to secure a suitable representative to handle 
the sale of their ROLLED STEEL SASH in San 
Francisco. 

D-20«3— I-os Angeles, Calif. Inventor of a SAND 
BOX and PLAY'HOUSE wishes to interest San 
Francisco firms or indi\-iduals in the sole or state 
rights of manufacture. He will furnish interested 
parties with terms, method of handling, manufac- 
turing and cost of same. Prospectus of the sand box 
and playhouse is on file with the Foreign and Do- 
mestic Trade Department. 

D-2064— Brooklyn. N. Y. Importers and manu- 
facturers of CORKS. CORKWOOD and CROWNS 
are seeking an individual or firm to represent them 
in California. Prefer someone already acquainted 
with their lin*- 



Specifications Available 



The folio 



I file at t 



quoted for various Nupplie* are now 
Foreign and Domestic Trade Departn 

For furnishing the War Depsi 
sistencc supplies, and dehvcring : 
Transport Wharf. Fort Mason. Sa 
required during the month of May. 1026, Bids are 
to be submitted to the Quartermaster Supply 
Officer, Fort Mason, -San Francisco, and H-ill be 
opened April 15. 1926. 

For furnLihing the War Department with sub- 
sistence supplies, and delivering the same at Fort 
MaAon. Warehouse N'o, 2, San Franciftco. on or 
about June 20. 1926. Bids are to be submitted to 
the Quartermaster Supply Officer. Fort Mason, San 
Francisco, and will be opened May 3, 1926. 

For furniiihing the War Department with drayage 
ser\-iee« between various points shown in proposal. 
Bids are to be submitted to (he Quartermaster Sup- 
ply Officer. S. F. G- I.. Depot. Fort Mason, San 
FraneUco. and will be opened April 23. 1026. 

For furnishing The Panama Canal with panel 
boards, generating plants, switches, oil meter, wire, 
lamp eord, steel conduit, batteries, spark pliigs, 
blinker ke>-8. conduit elbows, lead sleeving, bolls, 
nuts, rivets, washers, crushed shot, valves, ^lass, 
wood handles, mopheads. brushftf, tires, tubes, hose, 
gaskets, packing, oakum, linoleum, leather belting, 
harnes.* leather, diving dresses, fire extinguishers, 
wheelbarrows, coin safes, lye, soap, soap polish, 
paper towels, wrapping paper, oats, aivd hay. Bids 
are to be submitted to the General Purchasing 
Officer of The Panama Canal and will be opened 
April 14. I»2n 



Mineral Service Bureau 
Opened by Railroad Co. 

AT A WESTP:RN mineral confer- 
ence held recently a business 
^man told the mine owners that 
the only problem before them was a 
market. The Southern Pacific Com- 
pany is helping to solve this prob- 
lem for the western mineral deposit 
owners in a ver>* practical way. Its 
geological department maintains a 
mineral service bureau. Owners of 
mineral deposits are invited to fur- 
nish the bureau with information 
about their deposits, which is as- 
sembled into lists — a separate one 
being used for each mineral. 

These hsts are sent to users of 
minerals throughout the country; 
the service rendered is that of a 
clearing hovise for information and 
is absolutely free, both to the owner 
of the deposit and the user. 

If you will write the Southern 
Pacific Company. Geological De- 
partment, 645 Southern Pacific 
Building, San Francisco, if you have 
a minieral you wish to put on the 
market, or if you are in the market 
for a supply of any mineral, the in- 
formation will be gladly sent you 



SANFRANTISCO BUSINESS, APIUL 7. 1926 



Leads/orNew Business 



Oh- 



-♦o 



A Dew 6rm eotenDg a new territory must make 
new friends, and established firms have a chance of 
obtaining a certain amount of businese from new- 
comera if "tipped off" at the proper time. Thia 
department waa created with the intention of de- 
veloping new buaineas for members of the Chamber 
of Commerce It is a compilation of the names of 
new commercial and industrial enterprises reported 
to the Industrial Department of the Chamber of 
Commerce from many eourcee. It ia released with- 
out specific check-up, as firms generally prefer to 
investigate for themselves without waiting for de- 
tailed verification. In addition to new conceroB the 
list includes reports of removals and expansions. 

Business men can enhance the value of this serv- 
ice and make this department a clearing house for 
such news by mailing in or telephoning tips to 
L. M. Hyslop, Industrial Department, Chamber of 
Commerce, Main Floor. Merchants Exchange Build- 
ing, phone Kearny U2. 

A daily ser^'ice available to members is distrib- 
uted at 10:30 a. m., at the desk of the Information 
Department, 451 California street, or if desired, 
lists will be mailed to those furnishing the depart- 
ment with stamped and addressed envelopes 



Attorneys — Homer Lingenfetter. Leo. H. Shapiro 
find Julius Mackson, United Bank Bldg. 

Auto Repairing — Bert Caah. 3150 16th to 751 

Barber— C. Steffanilli, 1298 12lh Ave 

Beauty Parlors — Mrs. Jenny M. Navy. 44 Wi-st 
Portal Avp.; Mo<Iel Beauty Shop, 2335 Clement to 
120.S 12th Ave. 

Broker -G, V. Hiam. 821 Market. 

Cigars -\Vm. F. Heiligcr. 2958 to 2804 16th. 

Consulates — Consul General of Ecuador (Jose Y. 
Seniinurio). Kuss Bldg. to Monadnock Bldg. 

Electrical — Liberty Electric Co.. 479 Sutter to 
55fi CJeary. 

Furniture— Everett E. Saxe to 1265 Market; 
John J. Crowe. 1438 Sutter. 

Insurance — Seaboard Casualty Co. and Union 
Indt^innity Exchange, 459 Montgomer>- to 503 
Market. 

Interior Decorators — Menzo Decorating .Shop, 

Leases^Store. 132 Sansome; 119 Montgomery. 

Millinery — Broadway Millinery Co., 714 Market 
to 12 Geary. 

News Service — Associated Press, United Bank 
Bldg. to 812 Mission. 

Notary Public — Grace Sonntag. 485 California. 

Piano Tuner— V M. Alexander, 436 Xoe to 3820 
17th. 

Postage Stamps — N. J. Sargent, 235 Montgomery 
to 210 Post. 

Pnnting — .Art Printing Co., 15 Columbus Ave.; 
Excelsior Print Shop, 4671 Mission. 

Radios— Ray Fulton. 61 McAllister. 

Real Estate — .\ndersoa & Nelson. 1948 Irving; 
Schoenfeld A Murphy. 5715 Mission; Har\-ey L. 
SkirA'in. Spreckels Bldg. to 6099 Mission; Roy W. 
Gilmore, 235 Montgomery to 58 Sutter: Martin 
Hirsch, 235 Montgomer>' to 220 Montgomer>'- 

Restaurants — Italian French Restaurant. 1870 
Union: Business reopening, 639 Market; Chris 
Fotpz. 15:«Pine. 

Stationery— Reynolds Stationery (Mildred Ball). 
Russ Bldg. to 222 Kearny. 

Stocks and Bonds — E. L. Strauss. 235 Mont- 
gomery to 364 Bush. 

Tailors— California Woolen Mills. Inc. «21 
Market to 690 Market. 

Miscellaneous — Hayes Equipment Mfg. Co.. 346 
Crescent. 



Asks Aid for School 

THE American School of the 
City of Mexico is doing much 
towartls bringing a!)out better 
understanding between the United 
States and Mexico. Children of 
American as well as Mexican and 
European parentage attend and 
learn their fundamentals in se\'eral 
languages. The American Chamber 
of Commerce in Mexico has under- 
taken to secure a fund of 250,000 
pesos for the support of the school. 
Of this three-fourths will l)e used to 
pay off the mortgage on the school 
which comes due in July, and the 
rest will be used to build an assembly 
hall and play room combined. The 
major part of this fund has been 
raised in Mexico City and the 
.\merican Chamber of Commerce 
has written tlie Foreign Trade De- 
partment stating that it will be glad 
to accept subscriptions from Ameri- 
can foreign trade firms trading with 
Mexico. 

San Francisco firms which desire 
to have their names associated with 
this undertaking may secure further 
details from the Foreign Tiade De- 
partment. 



Revenue Freight Loading 

Loading of revenue freight the 
week ended March 20 totaled 977,- 
209 car^, according to reports filed 
by the carriers with the car service 
division of the American Railway 
Association. This was an increase of 
65,728 ears compared with the cor- 
responding week last year. 



Statement of the Ownership, Management, Circu- 
lation, etc., Required by the Act of Congress 
of August 24, 1912. 
of San Fr.^ncisco IUsine'^s. published weekly at 
San Francisco. Calif., for April 1. 1926. 
State or California / 

County of Sa.v Francisco ) 

Before me. a notar>* public in and for the State 
and county aforesaid, personally appeared L. P. 
Boyce. who, having been duly sworn according to 
law, deposes and says that he is the Advertising 
Manager of the San Fii.\nc(sco BrsiNESs. and that 
the following is. to the best of his knowledge and 
belief, a true statement of the ownership, manage- 
ment (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc., of 
the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the 
above caption, required by the Act of August 24. 
1912, embodied in Section 411, Postal Laws and 
Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, 

1. That the names and addresses of the pub- 
lisher, editor, managing editor, and business mana- 
gers are: Publisher. San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce. 465 California Street; editor, Geo. L. North, 
465 California Street: managing editor, none; 
business managers, none. 

L. P- Boyce, Advertising Manager. 

.Sworn to and subscribed before me this 25th day 
of .March. 1926. Minnie V. Collins, 

Notary Public in and for the City and County of 
San Francisco. State of California. 

(My commuision expires .\pnl 14. 1929.) 



MAY FESTIVAL 

AM.WTI.ME festival, with all 
the elaborate aeeoinpaniment 
of folk daiiee.s, old song.* and 
pageantry that were jjart of the 
celebration of May Dav in England, 
will })e given on May 8 ;it the Civic 
Auditorium a.s part of the Music 
Week festivities. One hundred chil- 
dren, under the direction of Miss Ida 
Wyatt, in cooperation with Philip 
Sapiro, director of the Municipal 
Band, will take part in the matinc^e, 
which promises to be one of the most 
colorful events of the week. 

Boy Scouts, C'ampfire Giils, fiirl 
Reserves, and other young people's 
organizations will be the special 
guests of the occasion, which, in 
common with the rest of the pro- 
grams, will be open to the public 
without charge. 

Music Week, which will be cele- 
brated by all musical San Francisco, 
will take place this year from May 2 
to 8, and will be the sixth annual 
observance of the festival. 



U. S. Intercoastal Conference 
Westbound Rate Docket 

Bulletin Nil. 42, posting date .\Iarc)i 31. lOJIi. 

The following subjects have been referred to the 
Standing Rate Committee and uill be disposed of 
not earlier than April 12. 1926. Full information 
concerning the subjects listed may be had upon 
inquiry at the office of the Traffic Bureau, San 
Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 

R-519 — ^Traps, animal (game traps, mouse and 
rat traps). Item 1630. Present rates CL 80c. LCL 
$1,0.5. minimum weight 24,000 lbs. Request for 
reduction in rates to 65c CL. 90c LCL.; R-520, 
artificial leather binding. Item 2265. Present rate 
$2.50 per 100 lbs. A. Q. Request for reduction in 
LCL rate to $1.50 per 100 lbs.; R-.52I, wooden decoy 
birds. Request for the establishment of a CL com- 
modity rate of $1.50. mimmum weight 10.000 lbs., 
LCL $2.50; R-522, curling irons. Docketed for 
tariff clarification; R-523, locks and lock sets. 
Docketed for tariff clarification; R-524, door bells. 
Docketed for tariff clarification; R-525, bottle caps, 
tin and cork combined; request for reduction in CL 
rate to 50c. also permissible mixture with bottle 
capping machines; R-526, stair pads, cotton or jute 
filled, in compressed bales. Request for addition to 
Item 800 an entry reading "Stair pads, cotton or 
jute filled, in compressed bales"; R-527. caster cups, 
furniture, wood or wood and metal combined. 
Request for reduction in rate to same basis as Item 
1630 or same rates as Item 1360. 



Transcontinental Freight Bureau 

The subjects listed below will be considered by 
the Standing Rate Conunittee of the Transconti- 
nental Freight Bureau Docket not earlier than 
.April 15. Full inforniation concerning the subjects 
listed may be had upon inquiry' at the office of the 
Traffic Bureau, San Francisco Chamber of Corn- 
Docket No. 6726 — .Sugar, CL, eastbound ; 6727, 
lead foil, CL, westbound, for export: 6728. auto- 
mobile bodies. CL, westbound; 6729, power shovels 
or loaders, CL and LCL, westbound; 6730, fish, 
cooked, pickled or preserved, CL, westbound: 6731, 
tinware and stamped ware, CL, westbound; 6732, 
electric devices in mixed carloads with electric cook- 
ing stoves, westbound: 6733, caustic soda. CL, cast- 
bound; 6734, electrical appliances and./or parts 
thereof, CL. westbound: 6735, bumper guards and 
bumper rails. CL. westbound: 6736. builders' hard- 
ware, viz., locks, in boxes, LCL, eastbound. 



;A.\ FKANCISCO BISINKSS, APRIL 7, Ifll'fi 



Great Concert to Aid Symphony Orchestra 



Ar til.- i-lo.se of tlic l'J2r)-lil2(l 
season of coiieerts. tlie San 
"Franciseo Synipliony Orelies- 
tra finds itself with a cash deficiency 
of about S43,000. 

This di'ficicncy will have to he 
provided for before any respoiisi- 
iiilities for the next season can be 
undertaken. 

To aid in raising the funds to meet 
this deficiency, a Benefit Concert 
will be Riven in the Exposition Audi- 
torium on Sunday evening, April 18. 

The program will include Mozart's 
"Jupiter" Synii)hony. several solos 
by Claire Dux. an internationally 
famed soloist, accompanied by or- 
chestra; and as a climax, the first 
local performance of K icharc I St r.auss ' 
gigantic tone poem "A Hero's Life" 
will be given. 

Mr. Hertz now is conducting re- 
hearsals (twice daily) of this work. 
"A Hero's Life" is regarded uni- 
versally as one of the greatest con- 
tributions to musical literature dur- 
ing the last century and calls for a 
greatly augmented orchestra, more 
than one hundred musicians being 
required for its presentation. 

At the last meeting of the direc- 
tors of the Chamber, Mr. .John D. 
McKee, president of the Musical 
Association of San Francit-co, made 
an appeal for the hel]) of the Cham- 
ber in making this benefit concert 
the greatest possible success. Mr. 
McKee stated that if the house could 
be sold out for this concert, making 
possible a substantial profit, he then 
expected to secure sufficient cash 
contriliutions from individual sup- 
porters of the orchestra to l)alance 
the l>udKct and enal)le the associa- 
tion to face the coming sea.son on an 
even basis. 

Mr. McKee pointed out emphati- 
cally that a full attendance would 
l)p an indication that the Symphony 
Orchestra had the support of the 
community, and would lie a distinct 
encouragement to those who were 
working hard to maintain the orches- 
tra as a valued asset of San Fran- 
cisco. 

The ( 'hamber of ( 'ommerce hear t- 
ily endor.ies the statements made 
and urges u|)on its members the pur- 
chase of tickets for the Benefit Con- 
cert. 

Every ticket purchased not only 
will help the Supporting Fund of the 
Orchestra, but will be an investment 
intrinsically worth more than its 
cost. The prices of tickets are S3, 82 
and.'?l. 



Symphony Box Office, Shei-mari, Clay A Co., 
San F'rancisco, California: 

Please reserve for me seats at S for the concert of 

April ISth. Check preference of location { } Main Floor; { J Balcony. 



Purchasing Agent 
Convention Will 
Draw Hundreds 

By D. B. CRAY 

Manufacturers on the Facific 
Coast have a rare oppor-tunity to 
exhibit their pro<^}rcts during the 
four days of the Convention of Pur- 
chasing Agents to be held in Los 
Angeles, .lune 9 to 12. 

This is the Eleventh Annual Inter- 
national Convention of Purchasing 
Agents. 

It is the fir.st convention of the 
National Association to be held west 
of the Rockies. 

Every purchasing agent on the 
Pacific Coast who can possibly get 
away will endeavor to attend this 
convention. 

A great Informashow will be 
staged in which Pacific Coast manu- 
facturer's have Ijcen especially asked 
to place exhibits. 

This Informashow, which is a 
great exhibit of manufactured ai't icles 
and raw products, provides a won- 
derful opportunity for producers to 
demonstrate their products first- 
hand to purchasing agents of big 
firms all over the L'nited States and 
Canada. Tliis is an opportunity 
that seldom comes to any manufac- 
turer — a selective audience and not 
a merely curious ci'owd. 

It is estimated tliat the attend- 
ance at the convention and the 
Informashow will include about 
twelve hundred purchasers. The 
Purchasing Agents' Association of 
Northern California expect to send 
at least one hundred delegates. 

Information regarding the In- 
formashow, space, rates, etc., can 
be obtained from L. A. Colton of 
the Zellerbaeh Paper Company or 
from the association headquarters, 
433 California Street, phone Garfield 
124. 



Marysville Finds 
Cooperation in 

San Francisco 

THE foUowirrg letter to the 
( 'hamber of Commerce is in 
acknowledgment of a service 
recently r-endered by this organiza- 
tion to the Yuba County Chamlier 
of Commerce with the cooperation 
of the San Francifco Call and Radio 
Station KFRC: 

"Yuba County Chamber of Com- 
merce and the faculty of Marysville 
Union High School are very grateful 
to you and to the Sayi Francisco Call 
for the recent u.se of Statiorr KFRC 
in broadcasting our concert. 

"Fr-ankly speaking I had little 
hope of obtaining any consideratiorr 
of our request tliat your organization 
get permis.sion for our boys' band to 
broadcast over any station on such 
short notice as twenty-four hours, 
arrd it speaks well for yoirr activity 
that such a popular station extended 
the courtesy, especially on Saturday 
night when all programs are filled. 
"Will you plea.se extend our th.anks 
to all the parties concerned for the 
very hearty cooperation and goorl 
will shown the Marvs\nlle I'nron 
High School Band on the occasion of 
our recent visit to San Frarrcisco? 

"Very sincerely. 
"Y'uba County Chamber of Com- 
merce, 
By W. S. O'BRrEN, Secrelary." 



SPECIAL NOTICE 

Through the coui'te.sy of the 
Japanese Consulate the For-eign 
and Domestic Trade Depart- 
ment is receiving the magazine 
"Japanese Silk," a monthly 
devoted to the development of 
the silk industry and trade of 
Japan. This puiilication will 
t)e available to interested San 
Francisco fii-nis at all times. 




BEAUTIFUL LAKE LOUISE 



Pacific and Atlantic 
Oceans; Great Lakes 
and the Qulfof Mex- 
ico. Niagara Falls, 
National Parks ' ' ' 

Tivo Foreign Coun- 
tries, 14 States ' ' ' ' 

Neiv York Harbor, 
Puget Sound ' / ' ^ >■ 



Amazing Lo'w Cost 



— Southern PaciHc's new vacation- time 
oESer — around the United States in a 

great circle tour 

HERE'S a new travel bargain. Around the United States for 
hut a few dollars more than the roundtrip direct route fare 
to New York City. Summer excursion fares in effect May 22 
and good until October 3 1 make it easily available to you. 

From California, down through the gorgeous southland — 
Arizona's fascinating places, spectacular ApacheTrall, Tucson, 
Phoenix, Casa Grande Ruins. El Paso, San Antonio, Houston 
in Texas, with sidetrip from El Paso into Old Mexico at Juarez. 

New Orleans, city of romance and old-world atmosphere; 
then by boat for a five-day cruise, down the Mississippi and up 
the Atlantic to New York (meals and berth included in fare i. 

SiJetrips to eastern cities, world-famous playgrounds; then 
to Montreal and west, or across New York state to Niagara 
Falls. Westward again — the Great Lakes, Chicago, Minneap- 
olis and St. Paul, returning over northern United States or 
Canadian lines to the Pacific Northwest. 

Vancouver and Victoria, B.C., Seattle, Tacoma, Mt.Rainier, 
Portland and Columbia River highway, unique Crater Lake 
in Oregon, Mt. Shasta, and home. 

Here is the trip of all trips. Do it in a few weeks or take all 
summer. Stopover privileges all along the route. The finest 
travel accommodations; convenient connections everywhere. 

Mail the coupon today. Have our agents help you plan for 
your finest vacation trip. 

SEND THIS TODAY 




Southern Pacific Lines 

F. S. McGinnU, P. T. M., 
Dept. F., San Francisco 

I Pk-asesendmevourfrt-clit 




SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



Nippon 

Dry Goods 

Company 

Manufacturers, Importers and 

Distributors 

of 

Oriental 'Dry Qoods 

Export Department | 

AUTOS and AUTO PARTS 

CHEMICALS 

MACHINERY 

Etc. 



Main Office 

PINE and FRONT STREETS 

San Francisco, Cal. 

NEW YORK OFFICE 
I i6i Broadway 



Cable Address: ■•NIPONDRYCO' 



3o AUSTRALIA 

VIA Hawaii and the 
SOUTH SEAS 

The rich markets of the 
Antipodes invite you to an 
OCEANIC tour. Whether 
on business or pleasure bent 



^ 



-or both— the trip 
will prove pro6t- 
t} able. 

The voyage to Aus- 
tralia aboard an Oceanic 
liner is one of diversity 
and charm. On the way 
you call at Honolulu and 
at wondrous South Seas 
isles of enchantment, 
where the hfe of the 
natives retains its sim- 
phcity as of yore. 

Oceaniclinersarelarge 
/ and commodious, and are 
/ notable for the excellence 
1 ■' of their cuisine. The voy- 
age is enhvened with or- 
chestra music and novel 
entertainment features. 

Write for illustrated 



literature. 

OCEANIC '^^^"^^^ 



COMPANY 



2 PINE STREET 
S.\N FRANCISCO, C.VLIFORNIA 



AH Makes Guaranteed 

Vactory Rehuilt Typewriters 




Five Touch Method Book. 



SOLD RETAIL 

40/° to 75/« helow 
original prices 

Terms: .S.j.OO monthly 

it' desired. 

Late Model Standard Machines 

Rented— 1 month, S3.00 

2 months, S5.50 

3 months, S7.50 
Initial rent applies on purchase. 




NEW AND REBUILT PORTABLES 



FOREIGN DEALFRS: Address our Export Dep.artn 
Revised Wholesale Price List. 
Cable Address: "Wholetype" 



nt for Latest 



The Wholesale Typewriter Co,y Inc. 



530 Market Street, San Frartcisco 



Telephone Garfield 90 



STORES: Los Angeles, Seattle, Portland, Sacramento, Fresno, Salt Lake City 



J. R. F. SERVAES, President 



H. W. HAUSER, Secretary-Treasurer 



Pacific Marine Insurance 
Agency, Inc. 

General Agent 

MARINE DEPARTMENT 



United States Merchants and 
Shippers Insurance Company 

Fire Association of Philadelphia 

London & Scottish Assurance 
Corporation, Ltd. 

Milwaukee Mechanics Insur- 
ance Co. 

The North River Insurance Com- 
pany 



Royal Exchange .\ssurance 
Tokio Marine and Fire Insurance 

Co., Ltd. 
United States Fire Insurance 

Company 
Agricultural Insurance Company 
Indemnity Mutual Marine As- 
surance Co., Ltd. 
(For Oregon and Washington) 



OREGON AGENTS 

DURHAM & BATES 

Board of Trade BuUding, Portland 

330 California Street, San Francisco 



SAX FRA\C18C0 BISINKSS. APRIL 14. 1920 



San Jrancisco 

The FURNITURE MARKET o/^Ae WEST 




*"ae:f" 



THE SAN FRANCISCO FURNITURE EXCHANGE 
Home of Half- a - Thousand Fadories 



180 New Montgomery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 



«5/= 



='k:* 



San Francisco Business 

Published Weekly by San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

GEORGE L. NORTH, Editor 451-465 California Street Ttltpiom Kcamy 112 L. P. BOYCE, Advertising Mamgir 



Entered as second-cU. 



:e, San Francisco^ California, under the act of March 3, W9. 



Volume XII 



San Francisco, Calif., April 14, 1926 



Number 14 



Officers 

SAN FRANCISCO 
CHAMBER of COMMERCE 

CLAY MILLER— President 

C. W. SAUNDERS— Vice-President 

PHILIP J. FAY— Vice-President 

ROBERT NEWTON LYNCH— Vici-President 

and Manager 
W. W. STETTHEIMER— Treasurer 

t Manager and 



Board of Directors 



James A. Bacioa 


cpi J. R. McDo.vAi.D 


W. L. Beedv 


Clay Miller 


Jacob Blcmleis 


Harry J. Moore 


F. W, Bbadlev 


Almer M. Newhall 


J. B. BRAnr. 


Capt. C. W. Saunders 


H. C. CA.VTELOW 


R. S. Sbaixwald. Sb. 


Samcel p. Eastm 


\N W, W. Stettheimer 


Philip J. Fay 


Charles A. Stewart 


George R. Gat 


Walter H. Sclltyan 


J. R. HATnEN 


A. B. SWINERTOX 


L 


M. VOORSANCEB 



Committee Chairmen 

CAPTAIN C. W. SAUNDERS— Aerial Affairs 

FREDERICK BARUCH— Appeals 

HENRY ROSENFELD— Arbitration 

FREDERICK H. MEYER— Bridge and Highway 

CLAY MILLER— Executive 

H. P. BLANCHARD- Fire Prevention, Safety and 
Fire DepartmentlMatters _ 

PHILIP J. FAY— Finance 

RUDOLPH VOLMER— Floor 

ALMER M. NEWHALL— Foreign Trade 

W. L. BEEDY -Grain 

GEORGE R. GAY— Industrial 

WALLACE M. ALEX.\NDER— Japanese Re- 
lations 

ROBERT CABRERA— Latin American 

GEORGE R GAY— Legislative 

H. J. BRUNNIER— Municipal Affairs 

CAPTAIN C. W. SAUNDERS— Maritime and 
Harbor 

J. C. ROHLFS — Management of Marine Exchange 

L. M. VOORSANGER— Membership 

ROY C. WARD— MUitary Affairs 

WALLACE M. ALEXANDER— Naval Affairs 

DR. DA\TD P, BARROWS— Philippine Situation 

A. B. SWINERTON— Publicity 

W. H. SELLENDER— Steamship Passenger 
Business 

W. L. BEEDY— Transportation 

V. S. McCLATCHY— Trans-Pacific Communica- 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Foreword, by Clay Miller 6 

The Wealth of San Francisco, by C. E. Kunze 13 

Industry and Manufactures 17 

Shipping and Foreign Trade 27 

Building and Finance 139 

Our Port, by William A. Sherman 133 

Chinatown, by Chee S. Lowe 1^7 

San Francisco Hotels, by Ernest Drury 144 

Acti\nties of Committees 153 

Brief Facts About San Francisco 151 

Industrial Advantages 134 

General Description of San Francisco 148 

San Francisco Libraries 144 

Membership Index 38 

Index to Advertisers 158 

Illustrations 

Executive Offices, Chamber of Commerce 7 

Departments, Chamber of Commerce 8 

San Francisco Parks and Playgroimds 9 

Industrial Plants 10 

Shipping and Water Front 11 

Residences 12 

Tables and Charts 

Wealth of San Francisco 13-16 

Wealth Factors 14-15 

San Francisco Manufactures 21 

Bay Region Manufacttn"es 21 

Pacific Coast Manufactures 21 

Census of Manufacttu'es 24-25 

Growth of California 18 

San Francisco's Principal Industries 22 

Industries Less Than »I,000,000 22-23 

Value of Exports, 1925 27-28 

Imports of Merchandise 27 

Exports and Imports by Countries 30 

Shipping and Foreign Trade 27. 29, 31, 32, 33, 35 

Assessments and Taxes 142 

Building and Finance 143-144 

Banking Strength 143 

Characteristics of Population 136 

Wholesale and Retail Distribution 137 

San Francisco, The Terminus 135 

Switching Limits 26 

Deep Water Advantages 155 

Value of Manufactures 157 



i.\N I'HANCISCO msiNKSS. AI'KIl, 14. \<.m 



FOREWORD 



CLAY MILLER 
President, San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 




AN FRANCISCO is today in a better position than at any time 
during the past twenty years to understand its true place among 
Vmerican cities. Twenty years ago the city was devastated byagreat 
calamity. Scarcely recovered from that blow and normal conditions 
and economic trends were destroyed by the World War. During that period 
the Port of San Francisco was utilized to meet prevailing world conditions 
and an abnormal trade was based upon a world demand centered upon 
America for food and raw materials. 

Today, however, trade and transportation are responding to normal laws 
and conditions and San Francisco is truly reflecting the resources and import- 
ance of the territory which it serves and is receiving recognition as a world 
city with matchless geographic location with reference to markets, transpor- 
tation, distribution and communication. 

The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce is presenting in this Year Book 
facts and figures which truthfully show the conditions which give San 
Francisco impressive importance among American cities. The articles and 
tables arc from authentic sources and show not onlv the progress which has 
been made but present reasons for the pride and faith which we have in San 
Francisco's greatness. 

In the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce are focalized the strong, con- 
structive elements of the community. The physical organization with its 
various departments is based upon a sound and economic basis and the several 
hundred of our leading business men who form the Board of Directors and 
the various standing committees are sincerely devoted to the solution of the 
major problems of San Francisco and the early realization of her magnificent 
opportunities. 

The Chamber of Commerce is endeavoring to coordinate all community 
effort, to eliminate the waste and to stabilize and give leadership to such 
work as will form a sound basis for our present and future welfare. Upon 
every side is evidence of faith in the city and desire of our people to serve. 
The Chamber of Commerce, by reason of its representative character, is 
charged with a definite leadership in matters concerning our commercial life, 
and offers the facts and figures contained on the following pages, compiled 
without fear or favor, as a basis for faith, encouragement and inspiration 
to all of those who are interested in the welfare of San Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. APRIL 14. 1926 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES OF THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



Ke.,u.r.e„.f..eSanF.a„cUc,oC.^5.e.^o,^Co„.e„^ 



SAN FRANCISCO BtSlNESS. APRIL U, 1926 



THE MARINE EXCHANGE AND GENER.\L OFFICES 




Bureau, '"•'->jS|J,«,|Pr Trc.ro„''°/n'^SoTpf.S!'^tuTe3T:.='<'^ Depa„.2en.. ^1^1.^' '""" 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 

SAN FRANCISCO'S PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS 




.,p.e.,..».s.„^<^c„■sP^s.^^^^t^.^^ 



aK Flelshhacker Playjlround; No. 5 — A 
,e at Chutes at the Beach; INo. t,^un« «. '-^■■"•"yX7amous'jlpaS«" 



night scene at Chutes at the Beach; No.,6^0ne_of^_the 



SAN FRANCISCO BCSIXESS, APRIL 14, Hi2ii 



A FEW YEAR-ROUND INDUSTRIAL PL.\.NTS 




San Francisco Industries operate everj- working dav in the 

taken at random : No. 1-An Ice Cream Churnine R _ 

No. 3— Flnishtne Room of one of the largest automobile fa 

modem Friit Products Factory; No 5 — • n interearin'orn™,... i„ , „;"j ' V" ' — V,-" 
Bo. Factory; No. 7-View of the SewinlVooi S^Yaige SS^e^"a?ti^? 



under Ideal climatic and sanitao' conditions. Here are 
'^** 2— Interior of a San Francisco Shade Cloth Factory; 
in the West; No. 4 — Berry Pickers In a 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



A CAMERALOGUE OF THE WATERFRONT 



""i mi 




mpanying pictures show: No. 1 — One of the forCy- 
ade of the port; No. 2 — A nif^ht view of the 
"front""; No. 3— Interior" of pier; No. 4— The bay from Telegraph Hill; No. 5 — "Sailing Day"; No. 6 — 
Fishermen's Wharf; No. 7 — Unloading lumber, China Basin; No. 8— Cargoes for the world; 
No. 9 — A typical cargo of California fruits for Europe. 



SAX FRANCISCO BISINESS. APRfL 14. 1926 



TYPiaVL S.\N FR.\NCISCO HOMES AND GARDENS 




^ ,^.?^?^1 .l*^ .3^ ?""' ^'' F2P='.«^ "^o™' to >» •""""> as a dly of beautiful homes. Here are a few taken at random 
r^,?^„ V t "^^J ""^l attractive resideiitial districts: No. 1-An entrance at Sea CUB overlookinft the Golden 
\i- 2; V* residence in St. Francis BouleTard; No. 3~An outlook from Lake Street; No. 4— A mansion on 
Washington Street; No. 5— Forest Hill Club House; No. k—A glimpse of Ingleside Terraces: No. 7— A 
typical Broadway home. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



The Wealth of San Francisco 

The ISlature and True Source of the Qty's JVell-Being 




IJHE well-being of San 
Francisco — that is to 
say, the city's rapidly in- 
creasing wealth and the 
true sources thereof — 
may best be seen if drawn to a 
statistical focus, and if it be viewed 
in relationship with the wealth and 
well-being of the whole of California. 
Not that the state borders mark 
the limit of the city's economic per- 
spective. This is far wider. It em- 
braces, in fact, the whole of the 
Pacific littoral, the Asiatic as well as 
the west coast of the two Ameri- 
cas. At times, however, and for the 
purposes of clearer vision, it is 
advantageous, even for so wide- 
angled a contrivance as the statisti- 
cal eye, to limit the field somewhat, 
and hence, for the purposes of this 
article, that limitation has been 
fi.xed at the borders of California. 

The Wheel of Prosperity 

It will serve a convenience also if 
our lookout post shaU be from 
Meiggs wharf, where we may watch 
the vessels come and go. The 
reasons for this had best be given. 
A good marine glass, such as Meiggs 
affords us, is not the only optical 
instrument wherewith one may see 
the huge wheel of San Francisco's 
prosperity and the forces that make 
it go. But sea-borne commerce has a 
traditional claim upon this recogni- 
tion, and it still contributes a very 
portly slice of the city's annual in- 
come. And quite aside from these 
considerations, there is a story to be 
found in the goods which come and 
go in the bellies of the passing ships 
which must not be overlooked, a 
story that really reveals, with a 
clarity not elsewhere found, the 
true significance of the oft used 
phrase: The Wealth of California! 

For our own convenience, there- 
fore, we have taken our post at 
Meiggs wharf, fixed our statistical 
eye into the marine glass, and from 
there, after we have surveyed the 
commerce of this port in some detail, 
we shall not hesitate to turn it land- 
ward and scrutinize for a bit the 
nature and the sources of all this 
wealth that these ships are so cease- 
lessly carrying in and out of port. 

II 

Commerce, of course, signifies the 
prevalence of goods — the things of 



By C. E. KUNZE 



use which the whole world needs and 
desires. California has always been 
a mother of goods. Even when the 
first Nordic traders came here, with 
quantities of merchandise for the 
Indians and the Spanish settlers, 
they found vast stores of goods to 
take away with them, the hides and 
tallow of the great cattle ranches, 
furs and quantities of salt meat and 
other food products. Up to the ar- 
rival of the Americans the tide of 
trade was altogether outward, but 
with the discovery of gold, and the 
sudden inrush of people with their 
great need for supplies that tide was 
abruptly reversed, and for more than 
a decade the goods came in and only 
one article of trade, namely virgin 
gold, went out. The old trade in 
hides and tallow continued to some 
extent, but it no longer amounted to 
enough for serious consideration. 

This flow of merchandise into San 
Francisco, and the export of gold, 
began to change in the early sixties, 
when the great wheat farms and 
later barley ranches began to yield 
so heavily their somewhat darker 
grains of gold. The nature of mining 
also began to change, with hydrau- 
hcking and quartz mining developing 
a need for new kinds of equipment 
and machinery. Lumbering also got 
under way, with its need for special 
equipment, and the huge ranches of 
the Sacramento and San Joaquin 
opened a market for farming ma- 
chinery of peculiar design. 

San Francisco's Inventions 

It is significant that these changes 
in California's economic affairs were 
accompanied by the establishment 
in San Francisco of shops and 
foundries, where the engines, mining 
pumps, hoists, sawmiU machinery 
and other needed equipment were 
manufactured. There exists, in fact, 
a whole history of San Francisco 
inventions, many of them of an im- 
portance that revolutionized the 
industries in which they were em- 
ployed, the beginning of which is 
found here in second decade of the 
American occupation, and it is this 
history, together with the story of 
California manufacture, that has 
played so vital a role in the com- 
merce of this port. 



The active export of fabricated 
goods dates from the middle and late 
sixties. 

Its importance was not so much 
from the tonnage it provided for the 
waiting ships as in the value of the 
goods, for the process of manufac- 
ture for San Francisco and for the 
state as a whole adds very close to 
40 per cent to the value of the 
materials used in the process. 

The sea-borne commerce of San 
Francisco for the year 1924 reached 
the total of 8319,000,000. 

The manufactures in San Fran- 
cisco for 1923, the last year for 
which census figures are available, 
were valued at $416,000,000. 

Exports and Imports 

The commerce between exports, 
which are more heavily affected by 
local manufactures than are the im- 
ports, and imports was as follows: 

Exports (exclusive of gold and 
silver) $173,000,000. 

Imports (exclusive of gold and 
silver) 8146,000,000. 

An analysis of the goods shipped 
in and out reveals the close relation- 
ship between commerce and manu- 
facture, and also between commerce 
and the production of raw materials 
for which California is so widely 
noted. The following table presents 
the story of the export goods: 

SAN FRANCISCO EXPORTS— 1924 
Commodities Value 

Food products $ 57,667,827 

Mineral oils 40,372,778 

Cotton, raw 14,944,969 

Tobacco and cigarettes . 6,386,896 

Fabricated goods 5,108,829 

Leather and hides 3,375,877 

Lumber., 2,333,478 

Lead in pigs 1 ,305,235 

Foreign merchandise .. . 2,319,731 
All other goods 39,618,235 

ToT.u, 3173,433,235 

Food products, the largest item in 
the hst, are the combined output of 
three groups of producers, the 
farmers, fisherfolk and industrial 
workers. The larger share falls to 
the farmer, for many of the food 
products require but little treat- 
ment by industry to make them 
ready for market. In addition, the 
farmer supplies the raw cotton, and 
contributes heavily to such articles 
as hides and leather, the tobacco and 
some of the fabricated goods. 

[ continued on page 16 ] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APKIL H, 1926 



WEALTH FACTORS IN SAN FRANCISCO'S 

Compiled by Industrial Department, 



Wealth Factohs Ixde^ '"*"' ""*' 

'opulalion (A) 387,260 394,673 

Jank Clearings (B) »1,998,4(X).779 »2.133.883,625 

Issessed Valuation (2), (3) (C) 375,932,447 429,611.618 

'alue of Manufactured ProducM (D) 138,601,442 135.414,651 

•alue of Foreign Commerce (3) (E) 84,348,540 87,121,234 

Savings Bank Deposit*— S.F.Banka (4) (F) 162,320,980 154,071,803 

teal Estate Sales (G) 68.084.300 31.816.150 

iuilding Operations (5) (H) 34,947.386 56.578.844 

Carload Movement* (6) (I) <7) 100.000 116,709 

'oslal Bceeipts (J) 1,509,595 1,787,894 

;ustoma Receipt* <K) |9,482,639 8,324,981 

'er Capita Wealth (L) 1,941 2,430 



402,086 409,499 (1)416.912 425.88S 434.S&4 

»1,757,141,S50 $1,979,872,570 $2,323,772,870 $2,427,075,543 $2,677,561,952 



454,334,160 539.093.065 
134.227.860 (1)133.041.069 
76.251.545 81.667.481 

137.098,974 

31,083,572 

31.688.341 

117,961 

2,010,833 



2.259 



33.879.073 
28.184.068 
141,736 
2,212,163 
6,698,092 
2,632 



515,028,100 

138,892,800 

80,531,403 

155.701,351 

31,291,293 

20,508,556 

147,390 

2,488,224 

7.123,711 

2.470 



545.064.347 

144.744.600 

94.309.924 

168.744,339 

35,268.661 

20.915.474 

145.119 

2.570.213 

6.778.329 

2.559 



604.813.249 

150.396.400 

108,483,203 

172,347.277 

45,175,233 

23,338.563 

161.182 

2.783.049 

6.852.146 

2.781 



1913 

443.841 

$2,624,428,824 

623.847,729 

156,448,200 

128,523,066 

183,964,994 

44,728,900 

21,037,264 

163,169 

3,116,973 

6,399,976 

2.811 



1914 

452.818 

$2,518,001,816 

647,207.514 

(1)162.300.000 

130.485.990 

190.226,398 

27.574,992 

42,198,303 

163,967 

3,252,303 

5,183,326 

2,838 



(A) U. S, Census. (U) S F. Clearmg IIou.se. (C) S. F. Assessor s Office. 

(D) U. S. Census of Manufactures. 

(E) U. S. Department of Commerce. 

(F) State Banking Department, Controller of Cuirency. 

(G) Thomas McGee 4 Sons. 

(H) S. F. Department of Public Works (through Building & Engineering News). 

(I) Pacific Car Demurrage Bureau (J) U. S. Post Office. (K) U. S. (3ollector of Customs 

(L) San Francisco Chamber of Commerce. 



CISinG TEEND OF 

SAn FCAnci SCO'S 20 years peoscess 

BASE YEAR. I90e =IOO inPCX MUMBEE 



\»/' \ 



/"'7;:>C-.-/S^ 



\/ ./ 




YCAE5 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSlNf:SS, APRIL 14, 1026 



ROGRESS-20 YEAR PERIOD-1906 to 1925 Incl. 

Francisco Chamber of Commerce 



1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


SOURCB 


461.794 


470,770 


479,746 


488,723 


497.700 


(1)506.676 


615,652 


524,629 


533,605 


642,682 


(8)551,558 


(A) 


693,688.925 


83,479,862,482 


84,837,854,596 


85,629.321,142 


87,286.339.237 


S8.I22.064.916 


86,629,501,357 


87,274,069,242 


88,049,583,490 


88,366,230,636 


89.479.464.458 


(B) 


656,344,229 


755,888.974 


791,786.293 


780,450,765 


793.707.190 


817.691.922 


867,133,227 


856,662,874 


916,079,189 


988,668,165 


1.049.862.616 


(C) 


213,304,200 


264,308,400 


315.312.600 


366,316,800 


(1)417,321,000 


372.410,208 


(1)327,499,417 


371.808.471 


(1)416,317,535 


472,520,397 


528.723.269 


(D) 


157,569,007 


208,204,906 


286,917,617 


480,778,266 


455.863,420 


486,083,695 


303,715,613 


258,168,630 


343.325,940 


308,562,301 


336,439,199 


(E) 


214,626,682 


237,665,641 


265,607,748 


293,997,177 


307,292,438 


358,867,992 


390,136,816 


418,375,902 


499,504,013 


676,180,901 


678,759,170 


(F) 


28,741,399 


41,355,953 


35,453,511 


30,517,075 


61,681,593 


82,641,161 


80,863.796 


132,227,478 


166,188,438 


141,355,269 


182,907.216 


(G) 


15,920,527 


21,518,159 


19,554,220 


8,697,477 


15,658,878 


29,298,782 


23,942,814 


47,529,283 


47,701,340 


62,541,836 


50,392,793 


(H) 


180,054 


221,680 


221,099 


208,539 


195,758 


182.317 


143,834 


183,479 


212,548 


207,648 


230,880 


(I) 


3,561,800 


3,630,638 


3,964,045 


4,582,603 


4.825.547 


5,452,681 


6,928,350 


6,485,405 


7.704,036 


7,456,948 


8,132,899 


(J) 


4,647.886 


4,737,250 


5,211,651 


3,246,199 


4.548.798 


8,187,425 


7,431,826 


8,514,379 


11,815,498 


11,614,760 


12,073,552 


(K) 


2,842 


3,211 


3,300 


3.194 


3.189 


3,227 


3,363 


3,262 


3,433 


3,644 


3,807 


(L) 



(1) U. S. Census, other years estimated. 

(2) Basis of Assessment fifty per cent of true value 

(3) Figures for Fiscal years. 

(4) 1906 to 1914 inclusive, State Banks only; 1915 to 1925 inclusive, State and National Banks; figures taken as near January 1st e 

(5) Previous to the year 1914 Expenditures made by City, County and State were not recorded by Department of Public Works. 

(6) Carloads of Freight reported by all Rail Lines at San Francisco held for Loading, Reconsignment and Unloading. 

(7) Estimated— no records available April 18th to June 30th inclusive, 1906— Due to Fire. 

(8) San Francisco Chamber of Commerce Population estimate for 1926 is 708,391 — based on eight business indexes. 



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SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



The Wealth of San Francisco— g 



The item of mineral oils repre- 
sents the product of the Cahfornia 
oil fields and the refineries, consist- 
ing as it does chiefly of gasoline, 
kerosene, fuel oil and lubricating 
products. In this category of mer- 
chandise the raw material carries 
about two-thirds of the value, and 
the manufacturing process carries 
one-third. 

Food Exported 

In the top it«m, food products, the 
exports of which in 1924 amounted 
to $57,000,000— nearly one-third of 
the w'hole export total — the compon- 
ent factors were as follows: 

COMMODFTY VaLUE EXPORTED 

Canned fruit $17,074,315 

Dried fruit 15,222,172 

Barlev 10,829..-i60 

Canned fish 4,956,453 

Milk and butter 4,1 18.246 

Flour and rice 3,661 ,948 

Asparagus and beans . . 1 ,805.333 



Total $57,667,827 

Prunes supplied about half of the 
dried fruit shipments: raisins about 
one-fifth, and apricots, apples and 
peaches the rest, in the order named. 
It is interesting, too, to ob.serve, 
that the shipment of §7,500.000 in 
prunes from this port constituted 
just half of the year's prune crop in 
California, while the raisin ship- 
ments of §3,175,000 was only about 
one-fifth of the annual production. 
So, too, the California peach crop in 
1924 was valued at 811,200.000, 
while only a dab of this succulent 
fruit, namelj' .S363,000 worth, passed 
out through this port, and as for 
beans, the port shipment was $341,- 
000, while the crop that year brought 
the Cahfornia bean growers -Sll,- 
721,000. On the other hand, the 
whole barlev crop for 1924 was 
valued at §11,693,000, while the 
exports from this port alone were 
over 810,000,000! 

These figures show the need of 
some interpretation. It does not 
follow, of course, that a crop is 
shipped away the same year it is 
raised. With grain this is more true 
than with fruit. The production 
varies rather widely from year to 
year in some of these crops, and 
these facts must be taken into con- 
sideration when we attempt to fit 
port shipments to total crop produc- 
tion. For the year 1923, for instance, 
the barley crop was valued at §23,- 
000,000, and it is more than probable 
that a lot of the 1923 crop figured in 
the 1924 customs' reports. 

In order to show more fullv what 



is back of the food product ship- 
ments, which make up so large a 
part of the sea-borne exports of San 
Francisco, we give the following 
table showing the fifteen highest 
farm crops for two years: 

FIFTEEN MOST VALUABLE F.\R.M 

CROPS GROWN IN 1923 AND 

1924 IN CALIFORNIA 

1923 

Rank Crop Value 

1 Hay $ 73,710,000 

2 Oranges 49,000,000 

3 Barlev 23,148,000 

4 Raisins 20,300,000 

5 Beans 18,776,00(J 

6 Wheat 17,450,000 

7 Wine grapes 17,120,000 

8 Table grapes .... 15,470,000 

9 Prunes 13,000,000 

10 Lemons 10,771,000 

11 Wahiuta 10,000,000 

12 Cotton 9,347,000 

13 Peaches 9,120,000 

14 Potatoes 8,736,000 

15 Sugar beets 7,938,000 



1924 

Rank Crop Value 

1 Hay $104,659,000 

2 Oranges 40,320,000 

3 Wine grapes 22,050,000 

4 Table grapes .... 18,240,000 

5 Prunes 15,290,000 

6 Lemons 14,640,000 

7 Raisins 14,400 000 

8 Beans 11,721,000 

9 Barlev 11,693,000 

10 Peaches 11,200,000 

11 Cotton 10,084,000 

12 Walnuts 9,030,000 

13 Apples 8,991,000 

14 Pears 8,778,000 

15 Sugar beets 7.826,000 

These figures represent the farm 
value of these crops and are taken 
from the report of the California 
Cooperative Crop Reporting Serv- 
ice. Some of the fruit, such as the 
raisins, prunes and peaches, goes 
from the farm not directly to mar- 
ket, but to the canning or processing 
plants where the article goes through 
some sort of a manufacturing proc- 
ess, and adds considerably to its 
value. 

In short, we have here certain 
items of raw materials that Cali- 
fornia produces in such vast quanti- 
ties, and the possession of which is 
so large and vital a factor in its 
economic scheme. 

The Goods of Commerce 

The farms, the forests, the mines 
and oil wells, the rivers and ocean, 
where fish are caught, all contribute 
their share of the raw materials, 
which in their native state, or in 
some manufactured form, make up 
the goods of commerce. The greater 
part, by far, reach the markets by 
means of railroad transportation. 



'ontinued from page ij 

The extent to which these farm 
products contribute to San Fran- 
cisco's sea-borne commerce has al- 
ready been shown. 

From the production of raw ma- 
terials, the trail leads us directly to 
the industrial plants. 

Before we follow it, however, it 
would be helpful to make a brief 
survey of the sources of raw materi- 
als, wherewith California is so richly 
supplied. The following table gives 
the production in value of the four 
chief groups of raw material pro- 
ducers for the year 1924 : 

CussincATioN Value 

Farm crops $420,000,000 

Mineral products . . . 358.000.000 

Forest products 50.000,000 

Fisheries 10,000,000 



Total $838,000,000 

These figures are based partly on 
accurate reports taken by Govern- 
ment agencies, and partly on esti- 
mates, but are accurate enough to 
present a working basis for the more 
refined statistics that are to follow. 

A Titanic Creative Effort . 

It is interesting to note that in the 
production of these raw materials, 
which form the true basis of Cah- 
fornia's wealth, there were engaged 
approximately one-half of the popu- 
lation of the state, and about one- 
half of the invested capital. Bv an 
effort of the imagination one can at 
least vaguely \Tsualize the scope of 
this titanic creative effort, engaging 
the dailj' labor of perhaps a milhon 
people, and spread over the entire 
area of the state of more than 100,- 
000,000 acres of land, and the waters 
adjacent thereto. In its technical 
skill, in the intelligence of its direc- 
tion, and in its equipment and 
mechanical aids, it is without ques- 
tion the most advanced and the best 
trained industrial armj- ever mobil- 
ized in the historj* of the world. 

Of this huge mountain of materials, 
the industrial estabhshments in 
Cahfornia absorbed in 1923, a 
quantitv valued by the census 
bureau at §1,285,000,000. 

There were 9,228 establishments 
employing 246,000 workers, to whom 
was paid in wages 8353,000,000. 
Their total output had a value of 
82,216,000,000. 

This value is almost three times 
that of the value of the raw materials 
produced in 1924, and if we assume, 
as it would certainly be safe to do, 

[ continued on page IS] 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14. I92fi 



industry and Manufactures 



s,«,vou "■^'^ JoTT^T"-! The value of the 

manufactured prod- 



ucts of San Fran- 
cisco's metropolitan 
area (five bay coun- 
ties) was ^1,379,- 
000,000 in 1925. 
This was 49 per 
cent of the total 
products of the 
State. The area is 
defined in the State 
map by the heavy 
/\ line. 




T\/rANUFACTURES 
iVX of a wide vari- 
ety have been of eco- 
nomic importance in 
San Francisco since tlie 
middle sixties, at which 
time the city became 
the mother of Cahfornia's in- 
dustries. Since that very early 
period the industrial wealth 
created here has been a steadily 
growing factor in the upbuilding 
not only of San Francisco but of 
California. 

For the state as a whole the an- 
nual wealth produced by manufac- 
tures, including, of course, the cost 
of the raw materials, now e.xceeds 
three billion dollars. Of this huge 
mountain of commodities, the con- 
tribution made by San Francisco 
alone amounts to something more 
than half a billion dollars, which is 
roughly one-fifth of the production 
of the state. The estimated value of 
San Francisco's production for last 
year is S529, 000,000, which is within 
about $60,000,000 of the total out- 
put of the state of Oregon. 

There is in fact a very significant 
story to be read in the latest tabu- 
lations made pubhc by the United 



ployment of capital in the manu- 
facture of goods, and in the develop- 
ment of markets, of domestic and 
foreign trade, and all those things 
which come with an industrial civili- 
zation. 

Agriculture, mining, lumbering 
and fishing, while they must always 
remain of basic importance, will be- 
come more and more closely fabri- 
cated with the industrial life of the 
commonwealth, for which they sup- 
ply so many of the basic raw 
materials, and will lose more and 
more that economic independence 
which has been so large a factor in 
the life of the people here for the 
past three-quarters of a century. 

In fixing San Francisco's indus- 
trial rank on the coast it would be 
altogether deceptive to rely upon 
poUtical boundaries, and to ignore 
the natural economic unit which the 
Census Bureau employs under the 
name of the San Francisco metro- 
political area. A sugar factory at 
Crockett, for instance, that is man- 
aged from offices located here, and 
financed by San Francisco capital, 
is almost as much a San Francisco 
plant as though it were located 
'\ out in the Potrero district. An 
■\ oU refinery at Richmond, a 
X cement plant at Redwood 
■•. City, a tannery at Be- 
'\ nicia, are all vitally 
\ tied into the San 
'\ Francisco indus- 
trial field, not 
■\ only liy the 
\. fact that 







States Census Bureau on Cahfor- 
nia's industrial activities. They re- 
veal that the state has quite defi- 
nitely entered an industrial epoch, 
and that its future will probably be 
cast more and more toward the em- 



the management often is directly 
from some San Francisco office 
building, and by the fact that the 
banking is done through some San 
Francisco bank, but because of the 

[ continued on page 21 1 



SAN FRANCISCO BISINESS. APRIL 14, 1926 



The Wealth of San Francisco— Continued from page i6 



that for tlip previous year the value 
of raw materials was no larger, we 
have an interesting gauge for meas- 
uring the rapid rise in the great 
stream of wealth as it flows from its 
source in the fields, the mines and 
the forests down through the indus- 
trial districts of the cities and out to 
the sea of hungry consumers. 

The Mother of Industries 

San Francisco was, of course, the 
mother of California industries. It 
was here that the first plants were 
built of the ten thousand that now 
operate in the state. 

The peculiar problems of the Cali- 
fornia farms, mines, lumber camps 
and even fisheries demanded appli- 
ances unknown elsewhere and not to 
be had in any market, with the result 
that many new inventions were 
worked out in San Francisco shops. 
Thus came the gang plows, the com- 
bined reaper and harvester, the 
tractor, the deep mine pumps, the 
machinery for sawing the huge red- 
wood logs, that are still the marvels 
of the mechanical world. But other 
countries, notably South America, 
have had extensive use for some of 
these machines and devices, as have 
many western states, and thus neces- 
sity mothered not only industrial 
production, but commerce for this 
port. 

Began in the Sixties 

The industrial activities l>egan on 
what may be termed the commercial 
scale here in the middle sixties, with 
iron works (foundries they were 
called), tex-tile mills, chemical plants, 
glass works, and ship yards as the 
leaders. Today the number of plants 
is given in the Government's census 
— always at least a couple of years 
behind — as 2,090, the number of 
workers employed as 43,638, the 
annual pajToU 861,376,000 and the 
value of the annual output in goods 
as §416,000,000. 

This sum is very near one-fifth of 
the industrial production of the 
state, using that term specifically as 
referring to goods produced in in- 
dustrial plants or factories, in short, 
manufactured. 

The foremost industrial acti\-ity, 
if we accept the classification of the 
census bureau, is the roasting and 
grinding of spices. In 1923 there 
were 20 plants engaged therein, with 
478 employees, and the annual out- 
put had a value of 823,000,000. 

On the basis of annual product 
value, the following are San Fran- 
cisco's leading industries : 



Workers 
Indcstby Kmploted 
Coffee and spices . . 478 

.Slaughtering 529 

Publishing 1306 

Foundries 2433 

Bakeries 2036 

Furniture 1925 

Job printing 19&1 

Tinware 1177 

Men's clothing . . . .22.54 

Bags 445 

Lumber products . . 101& 

Fruit canning 807 

Flour milling lOS 

Leather tanning . . . 433 



V.M.UE OF 

Prodcct 
$23,000,000 
20,000,000 
19,000,000 
14,700.000 
14,350,000 
13.000,000 
12,800.000 
10.900.000 
10,600,000 
7,800.000 
7.300,000 
6.700.000 
4,400,000 
3,900,000 



The list could lie greatly extended, 
but enough has been shown to indi- 
cate the vital relationship between, 
let us say. the Mission and the 
waterfront, or the industrial district 
of the citv and the docks. To return 



imports for the year 1924, we find 
the following major items listed: 
CoMMOorrv Valce 

Raw silk $39,000,000 

Coffee 28,000.000 

Sugar 9,000,000 

Copra 7,000,000 

Tea 3.000.000 

Cocoanut oil 4.000.000 

Newsprint paper.. 3,290,000 
The raw silk pas.ses through en 
route to Paterson, New .lersey, but 
most of the other items here listed 
remain in San Francisco as raw 
materials for some processing or 
manufacturing plants. Tin in pig 
form, crude rubljor, and other prod- 
ucts made up the import volume for 
that year, namely 8146,000,000, and 
it is easy to see from an imaginarj- 
tour through the citv's manufactur- 



T.VBLE I. 

The following table shows comparisons for a number of years covering 
only the period since 1909: 

GROWTH OF CALIFORNI.\ >L\XUFACTURES 



Ye.\r Workers 

Employed 

1909 115,296 

1914 1.39,481 

1919 243,000 

1921 198,000 

19-23 264,975 



Value of 
Proudcts 
$ 529,000,000 
712,000.000 
1,981,000,000 
1,7.58,000,000 
2,216,000,000 



V.iLtrE Added 
By Manxt.^cture 

$204,000,000 
2&5,000,000 
762,000,000 
663,000,000 
931,000,000 



T.\BLE II. 

In the following table are shown the primary industries of the state in 
the order of their importance from the viewpoint of the gross value of their 
manufactured products, for four census years as follows: 

Name of Industry 1914 1919 1921 1923 

Petroleum Products $38,000,000 $141,000,000 $258,000,000 $267,000,000 

Canning, Fruit and Vegetables.. 61,000,000 219,000,000 118,000,000 149,000,000 

Ship Building 8,000,000 185.000,000 73,000,000 23,000.000 

Meat Slaughtering 50,000,000 94,000,000 78,000,000 102.000,000 

Iron Foundries 31,000,000 100,000,000 51,000.000 74,000,000 

Dairy Products 20,000,000 56,000,000 34 000,000 44,000.000 

Flour Mill Products 24.000,000 6.5,000,000 29,000.000 39,000,000 

Lumber 52,000,000 99,000,000 51,000,000 86,000,000 

Beet Sugar 15,000,000 26,000,000 22,000.000 14,000,000 

Bread Bakeries 54.000,000 60,000,000 

Tanneries 10,000,00 21,000,000 8,000,000 11,000,000 

Rice Milling 20,000,000 5,000,000 8,000,000 



to the first item in the table, the 
coffee and spice mills and roasteries. 
The raw materials required for the 
1923 operations were valued at 
817,800,000, all brought here in 
ships, and gathered up in many 
different countries. South and Cen- 
tral America, the Orient, Malay 
Peninsula and Islands, South Sea 
Islands — all contributed valuable 
and necessarj- materials to these 
twenty plants in San Francisco. The 
raw materials made cargo for in- 
coming vessels; the finished product 
was distributed widely over this 
state and others. 

Xow if we turn again to the tabu- 
lations of the Customs House under 



ing districts what becomes of most 
of these imports. Like the raw ma- 
terials from our own farms, mines 
and forests, they but feed the great 
stream of wealth as it moves toward 
the industries, and thus add their 
notable contribution to the wealth 
created here and the well-being of 
the city's population. 

That well-being is contributed to 
in many ways. Thus, if we study 
only the forty-five special industries 
which make up the Census Bureau's 
selected list for San Francisco, we 
find these illuminating facts: 

For the vear 1923, their total out- 
put in value was 8263,000,000. 

[ continued on page 134 ] 



':^^'^l 

^<^'''-:^> 





B 



BOOKCASES 

OOKS— advance agents of characfter— will dominate 
home or office with an atmosphere of your choosing. 
C[Let the bookcase be in as ^rikmgly good ta^e 
and as strongly refledt the dignity and pre^ige of 
the establishment. The difference is appreciable. 

H. S. CROCKER CO.. INC. 

561 Market Street 24^ Montgomery Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 




This issue of S.\N FRANCISCO BUSINESS 
from the Press of H. S. Crodter Co., Inc. 



SAN I'RANCISCO Bl'SINKSS, APRIL 14, lil2G 



44 



The Meeting of the Waters 



11 




■'A thing of beauty is a joy forever; 
Its loveliness increases; it will never 
Pass into nothingness." 




OURLSTS in ever-increasing numbers visit the Water Temple 
in beautiful Sunol Valley of Alameda County, California. 
Here, amid surroundings of natural loveliness and architec- 
tural dignity, may be witnessed "the meeting of the waters." 
(( In the crypt of this Corinthian temple the crystal-pure 
supplies from the Calaveras Reservoir, the Livermore Valley wells and 
the Sunol infiltration galleries of Spring Valley Water Company mingle 
their life-giving streams and start on the long flow down Niles Canyon, 
across San Francisco Bay and up the San Mateo peninsula to San Fran- 
cisco. On the peninsula these Alameda waters are united to the supply 
drawn from the San Mateo County watershed. C[The Water Temple is 
the symbol of a metropolitan supply developed to its present proportions 
on broad lines laid down sixty-five years ago by men who 
foresaw the greatness of San Francisco 



SPRING VALLEY WATER COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192B 



Industry and N[3inu(2id:u.ves— Continued fwm page 17 



fact that the products pass in and 
out of this port, make cargoes for 
ships or railroads having their ter- 
minus here, and that the trade 
currents fed by these plants, re- 
gardless of where they are located 
on the bay shore, run directly in 
and out of this city. 

On the basis of the San Francisco 
metropolitan area, which embraces 
the five bay counties of San Fran- 
cisco, Alameda, San Mateo, Marin 
and Contra Costa, the value of the 
manufactured products for 1925 
(estimated) was 81,379,000,000, or 
49 per cent of the total products of 
the state. This output is very close 
to the total value of the products of 
both Washington and Oregon. In 
the bay area are now listed 2,954 
industrial plants giving employment 
to 133,000 workers, and distributing 
last year in wages .1199,000,000. 
The cost of materials used by these 
plants was $765,000,000, and the 
value which they added by the proc- 
ess of manufacture was $514,000,- 
000. 

The Census Bureau now takes the 
census on manufactures every two 
years, and the tabulations for the 
year 1925 (now in progress) will be- 
come available early next year. The 
estimates for 1925 herein u.sed were 
arrived at by the method employed 
for such purpose by the Census 
Bureau, and may be considefed as 
conservative, for they merely assume 
that the rate of increase existing 
prior to 1925 has continued through 
that year. Undoubtedly, the most 
startling fact revealed by this 1925 
estimated output, is the stride at 
which industrial California is forg- 
ing ahead. Note these two sums: 

VALUE OF MANUF.iCTURED 
PRODUCT 

1919— Total California 

Product $1,981,20.5,000 

1925— Total for San Fran- 
cisco area alone. . . 1,379,414,000 

Were we to post ourselves on the 
summit of Telegraph Hill it would 
be possible on a clear day to actually 
see if not the plants themselves, at 
least the sites they occupy along the 
littoral of the bay. From North 
Beach to the Potrero, from Alameda 
to Richmond, from Sausalito to San 
Rafael, would be visible the tall 
chimneys of the gleaming roofs of 
hundreds of these establishments, 
from which year in and year out, 
flows this vast stream of wealth, and 
if the trip were deferred until after 
nightfall, one could pick up the 
gleam of their lights. Here are the 
foundries, the mills, the shops where 



the workers have employment, and 
the economic bones and sinews of a 
great industrial community are 
being built. 

It is interesting to note that in 
San Francisco the leading industrial 
pursuit as measured by value of 
products is that of printing and pub- 
lishing. For the year 1923, this 
single industry produced $31,000,- 
000, with coffee and spice roasting 
and grinding coming second with a 
product valued at $23,000,000. 

For that year the ten leading in- 
dustries for this city were as follows : 



Products Value of Products 

Printing (all kinds) $31,000,000 

Coffee and spice roasting 23,000,000 

Slaughtering and meat packing 20,000,000 

Iron foundries 14,700,000 

Bread and other bakery goods. 14,300,000 

Furniture 13,000,000 

Tinware 10,900,000 

Men's Clothing 10,600,000 

Bags (other than paper) 7,800,000 

Lumber Products 7,350,000 



Total $152,650,000 

In the following tables, the de- 
tailed story of industry and manu- 
factures for San Francisco and 
for the San Francisco metropolitan 
area is more fully revealed: 



SAN FRANCISCO MANUFACTURES 



Census 



Number of 
Plants 

*1925 2,198 

1923 2,090 

1921 1,986 

1919 2,360 

1914 2,334 

1909 1,796 



No. Wage 


Total 


Earners 


Wages 


50,095 


$69,418,000 


43,000 


61,000,000 


36,900 


53 ,.580 ,000 


48,000 


59,000,000 


31,000 


25,000,000 


28,000 


22,000,000 



Value of 
Products 
$529,000,000 
416,000,000 
327,000,000 
417,000,000 
162,000,000 
133,000,000 



*1925 Estimated. Establishments with less than $5,000 product omitted. 



SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION 

SAN FRANCISCO BAY DISTRICT COMPRISING 
FIVE BAY COUNTIES* 



Census 
Year 
1925... 



Number of 

Plants 
...2,954 



No. Wage 
Earners 
133,433 



Total 

Wages 

$199,161,167 



*San Francisco, San Mateo, Marin, Alameda, Contra Costa. 
CALIFORNIA MANUFACTURES 
Census Number of No. Wage 



Plants 
9,782 
9,228 
8,696 



Year 

•1925.... 
1923.... 
1921.... 

1919 11,942 

1914 10,057 

1909 7,659 

1904 6,839 

1899 4,997 



Earners 
306,743 
246,000 
198,000 
296,000 
176,000 
141,000 
120,000 
83,000 



Wages 
Paid 
$438,680,000 
353,000,000 
284,000,000 
380,000,000 
140,000,000 
107,000,000 
79,000,000 
47,000,000 



Value 9F 

Products 

$1,379,414,604 



Value op 

Products 

.$2,815,131,000 

2,216,000,000 

1,758,000,000 

1,981,000,000 

712,000,000 

529,000,000 

367,000,000 

257,000,000 



♦1925 Estimated. 



rr^v D c 1914 

ThreePacinc 

Coast States$l ,067,899,000 

California.. 712,801,000 

Washington. 245,326,000 

Oregon 109,762,000 

*Five S.F.Bay 

Counties 

SanFrancisco 162,300,000 



PACIFIC COAST MANUFACTURES 

VALUE OF MANUFACTURED PRODUCTS 
(IN DOLLARS) 
U. S. Census 
1919 1921 1923 



(1)1925 



.$3 157 511 000 $2,430,510,a35 $3,257,540,010 $4,4.33,847,000 

1981205,000 1,758,682,485 2,215,281,350 2,815,132,000 

'809523000 448,164,548 678,543,200 1,027,314,000 

366,783,000 223,663,602 363,715,460 591,401,000 

970,729,951 1,379,415,000 



Oakland. 
Los Angeles. 

Seattle 

Portland. . . . 



28,522,000 
103,458,000 
64,475,000 
55,695,000 



417,321,000 
134,755,000 
278,184,000 
274,431,000 
196,380,000 



327,499.417 
106,425,170 
313,589,985 
115,046,908 
105,015,276 



416,317,535 
122,491,778 
417,654,081 
155,780,000 
154,414,000 



529,140,000 
140,9SS,0{I0 
555,898,000 
210,926,000 
227,606,000 



(l)Estimated. 

*San Francisco, San Mateo, Marin, -Alameda, Contra Costa. 



SAN" FHANCISCO Hrsi.\F:.SS, APRIL 14, lft2ti 



PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES OF SAN FRANCISCO 

(Showing Industries with \'aluc Over One Million Dollars Vearly/j 



All Industries 

Printing 

Coffee and Spices 

Meat Packing 

Clothing 

Foundry 

Bread and Bakery 

Furniture 

Tinware 

Bags, other than paper 

Lumber 

Confectionery 

Canning and Preserving 

Butter 

Electric Machinery 

Structural and Ornamental Iron 

Millinery and Laces. 

Rice Cleaning and Polishing 

Flour 

Chocolate and Cocoa 

Food Preparations 

Boxes, paper and other 

Paints 

Leather 

Lithographing 

Mattresses and Bed Springs 

Pickles and Jellies 

Copper, Tin and Sheet Iron 

Motor Vehicle Bodies and Parts 

Cooperage 

Boots and Shoes 

Beverages 

Knit Goods 

Brass and Bronze 

Ice Cream and Water Ices 

Boxes (wood) 

Patent Medicines 

Sausages 

Fur Goods 

Jewelry 

Chemicals 

Flavoring Syrups 

Marble, Slate and Stone 

Gas and Electric Fixtures 

Bookbinding 

Stoves 

(a) — Not reported separately in 1921. 



u 


. S. CENSUS OF 








MANUFACTURES FOR 1921 


AND 1923. 






Number of 


An-er. No. 




1923 


1921 


Establish- 


OF' Wage 


W AGES 


Valce of 


Vauje of 


ments 


Earners 




Prodcction 


Production 


2090 


43 038 861,376,028 


$416,317,535 


$327,499,417 


293 


3,270 


5,863,399 


31,833,132 


29,750.097 


20 


478 


682,194 


23,870,186 


21,465,506 


19 


529 


889,061 


20,451,709 


17,417,652 


83 


3,102 


3,519,129 


16,027,138 


15,0.35,943 


143 


2,4.33 


3,891,891 


14,704,193 


9,336,990 


164 


2,036 


3,198,572 


14,357,937 


15,119,597 


69 


1,92.5 


3,068,581 


13,009,786 


7,241,710 


6 


1,177 


1 .451 ,372 


10,923,870 


8,330,808 


6 


445 


4 11. .335 


7,895,209 


6,551,063 


38 


1,018 


1 .S70.()08 


7,357,907 


2,761 ,946 


54 


1,211 


1,102.541 


6,882,225 


6,.305,819 


7 


807 


040,321 


6,774,352 


5,799,821 


10 


236 


283,301 


6.509,580 


(a) 


40 


862 


1,069,012 


5,287,936 


2,9.36,2S0 


31 


6.S0 


1.0M,4.T1 


5,136,232 


2,829,876 


31 


1 ,223 


1.L'IKI.(](I5 


5,095,467 


3,120,878 


9 


142 


HW.slili 


4,911,009 


3,455,882 


6 


108 


101,999 


4,474,376 


(a) 


4 


223 


269,796 


4,463,104 


4,080,127 


39 


399 


495,427 


4,279,134 


3,444,118 


19 


749 


836,299 


4,094,405 


2,4.39,717 


10 


187 


239,788 


4,080,566 


1,999,586 


7 


433 


594,735 


3,973,.561 


2,498,424 


12 


607 


991,297 


3,812,448 


fa) 


22 


429 


.591 ,096 


3,629,285 


2,431,867 


12 


363 


333.255 


3,310,.S.34 


2,811,977 


62 


593 


1,0CI4,M7 


3,220,476 


2,133,269 


53 


486 


.Sf)3,210 


2,993,619 


2,097,349 


8 


246 


397,102 


2,350,590 


1 ,602,700 


5 


445 


488,826 


2,255,880 


2,030,852 


16 


215 


399,648 


2,032,212 


2,142,197 


8 


439 


429,711 


1,972,868 


1,574,430 


16 


309 


526,725 


1,796,348 


1,148,712 


6 


134 


215,899 


1,770,113 


1,144,806 


6 


343 


363,372 


1,742,444 


1,579,310 


20 


187 


205,621 


1 ,682,899 


1,594,532 


27 


163 


249,422 


1,689,075 


1,438,485 


22 


203 


341,158 


1 ,.575,519 


2,098,806 


42 


186 


301 ,303 


1 ,370,28.5 


1,097,105 


8 


138 


217,078 


■1,350,955 


926,435 


7 


72 


70,234 


1,312,143 


204,429 


10 


275 


416,761 


1,164,021 


1,326,312 


9 


188 


253,755 


1,115,177 


(a) 


17 


210 


.341,415 


1,044,346 


850,901 


6 


1.52 


138,605 


1.0t)9,108 


441.559 



INDUSTRIES IN S.\N FRANCISCO WITH LESS TH.\N $1,000,000 ANNUAL PRODUCTION 



Shirts 

Awnings, Tents and Sails 

Wall Piaster, Wallboard & Floor Composition 

Window Shades 

Wooden Ship and Boat Building 

Trunks, Suitcases and Bags 

Grease and Tallow 

Photo Engraving 

Hats and Caps 

Coffins 

Soap 

Perfumery and Cosrcetics 

Men's Furnishings 

Belting, leather 

Leather Goods 

Ice Manufacture 

Optical Goods 

Mirror and Picture Frames 

Stamps and Stencils 



Nu-mber 


N UMBEK 




1923 


1921 


LST.\BUSH- 


Wage 


\\ ages 


Value of 


Value of 


MENTS 


Earners 




Production 


Productio.n 


11 


184 


$194,339 


$945,818 


$1,012,002 


6 


56 


74,447 


937,844 


711,833 


8 


95 


112,.300 


926,330 


260,217 


13 


74 


116,587 


905,045 


589,107 


12 


159 


285,015 


769,487 


738,769 


13 


148 


179,525 


745,498 


699,215 


6 


55 


91,000 


732,780 


472,899 


10 


112 


267,379 


713,596 


663,269 


14 


123 


163,878 


716,519 


706,579 


4 


73 


109,973 


703,845 


631,344 


6 


50 


59,260 


657,970 


783,121 


12 


50 


.55,882 


633,887 


647,278 


3 


90 


85,311 


584,478 


766,903 


5 


37 


64,181 


568,630 


455,105 


11 


111 


140,943 


559,656 


441,691 


6 


90 


171,734 


542,582 


439,182 


7 


55 


86,582 


448,288 


128,425 


7 


94 


128,743 


442,006 


345,171 


8 


64 


106,895 


403,623 


321,074 



SAN FRANCISCO BUS1NKS.S, APRIL 14, l!l'26 



INDUSTRIES IN SAN FRANCISCO WITH LESS THAN $1,000,000 ANNUAL PRODUCTION 

[ continued from preceding page ] 



Pumps , power 

House Furnishing Goods 

Models and Patterns 

Fancy and Miscellaneous Articles. . . 

Saddlery and Harness 

Steel and Copper Plate Engraving . . 

Signs and Advertising Novelties 

Springs, steel 

Refrigerators 

Flavoring Extracts 

Hats, fur, felt.. 

Electroplating 

Mirrors , , 

Gloves, Mittens, leather 

Brooms 

Dental Goods 

Statuary and Art Goods 

Iron and Steel, processed or welded. . 

Steam or other packing 

Cleaning and Polishing Preparations- 
Glass Cutting 

Mucilage, Paste, Etc 

Lapidary Work 

Tools 

Toys and Games 

Engraving, other than steel 

Artificial Limbs 

Wooden Goods 

Blacking, Stains and Dre.ssings 

Photographic Apparatus 

Surgical Appliances 

Carpets, Rugs and Rags 

(a) — Not reported sep.irately in 1921. 



Number 


Number 




1923 


1921 


EsT.VBLISH- 


Wage 


W.\GES 


Value of 


Value of 


ME.NTS 


E.\RNERS 




Production 


Pkoduction 


4 


57 


SI 04 ,807 


.8403,582 


(a) 


5 


43 


56,695 


387,392 


.*32S,671 


16 


76 


128,346 


367,960 


191,514 






86,529 


.348,743 


146,817 




.56 


74,6.36 


340,470 


140,314 




62 


116,970 


3.38,602 


280,740 





64 


100.957 


333,443 


699,383 





47 


83,372 


329,536 


399,302 


4 


38 


92,561 


327,580 


(a) 


7 


15 


15,675 


.324,9-4 


1,138,259 




38 


55,826 


311,24) 


305,658 




*2 


131,831 


295,.52S 


202,021 




42 


75,427 


281,107 


83,154 





74 


70,094 


279,211 


2.35,751 


7 


(H 


62,995 


263,179 


225,140 


1.5 


45 


55,159 


231. .507 


213,513 


8 


47 


107,347 


199,621 


71,100 


10 


33 


61 ,148 


197,107 


137,030 




26 


39,568 


195,609 


183,622 


7 


16 


20,537 


187,655 


(a) 


* 


2(1 


45,535 


157,075 


508,918 




8 


10,805 


119,205 


(a) 


.5 


23 


49,124 


113.895 


36,823 





23 


32,994 


112,521 


214,929 


4 


20 


23,131 


93,204 


(a) 


4 


31 


37,194 


87,191 


105,173 




18 


28,880 


81,900 


(a) 


4 


27 


23,039 


77,708 


(a) 


3 


9 


11,375 


76,013 


(a) 


3 


15 


20,467 


75,45i 


157,175 


5 


24 


23,506 


74,51)7 


89,452 


3 


13 


11,614 


26,500 


27,500 



Hotel SENAXOR^/acingCapitoIPark 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA 



G ^y^AKE your next business trip to Sacramento 
-^ J\ I one of pleasure by stopping at the Hotel 
\»^ Senator — the hotel of metropolitan delights. 

It is of this hotel that Arthur Brisbane recently wrote: 
"The Hotel Senator was finished only a few months 
ago. It has everything that any hotel in New York, 
London or Paris has, and more." 



rooms ^3 to 



Every room has its private bath. Single 
$4; double (except suites) ^4.50 to ^6. 

The dining service is excellent. There is a dinner 
dance every evening in the Florentine Room ^1.50. 
Supper Dance Saturday night, ^1.00 cover charge. 
Regular luncheon 75c. The Coffee Shop is open from 
6 a. m. to 1 a. m.; Saturday 2 a. m. serving delicious 
food at little cost. Bring your golf clubs. Guest cards 
will be gladly issued to one of the finest courses in 
California. 

CHARLES R. FRASER 

Manager 




Vppcr— Hotel Senator f, 
Capitol Park. 



Lower — Dining on (he Loggia 
is delightlul. 



8AN FKANCISCO BISINKSS. APRIL U, I92ii 



CENSUS OF SAN FRANCISCO MANUFACTURES 



Xo. OF AGE Value 

EsTAB- Xo. OF Wages of 

USH- Wage Prodccts 

ME NTS Earn- 
ers 

Total 2090 43,638 $61,376,028 t4I6,317,535 

FOOD PRODUCTS: 

Beverage 16 215 339,648 2,032,212 

Bread and other bakery products 164 2036 3,198,572 14,357,937 

Butter 10 236 283,301 6,509,580 

Canning, preserving, fruits and vegetables 7 807 640,321 6,774,352 

Chocolate and Cocoa Products, not including confectionery 4 223 269,796 4.463,104 

Coffee, Spice, roasting and grinding 20 478 682,1<4 23,870,186 

Confectioncr\- 54 1211 1,162,541 6,882,225 

Flavoring Extracts 7 15 15,675 324,964 

Flavoring SvruiK and Bitters 7 72 76.234 1.312,143 

Flour-mill and Grain-mill products 6 108 161,999 4,474,376 

Food Preparations, not elsewhere classified 39 399 495,427 4,279,134 

Grease and Tallow not including lubricating greases 55 91 ,777 732,780 

Ice Cream and Water Ices 6 134 215,899 1,770.113 

Ice, manu/actureil 5 90 171,734 542,582 

Pickles, .lellies, Preserves and Sauces 12 363 333,2,55 3,310,334 

Rice, cleaning and polishing 9 142 199,866 4,911.009 

Sausage and SaiLsago Casing, not made in slaughtering and meat-packing establishments. . 27 162 249,422 1,689,075 

Slaughtering and meat packing, wholesale 19 529 889,061 20,451.709 

PAPER PRODUCTS: 

Bookbinding and blank-book making 17 216 341.415 l.fH4..3-}6 

Bo.xe.s, paper :mii 111 her not elsewhere classified 19 749 836.299 4.094,4a5 

Printing and Publishing, book and job 184 1964 3,464,648 12,816,383 

Printing and Publishing. newspai>ers and periodicals 109 1.306 2,398,751 19,016,749 

TEXTILES: 

Awnings, tents ami sails 6 56 74,447 9.37,844 

Bags, others than paper, not including bags made in textile mills 6 445 411,.335 7,895,209 

Carpets and Rugs, rag 3 13 11,614 26,.509 

Clothing, men's 34 2255 2,.581,649 10,638,325 

Clothing, women's 49 847 937.480 5,388,813 

Fur Goods 22 203 341,158 1,575,519 

Furnishing Goods, men's, not elsewhere classified 3 90 85,31 1 .584,478 

Hats and Caps, other than fur-felt, wool-felt and straw 14 123 163,878 71«,S19 

Hats, fur-felt . 3 38 55,826 311,246 

House-furnishing Goods, not elsewhere classified 5 43 56,695 .387,392 

Knit Goods 8 439 429,711 1,972,868 

Millincrv and Lace Goods, not elsewhere classified 31 1223 1 ,200,095 5.095,467 

Shirts 11 184 194,339 945,818 

METAL PRODUCTS: 

Brass. Bronze and other non-ferrous alloys, and manufactures of these alloys and of copper. 10 .309 .526.725 1,796,348 

Copper. Tin and. '^hect-iron Work, including galvanized-iron work not elsewhere classified 62 593 1,004,847 3,220,476 

Electrical Machinery, apparatus and supplies 40 862 1 ,069,012 5,'287,936 

Electroplating 9 72 131,831 295,528 

Engraving fother than steel, copper-plate or wood), chasing, etching and die sinking 4 31 37,194 87,191 

Engraving, steel and copperplate and plate printing 10 62 116,970 338,602 

Foimdry and machine-shop products, not elsewhere classified 143 2433 3,891,891 14,704,193 

Gas and Electric Fixtures, not including lamps and reflectors 93 188 253,755 1,115,177 

Iron and Steel, processed or welded 10 33 61,148 197,107 

Jewelrj- 42 186 301,303 1,.370,285 

Photo-engraving, not done in printing establishments 16 112 267,379 713,596 

Pumps, power 4 57 104,807 403.582 

Springs, steel, railway, vehicle, heavy machines, etc., not made in rolling mills 5 47 83,.372 329.536 

Stoves and ap|>liances. gas and oil 6 152 138,665 1 ,009,108 

Structural and Ornamental Iron Work, not made in rolling mills 31 680 1,081.431 5,136,232 

Tinware, not elsewhere classified 66 1177 1.451,372 10,923,870 

Tools, not including edge tools, machine tools, files or saws 5 23 32,994 112,521 



SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH CO. 



SECOND and BRYANT STREETS \i\r>hniinh/ SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




a4 Pacific Coast Industry With Branches in Seattle, Portland, Sacramento, Fresno, 
Los Angeles, Honolulu c->j> Main Office, San Jrancisco 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



CENSUS OF SAN FRANCISCO MANUFACTURES 

SUMMARY STATISTICS— All Industries Combined— 1923 U. S. Census— Latest Available Figures- 
Groups Arranged in Order of Values, Eiclude Establishments with Products Under $5,000 for 1923. 

Aver- 
No. OF .\GE VaUIE 

EsTAB- No. OF Wages of 

LISH- Wage Products 

MENTS Earn- 

WOOD PRODUCTS: ers 

Boxes, wooden packing, except cigar boxes 6 343 $363,372 $1 ,742,444 

Coffins, burial cases and undertakers' goods 4 73 109,973 703,845 

Cooperage 8 246 397^102 2,3o0i590 

Furniture (including show eases) 69 1925 3,068,581 13,009,786 

Lumber, planing-mill products, not made in planing mills connected with sawmills 38 1018 1,870,908 7,357,907 

Mirror and Picture Frames 7 94 128,743 442,006 

Models and Patterns, not including paper patterns 16 76 128,346 367]960 

Refrigerators 4 3S 92,561 327,580 

LEATHER: 

Belting, leather 5 .37 64,181 568,630 

Boots and Shoes, other than rubber 5 445 488,826 2,255 880 

Gloves and Mittens, leather 5 74 76,094 279*211 

Leather Goods, not elsewhere classified 11 111 140,943 449^656 

Leather, tanned, curried and finished 7 433 594 735 3,973'561 

Saddlery and Harness 3 56 74^636 '340470 

Trunks, Suitcases and Bags 13 148 179,525 745,498 

MINERAL PRODUCTS: 

Glass Cutting, Staining and Ornamenting 7 26 45,535 1,157,075 

Marble, Slate and Stone Work 10 275 416,761 L164io21 

Mirrors framed and unframed 5 42 75,427 '281^107 

Optical Goods 7 .55 86,582 448,288 

Statuary and Art Gooiis. factory product 8 47 107,347 199,621 

Wall Plaster, Wall Board and Floor Composition 8 95 112,300 926,330 

PAINT AND OIL PRODUCTS: 

Paints 10 187 239,788 4,080,566 

TRANSPORTATION : 

Motor Vehicle Bodies and Parts 53 486 803,210 2,993,619 

Ship and Boat Building, wooden, including repair work 12 159 285,015 769,487 

Wooden Goods, not elsewhere classified 7 27 23,039 77,708 

CHEMICAL PRODUCTS: 

Blacking, Stains and Dressings 3 9 11,375 76,013 

Chemicals, not elsewhere classified 8 138 217,078 1,350,955 

Cleaning and Polishing Preparations 7 16 20,537 187,655 

Mucilage, Paste and other adhesives, not elsewhere classified 3 8 10,805 119,295 

Patent Medicines and Compounds 20 187 205,621 1,682,899 

Perfumery, Cosmetics and Toilet Preparations )? 50 55,882 633,887 

Soap t 50 59,260 657,970 

MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS: 

Artificial Limbs 3 18 28,880 81,900 

Brooms 7 64 62,995 263,179 

Dental Goods 15 45 55,159 231,507 

Fancy and miscellaneous articles, not elsewhere classified 7 91 86,529 348,743 

Hand Stamps, Stencils and Brands 8 64 106,895 403,623 

Lapidary Work 5 23 49,124 113,895 

Mattress and Bed Springs, not elsewhere classified 22 429 591,096 3,629,285 

Photographic Apparatus and materials 3 15 20,467 75,453 

Signs and Advertising Novelties 5 64 100,957 333,443 

Steam and Other Packing, Pipe, Boiler Covering and Gaskets 4 26 39,568 195,609 

Surgical Appliances 5 24 23,506 74,507 

Toys, Games and Playground Equipment 4 20 23,131 93,204 

Window Shades and Fixtures 13 74 116,587 905,045 

All Other Industries 233 10,613 14,849,680 125,747,181 

ToT.u. 2090 43,638 $61 ,376,028 $416,317,535 



t f A| yt 'y 4- t\l If /> /^ 'V C °t specialization in San Francisco city properties 

^ Leasing -^ Selling -^ Insurance 

W. B. McGerry & Co., Inc. 



39 SUTTER STREET 



REALTORS H. J. Mallen, Mgr. 

Phone Douglas 1551 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



SAN FKANCISCO lil'SIXESS, APKIL 14, 1926 



00^^^ 



■to 01 



,R1£NT 



'"'9. 



'^NC, 



•Co 



n 



SANfRANCISOO 

Your Market 
2^ HOME c/ Industry 

The Center (^ Pacific 
slope Population and 
Distribution ^^^ 
Where )i of 
^ California's Manu- 
cros^/t^otrb'/marRAfactured Products 

inlwenly mmutes. rarC tumed OUt. 



The Bay 15 20 
minutes widr 



^4- 



/^ 



^. 



^. 



4/. 



'^. 



o. 



o 



68% Greater 
Population can be 
breached from your plant 
in San Francisco within switch- 
ing limits than from any other 
Bay point. 

Locate your plant where the 
(greatest number of People are. 



<S> 



'^^ 



Write ~ Indu3fridl Dept 

5an Francisco Chambero/Commerce 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192B 



Shipping and Foreign Trade 




[IN TPIE volume and 
value of its commerce, 
the Harbor of San Fran- 
cisco rates as the un- 
challenged premier of 
the Pacific Coast. In fact it stands 
second in the United States, out- 
ranked only by the Port of New 
York, and during 1925 led such well- 
known rivals as Philadelphia, Los 
Angeles, Baltimore and New Orleans 
by a wide margin. 

For statistical purposes this water- 
borne commerce is divided into two 
classes; foreign trade and domestic 
trade. The latter includes inter- 
coastal as weU as the river com- 
merce, in both of which the Bay of 
San Francisco is very rich. 

In the foreign trade the port con- 
tinued its forward progress, both 
exports and imports making a steady 
advance, the total increase over 1924 
being roundly $60,000,000. For the 
year 1925, the total foreign trade of 
the San Francisco customs district 
was $380,000,000, as against $319,- 
000,000 for 1924. 

$2,000,000,000 in 1925 

In cargo value the entire shipping 
business of the bay, which is the 
unit for San Francisco, in 1925 
probably passed the two bUlion 
dollar mark, though the exact figures 
are not yet available. In the 1925 
report of the Board of Army Engi- 
neers for Rivers and Harbors, the 
value of the harbor's 1924 commerce 
is given as $1,832,000,000. 

The nearest competitor, Phila- 
delphia, in the same period had a 
commerce of $1,024,000,000, whUe 
the total commerce of the Los Ange- 
les district was $611,000,000, about 
one-third that of San Francisco. 

Los Angeles, on the other hand, 
has an unusually high tonnage com- 
pared to the value of the cargoes, 
that for 1924 being 22,000,000 as 
compared to 28,000,000 tons for San 
Francisco. The explanation is to be 
found in the type of commodities 
carried, Los Angeles going largely to 
lumber and oil, weighty cargoes for 
the value of the goods, while San 
Francisco's commerce runs more to 
food stuffs and general merchandise. 
The relationship is readily shown in 
the report of the Government engi- 
neers, where the San Francisco value 
per ton of cargo is recorded as $63.47 
as compared to $27.51 per ton in Los 
Angeles. 



In Seattle, where the tonnage for 
the year amounted to only 7,000,000, 
the value was $87.30 per ton, thus 
giving that port a higher total com- 
merce in value than that of Los 
Angeles, though the volume handled 



was less than one-third in Seattle. 
The following table shows the true 
position of San Francisco in the 
shipping world, being second among 
the twelve leading harbors of the 
United States: 



POSITION OF LEADING AMERICAN PORTS 

From the 1925 Annual Report of The Board of U. S. Army Engineers for Rivers 
and Harbors 

Port Cargo Tons Value pIr^Ton 

1. New York 161,759,998 $14,282,163,388 S88.29 

2. San Francisco 28,875,579 1,832,895,934 63.47 

3. Philadelphia 25,439,611 1,024,447,844 40.27 

4. Los Angeles 22,214,137 611,133,664 27.51 

5. Baltimore 16,526,291 952,705,319 57.65 

6. Norfolk 15,174,708 663,112,016 43.69 

7. New Orleans 13,609,603 842,243,445 61.88 

8. Boston 13,185,884 641,407,499 48.64 

9. Port Arthur 8,872,920 221,059,691 24.91 

10. Seattle 7,612,334 664,674,517 87.30 

11. Portland 7,494,444 305,099,527 40.71 

12. Houston 7,094,294 365,851,048 51.57 



In its foreign trade the leading 
factors continued to be for 1925, as 
for some years past, the export of 
prepared food products, chiefly dried 
and canned fruit and vegetables, 
with grain, notably barley, as a big 
item, and in imports raw sUk from 
Japan and coffee from various coffee- 
producing countries. 

The food product exports for the 
year exceeded $60,000,000, out of a 
total export of $183,000,000, and of 



the imports, silk and coffee made up 
more than $102,000,000 of the total 
imports of $197,000,000. The follow- 
ing tables show the value of the 
port's foreign trade, and the steady 
increase in this traffic since the big 
slump of 1920 due to the great world 
break which followed the end of the 
war: 

(From the armual statistical state- 
ment of the San Francisco Customs 
Service.) 



VALUE OF EXPORTS 1925 AND OF PREVIOUS YEARS 

Calendar Year Domestic Foreign Tot.u. 

1925 $180,403,177 $2,610,601 $183,013,778 

1924 171,113,504 2,319,731 173,433,235 

1923 159,123,687 1,645,027 160,768,714 

1922 143,372,837 1,727,982 145,100,819 

1921 127,043,667 2,432,645 129,476,312 

1920 220,257,771 5,578,173 225,835,944 

1919 235,665,879 4,807,225 240,473,104 

1918 210,562,365 4,270,414 214,832,779 

1917 168,468,148 6,928,144 175,396,292 

1916 123,832,543 3,965,998 127,798,541 

1915 80,539,218 1,837,573 82,376,791 

1905-1914 43,973,327 (Yearly average for ten years) 



IMPORTS OF MERCHANDISE 

Calendar Year Free of Duty Dutiable Total 

1925 $158,624,306 $38,751,104 $197,375,410 

1924 113,279,635 33,538,577 146,818,212 

1923 130,881,025 35,948,471 166,829,496 

1922 143,067,900 27,747,151 170,815,051 

1921 73,267,768 23,881,324 97,149,092 

1920 145,147,956 66,780,276 211,928,232 

1919 207,668,625 30,405,436 238,074,061 

1918 220,292,408 25,231,801 245,524,209 

1917 203,769,328 28,211,115 231,980,443 

1916 97,458,612 19,668,349 117,126,961 

1915 67,352,388 15,985,750 83,338,138 

1905 to 1914 (Yearly average for ten years) 54,565,528 

[ continued next page ] 



SAN FHANflSC'O BISIM SS. APHIL 14. H<2r, 



SHIPPING AND 
FOREIGN TRADE 

1 cootinued from preceding page ) 

The commodities making up the 
exports in San Francisco's foreign 
trade are aknost entirely of Califor- 
nian origin, and reveal verj' pointedly 
the relationship between the city's 
foreign trade and its chief support- 
ing industries, including of course 
such a-s are engaged in the produc- 
tion of the raw materials, namely, 
the farms, the mines, the forests and 
the fisheries. Another notable fea- 
ture of this trade is to be found in the 
fact that for the most part the com- 
modities going into export are of the 
manufactured classes. The excep- 
tions worth noting are grain, chiefly 
barley, raw cotton in the bale, lead 
in refined pigs, leaf tobacco, and 
some oranges and lemons. 

All of the fruit, both dried and 
canned, goes through some sort of 
processing or packing before it is 
shipped, and has considerable value 
added through the manufacturing 
process. The same is true of course 
of the large shipments of salmon and 
sardines, asparagus and other pre- 
pared food products. The adjoining 
table prepared by the Customs Serv- 
ice shows the principal commodities 
exported during 1925 from this port. 

Silk, Coffee and Copra 

Raw silk, coffee and copra are the 
three chief articles of imports, and in 
1925 aggregated in value S124,000,- 
000, out of a total import of §197,- 
000,000. In imports as in exports 
the precious metal shipments, though 
listed for reference purposes, are not 
included in the total value of the 



Markets and Commodities 

Markets and commodities remain 
two of the ruling factors in foreign 
commerce, and it is difficult even in 
this age of modern trade technique 
to say positively which is the more 
important. In 1913, only 13 years 
ago, the exports from this port 
amounted to §64,000,000, just about 
one-third of the 1925 business. 
Obviously, a great many new mar- 
kets have since then been opened 
up, but also there has been a 
tremendous change in the second 
factor, namely, commodities avail- 
able for export. 

In 1913 there were only eight 
conmiodities shipped from this port 
the value of which exceeded for the 
year the one million doUar mark. In 

[ continued next page ) 



SAN FRANCISCO EXPORTS, 1925 

Gold $41 ,31o,S48 

Silver 8.882,581 

Lumber (P^ureka and Noyo) 2,01 1 ,995 

Oil (Port San Luis) 2,21 1,791 

Milk, evaporated and condensed 30,611,965 lbs. 4.260,458 

Butter 840,197 lbs. 474,480 

Salmon, canned 13,473,036 lbs. 2,884,790 

Saraine.s. canned 23,479.916 lbs. 2,091 ,232 

.Sole Leather 5,841,576 lbs. 1,787,493 

Ipper Leathers 3.147,473 sq. ft. 1,025,408 

Barley, grain 11.831,836 bu. 11,452,109 

Kite, grain 1,218,057 lbs. 63,947 

Uicc. briiken or brewer's 21,406,394 lbs. 820,253 

Wheat Flour 257,518 bbls. 1,926,638 

Asparagus, canned 8,285,748 lbs. 1 .336,049 

Fruits, dried— Raisins 79,570,664 lbs. 5,869,800 

Apples 5,426,993 lbs. 684,794 

Apricots 14,799,119 lbs. 2,633.303 

Peaches 2,672,940 lbs. 328.365 

Prunes 100,310,276 lbs. 7,M4,895 

Other 7,904,468 lbs. 1,046,729 

Fruits, canned and preserved 182,682,608 lbs. 20,518,424 

Pneumatic Casings for automobiles 85,299 niunber 1,069,047 

Leaf Tobacco 21,653 422 lbs. 5,976,403 

Cigarettes 2,505,914 m. 4,260,246 

Cotton, unmanufactured (90,255 bales) 45,599,863 lbs. 11,593,895 

Redwood Boards, planks and scantlings 64,.326 mft. bm. 3,158,159 

Mineral Oils— Crude 5,464,848 gals. 185,901 

Refined— Gasoline, naphtha 82,222,611 gals. 17,796,758 

Illuminating 77,229,597 gals. 9,942,359 

Fuel and gas 146,413,7.53 gals. 4,532,986 

Lubricating 19,526,792 gals. 3,452,178 

Petroleum .\sphalt 50,604 tons 1,087366 

Scrap Brass 7,707,986 lbs. 843,022 

Refined Lead in pies 40,947,779 lbs. 3,002,163 

.\utomobiles and chassis — passenger and commercial. . 1,324 number 1,355,885 

Motion Picture Films 23,199,840 feet 663,854 

Radio Apparatus 848,463 lbs. 1,446,207 

Oranges 91,166 boxes 499,442 

Lemons 47,628 boxes 279,412 

Apples, fresh 145,9.57 boxes 288,086 

Draamite 4,176,274 lbs. 538,914 

All other articles 41,601,227 

SAN FRANCISCO IMPORTS, 1925 

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES IMPORTED FREE OF DUTY 

Copra 226,940,884 lbs. JU,231,636 

Chinese Nut Oil or wood oil 24,933,206 lbs. 2,749,871 

CocoaBeans 9,592,385 lbs. 1,290,466 

Coffee 113,186,787 lbs. 25,844,538 

Tea 10,631,328 lbs. 3,071,165 

Rubber, crude 1,567,296 lbs. 716,973 

Cotton, unmanufactured 3,181,493 lbs. 714,696 

Silk, unmanufactured 12,467,655 lbs. 77,400,612 

Other unmanufactured vegetable fibers 7,021 tons 2,207,157 

Newsprint paper 81,632,205 lbs. 2,812,678 

Tin in pigs 3,969,490 lbs. 2,099,367 

Nitrate of Soda 31,281 tons 1,413,043 

Perilla Oil 3,585,962 lbs. 423,970 

Wet Salted Cattle Hides (79,833 pieces) 4,586,840 lbs. 805,764 

Rabbit Skins (8,333,063 pieces) 1,189,562 lbs. 1,187,551 

DUTIABLE ARTICLES FROM PHILIPPINES MADE FREE BY ACT OF 1922 

Cocoanut Oil 61.947,760 lbs. 5,427,186 

Sugar 165,267,142 lbs. 7,903,376 

Cigars 519,978 lbs. 1,060,^45 

All other articles free of duty 10,263,412 

PRINCIPAL COMMODITIES IMPORTED— DUTLABLE 

Crab Meat 4,520,214 lbs. 1,626,019 

Cheese 2,270,655 lbs. 642,776 

Rice, cleaned 17,965,991 lbs. 787,843 

Beans, dried 20,7.35,430 lbs. 946,742 

Walnuts, shelled 1,460,029 lbs. 314,151 

Walnuts, unshelled 4,163,305 lbs. 326,216 

Peanuts, shelled 30,167,232 lbs. 1,546,478 

Peanuts, unshelled 4,475,765 lbs. 216,410 

Olive Oil 6,411,531 lbs. 1,111,703 

Burlap 43,561,883 lbs. 5,715,283 

Bags 18,603,088 lbs. 2,347,095 

Silk Fabrics 216,078 lbs. 871,882 

Vanilla Beans 93,397 lbs. 453,371 

Diamonds 7,496 carats 862,496 

Sugar 25,405,749 lbs. 849,439 

Lead, in ore 14,591,786 lbs. 881,754 

Linseed Oil 7,188,546 lbs. 730,003 

Soyo Bean Oil 5,057,510 lbs. 413,951 

All Other Dutiable Articles 18,107,392 



SAN FRANCLSCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14. 1926 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 



their rank they were 
Commodity 

Cotton, raw 

Fruit, canned and 
preserved .... 

Kerosene 

Barley 

Salmon, canned. . . 

Prunes 

Fuel and gas 

Flour, wheat 



as follows 

V.\LUE 

S1S,224,8' 



4,584,360 
4,407,547 
3,756,1.59 
3,277,841 
2,862,452 
2,114,990 
1,644.166 



[ continued from pi 

leaders of the group 
lowing : 

Fruit, canned and 
preserved .... 

GasoUne 

Cotton, raw 

Barley 

Kerosene 

Prunes 

Raisins 

Condensed milk. . . 



were the fol- 



i20,518,424 
17,796,758 
11,593,895 
11.452,109 
9.942,359 
7,644,895 
5,869,800 
4,260,455 



In 1925 the number of commodi- 
ties which exceeded in value 81,- 
000,000 numbered 23, and the eight 



Exports of redwood lumber, which 
in 1913 were valued at 8385,000 
have increased steadily to the pres- 



ent level of 83,158,159. Canned 
salmon has fallen back from S3,- 
277,000 in 1913 to 82,884,232 in 
1925, and canned sardines, unknown 
as an article of export commerce as 
lately as four years ago, are now ex- 
ported to the value of $2,091,232. 
The following table, prepared by 
Mr. J. H. Farrell of the Bureau of 
Foreign and Domestic Commerce, 
U. S. Department of Commerce, 
shows the position of the leading ex- 
port commodities for the period 
herewith discussed: 



PRINCIP.\L DOMESTIC COMMODITIES EXPORTED THROUGH 
THE PORT OF SAN FRANCISCO 

COUUOD1TIE9 /1913 1918 1919 

. Milk, evaporated and condensed... S 144.216 Sl.045,825 SI. 154.961 

. Butter 16.028 100,557 465.529 

. Salmon, canned 3,277,841 749,095 4,359,336 

. Sardines, canned • * • 

.Cattle hides 121,020 35,133 235.725 

. Sole Leather 728.707 635,181 2.218,607 

. Upper Leather, except patent 56.144 398.459 427,101 

. Barley, grain 3.756.159 687.484 8,472,468 

. Barley, malt • 245.017 276,015 

. Rice, grain » 39,639 3,163,648 

. Rice, broken or brewer's * * * 

. wheat, grain • * * 

. Wheat, flour 1,644,166 2,392.587 5,764,754 

. Beans, dried • 68,729 478,632 

. Asparagus, canned • * • 

. Dried Fruits: Raisins 551,852 1,089.746 2,719,312 

Apples 78,554 &4.710 807.142 

Apricots 853,401 218,550 2,473.184 

Peaches 249,581 109,446 717,460 

Prunes 2,862.452 453.128 4.980,382 

Other » 184,838 871,531 

. Canned and Preserved Fruits 4,584,360 1,580,474 10,989.525 

. Leaf Tobacco 322,780 4,743.890 3,433.650 

. Cigarettes 460,735 3,393,973 835.093 

, Cotton, raw 18,224.877 21,698,168 20,596,373 

. Redwood Lumber 385,750 1.125.914 1.251,676 

. Cedar Logs * * * 

, Softwood Lumber, other 632,287 745.763 883,467 

. Mineral Oils, crude • » 108,872 

. Refined Gasoline and other light 

products • 7,342.605 5.882.802 

. Illuminating (kerosene) 4.407,547 5.801.831 11.424.761 

.Lubricating 169.989 4,238,692 3,454,056 

, Fuel and Gas 2,114.990 5.976,214 5,649.603 

. Autos and Chassis, pass, and com'l. 648.993 5.480.870 3.911,315 

, Auto Casings and Solid Rub. Tires. 94,016 3,371,767 2,757,810 

. Sulphate of Ammonia * • « 

. Refined Lead in Pigs • 363,552 663,613 

. Motion Picture Films 141,243 994.678 1,266.220 

.Dynamite 268.471 1.373,780 735,211 

. AU Other Articles 18.085.535 133.500.879 122.223.232 

ToTiLS $64,881,697 8210,433,929 $235,665,879 $220,237,771 $127,013,667 $143,372,837 8139,123,687 $171,113,501 $180,403,177 

•Not specially classified, 
fiscal year ending June 30. 



DtTHIXG 


The Caleno. 


IR Yeabs Oe 








1920 


1921 


1922 


1923 


1924 


1925 


$1,283,186 


$2,337,117 


$2,321,443 


82.656.261 


$3,534,790 


$1,260,458 


718.484 


426,941 


597,201 


589.308 


383.4.56 


474,480 


3.671.489 


2,639,684 


1,619.688 


2,834,287 


3.433.008 


2,884,790 






886,717 


1,157.260 


1.323.443 


2,091,232 




158,769 


190,343 


210.718 


507.985 




2,378,833 


1,577,285 


1,182.174 


1.722,454 


1.676,065 


1,787,493 


277,336 


377,716 


940,536 


1,103,375 


1,191,827 


1.023.408 


6,265,428 


14.113.077 


10,745,761 


8,812,440 


10,829.360 


11.452,109 














8.387,361 


3,303.260 


4,593,928 


2,980,447 


929.216 


63.947 






534.149 


742,810 


729.249 


820,253 














6,096.974 


2,798,550 


2,396.483 


3.773,950 


2.003,483 


1,926,638 


















864,441 


1,264,796 


1.463.927 


1.336.049 


1.652.712 


1,555,686 


6,977,993 


3,317,651 


3.173,113 


5.869.800 


236.267 


545,496 


1,009.540 


1,019,322 


1.0<H.699 


684,794 


734.690 


2.028.013 


1.820.342 


1,872.686 


2.188.538 


2,633.303 


252.425 


473.336 


540.636 


311,260 


363.425 


328,363 


2,735,792 


3.772.864 


4,829,680 


2.432.429 


7,573,793 


7,644,895 


433,098 


329.607 


750,929 


826.262 


916,604 


1,046,729 


8,584,900 


11.101,184 


13,991,211 


10.724,562 


17,074,313 


20.318,424 


435,749 


412,872 


19,135 


339,323 


1,594,067 


3,976,403 


2,639,112 


3,714,652 


8,982,220 


4,922,098 


4,792,829 


4,260,246 


21,161,309 


9,763,942 


10,477,676 


11,368,332 


14,944,969 


11,593,895 


2,843.309 


933,410 


1,768.100 


4,263,398 


2,333,478 


3,138,139 






378.715 


569,605 


108,631 




1,251,231 
48.743 












90,001 


575,248 


433,332 


111,897 


185,901 


7.079.388 


2,403,277 


6.988.284 


16.181,984 


13,366,289 


17.796.758 


10,598.732 


9,181,933 


9,862,156 


12,432,833 


11,463,636 


9.942.359 


4.875,334 


6,420,970 


2,793,062 


3.945.617 


3.870.866 




9.855,919 


4,530,882 


4,140,598 


8.913,974 


9,358,090 


3.452.178 


7,732,609 


884,696 


822,628 


1.294.897 


2,078,981 


1,355,885 


3.029.130 
569.287 
601.288 


531.030 


















425,305 


73,436 


937,922 


1,305,235 


3,002,163 


1.184.895 


1,230,630 


1.240,053 


1,033,404 


742,457 


663,854 


752.359 


611,771 


589.950 


764.627 


541,269 


538,914 


98,517,840 


35,333,913 


31.186.838 


38,393,042 


38,633,121 


47,094,309 



The English people continue to be 
the one best customer for California 
commodities shipped out through 
this port, their purchases last year 
amounting to 838,000,000. Japan 
comes next, its purchases last year 
amounting to 826,000,000, China 
third with 825,000,000 and Austral- 
asia (British) fourth with 820,000,- 
000. The Philippine Islands took 
811,000,000 worth of goods. New 
Zealand 89,000,000, Canada 86,- 
000,000, Germany 85,000,000, etc. 

The following table prepared by 
the local customs statisticians under 
the direction of Mr. W.B. Hamilton, 
collector of port, gives the value of 
all exports and imports bv countries 
for 1925: 



VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 
BY COUNTRIES, 1925 

Imports Exports 



Austria $98,085 

Azores and Madera Islands 18,776 

Belgium 1,762,221 

Czechoslovakia 230,976 

Denmark 47,211 

Esthonia 389 

Finland 18,716 

France 1,662,399 

Germany 2,036,129 

Gibraltar 178 

Greece 34,267 

Himgary 1,858 

Iceland and Faroe Islands 40 

Irish Free State 12,288 

Italy 1,991,384 

Lithuania 

Malta, Gozo and Cyprus Islands 

[ continued on page 30 1 



Domestic Foreign 

86,464 

32,077 $17,095 

2,029,229 51,443 

43,090 

1,958,552 18,107 

500 

186,021 

3,625,320 260,147 

5,202,235 281,635 

927 

11,822 

3,455 

4-29,278 '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 

186,009 

869 

1,276 



SAN I-KANCLSCO Ul'SlNESS. AI'HIL 14, 192G 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 



Since canned and dried fruit make 
up tlie largest items in the port's 
export trade, and items tliat are in- 
creasing steadily, ami because of the 
further fact that they are above all 
others specialized products of the 
soil and civilization of California, 
there has been a growing interest in 
this phase of the city's commerce. 
The markets arc capable of unlimited 
expansion, and the difficulties which 
retard this expansion are not .so 
much of the competitive nature, 
which is the case with many other 
products, but of an educational 
nature involving such psychic prob- 
lems as habituation and dietary 
habits of the people. 

China, with a population of more 
than 400,000,000 people, last year 
took only §27,000 worth of Califor- 
nia prunes, indicating, plainly, that 

[ continued next poRC ) 



VALUE OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS BY COUNTRIES, I92S— Conti 

Imports Exports 



Mercantile Box Co. 

Manufiicturirs of Spruce jtij 
White Pine Boxes & Box Shook 

Wc solicit your inquiries 

Prompt delivery on any size order — 

one box or a carload 

New factory just compltted at 

1515 Third Street 

San Francisco : Hemlock 8930 




PACIFIC 

STATIONERY 

& SPECIALTY 

COMPANY 

SUCCESSORS TO 

Cardinell -Vincent Co. 

NOW LOCATED 
S. E. Cor. 2nd and Mission Sts. 

Manufacturers' Representatives and 

Jobbers — Moore's Fountain Pens 

Dreyfuss Greeting Cards 

Autopoint Pencils 

Etc. 







Domestic 


Foreign 




$1,307,859 


$3,049,012 
905,191 
20.489 


$118 486 




527,21 1 




Poland and Danzig 


49,505 




Portugal 


15,780 


30,855 






16,280 


3,781 




Spain 


398,1,'U 


46,320 


10,500 


Sweden 


1,249,690 


1,123,828 


23,187 




307,1.54 


75,400 


200 




23,688 




United Kingdom 


3,869,226 


38,241,391 


122,429 




813 


440 




Canada 


3,8.TO,3a3 


6,468,830 


192,047 


Costa Rica 


882,217 


220,000 


20,061 


Guatemala 


3,794,0.56 


719,849 


34,104 


Honduras 


63,336 


265,988 


8,746 


Nicaragua 


1,860,158 


596,422 


23,270 


Panama 


168,946 


1,365,881 


11,916 


Salvador 


2,024,194 


1,152,665 


37.149 


Mexico 


1,921 ,8M 


3,605,589 


415,394 




902 










482 
7,097 
14,144 






17,830 


39 




94,120 


278 


Other British West Indies 


326 


4,333 




Cuba 


290,657 


858,051 


126,031 






24,331 


65 




72 






. . 137 


27 
30 




Virgin Islands of United States 






Argentina 


1,629,457 


803,833 


6,364 




10,4Ot 


170,226 


34,559 


Brazil 


6,688,869 


86,752 




Chile 


2,065,242 


1,138,713 


81,882 


Colombia 


7,928,546 


819,795 


86,041 


Ecuador 


735,050 


215,366 


24,171 






17,849 
5,252 
2,093 


410 








Paraguay 


27,815 




Peru 


237,246 


1,260,339 


17,513 


Uruguay 


232,351 


102,136 




Venezuela 


45,315 


260,937 


1,674 


Aden 


10,857 


514 






8,965,632 


801,246 


14,321 




984,275 


139,724 
1,733,562 






3,715,201 


419 




700 


10,604 
25,863,463 




China 


. . . 19,875,448 


81,047 


Chosen 


2,321 


207,461 


215 




3,342,695 


1,296,690 


974 


Other Dutch East Indies 


248,610 


352,872 






872 


610,499 




Hejaz, Arabia, etc 


19,750 


2,284 




Hongkong 


8,315,215 


2,989,113 


95,273 


Japan 


. . . 70,563,884 


26,433,854 


138,965 




807,061 


429,217 


9,689 


Palestme and Syria 


1,186 


3,828 




Persia 


47,462 


207 




Philippine Islands 


. . . 24,766,678 


10,095,569 


70,374 






90,009 


104 


Siam 


19,400 


108,175 




Turkey in Asia 


5,185 








542 

20,645,685 




Australia 


2,436,767 


42,680 




621,341 


287,358 

945,849 

9,278,458 


6,128 




1,599,771 


56,864 


New Zealand 


226,352 


60,156 




468,062 


181,915 


2,006 




8,687 






21,346 








23 


378,372 

37,407 

150 

52,552 






22,862 








168 


Egypt 


4,305 






1,627 


4,488 
382 




Morocco 


34,565 




Portuguese East Africa 




19,611 








256 








400 











ToT.as $107,375,410 $180.403, 177 $2,610,601 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192C 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 

[ continued from page 30 1 



the Chinese have not acquired the 
habit of eating prunes. Japan, one of 
our best customers in certain lines, 
takes very meager quantities of Cali- 
fornia fruit, either canned or dried. 
Nearly half the dried apples shipped 
out from here last year were taken 
by the Dutch people, while the 
British were the best customers for 
raisins, the French the best cus- 



tomers for prunes, Germany and 
The Netherlands the best for dried 
apricots, and the British people for 
dried peaches. 

The following interesting and 
valuable tables prepared by Mr. J. 
H. Farrell, of the Bureau of Foreign 
Commerce, covering ten fruit com- 
modities, show in detail where these 
goods are sold: 




EXPORTS— SAN FRANCISCO, 1925 

CoDNTRiES Raisins Dried Apples 

Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars 

Belgium 310,425 24,259 22,500 2,588 

Czechoslovakia 27,500 2,447 

Denmark 2,386,000 196,572 277,572 32,658 

Esthonia 5,000 500 

Finland 32,500 2,422 171,083 21,908 

France 217,074 14,783 155,250 18,329 

Germany 13,822,056 945,889 298,195 35,004 

Irish Free State 124,625 9,122 17,250 2,259 

Italy 68,750 6,207 2,125 365 

Lithuania 10,625 8869 

Netherlands 10,033,329 676,588 2,934,375 373,836 

Norway 551,230 41,156 172,375 20,999 

Poland 25,000 1,825 

Spain 1.250 190 

Sweden 765,681 65,712 323,042 37,036 

United Kingdom 30,244,985 2,251 ,107 638,092 75,283 

Canada 7,826,626 530,266 6,575 888 

Costa Rica 13,490 1,916 250 33 

Guatemala 44,117 4,690 1,200 194 

Honduras 7,954 1,080 125 19 

Nicaragua 42,664 5,724 96 13 

Panama 66,293 7,293 1,710 332 

Salvador 35,477 4,496 

Mexico 284,862 29,048 19,366 2,719 

Jamaica...: 4,585 467 150 18 

Trinidad and Tobago 14,875 1,158 394 66 

Cuba 65,006 9,574 1,726 313 

Dutch West Indies 1,766 229 ■■■„■••. ■•.Vioi 

Argentina 377,625 26,147 98,21o 14,124 

Bolivia 2,258 304 6,367 90o 

Chill 10523 7.83 8,725 1,158 

Colombia..' 124,357 19,632 2,282 483 

Ecuador 30,116 3,616 1,190 229 

British Guiana 15,721 1,405 2,265 497 

Dutch Guiana 1,021 128 ■••■•;•; ;;; 

Peru . 27,490 3,430 2,670 415 

Uruguay 41725 4,409 3,750 586 

vSSa 210 344 32,284 1,829 437 

British India'. 3;969 '719 16,699 3,881 

Cevlon 3,111 472 11,647 2,126 

Straits Settiem'ents 5,818 891 20,378 3,011 

Othpr R E Indies 48 10 318 55 

chin'L .■.'.:::.•::.'.. 3,384,248 278,353 71,9^ 10,632 

Chosen 576 57 127 27 

Java and Madu'r'a.'.: 13,715 1,4_39 58,842 9,424 

Other D. E. Indies 8,313 873 20,326 3,275 

French Indo-China 17,452 2,07/_ 4-0 96 

Hongkong 34,732 3,875 17,428 2,474 

Janan . 2,459 131 201,842 1,660 267 

Kwangtun'g,' leased 'territory.. 134,483 11,297 8,000 1,108 

Philippine islands 611,200 54,581 7,959 l,o82 

i-r^"^"'^ :■:;.•;:;::: •"4',5oo 736 530 132 

Sraiia.' .':;'.......: 34;870 4,129 2,675 3oS 

British Oceania 1,713 244 336 88 

French Oceania 2,453 3o8 935 120 

New Zealand 4,967,129 379,0o2 8,7^ 1,091 

OtherOceania 8,118 591 750 132 

British South Africa 954 110 450 80 

British East Africa 2,072 198 2,0^ 347 

Egypt 384 77 1.600 ^ 

Totals 79,570,664 5,869,800 5,425,993 684,547 

[ continued next page ] 



Recognized as 

California 

Institutions! 




— the Super- Express Liners 



YALE and 

HARVARD 



Four sailings weekly 



LOS ANGELES 

and 

SAN DIEGO 

— every Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 
and Saturday from San Francisco. 
Dance and Berth and Cuisine rare are 
all included in one low fare. 



Los Angeles — Hawaii 

This company also owns and operates 
the giant liners S. S. City of Los An- 
geles and S. S. Calawaii — with regular 
fortnightly sailings, via the Southern 
Route, direct from Los Angeles to 
Honolulu. 



Los Angeles Steamship Co. 

685 Market St. 

Telephone Sutter 6S1 

San Francisco, Calif. 



.SAX FRANClSCt) BUSINESS, APKIL 14, 1920 



PRIMO 

smokers 
outnum- 
ber all oth- 
ers amoiig 
buyers of 

GOOD 
CIGARS 

in San 
Francisco 

This face is the 
mark cfElMmo 




Made in 

2 for a Quarter 

and 10^ sizes 

E.GOSS&CO.Mfrs. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



The same high 

Quality packed 

for Export 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 

[ continu(-<i from page 31 ] 

EXPORTS— S.\N FR.\NCISCO, 1925— Continued 

Prunes Other Dried Fbutts 

Countries 

Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars 

Austria 5,000 500 

Belgium 1,060,430 121,096 3,250 715 

Czechoslovakia 40,149 7,363 

Denmark 4,088,573 318,027 97,272 13,483 

Finland 1,518,922 113,284 264,972 35,827 

France 29,468,090 2,125,179 124,335 17,872 

Germany 17,069,842 1,024,602 1,461,614 220,312 

Irish Free State 191,550 15,384 13,750 2,000 

Italy 406,575 40,274 11,642 2,617 

Netherlands 8,520,033 562,473 802,777 100,299 

Norway 1,788,284 122,250 132,414 18,025 

Poland and Danzig . 158,590 13,136 5,250 1,002 

Rumania 2,063 196 

Spain 49,274 5,630 3,435 520 

Sweden 4,139,714 397,292 2,284,571 293,476 

Switzerland 9,188 508 1,750 432 

Fnited Kingdom 22,771,553 2,032,679 1,381,388 183,891 

Cimada 4,003,061 320,537 702,515 66,693 

Costa Rica 3,196 395 860 157 

Guatemala 35,237 3,507 4,190 728 

Honduras 3,549 345 564 78 

Nicaragua 26,881 3,663 1,158 221 

Panama 21,456 2,033 3,155 289 

Sahador 17,543 2,221 1,310 206 

Mexico 273,961 23,243 21,023 2,584 

Jamaica 2,100 184 1,394 189 

Trinidad and Tobago 35,149 3,111 500 79 

Cuba 123,818 11,849 3,738 780 

Dutch West Indies 2,105 241 2,546 383 

Haiti 225 9 

Virgin Islands of United States 50 6 

Argentina 1,328,834 133,209 95,605 16,802 

Bolivia 32,952 3,143 4,216 863 

Chile 3,600 315 2,400 374 

Colombia 133,207 9,160 5,312 922 

Ecuador 7,362 880 1,134 251 

British Guiana 11,067 1,157 25 4 

Dutch Guiana 883 91 175 15 

Peru 183,168 13,590 4,916 732 

Uruguav 252,325 31,453 6,655 1,584 

Venezuela 21,103 2,640 11,372 1,809 

British India 9,993 837 9,323 1,805 

Ceylon 1,000 137 3,924 833 

Straits Settlements 1,818 652 6,483 1,252 

Other British East Indies 72 7 

China 322,399 27,221 84,737 12,377 

Chosen 890 96 46 14 

Java and Madura 19,986 2,061 3,806 743 

Other Dutch East Indies 2,149 175 2,312 398 

French Indo-China 500 100 50 23 

Hongkong 55,181 5,704 28,168 3,225 

Japan 24,364 2,457 3,075 562 

Kwangtung, leased territory. . 15,046 1,430 6,278 1,028 

Palestme and Svria 10,000 627 2,500 360 

Philippine Islands 30,377 3,383 27,399 5,659 

Russia in Asia 96 15 242 52 

Siam 1,661 232 

Australia 327,301 23,290 125,888 13,951 

British Oceania 8,370 1,034 4,316 624 

French Oceania 7,626 842 906 114 

New Zealand 1,667,314 112,856 126,224 16,592 

Other Oceania 1,337 235 

British South .\frica 3,145 289 829 98 

British East Africa 210 12 900 106 

Egj-pt 51,850 4,817 775 244 

ToT.^LS 100,310,277 7,644,895 7,904,464 1,046,748 



A\ER.\GE YEARLY VALUE OF FOREIGN TR.\DE 
BY INCLUSIVE PERIODS 



Fisc.iL Years San Francisco Se.ittle 

1850—1859 % 9.652,753 

1860—1869 28,528,842 

1870— 1879 47,464,934 

1880—1889 77,309,167 

1890—1899 76,225,477 

1900—1909 79,731,863 

1910—1919 213,186,880 

1920—1925 339,273,336 



S 644,103 
531,667 
2,114,671 
11,379,605 
47,897,635 
244,868,311 
321,040,223 



522,380 
1,136,430 
8,235,003 
63,960,466 



S 7,504,909 
13,337,363 
15,958,125 
63,508,263 



v\X FRANCISCO BUSIXESS, APRIL 14, 1020 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 

[ continued from page 32 1 

EXPORTS— S.\N FRANCISCO, 1925— Continued 

Dried Apricots Dried Peaches 

Countries 

Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars 

Belgium 475,198 82,057 65,922 8,842 

Czechoslovakia 91,727 15,805 

Denmark 1,378,661 260,522 97,664 14,190 

Finland 19,647 3,776 .38,896 4,169 

France 615,510 112,516 152,626 19,701 

Germany 3,747,657 659,736 441,416 57,838 

Gibraltar 1.375 220 

Irish Free State 19,950 3,618 2,500 3,338 

Italy 26,0.38 5.819 40,793 6,543 

Netherlands 3,908,639 677,992 98,092 14,667 

Norway 493,240 90,774 10,326 1,262 

Poland 9,626 1,802 

Rumania 8,527 1,806 

Russia m Europe 96 24 

Spain 2,062 400 6,875 1,067 

Sweden 611,274 107,906 135,102 18,079 

Switzerland 1,250 226 

United Kingdom 2,231,784 402,020 127,803 15,155 

Canada 665,397 105,992 1.161,650 127,697 

Costa Rica 770 174 541 IW 

Guatemala 2,225 457 450 74 

Honduras 840 17 

Nicaragua 131 41 50 11 

Panama 765 215 640 94 

Salvador 1 ,104 159 600 75 

Mexico 9,450 2,046 21,912 3,244 

Jamaica 50 11 

Trinidad and Tobago 591 148 200 28 

Cuba 8,303 1,713 35,295 3,185 

Dutch West Indies 50 12 

Argentina 60,775 13,343 1.57 ,.595 20,884 

Bolivia 5,775 1,145 9,042 1.239 

Chile 1,825 364 500 67 

Colombia 1,.575 4.52 1,104 225 

Ecuador 1,226 291 1,997 .346 

Peru 13,246 2,700 8,098 1,011 

Uruguay 7,642 1,741 3,500 548 

Venezuela 610 1.50 1,814 323 

British India 6,525 1,274 1,992 381 

Ceylon 2,425 .3.50 300 64 

Straits Settlements 4,156 911 1,017 2.215 

China 41,439 7,861 23,355 3,080 

Chosen 1.192 121 100 16 

Java and Madura 19,333 3,406 942 101 

Other Dutch East Indies 5,581 815 830 114 

French Indo-China 1,195 257 200 26 

Hongkong 10,009 1,971 .550 88 

Japan 227,993 49,219 242 29 

Kwangtung, leased territory 6,250 1,118 3,540 442 

Philippines 4,315 948 3,688 829 

Russia in Asia 96 38 

Australia 4,935 1,037 1,760 2S5 

British Oceania 306 54 612 100 

French Oceania 708 112 90 12 

New Zealand 39,136 5,533 5,836 791 

British .South Africa 144 35 250 20 

British East -Mrica 336 87 912 125 

Egypt 1,275 366 900 152 

ToT.ALS 14,799,2.39 2,633,.333 2,672,940 328,365 



Canned Cherries 

Countries 

Pounds Dollars 

Austria 450 70 

Belgium 5,295 788 

Czechoslovakia 780 157 

Denmark 5,289 572 

Finland 141 24 

France 3,620 453 

Germany 30,195 2,542 

Irish Free State 186 30 

Italy 210 25 

Netherlands 8,890 1,183 

Sweden 2,595 436 

Switzerland 1,191 197 

United Kingdom 123,464 16,261 

Canada 100,229 15,793 

[ continued next page ] 



Canned Prun-es 
Pounds Dollars 



232 

245 

7,150 

67,080 



522,615 
60,230 



774 
5,329 



61.312 
6,759 



THE YOKOHAMA 

SPECIE BANK 

Ltd. 

"Commercial" 

HEAD OFFICE. YOKOHAMA. JAPAN 

Established 1880 

Capital Subscribed Yen 100.000,000.00 

Capital Paid Up Yen 100.000.000.00 

Reserve Fund 

(Surplus) Yen 83,500,000.00 



Exporters and Importers are invited 

to avail themselves of our services, 

especially with the Orient. 

San Francisco Branch 

415-429 Sansome Street 
K. KOJIMA, Manager 



SURE-FOOTED 




KEATON Non- Skids 



1 Keaton 



Made !□ SaQ Fraaclsco 

A high-Krade tire built for the severe re 
of the West and embodyiig the Sure-Foo 
Noa-Skid Tread for protection on the crowded 
streets and highways :>ee us for liberal offer to ci- 

INGERSOL- KEATON SALES AND SERVICE 
» 524 Van Ness Arc. 

Hemlock 4774 

GEO. S. MERWIN CO. 
St.. Cc 

REGAN TIRE &. REPA 






1946 Polk St.. Comer Pacific 



688 Turk St.. Near 
Phon. - 



t 6485 



I Nes! 



GERARD BATTERY & TIRE CO 
4600 Geary St., Cor. lOth Ave. 

Phone Evergreen 2144 

BEHRMANN TIRE & RIM CO. 

1375 Golden Gate Av., nr. FlUmot 

Phone Walnut 2663 

VIADUCT TIRE CO. 
4298 Mission St.. Opp Sliver At. 

Phone Randolph 4135 

COLUMBUS VUL. & TIRE CO. 
704 Filbert. Cor. Columbui 

Phone Kearny 3794 

0-\K.LAND RIM ATIRE CO. 



2811 Broadway. Oakia 



SAN FRAXCl.SCO BUSINESS, APKIL 14, 1926 




Nitrokote 

for Store and 
Office Floors 



Protect your floors with 
Nitrokote. Its lustrous, tough 
surface imparts an attractive 
appearance to wood, concrete 
or hnolcum floors and protects 
them from grueling wear. 

Proof against water, soap, oil 
and similar liquids — Nitro- 
kote keeps floors dry, post- 
pones disintegration and 
makes them easily cleaned. 

Two coats can be applied 
overnight — it dries in half an 
hour — and is ready for morn- 
ing's work. Six pleasing shades 
and clear. 



W. P. FULLER &PCO. 

301 Mission Street 
San Francisco 

Branches in 26 PaciSc Coast Cities. 

Factories in San Francisco. Los 
Angeles and Portland. 

Distributors of Valspar on the 
PaciBc Coast. 



FULLER 

PAINTS ^P VARNISHES 



PIONEER WHITE LEAD 



77 years' experience — your assurance of 
Fuller quality. 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 

1 cominu|.ii from past 33 | 

EXPORTS— SAN FRANCISCO, 1925-Continued 

Canned Cherries Canned Prun-es 

codxtries 

Pounds Dollars Pounds Dollars 

Costa Rica 103 17 1,954 242 

Cuatemala (5,782 1,102 84 12 

HoDduras 2,166 27.3 276 39 

Nicaragua 6,831 1,176 32,057 4,815 

P.inama 10,119 I.S44 45,566 6,141 

Salvador 3,307 565 5,299 832 

Mexico 21,903 3,259 49,984 6,089 

Jamaica 205 54 

Trinidad and Tobago 1,479 263 819 91 

Cuba 5,439 959 10,626 1,219 

Dutch West Indies 5,121 716 1,691 205 

Argentina 3,375 540 18,000 2,359 

Holivia 3,623 519 6,310 544 

Colombia 12,459 2,006 21,390 3,079 

Ecuador 2,655 391 1,548 203 

Uritish Guiana 1,539 229 2,892 401 

Dutch Guiana 1,557 223 420 50 

Peru 13.294 2,005 14,248 1,687 

Iruguav 890 1.3.5 12,500 1,213 

Venezuela 29,938 4,445 73,886 9,653 

.\den 990 118 

British India 72,406 13,509 274,.860 36,780 

Ccvlon 10,745 1,709 35,551 4,870 

.Straits Settlements 24,726 4,405 60,.5O4 7,233 

Other British East Indies 585 102 804 84 

China 239,042 37,340 60,461 5,923 

Chosen 564 72 987 119 

Java and Madura 95,702 14,806 130,.845 14,819 

Other Dutch East Indies 43,520 7,045 33,376 3,558 

French Indo-China 15,777 2,510 

Hejaz, Arabia, etc 294 30 

Hongkong 32,631 5,815 14,655 1,705 

.Japan 14,989 2,714 59,920 7,213 

Kwangtung, leased territory 2,905 498 420 54 

Palestine and Syria 120 82 1.S9 17 

Philippine Islands 126,266 21,304 60,034 8,312 

Siam 1,536 281 3,498 550 

Australia 4,412 1,115 154,098 14,752 

British Oceania 3,202 590 3,242 278 

French Oceania 973 147 1,616 200 

Xew Zealand 4,155 1.204 12,135 1,209 

Other Oceania 264 46 720 95 

British South Africa 2,010 777 4,746 363 

British East Africa 7,275 712 

Egypt 1,302 ISO 84 11 

ToT.iLS 1,113,152 175,202 1,886,476 222,371 

S.\N FRANCISCO PORT STATISTICS— 1925 

Prepared by \V. B. Ha^iilton, Collector of Customs. 

SHIPMENTS TO THE NON-CONTIGUOUS TERRITORIES 

OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Hawaii, 848,542,904; Alaska, $2,3.54,544; American Samoa, $102,073; Guam, $300,187 

Porto Rico, $516,298. 

\TSSELS ENTERED AND CLEARED IN THE FOREIGN TRADE 





Entered 




1925 




Cleared 






No. of 


Net 






No. of 


Net 




Vessels 


Tons 






Vessels 


Tons 


American. . 


481 


1,918,748 




American 


457 


1,911,817 


Foreign... . 


689 


2,319,561 




Foreign 


707 


2,344,468 




1,170 


4,238,309 


1924 




1,164 


4,256,285 


TOT.U.. 


1,129 


4,104,784 




TOT.U.. 


1,062 


3,358,925 



COLLECTIONS 

Duties on Imports $11,751,894.83 

Other Receipts 321,638.11 



Total Collections $12,073,552 94 

FOR COMPARISON 

Total Collection— 1915 $ 4,647,886.15 

1921 7,431,825.39 

1922 8,614,379.94 

1923 11,612,201.16 

1924 11,514,760.11 



Special deposits not included in figures for total collections. 



SAN FRAN-Ci8rO BUSINESS, APKIL 14, 192(i 



SHIPPING AND FOREIGN TRADE 



tinued from page 34 ] 



Pounds Dollars 



2S 
1,121 



EXPORTS— SAN FRANCISCO, 1925- 

Canned Apples and 
Apple Sauce 
cocntbies 

Austria 

Belgium 

Czechoslovakia 

Finland 

France 225 

Germany 10,205 

Greece 

Irish Free State 

Italy 

Netherlands 540 

Norway 

Sweden , . . . 270 

Switzerland 

United Kingdom 4,548 

Canada 39 

Costa Rica 

Guatemala 

Honduras 

Nicaragua 

Panama 

Salvador 

Mexico 

Jamaica 

Trinidad and Tobago 990 

Cuba 2,250 

Dutch West Indies 551 

Argentina 

Bolivia 61 1 

Chile 288 

Colombia 

Ecuador 

British Guiana. 
Dutch Guiana. . 

Peru 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 22,770 

Aden 

British India 11,662 



lued 
Canned 
Apricots 



75 
558 
538 
695 

6,759 
480 

3,065 



4,843 

1,662 

90 

' 7,234' 



Ceylon 10,011 

Straits Settlements 32,956 

Other British East Indies 

China 15,421 

Chosen 960 

Java and Madura 79,485 

Other Dutch East Indies 15,488 

French Indo-China 1,911 

Hongkong 2,225 

Japan 284 

Kwangtung, leased territory 

Philippines 33,100 

Russia (.\sia) 

Siam 564 

Australia 980 

British Oceania 246 

French Oceania 702 

New Zealand 

Other Oceania 228 

British South .«rica 5,985 

British East .\frica 1.080 

Egypt 336 



62 



505 



310 



230 
54 



629 
197 
10 



2,378 



1,559 
1,171 
3,913 

' i',713 
107 
11.884 
1,887 
195 
267 
48 



Pounds 

10,005 

276,106 

10,015 

1,077 

866,661 

67,347 

210 

60,660 

1,470 

274,629 

42,790 

158,929 

45,837 

23,1,84,473 

675,800 

817 

3,758 

672 

11,985 

24,588 

1,657 

24,291 

162 

4,174 

4,371 

4,431 

7,080 

1,736 

768 

14,126 

4,902 

2,754 

1,272 

15,793 

622 

43,080 

100.019 

16,6.';3 

41,569 

90 

81,925 

420 

128,577 

44,729 

15,864 

41,441 

129,990 

3,705 

29.289 

240 

2,507 

3,060 

2,792 

2,226 

176,345 

922 

2,907 

7,020 

5,235 



Dollars 

1,205 

27,225 

6,524 

128 

76,518 

9,013 

30 

5,171 

171 

28,366 

4,969 

16,042 

4.SS6 

^ 147,296 

61,051 

101 

530 

1,469 
2,720 
201 
2,652 
20 
453 
579 
493 
834 



533 
295 



13,843 

2,116 

5,694 

10 

9,509 

37 

16,605 

5,609 

2,040 

4,662 

19, .303 

414 

3,579 

2S 

387 

3S3 

346 



328 
662 
729 



ToT.ALS 282,820 34,864 26,753,896 2,509,968 



BISHOP &BAHLER 

(Incorporated ^E(TEMBE« v.. ..jul 

369 PINE STREET 

Sutter 1040 

Traffic Managers 

E. W. HOLLINGSWORTH 

Commerce Counsel 



traffic problems i 
iDtiess increase your business. Wi 
phone us and our representative > 
*■ Ol'R AIM: 

'Transportation Economy' 



DECKELMAN BROS., Inc. 

Wholesale and Retail 

Barbers' Supplies, Cutlery 

and Beauty Parlor 

Equipment 

Koken Barber Chairs 

48 Turk Street Franklin 2870 



"MANY COPY" Carbon 

Light 4-lb. weight. In black, blue. C^ ■2'2 
or purple. SJsxIS. per 100 sheets - ^*-0*> 

4i Grades Carbons and Ribbons. 

Moderate prices. Get samples. 

C. H. MILLER CO., 717 Market St. 

Phone Douglas lt*^S 




Recommended by 

James E. Power 

POWER RUBBER CO. 

670 Turk Street 
Prospect 69 



"Prompt 
service 

Modern methods- 
complete handling 
equipment — an or' 
gani2,ation imbued 
with the will to help 
—at your command. 

lAVyRENCE 

Warehouse 

37Drumm Street, Sin Frincisco. 



SAN PKANCISCO BUSINKSS. APKIL 14, 1926 



San Francisco 

Destroyed April 18,1906 

Burned Area, 450 Blocks 

On!) 50 Per Cent Insured 

20 Insurance Companies 

Forced to the Wall 

Conflagration Hazard Exists 

in Ever)- American City 




IT HAS STOOD THE TEST N^ 

Chicago, 1871 • Boston, 1872 
San Francisco, 1906 



Fire, JMarine 

and ^utomobiltj 

Insurance 



FIREMAN'S Fund Insurance Company 

HOME OFFICE, 401 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



SAX KRAN'ClSrO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



ZEROLENE 



f/Zerolene is produced by 
a low temperature process of re- 
fining under vacuum, developed 
and perfected by this Company 
ten years ago:i^y|By this pro- 
cess all of the essential lubri- 
cating elements of an oil ^^i- 
are conserved to a greater 
degree than by any other pro- 
cess known, ^m^ 

ZEROLENE 

puts Standard Oil efficiency 
in your crankcase 

The old method of refining under /i:gh lubricating properties of an oil. Our low 
temperatures destroyed many of the natural temperature vacuum process conserves them. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 



iAN" FKANCISCO BISINKSS. Al'lUI, 14, lU2ti 



The Key c5^an Organization and 
How It IVorks 



■■■■■ t) fiiotor in the coordination of Chamber of Commerce activities and consequent representation 
k^ S ***^ *^"' entire membership in the Board of Directors, is more important than the "Key Man" 
r \ - organization. This comprises one hundred and eighty active workers, each representing one 
L of an e<iual number of important business or industrial groups. This is the machinery through 

which the membership of the Chamber of Commerce are assured the greatest service in the 
solution of their numerous pr()l)lems. Individual members requiring a service communicate their problems 
to the key men of their respective groups, who in turn present them to the Board of Directors. This 
system of direct representation has definitely increased the usefulness of the Chamber to its thousands of 
members, and is already productive of results. The key men and the groups they repiesent, follow: 



Addreaaoitrapha 

NELL. Rapid 
Adjuaters and 

American A 
BIdK 



VRTiLKCEKr. Ccrf& 
uUrornia St 

and Multlftrapha — C. F. Con- 
^Jd^f««JKrap^l Co. 58 Sutler St. 
Appralaera^ — H. R. BkacKkn. 



— Emil Bbisachrr. Emil Bri«acher 
J. Fluud Buildinii. 

— JAMKI. IKVIN 

t EnterprlBca — Euw. B. Ba 



Crocker BulldinK. 



1 Mi 



Art Goods— 

nt, Gro' 

Attorneya- 



,S, F. 
.526 Powell St. 



omobllea — R. F. Tkum 

noblle Acceaaorlv*— 

V^teni AutaSu|>[>lvCu 
noblle Repaira- H J 



LBH. SchuMiIrr Brt. 

Ks. Chronicle Bids. 
f»iON. Howard Autc 
'e. and Calilomia Si 
Jambs M Fokki 
,2Q5CKildenGiti 



<■ Hut 1-1 
1 1 leva— 7 

. 260 Miti 



: M Ro 



-W 



Trannportailon 

5^;?"H7uwi'it-" Cafe and 

tNHAiiD. B. BernlL-ird & 

OS pBtiKN. L, P. DcKPn 

IMfVa. ~ R. C. Pkll. 
, 815 Buttery .St 
^.'BWBBCiN. Newbexin'm 

Unas. 222 Stockton St. 
r.. Hyman. Pacific Box 



Brokers — Cuatom Houac — B. C. Brbmrr. Mat- 
toon & Co . 516 Biiltcr> St. 
Bruahea and Brooms— W N. Van Laak. Van 

Lank MfK Cu. i2MT HarHwn St. 
Builders and ConTracIora — A. B. Swinrrton. 
Lindgrcn & Swim-non. Inc. 225 Bust 



iiidii 



■a 'n — Frkmokt Wood, 
I A8»n., 165 Sutter St 
StatcH Savinipi & Loan 

J. Sullivan, American 



Canned Goods— C E. Hlme, G. 
Carpets and Rufts—JoHN 1. Wa 



■ S. F. 

and Cement— George R Gay. 
Portland Cement Co,. Crocker 

. R. Rogers. R. R. Roeera 



c:hin 



:Mei 



, 400 Grant Ave, 
ircra— D. Lvlb 
i Co. 940 North Point Si. 

l South I 



Chocolate Manu 
DELLi. D. Ghir 

Clears. ClAarettea & Tobacco — O. W. Peaslbe, 
American Tobacco Co.. I South Park St. 
Adolph Jldell. H. L. Judcll Co,. 334 Sacra- 
mento St. 

Clay Products— E. C. Moore. CaUfomia Brick 
Co.. '" 

Cloaks and Suits — M. Savannah, The Parason. 

Clothing Maiiufactu 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods— 



. 604 Mia 

" " || 

.3 JO MiB 

I & Michels" 

Clubs and Associations — Harry Troupe. Hotel 
Grceters of America. 545 Post St. 

Coal Dealers — Elbert E. Beedle. Kins Cole Co., 
369 Pine St. 

CoRee and Tea — Geo. W. Caswell. Geo. W. ( as- 
well & Co . 438 Second St. 

Commercial Paper— L- F. Weaver. L. F. Weaver 
Co.. 1439 Van Ness Ave 

Commission Merchants (Gen'l) — M.G.Lewis. 
Lewis-Si mas-Jones Co.. 427 Davis St. 

;8lon Merchants (Dairy Produce) — 



Da 



Ma 



Ma 



427 Davis 
'^•alry 
Produ 

& Vegetables) 

aggini Co.. 240 

Foster & Orear. 



>plles- 

62 First St- 



W. 



arrel Co 
nery V 
lilk Pi 



Dental Laboratorles- 



KosTER, California 

. _i St. 

Products— R, E. Jones. Golden State 
Battery St. 
N G. Bell, 209 Post 
-Thos. R. Edward: 
W. Edwards Co,, 323 Geary St. 



Edwards. The 



Department Storea— J. V. Civblli. The Empo- 
rium, Market St.. near Fourth St- 

Drayage — Frko J. Rbnnkr. Steuwin- Renner Dray- 
age Co , 448 Battery St. 

Drug* — Geo. M Brobmmkl. Brocmmcrs Pre- 
acriptioo Pharmacy. Fit,ihush Bld«, 

Educational Inatltutlona — Geo S, Potter. The 
Potter School. 1899 Pacific Ave 

Employment Agendea — S Robbrtson. Fo«ter- 
Rolwrtaon Service. 68 Post St 

Engineer*— David W, Dickie, 112 Market St. 

45 Fremoi 



nk BIdK 



Fourth 

._ ^ .tKNNKB. ~ 

■ Co., 448 Ba 

-Geo M E _. 

criptioo Pharmacy. Fit,ihush Bld«, 
--Rtlooal Inatltutlona — G " " 

Potter School. 1899 Pacific 
iployment , 
Rolwrtaon Service. 68 Post St 

11 neera— David W. Dickie. 112 

Envelopes — Alan Field, Field-Ernst Envelope 

Co . 45 Fremont St 
Exploalvea— J B Rice. Ilerculn Powder Co . 22S 

Bu»h St 
Exporters and Importers — A._E Wu 

Fanc.v Goods and Laceo — Wh 

ern Fancy G.wd« Co.. 546 MisMon St. 
Feed and Flour Mllla— H. B. S»>bbrv. Sperry 

Flour Co . 141 Caltfomia St, 
Fenlllzera — A B Wright. Pacific Bone Coal & 

Fertili/er Co . 4K5 California St 
Fire Apparatus- B L Davis. Pacific Fire Ex- 

liiiL;,,!-!.. r » .- , 424 Howard St 
Fish Packers I- K Kimith, F E. Booth Co.. 1 10 

Foundries \\ M '. .\ldknhagkn. Western Pipe 

Freight Forwarding — E. V. Framb. Judwn 

Frt-iKht KoTwardinB Co.. 64 Pine St. 
Fruit iGreen and Dried)— Bbrt Kati, Cuxgen- 

hime & Co.. ISO California St. 
Funeral Directors — Irving H. McMullen. 

Ashley & McMullen, 399 Sixth Ave. 
Furniture — O C. Bi/nstbr, Sterling Furniture 

Co . 1049 Market St. 
Furrlera — Louis Cassnbr. Gauner, Inc. 112 

Garages— A. G. Curtis. Po«t-Taylor Garuac 5.(0 

Taylor St. 
Gas and Electric Companies — H. Bostwick. 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.. 245 Market St. 
Glaaa— Otto Rosbnsibin. Illinois- Pacific Glass 

Co.. Fifteenth and Foleom Sta 
Glue Manufacturers — D P. Perkins. Russi» 

Cement Co . 939 Howard St. 
Grocers IWholeaale)— Perry Cuuberson. Wm. 

ClufiF Co ~ 



Ha rdw a re- 
ft Hay< 
Hatters- 1 
Hay. Grali 

fomia i 

Hops-""'"*' 



■all?^A 



; St 



S.Jo 



> Ha 



, Johnson Broa.. 
. Dunham. Carrigan 



I St, 



od Beana— W'. L. Beedy. 245 Ca 

Ventilating— Ross M Clar 
RadiatorCo. Second and Townseni 
Volf Hop Co.. 245 Ca 



Hosiery — Sam T Breyer. Geraon 8t Bre 

Mission St. 
Hoapltal Appliances — C. G. Vandevei 

Vandever Co . 524 Ma " 

Hotel Clift",~Geary and Taylor Sts. 



C. G 



H< 
Ice M 



Apartmenta — Frederick C. Clift. 
_ ift, Geary and Taylor Sts. 
facturers-— C. K. Melrose. Union Ice 
" ' Pine St. 

Caaualty) — Rollo E. Fay. Aetna 
_ ._ insurance Co., 333 Pine St. 
Insurance (Automobile) — Homer Hincuman, 
lan and Went7, 22 Leidesdorff St 
(Brokera & Agents) — Robert Foster 



Life In 



, H, Fo) 

FTremaL 

ce (Fidelity and Si 



J Ma 



Fund Ins Co.. 401 California 
ty and Surety) — Jov Lichte 

Hartford Accident & Ind. Co. A 

nia St. 

(Life. Accident and Health)— E 



B, E\ving, U. 
o BldE. 



Lestock Gregor 

Pine St. 
Iron and Steel— G 

Products Co.. R 
Jewelers (RetalD- 

Qearj- St. 
Jewelers (Wholi 

Knitting and Cotton'Mllls — 

Km- ■ 

Mie 

Lit .-- _, . 

Lumber (Hardwood>— C. Harry 

Mach 
R 
Machinery Supplies — Charles F. Bi 



, Can 



663 M 

-F. B Ke 

ion St 
_ phers— Cai 
Lithograph Ci 

(Hardw< 

. Fifth a 

ry (General I- 
Rickard & McCone. 139 Townsend St 
hinery Supplies — Charles F. Bl 
BuIotU Machinery Co.. 827 Folso) 
lufacturers' Agents — F. Somers 
53 CaUfomia St. 



Cobsn. Alconc 

.on Bros.. 75.S 

IIDT. Schmidt 
Bryant St 

. White 

Hatron, 



Marble and Granite— E C. Porter, Vermont 

Marble Co . 244 Brannan St 
Maltreasea and Bedding— Mbbkitt A Cuttbs. 

John Hoey & Co . 200 Vermont St. 
Mayonnalse Manufacturera — Wm J. Nt>LLE. 

Rtchard Hellman. Inc.. l6Lh and Harrison Sts 
Meats 'Wholesale and Retail)— Sol C. I^ri. 

F Uri 8t Co . 521 Clay St. 
Meat Packers — Chas E. Virdbn. Virden Pack- 
ing Co.. 155 Montgomery St. 
Millinery— Albbkt Raas. Muller 8c Raas Co.. 

833 Market St 
Minerals \ P \- t-fp-ov i_t 

MimiiL: I . I . : . , I ., Hoba 

Bldg. 

■ & ; 
Bidg 



Bids 

'idg. 

> & Mif 



Musical 



H 



J. Bl;. 



The 



732 Mo 



. S2S M a 
No 



F Ne 



BldR 



. 54 Geary 



Nuts 

Co . .'530 
Opticians— 

Paints and Oils 

M 
Paper 

notographe: 

■^- r _ 

-Dr W 

... s 

feld Co.. 250 Broad 
chasing Agents— 

Powder _Co . 225 Bui 

Co.. 605 M: 



Planters Nut St Chocolai 



W. Spbrby. 



Piggoii & 
Ihoa BIdK 



13 Third : 
fhysiclans— Dr V 
Plumbers Suppllea- 

Second and Brannan ^ts. 
Prlntera — -Albert M bverpbld. Gabriel Meyer- 

__:_ Co.. 250 Broadway 
Purchasing Agents— H. F. Kolb. Hercules 

Powder Co . 225 Bush St. 
Railway & Transportation — Norman W. Hall. 

A, T & S. K Ry. Co.. 605 Market St. 
Real Estate— John J. McGaw. John J. McGaw & 

Son. 340 Bush St. 
Real Estate Brokera — Louis T. Samuels. 55 

Montgomery St, 
Rice— WW. Katbnssink. Rosenberg Bros. Co . 



Stone. 804 C. Spreckels Bldg 
_ r Hammkh L ■ " ■ ' 
155 M 

I __._ 

8i Co.. 651 Mi 
L. Morse, C. C. Mors 
Front St, 
Shipping and Commlaalon — G. M 
ft 6 Pine St 



Salt 

I 
Seedi 



Shipping 



(S. S. 
i-Ha 



Leslie-California Salt Co.. 

-Gbo. C. Green. Fairbanks, 

& Co.. 749 

Co.'s)- 



. 215 Market St. 
. 2 Pine. 



. CaUf, 



_ _ . J. Seale & Co.. 311 CaUfoi 
Ship Service (Stevedores)- •• - •• 

Steve - - - 

Shoes— \ 

Grant Ave. 
Silks— Arthur P. Epstein. Clayburgh Bros,. 95 

First St. 
Soap — A. Haas. Joa. Gutradt Co., 350 Fremont St. 
Soda Fountain Supplies— W. V Dennis, Ameri- 
can Soda Fountain Co.. 583 Mieaion St. 
Sporting Goods — Jos. A. Addleman, Wright & 

Diieon Victor Co.. S3 First St. 
Stationery and OOlce Supplies — A. C. Moench , 

H. S Crocker Co.. Inc , 565 Market St. 
Stocks and Bonds — J. W. Lilienthal, Jr., 

Straus- burger & Co., 133 Montgomery St. 
Storage — Reed J. Bekins. Bekins Van & Storage 

Co.. Thirteenth and Mission Su. 
Stoves— H, W Jackson. James Graham Mfg. Co .. 

Tailors— H.''p. Schneider. C. \V. R. Ford Co.. 

164 Sutter St, 
Telephone and Telegraph — Thos, F. Delury. 

Pacific Tel. & Tel. Co.. 140 New Montgomery. 
Tents and Awnings — Lawrence W. Harris. 

Ames-Harris-Neville Co , 37 Front St, 
Tires (Rubber)— J. B, Brady, U. S. Rubber Co., 

300 Second St 
Trunks— L, P. Meaney. Hirschfelder & Meaney. 

36 Battery St. 
Typewriters — C. E. F, Russ, Royal Typewriter 

Co.. 126 Post St. 
Warehouses — ^S. M, Haslett. Haslett Warehouse 

Co,, 60 California St. 
Wire and Cable— F. W. Hammond, John A. 

Roebline'a Sons Co.. 624 Folaom St. 
Yeast- H W. Robinson. Fleischmann Co. of Cal., 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
MEMBERSHIP INDEX 

THE FOLLOWING IS A CLASSIFIED LIST OF FIRMS THAT, 

BY CORPORATE OR INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP, ARE 

REPRESENTED ON THE ROSTER OF THE SAN FRANCISCO 

CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 



ABRASIVES 



American Glue Co. (M). Fairfax Ave. and Rankin; Mission SOS 

Burd. Wm., 22 Battery: Kearny 1308. 

Pacific Abrasive Supply Co.(D). 318 Mission; Davenport 540. 



ACCOUNTANTS 



Aaron. Victor (C.P.A.). 485 California; Garfield 1347 

Barrow. Wade, Guthrie & Co.. 114 Sansome; Kearny 4071. 

Bearwald. J. K., 582 Marliet; Douglas 9251. 

BRACE & BBACE, 670 Marliet; Douglas 755. 

Cooper. H. J.. 2 Pine; Sutter 1232. 

De Haas. C. A. & Co.. 582 Marltet; Douglas 1340. 

Denham, J. Foster. Hearst BIdg. ; Sutter 3056. 

Diehl, G. L.. 821 Marlset; Sutter 4917. 

Doty. Allen. 433 California; Sutter 1239. 

Ernst & Ernst, 220 Montgomery; Sutter 367. 

Froggatt, Joseph & Co. (Instu-ance) , 433 California; Sutter 1239. 

H irris. Jorathan N.. 2 Pine: Sutter 1232. 

Harris. L Q.. Hearst Building: Douglas 7310. 

Hemingway's Accountancy Institute, 220 Montgomery. 

Hertz. Louis. 149 California. 

Kilroe, W. R. R.. 351 California. 

Landis. H. L.. 369 Pine: Douglas 6948. 

Logan, Sage & Logan, 351 California; Sutter 308. 

MacHugh, Hill &. Co., 277 Pme; Douglas 510. 

Murton. Geo. T.. Audit Co., 582 Marliet: Sutter 7317. 

Peimy-Stephenson & Bossana Co.. 315 Montgomery; Kearny 8592. 

San Francisco Institute of Accountancy, 38 Sansome: Douglas 4656. 

Stephenson-Smith-Penney Co.. 315 Montgomery; Douglas 4765. 

ACCOUNTANTS— CERTIFIED 

AAKON, VICTOR, 485 California; Garfield 1347. 

Austm & Co., 625 Market: Douglas 607. 

BaU. Alex, Hearst Bldg.; Sutter 1464. 

Barnard. Stuart S.. 486 California: Sutter 468. 

Hours & Smyth, 620 Market; Garfield 5653. 

Bullock & Kellogg. 485 California; Garfield 3424. 

Cerf & Cooper. 519 California; Kearny 1131. 

Chamberlain, C. P.. 311 CaUfornla: Sutter 5019. 

Diebels, L. T.. 485 California: Garfield 4272. 

Dolge. Wm. & Co., 369 Pine; Sutter 697. 

Garrett, Harrison. Skinner & Hammond. 332 Pine; Douglas 8898. 

Greenhood & Jansen. 519 CaUfornia; Kearny 1131. 

Haskins & Sells. 620 Market: Douglas 3480. 

Herrick, Lester & Herrick. 465 CaUfornia; Kearny 844. 

Hood & Strong, 225 Bush; ~ 



ADJUSTERS 

Barry, W. P.. 454 CaUfornia: Garfield 4521. 

Beckett, A. Middleton. 310 Sansome; Garfield 3931. 

JOHNSON & HIGOINS OF CAL. (Willcox. PeCK & Hughes), 311 

California : Douglas 6767. 
Maris, Wra,. 201 Sansome: Sutter 1628. 
Pacific Coast Adjustment Bureau, 433 California; Sutter 2935. 

ADVERTISING AGENCIES 

Ayer, N. W. & Son. 215 Market: Davenport 3760. 

Bain. Fred B.. Inc. (Novelties). 216 Pme: Douglas 4687. 

Bankers Utilities Co., Inc. (M) (Home Savings Banks), 268 First: Gar- 
field 123, 

Blum's Advertising Agency, 20 Jones; Market 616. 

Brisacher, Emil, & Staff, 870 Market; Garfield 276. 

Butler Bureau (Direct Mail), 40 Sansome: Kearny 7620. 

Cahill Advertising Co., 821 Market; Douglas 8674. 

CaUfornia Redemption Bureau (Premium) , 2060 Market; Market 7725. 

Cinema Advertising Co. (M) (Motion Picture Exploitation), 331 Turk; 
Prospect 9270. 

Dake-Johanet Advertising Co.. 251 Kearny: Kearny 1472. 

D'Evelyn. Norman F., 351 California; Douglas 8937. 

Drury Co.. 681 Market; Douglas 2353. 

Foster & Kleiser Co. (Billboaid). 1675 Eddy; Walnut 10. 

Green's Advertising Agency. 1 Montgomery; Douglas 3674. 

BANEINS- WILLIS AGENCY, 25 Taylor: FrankUn 1471. 

Hanvey. Howard G.. 760 Market: Douglas 4100. 

Honig-Cooper Co., 507 Montgomery; Douglas 5296. 

Home & Livingston, 510 Montgomery: Garfield 6300. 

Kelsey-Mooney-Stedem, Inc.. 690 Market: Sutter 3328. 

Latimer. J. L. (Window Designs). 830 Market; Garfield 5613. 

Le Vene Advertising Co.. 350 Battery: Douglas 5656. 

Lippmann Co.. Hearst Bldg.; Sutter 3074. 

Lisberger, D. S., 235 Montgomery; Kearny 7978. 

LOCKWOOD-SHACKELFORD CO., 55 Sutter; Sutter 7340. 

Lord & Thomas. 225 Bush; Garfield 4380. 

Lyon Advertising Agency, 525 Market; Douglas 3546. 

McCann. H. K. Co.. 451 Montgomery; Sutter 6200. 

Modesto Paper Holder Co. (Novelties). 351 California; Walnut 2653. 

National Program Co., 785 Market; Douglas 1038. 

Pacific Railways Advertising Co.. 681 Market; Douglas 2392. 

Rothe, Lewis (Designs). 703 Market; Garfield 4177. 

Russell's Mail Service. 340 Sansome; Sutter 6153. 

San Francisco Adv. & Distributing Agency, 515 Howard; Kearny 5343. 



SPENCER LENS CO, (Projecting Machines) , 45 Second; Sutter 2029. 
Sperrv & Hutchinson Co. (Premium). 1260 Market; Hemlock 2742. 
Standard Electric Sign Co. (M) (lUumination Engineers), 1047 Mission; 

Market 223. 
Thompson. J. Walter, Co., 406 Montgomery: Douglas 9394. 



Peat. Marwick, Mitchill & Co.. 485 CaUfornia. 
Price. Waterhouse & Co.. 351 CaUfornia; Kearny 946. 
Robinson, NoweU & Co.. 620 Market; Sutter 1848. 
Rupp & Bailey. 255 California; Douglas 8256. 
Rowe. C. v.. 703 Market: Kearny 852. 
Ruckslell & Land. 703 Market: Kearny 6010. 
Sullv. James O. & Co., 260 CaUfornia; Sutter 1886. 
Weiizelburger & Shipley, 315 Montgomery ; Kearny 30( 1, 

ADDRESSING AND MAILING 

Addrcss()^'t;i[.li SaUs Co. (FBI. 45 Second: Garfield 6942. 
Coddint: Aiin;t L., f.M Market; Douglas 8486. 
HANKINS- WILLIS AGENCY, 25 Taylor. Franxlin 1471. 
Rapid Addrt^ssiiiR Machine Co.. 58 Sutte ' -~ "' ' 



ALCOHOL 

Butcher, L. H. Co. (W), 274 Brannan; Douglas 1730, 
Mason Bv-Products Co. (M). 2 Pine; Douglas 6720. 
Western industries Co. (M) (Denatured). 110 Sutter; Kearny 1611. 

ALIMENTARY PASTE PRODUCTS 

Fomana Food Products Co. (M), 2 Pine: Douglas 6753. 

Golden Gate Macaroni Paste Factory (M). 2930 Octa-via: West 2813. 

Roma Macaroni Factory (M). 199 Francisco; Douglas 2071. 



ALUMINUM GOODS 

Aluminum Goods Mfg. Co.. 760 Market; Sutter 5291. 
Kirsten. Oscar (M) (Specialties), 51 Tehama; Douglas 2426. 



M — Manufacturer ; 



SAN IHA.VCISCO lUSlXESS, APHIL 14. iy2fl 



CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS 

Section 3 of the Act of March 23, 1901. Statutes of California, creating the 
State Board of Accountancy, provides: 
"Any citizen * • • may apply for examination • • • and upon issuance and receipt of 
such certificate, and during the period of its existence, or any renewal thereof, he shall be styled and 
known as a Certified Public Accountant or Expert of Accounts, and no other person shall be permitted 
to assume and use such title or to use any words, letters or figures to indicate that the person using the 
same is a Certified Public Accountant." 

Is your Accountant licensed to practice as Certified Public Accountant in California? 



VICTOR AARON 

American Bank Building 
Garfield 1347 



.. T. DIEBELS 

American Bank Building 
Garfield 3064 



OSCAR MOSS & CO. 

315 Montgomerv Street 
Douglas 434S 



AUSTIN & CO. 

625 Market Street 
Douglas 607 



WILLIAM DOLGE & CO. 

369 Pine Street 
Sutter 697 



H. S. PATTERSON 

Mills Building 
Kearny 2395 



WALTER B. BAILEY 

255 California Street 
Douglas 7539 

ALEX,\NDER BALL 

1219-1220 Hearst Building 
Sutter 1464 

STUART S. BARNARD 

Kohl Building 
Sutter 468 

BOURS AND SMYTH 

Crocker Building 
Garfield 5653 



HASKINS & SELLS 

Crocker Building 
Douglas 34S0 



LESTER HERRICK & 
HERRICK 

Merchants Exchange Building 
Kearny 844 



PAUL HEYMANN 

Mills Building 
Garfield 1963 



PEAT, MARWICK. 
MITCHELL & CO. 

American Bank Building 
.Sutter 2696 



ROBINSON, NOWELL & CO. 

Crocker Building 
Sutter 1848 



RUCKSTELL & LAND 

703 Market Street 
Glaus Spreckels Building 
Kearny 6010 



BROTHERTON, THOMAS & 
CO. 

American Bank Building 
Kearny 3939 



BULLOCK & KELLOGG 

American Bank Building 
Garfield 3424 



CERF & COOPER 

Successors to 
Greenhood & Jansen 
519 California Street 
Kearny 1131 

C. P. CHAMBERLAIN 

3 1 1 California Street 
Sutter 5019 

WALTER H. CRAMER 

268 Market Street 
Sutter 2588 

DAWSON & RILEY 

Hearst Building 
Sutter 5175 



HOOD AND STRONG 

425 Standard Oil Building 
Sutter 793 



EDWARD B. JORDAN 

110 Sutter Street 
Kearny 7956 



JORGENSON, LUCKHAM & 
BUNN 

Chancery Building 
Garfield 4499 



GEO. J. RASCH 

325 Bush Street 
Garfield 6136 



HOWARD KROEHL & CO. 

1010 Balboa Building 
Sutter 3296 



LYBRAND, ROSS BROS. 
MONTGOMERY 

2 Pine Street 
Sutter 1232 



CHARLES P. RUPP 

209 California Street 
Douglas 8787 



SKINNER & HAMMOND 

332 Pine Street 
Douglas 6S98 



JAMES O. SULLY & CO. 

260 California Street 
Sutter 1886 



A. SUTTER & CO. 

Nevada Bank Building 
Sutter 3179 



WALTHER WOLF 

625 Market Street 
Garfield 6354 



:. G. WUNNER 

260 California Street 
Sutter ISS6 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



AMMONIA— ANHYDROUS 



AMMONIA FITTINGS 

CYCLOPS IRON WORKS (Mi. S37-S47 Folsoni; Sutter 3030. 

AMUSEMENTS— OUT DOOR 

Chules-At-The-Beach, 790 Great Highway; Pacifle l-ltO. 



APRONS 



APARTMENTS 



Abbey Apartments. 450 JoDes: Pri sin'( ( >(174 

Hampton Court Apartments; 37s Unldiii t;alf Ave.. Franklin 7984. 
Huntinpon Apartments; Calilornia aid Ta.\lijr; Franklin 54L0. 
Stanford Court Apartments. 801 California; Ciarfleld 464. 



APPRAISERS 



AMERICAN APPRAISAL CO., 485 California; Sutte 
California .\ppraisal Co.. 465 California; Douglas 7341. 
Ewart. D. F.. 310 CaUfornia: West 1407. 
General Appraisal Co.. 821 Market. Sutter 2050. 



BANFIELD-HULLINGER CO. 

Art Dealers 

501-503 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Art Goods Picture Framing Greeting Cards 

Scenic Views Kodak Work 

Eastman Agency 

Phone PROSPECT .1216 



.Marian .Mltr ('.. 
.Moore, Walton -\ 
Normandin Brc;s 
Reynolds. G. W ; 
Rosenthal. Maurii 
Simshine TVIfg. Co 



r.l2 Howaid; Garfield 4039. 
Market 2482. 
Douglas 1900. 
i> 4741. 

.siun and Fremont; Daven. 841, 
.arny 2891. 
Douglas 4136. 



ARCHITECTS 



\pplegarth G \ "mAruk.t D u^l i U2. 
Ashlej A. E\ers ^ '^ in r I> i i - 'i 
Bdkewell t Brc \mi i I i ( s 

Baumann H ( i i» 

Bhss Au Fauweitli i i i 

Bollet, Edwaid ( i i i 

Branner Julin K i 

Bruce Rlonis M i i M 

Bugbee \itlni[ ^ 
Cauldwtll -Vll II I 

Coffev AJfrtd 1 < n l l i i > i n s 
Covhead Emest H< ti t B!(l„ Mill i > 109 
Crim W H Jr 425 Keamy Kearnj 117fa 



Parr Albert 68 Post Douglas 1493 

Faville. Wm. B.. 1 Montgomery; Sutter 1715. 

Foulkes. Edw. T., 620 Market; Kearny 3304. 

Gutterson, Henry H.. 526 Powell; Douglas 1416. 

Hedstrom & Ryan (Naval). 215 Market; Davenport 2714. 

Hind, W. G., 110 Sutter; Sutter 2188. 

Hobart. Lewis P.. 620 Markcf Sutter 968. 

Howaid. John Galen, & Associates. 1 Montgomery; Douglas 37 

Hyman. Samuel Lighlner. OS Post; Sutter 4462. 

Kelham, Geo. W.. 55 New Montgomery; Douglas 8438. 

Knowles. Wm., Hearst Bldg.. Sutter 406. 

Lansburgh. G. Albert. 140 Montgomery: Douglas 335. 

Meyer, Frederick H., 742 Market; Sutler 780. 

Miller & Pflueger. 35 Montgomery; Kearny 3236. 

Mooser. Wm.. Co., 14 Montgomery: Kearny 1482. 

Morgan, Julia, 465 California; Kearny 4140. 

O'Brien Bros.. Inc.. 315 Montgomery: Kearny 2176. 



Ross. T. Patterson, 310 California: Kearny 4216. 
Schmidt, Herbert A., 251 Kearny: Kearny 4139. 
Schwartz. Mel I.. 14 Montgomery; Douglas 5014. 
Shea & Shea. 454 Montgomery: Sutter 2084. 



Complete Advertising Service 

We specialize in a complete personal service 

to advertisers of all classes. A number of well 

known clients can tell of results obtained. 

COPY ~ ARTiVORK ~ MAILING 

DISTRIBUTING - PLANNING 

GUARANTEED LISTS 



HANKINS-WILLIS AGENCY 

ADVERTISIINQ 

GOLDEN GATE BUILDING 

Phone FRANKLIN 1471 



ARMY AND NAVY GOODS 

Levin. M. & Sons (W), 2231 Third: Park 418. 
United Army Surplus Gocds (J). 501 Castro: Mission 6312. 
United States Army Store (J). 2338 Mission: Mission 6312. 
Waxman. J. (J), 1170 Market: Park 9143. 

ART GOODS 



Chew Jan Co.. 700 Grant Ave., China 269. 

Daibutsu. The. 501 Grant Ave.. Sutter 2200. 

Elder. Paul. 239 Post: Douglas 696. 

Fong Tai & Co., 957 Grant Ave,, China 129. 

Gump, S. & G. Co., 246 Post: Douglas 6200. 

Hart, Henry H., 328 Post: Ivearny 6642. 

INDIA-AMERICAN TKADINO CO. (I-E), 25 California: Dougl 1229. 

India Company (I). 149 California: Douglas 2855. 

Iwata, T. & Co. (I-R). 247 Grant Ave.; Kearny 7049. 

Meyer, Victorien M. (I-E). 883 Mission: Douglas 4285. 

Nanldng Fook Woh Co., 701 Grant Ave.: China 166. 

Paris Art Co. (M), 1037-1039 Valencia: Mission 3843. 

Schlissler Bros. (M), 326 Grove; Market 962. 



The American Appraisal Co^ 

A NATIONAL ORGANIZATION 

INVESTIGATIONS • VALUATIONS • REPORTS • INDUSTRIALS 
PUBLIC UTILITIES • NATURAL RESOURCES 



AMERICAN BANK BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAX FHAXCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



ART GOODS— Continued 



■ I'lilk 



[Ill-Id 4570. 



Shainin. I., t'o il i, 

Sheldon Art shop I _ 

Shim Yuen IlinK & Co. i I-K i. S4'.l < ^rant Ave.: China 45 

Sing Chong ImporlinR <'(>.. fiOl Orant Ave. ; Douglas 1245. 

Tung Sing Co.. 444 Grant Ave.; China 1334. 

Vickery. Atxins & Torrey (R). 550 Suiter: Kearny 5371. 

Wing Chin & Co.. 857 Grant Ave : China 36. 

ARTIFICIAL FLOWERS 

AMERICAN FLOWER WORKS i.\I). 34>>-.').i0 llajis: .Market 72y5. 

ARTISTS 

Beers. Emerson. 821 Market: Kearny 4126. 

HINEB, CBAS. L. (Catalr)g Illu<tratlon.s). S5 Second: Douglas 4844. 

Joseph. Sydney. 72S Montgemery : Kearny 850. 

Mann. W^alter J.. Co. (M). 5f)3 Clay: Douglas912.V 

Nelson .School of I>etterlng and Conunerclal Art . 153 Kearny : Doug. 0168. 

Kothc. Lewis. 703 Market; Garfield 4177. 

Sierra Art & Engraving Co. (M), 313 Front: Douglas 4780. 

ASBESTOS PRODUCTS 

.\sbeslos Co. of Cal.. 175 ? 

Johns M:in\ill,-. III.- ..f C; 

J0NESBR03 ASBESTOS SUPPLY CO . INC . .500 2nd: Dougl 7I1.".0 

PLANT RUBBER & ASBESTOS WORKS, •i:t7 Brannan; Sut. 2100. 

WESTERN ASBESTOS MAGNESIA CO \r , 21-29 South Park. 

ASPHALT 

Assjciated Oil Co. (M). 79 N'ew MontKomery; Kearny 4S00. 
Crown Bitumens CorporaUon. 315 Montgomery; Garfield 6431. 
Parafflne Companies. Inc. (M). 475 Brannan; Dounlas 9420. 
Shell Co, of CaUfornla (M). 200 Bush; Oarfleld 6100. 
Standard Oil Co. (M). 225 Bush; Sutter 7700. 
Union Oil Company of California. 220 Montgomery; Sutler 1400. 

ASSAYERS' SUPPLIES 

Hraun-Knccht-Heiniann Co :\V-Ml. 57IJ-5S4 .Mission; Kearny 34U3. 
Butcher. L. H. Co. (W-Di. 274 Brannan: Douglas 1730. 
Hanks. Ablwt A.. Inc.. (S24 Sacranienlo: K'eat-ny ;1473. 
Justinian Caire Co. <D). 573 Market ; Douglas 4432. 



ASSAYING 



Curtis * Tliomp-son. X'-\ 
Gracier. S. B. Co.. In. ^ 
Hanks. Abbot A.. Inc m 
Smith Emory & Co.. im , 
Wildbcrg Bros. SmtlUiiK - 



42 Market ; Sutter 1672. 



ASSOCIATIONS 



Builders Exchange. 180 Jessie; Sutter 6700. 

Butchers' Boaid of Trade. 821 Market; Douglas S4U7. 

California Canning Peach Growers Assn.. 244 California; Douglas 7914. 

California Chib, 1750 Clay. 

California Dairy Council. 216 Pine: Sutter 1453. 

California Development Association. Ferry Bldg.; Davenport 1900. 

California Fruit Distributors. 85 Second: Douglas 8920. 

California Growers and Shippers Protective League, H5-2d; Doug. 6361. 

California Metal and Mineral Producers Assn.. 625 Market : Gar. 1818. 

California Retail Lximbermen's Assn.. 112 Market; Douglas 4998. 

California Vegetable I'nion. 510 Batteiry: Sutter 203S. 

California White & Sugar Pine Mfrs. Association. 74 N'ew Montgomery'. 

Califomians Incorporated. 140 Montgomerj-; Douglas 561. 

Canners* League of California. 112 Riarket; Sutter 7115. 

Central California Berry Growers Assn.. 510 Batterj-; Sutter 1679. 

Clement Street Merchants Association. 801 Clement. 

GHAMBEK OF COMMEBCE, Merchants Exchange Building. 4: 



Chinese Chamber of Commerce. 750 Sacramento. 

Chinese Six Companies. 843 Stockton; China 310. 

Colma Vegetable Association, 541 Davis; Sutter 2134. 

Community Chest of San Francisco, 55 New Montgomery : Doug. 9160. 

Crab Fishermen's Protective Assn.. Meigg's Wharf; Franklin 4989. 



Hotel < 
Indu-sii 



ritc-MrrtfrT; Douglas 6565. 
- '■ < ■■ . . . 467 O'Farrell: Frank. 717. 
Xiw Montgomer> : Kny. 480. 

111., Kt-amy 112. 

nu-r. Kcamy 2050. 

iiO.5 Market; Douglas 7626. 



, 625 Market; Kearny 2648. 
.'. CaUfomia; Douglas 2350. 
a, 381 Bush: Sutter 5124. 
, 444 Bush; Sutter 1987. 
I National .\ssn. of North America, 99S Market; Garfield 457. 
Milk Dealers Association, 1095 Market; Park 1287. 
Musical Association of San Francisco. 760 Market: Gerfield 2810. 
North Beach Merchants Association, 535 Columhu-s Ave. 
Paciflc American Stvamsbip Association. 336 Battery : Sutter 2214. 
Pacific Coast Electrical Association, 447 Sutter; Garfield 2791. 
Paciflc Fruit Exchange. 85 Second: Douglas 6046. 
Pacific I'nion Club, 1000 California; Prcgpect 33. 
Poultry Producers of Centrai California, 700 Front; Douglas 6510. 
I»urchasinK Agents" Assn. of No. California. 433 California: Gar. 124. 
Retail Druggists Assn of San Francisco, 593 Market; Douglas 9f-6. 
Retail Merchants Association. 451 California: Kearny 112. 
Retailers Credit Assn. of San Franiisin, l'.'i Tavlor; Prospect 9622. 
San Francisco Assn. of Cr. <ln Mm, v.^, S.crid. Douglas 7876. 
SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMEKCE, MerchantsExcbange 

Bldg.. 451 California. Ki:nii\ iil' 
J^an Francisco Conununity .s.r-Ai.c |{<-< reation League. 870 Market. 
San Francisco Convention and Tourist League. Exp. Aud: Market 1208. 
San Francisco County Medical Swiety. 909 H>de: Graystonc 1330. 
San Francisco District Dental Society, 235 Siorkicn. 
San Francisco Remedial Ix)an Assn., Slint and Mission: Kearny 5349. 
San Francisco Restaurant Men's Assn.. 1028 Market; Hemlock 1607. 
San Francisco Stock Exchange. 3.56 Bush; Douglas 89C0. 
San Francisco Stock and Bond Exchange. 34 1 >Iontgomer>- : Gar. 2556. 
Shipowners As.sociation of the Paciflc. 336 Batter>; Sutter 2214. 



2424. 



Wuterfront Employers I'nion, 311 Californi 



Plant Rubber 6* Asbestos Works 

SA.N FRANCI.SCO Telephone Sutler 2100 

Manufacturers o/ ASBESTOS 



Asbestos Packings, Pipe, Boiler 
Insulation, Roofings 




Jones Bros. Asbestos Supply Co., Inc 

DISTRIBUTORS 

The Philip Carey Company 

SOO Second St. Phone Douglas 7650 San F 



WESTERN ASBESTOS MAGNESIA CO. 



USE 



for Stucco Base— Interior Finish- 
Exterior Finish — Acoustical Correc- 
tor, and in the one board get Sound 



Insulating Engineers and 
Contractors 

DISTRIBUTORS OF 



ASBESTOS and MAGNESIA 
PRODUCTS 

We employ a force of skilled work- 
men and contract for the construc- 
tion and insulation of cold storage 
rooms; furnish and apply comple 



Telephone Douglas 3860 



2l-29SouthPark, between Second and Third Sts., SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

OAKLAND BRANCH, 16th and Poplar Streets, Phone Oakland 2237 
We manufacture three types of Acousti-Celotex, and contract for their installation complete 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSl.NfESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW 

Ach. Henry. 822 Shaini Itldi; ; Suiter 2271 
Adams. Chas. Albert. 7S5 .\iarKit , Douglas 225 
Andros. Hengstler & Dorr. 4.^6 (.'alitornia; Sutter 468 
Armstrong. R. M. J.. 250 MontBomcrv; Garfield 2170 
Atwocd. C. G.. 220 Montgomery; Douglas 800 
Bacigalupi & Elkus. 550 Montgomery; Sutler 1321 
Barrett. Richaid W.. 7,s5 .\larkii. sutler 752 
Beedy. Louis S.. 315 Mnuii;..iuii\ K. amy 3945 
Bell & Simmons. 310 S;iiiM>nir, I »i.iji:las 3*680 
Bergerot. P. A.. 110 suiii r Ki,Lr[i\ i;to 
Blum, Max. 2.53 Calil..i ni.i li..u-l,;, m.-.i)' 
Bolton. Arthur W , i;j(i \!;,il,ri ^,,11,1 (i«fi 
Boynton, Alhi'll K , UO,", \l:iikri 1 ),,ii/l,.v 7i;_in 
Brandenstein n 1 _'_'n M.-ni l..,, . , , I,, ,rfi\5758 

Breeze. Thcs II ._■_■(: \l,.ni- 11 I 1. i.l I, . jhi6. ' 

Brennan. Janii> F jjo \i,.Mi L',.ir , i ^ I ^his 332 

Bridgford. Eugene A , :>ri 1 'alil.u in,, <,ailleld556 
Brobeck. W. 1. G20 M;iri,. I ~iiM.i..;t; 
Bro«-n. I. I.. 220 M.iiii^..im< 1 ^ 
Butler Bureau. 40 Sau^ >ni. . K 
Byington. Lewis F., 5!i;i M:irki 
Byrne .it Lamson. 485 CaUforni; 

Cashman. AV. E.. 201 Sansome; Kea 

Chamberlain. W. H., 311 California: s'uller 5019 

Chickering & Gregory'. 465 Cahfnriiia; Kearny 2273 

Cluff. Airred T 220 Mnntiinnifr\ Douglas 1370. 

Coole,\ , A K , 4.1;-; < aliroirii:! (l.uji.Id 4488. 

Corpiirai.^ciMr, \ ... „ i,,i 1. m IV. Munlgomery; Douglas 8263. 

Crothn- I.... I. r.'Hi \l.,i I,, , K , .1 inv 3876. 

Cullinan ,^ lliik, \ 7. .11 \1 nl,,- - i:iir'.120 

Cushing i (1:: !i L- I \i,:,- .,,:, siitier6S36. 

Davis. Jolui I- , - , M , . ; , , I ,, , ' , ;isf,5. 

Deering. Fr: 



1' ii^'las 346. 
IJl.^ 71120. 
l>"UBlas 380. 
2008. 



Den 



, AVi 



I ny 2330. 



Dibble. OUyer. 220 Montgomery ; Douglas 2945. 

Dibblee. Albert J.. 220 Montgomery; Douglas 7171. 

Dimond. Henry P., 255 California: Douglas 1654. 

Dinkelspiel, Henry G. W.. litlO Market; Kearny 367. 

Dinkelspiel. Lloyd AV.. 14 M,.nt;^i.iLnry . Kearny 941. 

Doble. Wm. A. iPaleuiv i.jn .\l ,,l„t: Garfield 4965. 

Dom. Winfleld. 465 Calilc.i ni.i ^,,11, t 1150. 

Drown. Leicester* Droun in,-, \I,.rugomery: Sutter 1430. 

Duim. H. A., 255 California. Douglas 1654. 

Dunne. J. J., 220 Montgomery. Douglas 3664. 

Dwyer. J. J.. 369 Pine; Sutter 3780. 

Ehrlich. Philip S.. 369 Pine; Garfield 3460. 

Ehrman. Sidney M.. 14 Montgomery; Kearny 941. 

Eicholl. Henry. 220 Montgomery; Sutter 1116. 

Eisner. Norman A.. 220 Montgomery; Garfield 301. 

Evans. Victor J. & Co.. (Patentsl. 582 Market: Sutter 229. 

Fallon. Joseph P.. Hearst Bldg. ; Sutter 1353. 

FEEHAN, JAMES B., 785 Market; Sutter 1056. 

Ford & Jolmson. 220 Montgomery ; Sutter 3430. 

Frank. In-ing H.. 465 Market; Kearny 4421. 

Gaylord, R. B.. 703 Market; Kearny 722. 

Gherini. A.. 460 Montgomery; Douglas 1606. 

Gillett. James N.. 465 California. Sutter 2035. 

Glensor. Clewe & Van Dine. 220 Montgomery; Douglas 2691. 

Goldman & Altman, 582 Market; Sutter 4686. 

Goodfellow. Eels. Moore & Orrick. 433 California; Kearny 5713. 

Goodfellow. Hugh. 433 California; Kearny 5713. 

Gregory. T. T. Co.. 351 California; Douglas 6340. 

Grifflth. Graves (Patent), 821 Market. 

Hall. Frederic W., 620 Market; Sutter 4815. 

Hall. Herbert E., 620 Market: Sutter 4815. 

Harding;^ R. T.. 275 Bush; Sutter 3144. 

Heller. E. S.. 14 Montgomery; Kearny 941. 

Hinckley. Frank E.. 465 California; Sutter 316. 

Houghton & Houghton, 465 CaUfomia; Kearny 1480. 

Humphrey, C. F.. 582 Market; Douglas 9616. 

Jacobs. Henry A., 1 Montgomery: Kearny 5164. 

Jones. Madison R., 351 California; Kearny 738. 

Jones & Dall. 351 California: Kearny 738. 

Keesling. Francis V.. 690 Market; Kearny 3876. 

Keyes, Alexander. 785 Market; Douglas 4860. 

Kirk. Joseph. 444 Market; Douglas 340. 

Kittle. Allen 1.. 225 Bush; Kearny 1675. 

ICnight. Boland. Hutchinson & Christian. 351 California: Douglas 684. 

Lansburgh. s. Laz. 220 Montgomery: Garfield 94. 

Lawrence. Frank L.. 430 Sansome; Kearny 2600. 

Leicester & Leicester. 105 Montgomery. 

Levy, Eugene W.. 1 Montgomery: Garfield 6460. 

Liechti. .Arnold W., 110 Sutter: Kearny 1993. 

LiUick. Ira S., 351 California; Sutter 23. 

McCutchen. Olney. Maunon & Greene, 351 California: Garfield 2324. 

McEnemey. Garret W., 582 Market: Sutter 6789. 

McGee, Wm. J., 220 Montgomery; Sutter 1286. 

McKinstry, Haber & Firebaugh, 703 Market: Sutter 590. 

McNab. Gavin. 625 Market; Douglas 520. 

Madison. Frank D.. 225 Bush; Kearny 102. 

Maim. Seth. 465 California: Keamv 112. 

Marks &. Clerk rPatents). 620 Market. 

Mee, John Hubert. 465 CaUfornia; Sutter 166. 

Meyerstein. Joseph C. 57 Pest; Sutter 6220. 

Mida's Pacific Coast Trade Mark Bureau (Trade Marks and Copyrights), 

112 Market. 
Miller. John H.. 620 Market; Kearny 5540. 
Monroe. Henry E.. 275 Bush; Sutter 3144. 
Moore. A. A.. 433 California. Kearny 5713. 
Moore. Stanley, 433 California; Kearny 5713. 
Moran, Edw. F.. 681 Market; Douglas 1564. 
Morris. Leon E.. 1 Montgomery; Sutter 1909. 

Morrison. Hohfeld. Foerster, Shuman & Clark. 620 Market: Gar. 5676. 
Mullally. Thomwell. 220 Monre.n-ej-v Douglps 2928. 
Munn & Co. lPatenls> 7.^JM,ll,.I -Suiter 6.532. 
Newlands. James. J.. L'jii Mtnr ^:.,ti , r\ Keamv 569. 
Oddie, Clarence M.. 2211 \l,,i,ii;(,in, r\ , Garfield 77. 
Orrick, W. H.. 433 Calir.Mni;i, K.aiiiy 5713. 
Owens. Geo. F.. 12 Geary. 
Parker. Claude I.. 620 Market: Kearny 888. 
Peart. Hartley P.. 785 Market: Sutter 862. 
Pedder. Stanley. 1 Montgomery; Douglas 1195. 
Peixotto, Edgar D.. 14 Montgomery: Bayview 7945. 
Pratt. Orville C, Jr.. 220 Montgomery; Sutter 3258. 
Preston, John W.. 582 Market: Douglas 8756. 
Pringle, J. R., 466 California: Sutter 1150. 



Samuels, Jacob. 
Sanborn H. P 
Sawyer. Harold 
Schlesinger, Ben 
Schwarz. Adolpli 



173. 



Shortrictee, Hon. Sanuitl M.. U'.io Maiket: Keamy 888. 
Sinton, Edgar, 220 Montgomerv : Douglas 1058. 
Slack. Chas. W., 310 Sansome: Douglas 2742. 
Sloss & Ackerman. 220 Montgomery: Suiter 3920. 
Solinsky, P. J.. 5s_> Mmlrt 

incry: Sutter 2471. 

lary: Garfield 1285. 
itter 2214. 



Sullivan. Wm. I' 
Sutro, Alfred. •2- 
Sutro. Oscar. 1 



BiLsh, 



1 102. 
102. 



Thomas. M. Anderson. 785 Market ; Sutter 752. 
Towne, Percy E., 690 Market: Kearny 3282. 
Treadwell. Edw. F.. 225 Bush: Kearny 7734. 
Van Duyn, O. M.. 233 Sansome: Davenport 870. 
Van Fleet. Carey, 620 Market: Douglas 895. 
Wallace, J. 8., 681 Market: Douglas 360. 



White & Prost. 620 Market ; Sutter 1989. 

Wiel, Samuel C. 465 California. 

Williamson. Raymord D., Hearst Bldg.; Kearny 7551. 



Wiihamson. W, 
W^ilson. Edgar 
Wright & Wright & S 



220 Montgomery; Garfield 2650. 



AUCTIONEERS 



Franklin 1143. 



AUTOMOBILE ACCESSORIES 

Automotive Service Agency. 950 Van Xess Aye.; Prospect 2437. 

Betts Bros. Spring Co.. Inc.. 1221 Mission; Park 548. 

BETTS SPBINO CO., 888 Folsom. Stitter 6472. 

Brunton. Julius & Sons Co.. 1380 Bush: Graystone 356. 

Bryte. M. A. (MA). 543 Golden Gate Ave.; Market 3351. 

Budd Wheel Co.. 1581 Bush; Prcspect 140. 

Chanslor & Lyon Co.. (W ), 734 Polk; Prospect 929. 

Chase. L. C. & Co. (FB) (Trimming Supplies). 74 New Montgomery. 

Cirac Auxomotive Reverse Control Co., 600 Market. 

Cobbledick, Frank M. Co. (MA-W). 1031 Polk; Prcspect 6896. 

Colyear Motor Sales Co., 1238 Van Ness Ave. : Prospect 4241. 

n; Prcspect 1 

, . - - _- - -td: Keamy 2 

Electric Storage Battery Co. (M), 1536 Bush; Graystone 676. 

Gruss Air Spring Co. (M). 220 Ninth. 

Holbrook. Merrill & Stetson (W). 665 Sixth: Sutter 60. 

Hoover Spring Co., 201 Franklin: Park 8660. 

KeUy Ball Bearing Co.. 651 Turk; Prcspect 4300. 

Kelly-Linehan Belting Co. (M). 33 Miima. 

Lathan Co.. Inc. (M). 1466 Pine; Graystone 360. 

McCoy Motor Supply Co.. 1524 Bush; Graystone 620. 

McKevitt. H. W. Co. (R), 739 PoLi: FrankUn 33. 

Maydwell & Bartzell Inc. (D-MA). 158 Eleventh: Hemlock 1630. 

Morgan Spring Co. (M). 670 Golden Gate Ave.: Prospect 5570. 

Motor Parts Sales Co.. 536 Golden Gate Ave.; Prcspect 5554. 

Nicolson. Harry M. (M), 155 Grove; Park 3201. 

North East Electric Co.. 941 Geary: Prospect 5141. 

Pacific Automotive Service, Inc., 895 O'Farreli: Prospect 511. 

Pioneer Motor Bearing Co. (M), 800 Van Ness Ave. 

Riddle Sheet Metal Works (M) (Auto Kitchen Cabinet). 1061 Folsom. 

Rowe Manufacturing Co. (M). 598 Hampshiie. 

S.K.F. Industries of Califoma. Inc.. 115 New Montgomery: Sutter 4196. 

Smith. Robert A.. Inc., 301 Golden GateAve. 

Sncdaker. W. H i^hclsi lii.dtn Bldg.; Douglas 6851 



M). 159 Fourteenth: Market 2631. 
Prcspect 8214. 
ss Ave. ; Prcspect 2000. 
n Ness Ave.; Graystone 887. 
Tin Douglas 1640. 



Bias 3488. 



■Ave 



? Ave. ; Market 814. 



. John J, iMAj. 



BETTS SPRING CO. 

Makers of Guaranteed Springs 
Since 1868 

AUTOMOBILE AUTO TRUCK 
AUTO STAGE 
LOCOMOTIVE 

Coil Springs of All Sizes 
Best of Repair Service 



888 FOLSOM STREET 

Phone Su 



SAN FRANCISCO 

■ 6472 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



AUTOMOBILE MAINTENANCE 

Transportation Guaranlw Co . I'.ilU S^ncnttriiili Himlcck 47tO. 

AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING 

FIs-her. E. P. Co. (.M). 140 Elmenth: Market 7067. 
GhetToU. B. ti Co.. 57 Jackson: Douitla.'i 1609. 
I^rkins A: Co. fM i. 3700 Gearj". Pacific 7951. 
LEE, DOB, 1000 Van Ne* Ave: Pnispcct 100. 
McAndrew Co . 1540 Pine: Graystone 6C00. 



: Grays! one 2SCa. 



Transportation Guarantee Co.. 1901 Seventeenth; Hemlock 4700. 



AUTOMOBILES 



Autocar Sales & Sei^ii 

Benson. \V. J. 

Boyer-nr. ullli- 

CADILLAC MOTOR CABS (Don l>ee>. 1000 Van Ness Ave. : Pros. 100 

Camplxll A I):il(on 3>00 Gean : Pacific 321 

Chandler-CleMlard Moi.r Car Co.. 1700 Van Ness Ave.: Gray. 6700. 

Chas<^Mi>rrill Co D . l.tDI Van Ness Ave.: Prcsnect 1765. 

COOPEB. HOWABD. COBP. Or CAL. iSiutz Fire Engines). 1246 

Howard Ht-miwk ^5^7. 
DuesentKTg .\ul<i Co . I!m> Van Ness Ave.: Graystone 147. 
Empire Auto Co. ofTokio Di. 24 CaUfnmia: Garfield 2519. 
Federal Motor Truck Co. of California. 1350 Howaid: Park 3105. 
Ford Motor Co. (Mi. Twenty-Brst and Harrison: Mission 6297. 
French. J. E. Co.. 1214 Van Ness Ave : Prospect 9000. 
Garford Motor Truck Co.. Inc. (FBi. Eighth ar.d Howaid: Market 520. 
General Motors Truck Co.. 515 Van New Ave.: Market 1047. 
Greer-Robhins Co.. 2050 Van Xtss Ave.: Graystone 1800 
Hall-Scott Motor Car Co.. Inc.. 620 Market: Douglas 263. 
Harrison. H. O. Co.. Post and Van Nras Ave.: Franklin 250. 
Hewitt-Ludlow Auto Co.. Inc.. 147 Eleventh: Market 1810. 
Howard Automobile Co. (D) . Van Ntss Axe and California : Gray. 2000. 
Hughson. William L Co . Eleventh and Market: Park 4380. 
Johnson. Lloyd S. Co. (Di. 1916 Van Ness Ave.: Graystone 147. 



KUeber & Co . 






.•I]f 



iM 



1426 Folsom. 
001 Market: Market 606. 
1701 Van Ness Ave : Gravstone 4S0. 
and OFarroU: Prospect 100. 



.1 w 
LEE, DON. 

Locoiii..liik 1,1 , ^.io Fulton: Matkel 630 
LOWE. EDWABO MOTOBS CO.. 2001 V 
Moreland .SaJes Corp.. 35 Van Ness Ave : Market 3891 



: Walnut 2000. 



Pacific Nash Motor Co.. 1R49 Van Ness Ave : Graystone 700. 

Paige Co. of Northern California. 1665 Van Ness Ave. ; Graystone 2900. 

Pierce Arrow Sales Co.. 1000 Gear}-: Prcspect 1250. 

Reo Motor Car Co. of California. 1 100 Van Ness Ave. : Prospect 682. 

Star Motor Co.. 1625 Vin Ness Ave : Graystone 6000. 

Weaver. Chester N. Co.. 1625 Van Ness Ave.: Prospect 240. 

Western Motors Co.. 2000 Van Ness Ave. : Graystone 2500. 

White Co (FBi (Trucks and Bussesi. 15C0 Mission: Hemlock 3100. 

WiUys-Overland of California. 12H9 Bush Gravstone 317. 

Vou Drive Auto Rental Co i Rental Ser\ice) . 655 Geary : Prospect 2275. 

BACTERIOLOGISTS 

Kierulfl. Dr. Edgar N . 240 Stockton : Garfield 1729. 

BADGES 

Erbe Inifomi Mfp C„ M in New Montgomery; Douglas 2269. 
Irvnn.- ,t .lar-h. II- M lof.s MissJon: Market 175. 
MOISE-KLINKNKH CO. Ml. 369 Market: Sutter 7040. 
PaM|u.-il. It In .\I 111' K. amy: Keamv 1213. 



Tully KuliU 



iMi. 45CaUfor 



BAGS AND BAGGING 



Ames. Harris. Neville Co. (M). 37 Front; Kearny 5560. 
Bemis Bro. Bag Co. (M). 1000 Sansome: Keamv 3570. 
Dial Grain Co. (W). 465 CaUfomia: Douglas 6545. 



Lichtenberg. Edw. iB). 311 California: Sutter 6571. 
Logic. Alexander (BJ). 260 CaUfomia; Sutter 5970. 
Meyer. Emil (B). 465 California; Kearny 4457. 



Pacific Bag Co. (Wl (Used). 869 Folsom; Douglas 1533. 
Palmer. P. R. & Co. (B). 465 CaUfomia: Garfield 859. 
Postlethwaite. J. R. (B). 465 CaUfomia: Garfield 5661. 
Raggi. P.. 320 Batters- ; Douglas 9134. 
Ritterband & WeUsch (B). 255 CaUfomia: Sutter 3346. 
Steel Bag Co. 'W). 48 Jackson: Douglas 6364. 
Steel & Valentine. Inc.. 706 Sansome: Keamv 4040. 
Western Bag Co.. Inc. (W). 124 Main: Douglas 5310. 



BAGS— PAPER 



Atlas Paper Co. (R). Mission and 12th; Hemlock 3606. 
Blake. Moffitt & Towne (W). 41 First; Sutter 2230. 
Boncstell & Co. (Wl. 118-124 First: Sutter 646. 

. Howard. Co. <M). 444 Brannan: Keamy 5102. 



M. GETZ & CO., Inc. 

162-168 FIRST ST.. SAN FR.\-\CISCO 

BAKERS', CONFECTIONERS', ICE CREAM 

ASD SODA FOL^TAIN SUPPLIES, 

TOOLS .AND MACHINERY 



BAKELITE MOLDING 



BAKERIES 



Chauerton System of Bakeries (Ri. 878 McAllister; West 5933. 

Dragon & Co iM). 1475 Pacific: Graystone 592. 

Eberly. J. P. iR). 324 Fell: Hemlock 684 

Ehert. Gwirge (R). 1101 Oak. 

Eppler 8 Bakirv (R i. 886 Geary : Prospect 2656. 

Esmond's (R/. 253 Grant Ave . .Sutter 5731. 



Johnsfin s Pfiurd Caki 1; 
LANGEMDOBP BAEI.va CO 
Lilx-rt\ Baking Cf; 
Meads Co • 



-..-(.-11 



. fifflces 517 sievena.m 
1 Franci<c»i Baki-ry. 423 Union: Dougla.« 1531. 
Old Homestejad Bakery. Inc. iM). 19th and ShotweU; Mission 931. 
Parisian Baking Co iRj. 731 Broadwav. 
Peoples Baking Co. (M). 1800 Bryant: Market 744. 
Phillips Baking Co. (Ri.3111 Geary ; Pacific 2567. 
Pi^n Whistle M-R). 33 PoweU; Sutter 5570. 



BAKERS' SPECIALTIES 

Demartlni. L . Supply Co (M-W). 125-135 Clay; Keamy 354. 
Fisher. Herman C. iM i (Shelled Nutsl. 450 Bnant : Douglas 5640. 
OETZ. M. & CO.. IHC. iWj. 162 First: Keamy 200. 



Ha 



L Co W . 3.39 Davis: Keamy 1891. 



Jell-f) c<j Inr Fli 4fi.5 CaUfomia. 

King K\ii-;.ri ( ■• Nl 1779 Fobom: Hemlock 2129. 

LEE-GBEEPKENS CO.. IHC. IM). 572-576 Folsom; Garfield 5574. 

Mallliafd ,t s.-hnii.dill K. 203 CaUfomia; Sutter 6920. 

Martin-Camm Co \Vi. 122 Sacran-ento Keamy 4796. 

PLANTERS NUT ti CHOCOLATE CO. M; (Shelled Nuts . 530 

Daris Ui.uKla«6970 
Ruggiero Bros Nut shellinK<'o.^t Shelled -Nuts .63Califorma:Str. 4621. 
Sunset .Nut ShelUng Co. Si Shi-lled Nui.s . 520 Folsom: Keamy 3420. 



BAMBOO 



Parfitnount 

" BR.\ND 



Guarantees 




Quality 



d Trade Mark 



Fountain Syrups Crushed Fruits 

Flavoring Extracts and Essences 

Colors Vanillas 



BAKERS. CONFECTIONERS. 

ICE CREAM M.\NL FACTURERS, 

RESTALR-\-NT SPECIALTIES 



MANUFACTURED BY 



LEE-GREEFKENS CO., Inc. 

572-576 FOLSO.M STREET 

SAN FR-\-NCISCO, C.\LIF. 

Cable .\ddrcss LEEGREEF BENTLEY Code 



SAN FRAXCLSCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1326 



BANKERS' SUPPLIES 



American Bank Note Cv . FB , 1 Mc.ntgomen-; Garfield 351. 
Bankers' Printing Co. iMi. .^3li Muntgomerv; Keamv l.*340. 
Bankers' Utilities Co. (Mj. 26s First. Garfield 123. 
Barry. Edward. Co.. Inc. (M). 134 -Spring; Sutter 2755. 
Berber Mfg. Co. (FB). (Deposit Boxes). 1120 Mission: Markf 



BANKS 



AMERICAN BANK CO.. ralifomia and Montgomery: Doug! S080. 

Anglo-California Tnist Co . Market and Sansome: Sutter 6900. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank. Sansome and Sutter; Doug. 8100. 

Banca Popolare Fugazi. 2 Columbus Ave.; Keamy 2754. 

Banco Occidental. 486 California. 

Bank of California. California and Sansome. 

Bank of Italv. Market. Powell and Eddy: Douglas 6000. 

British American Bank. 264 California: Sutter 5267. 

Canadian Bank of Commerce. 450 California; Douglas 27S3. 

Commercial Bank of Spanish America. 351 California; Sutter 6970. 

Commercial Credit Co. (Commercial Bankers). 433 California; Douglas 

6392. 
Crocker-First Federal Trust Co.. Post and Montgomer>-; Douglas 6900. 
CBOCKER-FIBST NATIONAL BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO, 

? and Sacramento; Sutter 3820. 
French American Bank. ION Sutter: Keamy 1421. 
HibemiaSa\'ings& Loan Society. Market. McAllister and Jones:Mkt..S71. 
Hongkong & Shanghai Banking Corp.. 361 California; Douglas 6120. 
Humboldt Bank. 783 Maiket: Sutter 7540. 
International Banking Corp.. 232 Montgomery; Garfield 2870. 
Italian Americaji Bank. Montgomery and Sacramento; Keamy 215. 
Liberty Bank. Market and Mason; Douglas 7400. 
Mercantile Trust Co. of California. 464 California; Douglas 9000. 
Mission Bank. Sixteenth and Julian; Hemlock 3740. 

1 Sa\'ings Bank. Sixteenth and Valencia: Hemlock 4200. 



Federal Reserve Bank, 



Pacific National Bank, 
Pacific States Savings \ I . . - 
San Francisco Bank, .'.l'i ' 
SUMITOMO BANK LTD 
United Bank &Tru.stCn -m ,i 
WeUs Fargo Bank & Cnioa In.: 
Yokohama Specie Bank. Ltd. 



lifoi 



arfield 6800. 

"alifomia; Su' 

.enport 1400. 



r5943. 



. ■ ;ir;dXewMontgomer>';Kny.80C0. 
_\ I arket and Montgomery- ; Str. 1500. 
ansome; Keamy 1396, 



BANKS— HOME SAVINGS 

Bankers' Utilities Co, (M), 26s First; Garfield 123. 

BANNERS AND PENNANTS 



BARBERS' SUPPLIES 

Beckel, Cordy & Hutchinson iM-Wi. 115 Mason; Franklin 1940. 

Deckelman Bros.. Inc. (\Vi. 4S Turk; Franklin 2870. 

GiUette Safety RazorCo. (FB' (.Safety Razors), 816Market; Doug. 2000. 

Greiff. Gus E. (MAI. S33 Market; Sutter 1441. 

Marcus-Lesoine. Inc. (W-Dl. 130 Turk; Prospect 6818. 

Monarch Manufacturing Co, (M) iRazor Strops). 6S Second: .Str. 659S. 

Rogers, R. R.. Chemical Co. iMi. o27 Commercial: Keamy 150. 

BARBERS 

BEBNHABD, B. & SON, Palace Hotel. Market and Xew Montgomery; 

Sutter 700, 
Fina Barber Shop, 6.5 Taylor; Prospect 7548. 

Merchants ExchanKe H;ithfr shop. 465 California; Keamy 1709. 
PALACE HOTEL BABBER SHOP, Palace Hotel; Sutter 700. 
Ruge & Gast. IS ElUs; Douglas 449. 



BARRELS 



Ames. W. R, Co. iMl iMetali. 451 
Bauer- S i-Mi, >:!:! Fj.in.la Mis- 
CALIFOENIA BARREL CO 

Eng-Skrll I',, , Iiir M H""t 
Gogi-rn, K.lwar.l H M \ ^ 



Ho 

Hudd . 



rwin; Market 3815. 

1 2268. 
I 433 California: Sutter 5430. 
1 2US-210 Mission: Day. 2812. 

'.(.I Market; Douglas 3991. 
I.[!l..c-I .568. 
k. I Ix.arm l,s71. 

;,,nt Urn ::{il Howard; Doug. 2471. 
„i( I'., ri , ;i;^7 (Jolden Gate Ave. 
i;ii..iiili H.iiilock3600. 
\ ijiei] Drum). 813 Folsom; Kny. 1080. 



BARS— STEEL 

COLUMBIA STEEL COEPOBATION. 215 .Marxet: Dougla 



The 




Sumitomo Bank, 


Ltd. 


315 California Street 




San Francisco, Cal. 




U. S. A. 





BASKETS 

Kiarny 2067 



AMEEICAN IMPORT CO . 16 F 

Angelo & Son iMl. 39S Bay; D.mgl 
1 Hing & Co. iI-E 



BATHING SUITS 

Alcone Knitting Mills (M). 1663 Mission; Market 263. 

Fisher. Chas. (MA). 49 Geary; Keamy 1669. 

Gantner & Mattem Co. (M). 461 Mission. Factor>': 1453 Mission. 

Moore. Walton X.. Dr>' Goods Co. (W). Mission and Fremont; Dav. 841. 

Rosenthal. Maurice (W), 49 Batterj-; Keamy 7213. 

Western Fancy Goods Co. (W ). 544-546 Mission: Douglas 20S6. 



BATTERIES 



Bnmton. Julius & Sons Co.. 1380 Bush: Graystone 356. 
Electric Storage Battel^- Co. (M), 1536 Bush; Graystonf 
Merry Co. (W). 228 Fremont: Douglas 1693. 



BEADS 

Dinkelspiel. L. Co.. Inc. (W). 125 Battery: Douglas 1900. 

Dreyfus. Henry & Daughter (I-W). 830 Market: Douglas 988. 

Fisher. Chas. (MA), 49 Geary; Keamy 1669. 

Kessler. Keimeth M. (W), 125 Stockton: Sutter 2558. 

Levy. Jules & Co (W). 340 Mission: Douglas 2873. 

.Moore. Walton N.. Dry Gocds Co. OK). Mission ar.d Fremont. Day. 841. 

Nippon Dry Goods Co. (W). 70 Pine; Sutter 690. 



BEANS 



.\lbers Bros. Milling Co. (M). 332 Pine; Sutter 61( 
Baker & Co., Inc., Modesto, Cal. 
Bamaid & Bunker, 149 California: Douglas 3121. 
■ Bros.. 200 Sacramento; Douglas 3127 



. Edw. L. & Co. a-E). 465 California; Keamy 289. 



Frankenheimer Bros,. Stockton. Cal. 



Orange Co , .Motk^ 



Ha 



900 Battery; Sutter 2553. 



Lompo. !■ 1 I; I Estate Co.. 149 California; Garfield 1931. 

Miller,* 1, \ < ■' _ m t ^ilifomia: Keamy 1011. 
Murph\. i,nii,iia J . I4'.i Califomia: Keamy 4890. 
Dtto. E, H. i Co. il-Ei. 245 California: Sutter 3680. 
Sinsheimer & Co.. 149 Califomia; Keamy 2401. 



BEARINGS AND BUSHINGS 

Cobbledick. Frank M., Co. (MA-W)(BaU and RoUer). 1031 Polk. 

Kelly Ball Bearing Co.. 651 Turk; Prcspect 43C0. 

Mamedel. C. W. (J-D-MA). 76 First: Douglas 4180. 

Pioneer Motor Bearing Co. iM). SOO Van Ness Ave.; Prospect 7138. 

S, K. F. Industries of Cal.. Inc.lBalll. 115 New Montgomery; Sutter 4196. 

Timken Roller Bearing Co.. IfOO Van Ness Ave.; Graystone S87. 

BEAUTY PARLOR EQUIPMENT 



BEDDING 

Beebe. .Scott (MA). 180 Nin \]niii^-.,i,:, i ^ Douglas 6565. 
Bemhard Mattress Co.. Thi> I'lUoiv " '•■ ' - ' 
CaUfomia Cotton Mills (Ml (nml).. 

Cleese. John P.. Co. (Comforters). ISth ard York; Market 386, 
Davis. Simon B. Ji Co. (W) (Blankets), 51 Fremont; Douglas 5922. 
Dinkelspiel. L.. Co., Inc. (W), 125 Battery; Douglas 1900. 
Greenbatun. Weil & Michaels fVV), (Blankets, Flaimels, Quilts), 740 

Mission; Keamy 4548. 
Hulse-Bradford Co. (I-W), 844 Mission; Garfield 526. 
Karsky & Abrahm (W) (Blankets). 37 Batteo': Douglas 2165. 
Kessler. R. H. (MA) (Flannels), 833 Market: Sutter 5963. 
Kraft. Karl F. (MA), 444 Market: Sutter 6460. 
Harris. S. & Co, (W). 550 Mission; Kearny 1956. 

Kalischer. N. & S. E. (W) iBlankels, Flannels. Quilts. Pillows): 5< First. 
Moore. Walton N.. Dry Gocds Co. i\V). Mission and Fremont; Dav. S41. 
Munter. Carl &. Co. (W), 517 Mission; Keamy 3126. 
Rosenthal. Maurice iW). 49 Battery; Keamy 7213. 
Shtin Yuen Hing & Co, (I-E). 849 Grant Ave.; China 45. 
Simon Mattress Mfg. Co. (M) (Comforters). 1900 Si.'Cteenth: Park 843. 

auss. Urn & Co. (M-VV). 98 Battery: Douglas 9440. 

iset Feather Co. (M) (Pillows). Sixteenth and Harrison: Hem. 3030. 



BEDS— WALL 



CaUfomia WaU Bed Co. (M). 359 Sutter: Garfield 1350. 
Marshall & Steams Co. (M). 760 Market; Douglas 34S. 
PBEMIEB BED & SPRING CO., (M). 5700 Third; Atn 



GEO. M. BERXHARD 

The Palace Hotel Barber Shop 
Manicuring 

Phone Sutter 700 San Francisco, Cal. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



BEE KEEPERS SUPPLIES 

Boydcn. A. L. Co. <FI!-\V). ".J Main, Dav,ni).)il "lUt. 

BELTING 

Clucago BelUnK Co., I '. I'm h.tmv IISI. 

Cook. H. N. BcltinB ( i M nil 11,1 llowaid; Kearny 452. 

Dogen. L. P.. Beltinf i . ji ii \li- i n Davenport 3820. 

Goo<lycar HlilihiT ( -o M . ii \l i- n.ii I).lU^■la^ .■)4.ill. 

GraKin ,(i KiiiKlii Mfn, <n ..1 I ,H \l JlTMi-Mni K.amy3576. 

Kelh-I.iiii'li.iii Fl.liiiiK I n .M ., :i.t Mini, , -,ri,, jnrii 

I'aciiic Mill \ Mm. — ii|i|.K i\i .,]., Ml „,■, 1 1120. 

liimnln.. Ill rri.ir.l M\ i,v| \l:,il,,i K, ,:. i,.; 

SMITH-BOOTH-nSHER CO I I > \l \ -n I n i il ; Suttor 0! 

tJ. S. RUBBER CO, OF CAL I'Mi, :«Hi s.,-,,tii1 Suii.t 2323. 
Wiirdcn. «, II. II... l.'i. I'm.- K.arii.\ llsl. 

BELTS SANITARY 



BENZINE 

Associated Oil Co. (M). 79 Now Montgomery: Keaniy 4800. 
Shell Co. of California IM). 200 Busli: Garfleld (ilOO. 
Standard Oil Co. (M). 225 Bush; Suttor 7700. 
Union Oil Co. ofCal.. 220 Montgomery ; Sutter 1400. 



BEVERAGES 



Martinoni. E. (M) (Cordlalsl. 
NICBOLS. W. R. W. CO., 

Davenport 1.^)38. 
Rainier Brewing Co. i.M). l.-.m 
Rathjen Bros,, Inc.. 17-l'i.M 1 
San Francisco Seltzer \\ ,, i . r < ", 
(M), 485 Green; Dmitlis ji 
Tacoma Brewing Co. 



k' Century Soda Works Co.. Inc, 



Wielands, Inc. (M), 



.'HI 



BICYCLES AND MOTORCYCLES 



BILLIARD AND BOWLING SUPPLIES 

Brunswick-Balk. -Collerd.r C... ilBi, ^i,v() .Missim; Sutter 333, 

BILLIARDS AND POOL 

Graney's Billiard Palace. Inc.. 024 Market; Kearn> 406. 

BLINDS— VENETIAN 

Jorgenscn. Carl & Co, iMA). ()04 Mission; Kearny 23f6. 

BLOWERS AND FANS 



Buiralo Forge Co. iFBl, 
Harron. Rickai<l ,V Mr( ■, 
Main Iron Wml,-. M-M 
ReesBlow Tip. Mlj: i , 



Stallman. F. (l. supply t '. 
Standard Metal Pii;ducls 
Sturtevant, B. F. Co. iM) 



inlli; .Market .134.';. 

Fremont: .suiter 952. 
. SOS Folsotti: Sutter 4499. 

167 First : Sutter 106S. 

Bryant: Sutter 5B90. 
n. Gas. Rotary, Etc.), 681 Market. 



BOATBUILDING 



Kneass, Geo. W. {M}, Eighteenth and Illinois; Market 8252. 
Moore Drydock Co. (.M). 351 C-ilifornia. Works; Oakland; Kcamv S24 
Schultze. August H. iMl. 1151 Evans Ave,: -Mission 937. 
Thonisen, H. C. iMi. 930 Evans Ave.; Mission 6924. 

BODIES— AUTOMOBILE 

Larkins & Co, (M). 3700 Geary; Pacific 7951, 
Martin-Parry Corp,. Twenty-flrst and Harrison: Mission 8523. 
Modem Veliicle Co. (M) (Truck). 437 Fourth; Garfield 1402. 
Motor Body Corporation. 1116 Post; Franklin 2926, 
Nugent-Covey AVagon Co,. 55 Duboce Ave,: Hemlock 973, 
Pacific Body Works. Inc. 134 Tenth; Market 4823. 
Peters & Co (M), 1645 Pacilic Ave.; Oraystone 2800. 

BOILER COVERING— MAGNESIA 

14 .Market; Garfleld 2261. 



BOILER SETTINGS 

Thorpe, J. T. Jt Son. Inc. i Brick Construclioni, 525 Market ; Kny. 2442. 



BOILERS 



Sccor.d ard Townsend; Kearny 5680. 
. Ltd, I.M ). 215 Market; Davenport 1740. 
iiiK ,v Supply Co., 543 Howaid; Str. 1180. 
Ii.i IllilJ Kearny 4496. 
nii; li.'ntont: Kearny 750. 

- --,.-- .1, Suiier 4665, 

HENDT, JOSHUA, IRON WORKS iMi. 75 Fremont Works; Sun- 
nyvale. Cal. ; Kearny 3430. 
Herbert Bros, (M), (Wash), 1525 Mission; Park 1080, 
lis, John G. & Co. (M). (Kitchen), 839-841 Mission: Sutter 936. 
Iron & Steel Contracting Co. (M), 215 San Bruno Ave.; Market 2466. 



Walsh & Wiednor Boiler Co.. 681 Market ; Douglas 9396. 



BOLTS AND NUTS 



BOOKBINDING 



111; Douglas 3140. 



AblMitt-Brady Printing ' 
Abbott. F, H, Co, (Ml, 
Althofi Bahk I.M). at: 
Barry. Edward Co., Inc 
Borden Printing <'o. (M 
Bostiul. E. L.. Printing Co. (M) 



Carlkile, A. & Co. (M). 

Conunercial News I*ubli.*,liiii^- c ,, .M ;,:.i -.n,, nie: Douglas 

Crocker. H. S. & Co.. Si;,-. Mill i n , 

Duddy-Kibbee Printing (.1 M i . , I i.uglas 5627. 

Foster & Futemick Co, .M l.ii.i ,i. ill l:i ^ in , Kearny 2( 
Oilmartin Co.. Inc, (M). s3 sii\eiisiin: l\eaiTiv ,ls4. 
Independent Pressroom (Mj, 3(10 Broadway , Douglas 6715. 
Ingnm-Kutledge Co. (M), 419-423 Montgomery; Sutler 6874. 
Kennedy-ten Bosch Co. (M), 300 Broadway: Sutter 1190. 
Kitchen, John. Jr.. Co. (M), 67 First: Douglas .351. 
I^nson & Gorfinkel, Inc. (M), 534 J.ickson; Davenport 1828. 
MaUo.ve. F. Co. (Ml, 261 Bush; Kearny 40. 
Mamell i Co. (M). 761 Market: Kearny 5064. 
Mercury Press (M>, 818 Mission: Garfleld 3140, 
Millerick, Wm, S Co iMi, 442 s.insnine: Kearny 2456. 
Neal. Stratford .<; K.r ,M ,-ji Mnrl,. t I'lant, 414 Mission; S 
NicoU, Alex, Prim M^' . n M r.I.ik.i Douglas 4185. 
O'Connell J: D,■^^l^ \l _' ;: . ilil,' lu.i Siiiier475, 
Pemau-Walsh Printini: . ,, ,\l 7,. 
Schwabacher Fre\ siaii..itti \ t .., • 
Trade Bindery (M), 523 Clay; Sutler 4673, 
U;jham, Isaac Co, (M). 610 Market; Garfleld 1332, 



BOOKS 

Book of Knowledge. 278 Post ; Kearny 5220, 

Elder, Paul, 239 Post; Douglas 696. 

Gregg Publisliing Co, (Stenographic Text ). 760 Market; Sutter 318G. 

(Jrolier Society (Educational). 278 Post ; Keamv 5220, 

LIETZ, A. CO. (Ml. iTfchnicall, 61 Po.st ; Keamv 1552, 

Methodist Book Concern iRl, .■; Citv Hall Ave,: Market 72. 

Ne»lx!gln. John J, iR), xr,-. p. «i nran-li.s 2K10. 

Presbyterian Book Store , K _7'- 1'. ^i i (ai field 1472. 

Rand McNally & Co,. ,1,:.:i Mj,sm, n 1 lunulas 4834. 

" " ' ■ - - - ■ , . Keamy 5278. 



u 



I Ma 



Hi. 



Id: Sutter 1276. 

arfleld 19, 

s Inc. 576 Sacramento. 



.IK^ 



"From the Mississippi to 

the Hawaiian Islands" 



jgU«^ 



W. R.W.NICHOLS COMPANY, Inc. 

OISTRIBUTORS FOR 

GARRETT & CO., Inc. 

VIRGINIA DARE EXTRACT CO.. Inc. 

VIRGINIA DARE GINGER ALE 

24-30 MAIN STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



EXPORT 



IMPORT 



Bees — Honey — Beeswax 

BEE SUPPLIES 

PACKERS OF 

BOYDZN'S HONEY 

and Private Brands, in glass and tin containers 

The A. L. Boyden Company 

Formerly A. I. Root Company of California 

52-54 Main Street San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



BOOKS— SALES AND ORDER 

PACIFIC MANIFOLDING BOOK CO. iM>. 210 Post: Suttei 

BOTTLERS' SUPPLIES 



American Scda Fountain Co. iFBl. 583 Miss 
Bach. Chas. Co. iM). 210S Storkt.m, Kramj 
Bauer-SchweitzerHop& M:i'' f ■ A:^^' nr.c 
Heunisch. A. G. Co. (>L\ jnjii - m,- 

Hotaling. A. P. & Co. . M \ ' ■ W 

Illinois Pacific Glass Co. m i il 

Mulhem. Jolin Co. (il). l^^' -c , . i ,i i i,,ii-i;, 
Pacific Coast Glass Co. iMy Seventh and In 
Rapp, John. 121 Second; Gaiiield 2193. 



: Sutler 1759. 



BOTTLES— GLASS 

Heunisch. A. G. Co. iMA). 202 Da\1s; Sutter 2207. 

Illinois Pacific Glass Co. iM). Fifteenth ard Folsom; Market 415. 

PACIFIC COAST GLASS CO. (M). Seventh and Irivin; Market 32S. 

BOX STRAPPING 

Fox, A. (Contract Senice) . 32-34 Commercial: Garfield 135. 
Homer. Jacn. Co. (Contract Seriicei. 141 Drunmi: Douglas 2951. 

BOXBOARD 

PARAFFINE COMPANIES, INC. iM). 475 Brannan: Douglas 9420. 

BOXES AND CRATES 

American Box ic Drum Co. iMi. 610 Front: Douglas 3442. 
California Pine Box Distributors. 1 Montgomerj-: Garfield 2885. 
Kruger, M. ..t Co. iMi. 650 Brannan: Douglas 4203. 
MERCANTILE BOX CO. (M). Third and .\lameda: Hemlock 7325. 
PACIFIC BOX FACTORY. INC. IM). 2600 Taylor; Franklin 3915 
Tarter. TVebster & Johnson. 1 Montgomer>-; Kearny 493, 

BOXES— BERRY 

Angelo & Son IM). 39S Bay; Douglas 3096. 

BOXES— FIBRE 

Parafflne Companies. Inc. (M). (Solid and Corrugated). 475 Brannan, 

BOXES— JEWELRY 

Rluhs Manufacturing Co. <M). 272 Tehama. 

BOXES— PAPER 

Acme Paper Box Co. (M), 44 Spear; Davenport 2S34. 

Boxboard Products Co. (Ml. 200 Paul Ave.: Mission 711. 

Carton Corporation. 645 Brannan; Sutter 1912. 

Enterprise Paper Box Co. (Mj. 73 Beale; Davenport 1772. 

Fleishhacker. A & Co. CM). 401 Second: Kearny 930. 

Mission Paper Box Co. (M). 2005 Bryant; Mission 5895. 

Mutual Paper Box Co iM>, 775 Brannan; Market 196. 

Pacific Label Co iM Pill ;n d Powderl. 1160 Folsom: Hemock 1086. 

Parafflne Conipanii-i. III. m. Corrugated and Folding). 475 Brannan. 

Raisin & Zaruba M I'.nih !l^6 Howard; Kearny 2985. 

SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH CO. iMl (Corrugated). 461-499 Second. 

Schmitt. Chas J <.\li. 52;i Folsom; Douglas 8521. 

Stem. A. \V.. Folding Paper Box Co. (M). 515 Howard; Sutter 1086. 

Thiebaut Bros. iM i. 534-54S Fourth; Keamy 4986. 

Union Paper Box Factory (M). 1529 Mission; Park 7246. 

Western Paper Box Co . 21 Sutter; Douglas S590. 

York-Bradford Co. iM). 775 Brannan; Market 196. 

BRAIDS AND BINDINGS 

Baude. Frank 'tt". iMA). 435 M 



Bauer Bros & Co 
California Binding Co, 
Colombat. Henrj iMi, 
Crowley. J. B. iWi, sii 
Dinkelspiel. L. C" itn 
Fisher. Chas. iM.V I'l 
Kessler. Keimetli M \ 
McLecd Me 



3 First; Douglas_731. 



II ur 3935. 
. niont; Daven. ; 
: Douglas 2086. 



BRASS AND BRONZE WORK 



Boescli I 1 
CaUfonuii 
Day. Tl.i.i 
Koven Mli 



441 H;, 



Krenz. Oscar. Copper ..^ Brass \\ k 
Monarch Iron Works (M i. 262 Se 
Old Mission Kopper Kraft. Inc. ( 
Roberts Mfg. Co iMV 663 Missi 
Seipel & Johnson iM). 1079 Folsom; Market 8919 



2067 
( ;;irfield 2,107. 

II :!49-3fi5 Seventh: Mkt. 2162. 
7J.i Mission; Douglas 1573. 
c.rv, 341..'J43 Ivy: Walnut 1705. 
I- 'Ml.612Bryant:Kearay472. 
h; Market 8404. 
.=164 Market; Douglas 4106. 



BRASS AND COPPER 

Htmgerford. U. T., Brass & Copper Co. (FBI. 22 Battery; Keamy 4921. 

BRASS GOODS— PLUMBERS' 

Boesch Lamp Co. (M). 962 Mission: Garfield 2S07. 

California Steam & Plumbing Supply Co. (D). 671 Fifth ; Sutter 737. 

Crane Co.. 301 Brannan: Sutter 7840. 

Golden Gate Brass Mfg. Co. (M). 1243 Sutter; Factory; 251 Second. 

KeUv & Jones Co. (FB). 671 Fifth: Sutter 737. 

Krenz. Oscar. Copper & Brass Wks. Inc. (M). 612 Bryant; Keamy 472. 

Mueher Co. (FB). 1072-1076 Howard; Hemlock 840. 

Stulsaft. M. Co. (W-D). 1338 Mission: Hemlock 1940. 

Tav. George H. Co. (W-D). 165 Eighth: Hemlock 3000. 

Western Brass Mfg. Co. (il). 217 Tehama; Sutter 2417. 

BRICK 

Butcher. L. H. Co. IW-D). 274 Brannan; Doug, 1730. 

CALIFORNIA BRICK CO., 604 Mission: Sutter 4345. 

Clark. N. it Sons, llfi Natoma; Keamy 2S30. 

Gladding. McBean & Co.. 660 Market: Douglas 540. 

LIVERMORE FIRE BRICK WORKS, INC.. 004 Mission; Sut. 4345. 

McXear Brick Agency. 6S1 Market; Douglas 580. 

Peterson-Kortschoke Brick Co.. fan Jcse. Cal. 

Port Costa Brick Works. 55 New Montgomery; Sutter 4884. _ 

Stockton Fire & Enamel Brick Co.. Kialto BIdg.; Garfield 47 



BROKERS 



Adams. W. W. & Co.. 465 Califomia: Garfield 6161. 
Althouse-McAfee Co.. Inc. (Insurance). 315 CaUfomia; Suiter 2295. 
Anderson & Fox. 316 Montgomery; Keamy 400. 



BaU. F. M. & Co. (Merchandise), 112 Market; Sutter 6938. 

Barth. J, & Co.. 480 California; Davenport 1,100, 

Becbc, A. M. Co. iFocd Pre ducts). 112 Market: Douglas 15 



BUSINESS 
FORMS 

Sales Books - Order Books 

ManifoMing Forms 

Continuous InterfoMed Forms 

Requisitions - Receipts 

Purchasing Orders 

Bills of Lading 

WIZ Flatpakit Registers 



We will gladly design special forms to 

fit your requirements. 
There's a P, M. B. salesman near you. 



PdcificManiroMingBooltGit 



EMERYVILLE 



CALIFORNtA 



San Francisco Office: 812 Shreve Building 



PACIFIC BOX FACTORY, INC. 

Boxes and Box Shook 



2600 TAYLOR STREET 



Phone Franklin 3915 



San Francisco 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS. APHIL 14. 192*i 



BROKERS— Continued 



Bellingall. P. W. (CxiMom House). 409 Washington: Sutter 531 1. 

Bender. A. M. (Insurances 311 California; Kearny 45VJ. 

Berg. William. 454 CaUfornia. 

Beri. H. & Son, 261 Montgomery: Douglas 381. 

fiettingall. Peter W. (Custom House). 409 AVashington; Sutter 5311. 

Beyfiiss. C. Co. (Stiipj. 244 CaUfornia: Sutter 90. 

Blckford. C. E. & Co. (Coffee). 104 CaUfornia; Sutter 170. 

Birdsall, W. &. Co. (Insurance). 504 California: Sutter 33*»8. 

Birlem. F. W. & Co. (Insurance). 485 Calilomia; Oarfleld 1039. 

Bissinger & Co.. 555 Front: Sutter 5343. 

Boas, Judab Finance Corporation. 454 Montgomerj-. Kearny 76. 



Bolton. Kobi. _ , 
Boole. Fred W. & ( 
Bouton. A\m. E. I 
Bo^ie. Langdon E 



i CaUfori 



Mk-td 4C.f*0. 
) I J I Harfleld 1M6. 
' LrlRld4547. 



. B. F. (Insii 
. A. A. Co. ■ l;i. 



B: 

Bro»-n 

Bryson & Co.. In 

Bums. T. A. Co.. 243 Orunuii: Sutler 47tS7. 

Byrnes. W. J. & Co. (Custom House). 409 Washington: Sutler 7331. 

Cambron. C. G. (Coffee and Tea). 157 California; Douglas 414^. 

Carolan. H. A. (Stocks and Bonds). 369 Pine; Douglas 3963. 

Coghlan, D. M.. 1285 Market; Market 7762. 

Colburn, R. 1 . 341 Bush; Sutter 6436. 

Cook. C. W. (Shipping). 24 Califomia: Douglas 4610. 

Cook-McFarland Co. (Nlerchandise). 2 Pine; Sutter 5769. 

Corbin, J. H. & Co. (Bonds;, 1 Montgomery; Garfield 6080. 

Costa, Jose (Fire Insurance). 100 Montgomery; Garfleld 34. 

Cotter. R. E. Co.. 112 Market: Sutter 1817. 

Creed. W'm. H. (Insurance). 433 CaUfornia: Kearny 7466. 

Da\ies. Turner & Co. (Ciwtom). 110 CaUfornia; Douglas 1670. 

Davis & Potts (Merciiandise). 417 Market; Sutter 5534. 

De Wolfe. Chapman. 351 CaUfornia: Suiter 2573. 

Dow. Frank P. Co.. Inc.. 415 Washington: Sutler 558. 

Duisenbcrg- Wjchman & Co.. 35 Post: Douglas 916. 

Ehrenberg. Theo E.. 16 CaUfornia: Sutter 2831. 

Ehrman, Albert L. (Stock). 228 Monigomery; Sutler 2484. 

'■ , R. M.. 465 CaUfornia; Kearny 289. 



Foster. (;< 



iirance), 465 California; Kearny 333. 

French i; ^ < i ^ nice). 114 Sansome; Kearny 820. 

Gale. MiiLt! I < i [ - Jiid Surety Bunds). 38 Sansome: Douglas 7050 

Griffith A: 111' I iik: ~jiiiii mg). 231 Sansome: Douglas 7744. 

Guyetl.R. t-...Si»_u viusuranco). 620 Market; Sutter 3352. 

Haly. G. S. Co.. 110 Market; Kearny 1618. 

Harper, F. F. O. & Co. (Custom House). 510 Battery; Kearny 1072. 

Harrison. C. B. (Insurance). 465 California; Sutter 5807. 

Hellmann. A. C. & Co. (Stock). 517 CaUfornia; Sutter 58. 

Hillman, John R. & Son (Insurance), 201 Sansome: Kearny 7787. 

------ rket. 

Joods). 112 Market; Sutler 586. 

«jd Products). 24 CaUfornia; Kearny 2441. 

, 214 Front; Keamy 1227. 
Hutton. E. F. & Co.. 160 Monigomery; Douglas 9200. 
Hyanis & Mayers (Insurance). 142 Sans^ome: Douglas 6115. 
Ireland. B. C. (Coffee. Rice. Seeds). 24 CaUfornia; Keamy 1650. 
Johnsi>n & Higgins (Average Adjusters. Insurance) . 433 California. 
Jones, Chas. H. (Insurance). 315 Montgomery; Keamy 5948. 
Jones, Edw. M. & Son (^Insurance), 465 CaUfornia; Keamy 4505. 
KeUy-Clarke Co. (Merchandise). 2 Pine; Keamy 121. 



Kepner. J. M.. 80 Post. 
Koshland.MaxI. (Stocks. Bonds. In 
Lambora & Co. (Food Pndt. i- 
Umg & Stroh Co. (Genenil i 

Leignton Industries. Inc. iIti- m 
Lichtenberg. Edw.. 311 Cain i 
Ulienthal. A. G.. 335 MoniL n . : 
LiUcnthal Co.. 351 CaUfornia, Sin 
LiUenthal-WilUams Co. (Food I'r 



1 U' 



s. Securities) .220 Montgomery-. 

dif-c. Sugar). 311 CaBfomia. 
i'1<t7878. 
i\i()r; Franklin 2400. 

'>71. 
ki 1750. 



ducts). 2 Pine; Suiter 3840 
l.ogie. Alexander (Bags and Bagging). 260 California; Suiter 5970. 
Ixjwden. J. E.. 465 Market; Sutter 3021. 
Lubecks Investment Co. (General), 821 Market: Keamy 21. 
Lundborg, Ir\Tng & Co. (Stock). 486 CaUfornia; Sutler 848. 
McCarthy. John W. Jr.. Inc. (Alerchandisej. 112 Market; Kearny 15K0. 
McColgan. R. (Mortgage Loans). 703 :Market; Douglas 2535. 
McDonneU & Co.. 633 Market; Suiter 7676. 

MailUard & Schmieden (Merchandise). 203 CaUfornia; Sutter 6920. 
Manheim. Dibbern & Co.. 315 Montgomery; Sutter 2945. 
Marcoux, J. E. (Insurance), 220 Montgomerj-; Douglas 337. 
Mattoon & Co. (Custom House), 516 Battery; Sutter 374. 
Mayhew. F. E. & Co (Custom), 510 Battery; Keamy 905. 
Meyer Emil. 465 CaUfornia; Keamy 4457. 
MiUs. E. T. B. Co.. 465 CaUfornia: Sutter 362. 
Moseley. E. L. (Merchandise), 25 CaUfomia; Keamy 1146. 
Xelsjn, Harry N. (Candy. Etc.). 112 Market; Keamy 1740. 



Ncwcii-MurdDCh & Co.. 341 Montgomerj-. 

Nichols & Fay (Insurance). 465 CaUfornia; Sutter 5774. 

O'Brien. M. F. & Co. (Insurance). 341 Montgomerj-; Garfield 2C0. 

ONeUI. Eugene M., 112 Market; Sutler 247. 

Pacific Italian Trading Co.. 220 Montgomery: Sutter 6918. 

Page Brcs. (Ship). 310 CaUfomia: .Sutter 4551. 

Palmer. P. R. & Co (Merchandise. Bags). 465 CaUfomia: Garfield J;59. 

Park. M. W. & Co.. 417 Market; Douglas 611. 

Parroit A: Co. (Commission. Insurance). 320 CaUfomia; Douglas 24C0. 

I*idweU. W. T. Co. (Merchandise). 112 Market; Douglas 1052. 

Poetlethwaile. J. R. (Insurance). 465 California; Keamy 5661. 

Powers. Roy C. Co.. 445 Drumm; Keamy 204. 

ProWdent Security Corp. tGeneral). 58 Swrocd; Douglas 866. 

I*ugh. Joseph J (Yacht). 58 Suiter: Sutter 4682. 

Rankin. Laurence W. (Insurance), 433 CaUfomia; Sutter 442S 

Reed. Geo. W. & Co. (I-E) (ClLstomj. 510 Batterj ; Garfield 864. 

Rilterband& WcUsch (Rice. Sugar, Bags. Etc.). 255 CaUfomia:Sutr. 3346. 

Rolph. ^\ilUam N.. 1 Dnmmi; Keamy 262. 

Rousse). Wm. H,. 152 Clay: Sutler 4230. 

Rufltaer-McDoweU & Burch. Inc. (Coffee and Sugar). 153 CaUfomia. 

ScheeUne. Sol. E. (General). 310 Sansome; Keamy 758. 

Schwartz. Harry- (Stock). 241 Montgomerj-; Sutter 4794. 

Scott, Joseph J.. 485 California; Garfield 1446. 

Seebohm. Edwin P. (Postage Stamps). 690 Market; Douglas 3931. 

Shean & Deasy (Insurance and Surety Bonds). 486CaUfomia;Sutter2676. 

Shc«;han. E. M. (Merchandise). 5h2 Market ; Garfield 1035. 

Smith. H. .Stevenson (lasurance). 311 CaUfomia: Keamy 628. 

Snodgrass St Myers. Inc. (Insurance. Finance). 333 Pine; Garfield 58CO. 

Stanton & Berry (Freight Handlers). 461 Market; Douglas 3464. 

Strassburger & Co.. 133 Montgomerj- ; Douglas 2220. 



Talbot. John H.. 486 CaUfomia. 

Thomas. H. B, & Co. (Custom House). 510 Battery; Sutter 4566. 

Thompson. M. & Co.. 311 California; Douglas 220. 

Thomley. Wm. H. (Custom). 520 Battery; Keamy 2490. 

Walsh. O'Connor & Co. (Stocks and Bonds). 345 Montgomery. 

Waterman. LawTence J.. 2.55 California. 

Webster-Mackenzie Co. (Insurance). 681 Market; Suiter 7300. 

vn^ie Bros. & Cmm Co.. 85 Second: Suiter 2576. 

WlUiams. W. W.. 486 CaUfomia; Douglas 3139. 

Wilson and Filmer. 519 California: Keamy 6646. 

AVinckler. (I. W. & Co. (Merchandise). 16 California; Douglas 6220 

WlsenuiD-Egan Co. (Merchandise). 830 Market; Douglas 2610. 

Zadig & Co (Mining. OU and Industrial Stocks). 370 Bush; Keamy 1 

BRUSHES AND BROOMS 

.American Import Co. d-E'. 16 First; Keamv 2067. 
Bass-Hueter Paint Co. i W-Ri. 2240 Twintv-fourth: Mission 444 
Hcyman Weil Cii. iM,, 720 .Mii.Mc.ii I)..UL-lr.s 1720. 
Kini! <;,],■ Hiiisli (',, . .-i;! .Minn , I i- ,^l .. ..i,.,l 

l.arkn S|i,-< i.ili.i c, , ln,> ,,l,-ji-i,, Oarfleld 6631. 

Ixmd-nllr a l':..l.ii -^ . M :i r. I ' . • ■ ;i !t21. 

MOBCK BEDSH MFO. CO ^ I -. h. .Market 7284. 

Van I.a;.k -Mfg. Co. uM).32!>l liaiH.,.i. .M..»,ion 683. 
United Siio<- Machinerj- Co. (FBj iPowcr;. 8o'J Mission. 
Washington Broom Co. (M). 527 Sansome: Garfield 949. 



BRUSHES— MOTOR 



wart : Davenport 42. 



BUILDERS 



Gompertz. Chas. W.. 593 Market: Sutler 2796. 
Perego, Grace. Mrs.. 159 Sutter: Keamy 2050 
Savage. W. A.. 624 Urbano Drive: Randolph 8988. 
Shaffer. Miss G. A. 4 Co.. 500 Sutter: Douglas 836. 
SVLLIVAN. WALTER H.. 155 Montgomery. 
United Income Properties Co.. 605 Market; Kearny 6C31. 



BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS 



Home Mutual Deposit Loan Co.. 282 Bush; Douglas 2235. 
MetropoUtan Guarantee Building Loan Assn.. 525 Market : Garfield 4021 
Provident Mutual Loan Assn., 519 CaUfomia: Douglas 3135. 
Union BuUding & Loan Assn., 224 Keamy: Sutter 150. 



Let Business and Technical Books Solve Your Problems 

W e carry the greatest variety and largest slock on the Pacific Coast. Some of the 
principal classifications dealt with authoritatively by masters are: 

ACCOUNTING CHEMISTRY MANLFACTURING 

AGRICULTURE ELECTRICITY MARINE and NAVAL 

BUSINESS BOOKS ENGINEERING MECHANICS 

CABLE CODES INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES PETROLEUM 

Technical Book Company 

525 Market Street Underwood Building Telephone Garfield 19 



We supply 



.■ hook in prii 



i' part of the uorld 



SAX FRANCl.SCU BCSINESS, APRIL U, 1926 



BUILDING MATERIALS 

I SEE ALSO SPECIFIC HEADINGS 

Anderson Bros, Planinp Mill iM i. Quint and Custer; Missiun 
Atlas Mortar Co. iM i. .is Sutter: DouBlas 93S. 
BADT-FALK & CO.. 74 New Montsomery; Douglas 3468. 
Bass-Hueter Paint Co.. 2240 Twenty-fourth; Mission 444. 
Bav Development Co.. Foot of Fourth; Park 221. 
Bode Gravel Co.. 235 Alabama; Market 7674. 
Calaveras Cement Co. (M). 315 Montgomerj-; Douglas 1652. 
CALIFORNIA BSICK CO.. 604 Mission; Sutter 4345. 
California Building Materials Co., 74 Ne 
California Shade Cloth Co. .M), 1710 Sa 

California Stucco Product^ ( .. AI .; ; ;i \i,[;m )_i 

California Wire Cloth Ci I M ., ■■ I • r-r- 

Cenain-teed Prcducts C'l] 1 j _ i ■ . - i 2110. 

Chamberlain Metal Weatln : - ,,i^ ^ > , ?.]ii::,,i -,,: i: ^'.''J. 

Clark N. & Sons, 116 Natuiii.i i,..ni,:, j-:;n 

Coast Rook & Gravel Co., 74 New Montijomery; Sutter 3990. 

Cobbledick-Kibbe Glass Co.. 666 Howard; Douglas 3124. 

Cowell, Henry. Lime and Cement Co. (M). 2 Market; Kearny 2095. 

Crowe Glass Co. (W), 574 Eddy; Prospect 612, 

Dwan & Co.. 532-534 SLxth; Kearny 7078, 

Eureka Sash, Door and Moulding Mills (M). 1715 Mission: Mkt, 600. 

Femald Co.. 275 Natoma, Kearny 263. 

Fffis System Co., Inc. (M), 218 Natoma; Sutter 6927. 

Porderer Cornice Works (M). 269 Potrero Ave.; Hemlock 4100. 

General Fireprocflng Co . 20 Beale; Douglas 6616. 



Horton Lime Co. (W-Dj. 681 Market; Kearny 4408. 
Howard Co.. First and Market. Oakland. Calif.; Lakeside 27. 
Jorgensen, Carl & Co. (MAi, 604 Mission; Kearny 2386. 
Kawneer Mfg Co. of Cal. iM ). Eighth and Dwight Way. Berkeley. Calif. 
Knise. J. H. (W-Ri, Twentv-third and Shotwell; Mission 2576, 
Leonard Lumber Co. iRl. 1843 Fifteenth; Market 773. 
LIVEBMOBE FIBE BKICK WORKS, Inc.. 604 Mission; Sut. 4345. 
Lomax. Walter B. (M.\l. 681 Market; Sutter 2297. 
McNear Brick Agency. 681 Market; Douglas 580. 
McWilliams-Marosky Co., 55 New Montgomery; Garfield 49^0. 
Malott & Peterson (MJ). 3221 Twentieth; .\twater 1600. 
Marshall & Steams Co.. 760 Market; Douglas 348. 
Meda .\rt Tile, 55 New Montgomery; Garfield 49^0. 



„„__-__ r 3075. 

Pacific Lime & Piaster Co. iM). 58 Sutter; Douglas 93S. 

PACIFIC POBTLAND CEMENT CO. cM). 821 Market ; Garfield 4100. 

Peirano. L. S. (M). (Stairs). 60 Thirteenth; Park 4598. 

Peterson-Kortschoke Brick Co.. San Jose, Cal. 

Phoenix Sidewalk Light Co. (M). 317 Harriet; Market 4565. 

Port Costa Brick Works, 55 New Montgomery; Sutter 4684, 

Portmans Planing MiU (M), 1618 Mission; Park 6204. 

Progressive Tile & Mantel Co.. 559 Washington; Douglas 374/. 

Richardson. E. H., 77 OFarreU; Sutter 5333. 

Rock Prcducts Co.. 582 Market; Kearny 7641. 

Rock. Sand and Gravel Sales Co.. Foot of Fourth; Park 221. 

RoebUngs. John A. Sons Co. of Cal (FB) (Wu-c Mesh), 624 Folsom; 

Keamv 2426. , , , „, 

SANTA CBUZ POBTLAND CEMENT CO. CM 1. 620 Market; Plant; 

Davenport. Cal.; Sutter 7,500. 
Schlage Mfg. Co 



Slade. S, E. Luml 
Soule. Edw. L. Ci 
Standard Gyps 



California 
V, 112 Mi 
P.i.l- , ~'it 


; Garfield 4272. 
rk.i; Kearny 1110 
.r 2S21. 



r 26.53. 



STANDABD POBTLAND CEMENT CO. iM), 620 Market; Plant 
Napa Junction, Cal, .sut 



21-29 South Park; 



Stockton Fire& Enamel Brick Co., BialtoBldg.; Garfield 4. <0. 
Stone. E. B. & A. L. Co.. 703 Market; Douglas 3976. 
Symon Bros. & Dolan, 1435 Market ; Park 6800. 
Tniscon Steel Co . 709 Mission; Douglas 7135. 
Tyre Bros Glass Co, (Wj, 668 Townsend; Hemlock 3113, 
United Materials Co.. 55 New Montgomery; Sutter 48S4. 
Van Fleet-Freear Co., 537 Howaid; Sutter 4073. 
Vevhle & ColUns aii, 547 Brannan; Sutter 1600. „ . , . „.„. 
Waterhou^e C J & Sons Co.. 55 New Montgomery; Garneld 6480. 
West Coast Wire & Iron Works. 861 Howaid; Douglas 439" 
WESTEBN ASBESTOS MAGNESIA CO. "' "" ~" 
Dotiglas 3860. 



BUILDINGS— OFFICE 



Alaska Commercial Building. 310 Sansome. 

Alexander Building, Bush and Montgomeo'. 

Allen, Wilev B. Co ,153 Kearny. 

American Banl( Bttilding. 485 California. 

Aronson Building. 86 Third. 

Associated Oil Building. 79 New Montgomery. 

Atlas Building. 604 Market. 

Babcock Building. 310 California. 

Balboa Building. 593 Market. 

Balfotu- Btiilding. Inc.. 351 California. 

Bancroft Building. 731 Market. 

Bank of Italv Building. 550 Montgomery. 

Bankers Investment Building. 742 Market. 

Boyd Block. 356 Market. 



QUALITY BRUSHES 

Three Generations of Brush Manufacturers 
making brushes for ever>' purpose 

MORCK BRUSH M.YNUFACTURING CO. 
8th and Tehama Sts. San Francisco 



■ Montgomery. 



Butler Building. 135 Stockton. 

California Commercial Union Building. 315 Montgomery-. 

Califomia-Paciflc Building, 105 MontBumery. 

Call Building. 74 New Montgomery. 

Chancerv Building. 564 Market. 

Charleston Building. 251 Kearny. 

Chronicle Building. Fifth and MLssion. 

Claus Spreckels Building. 703 Market. 

Clunie. Thos.. BuUding. 519 California. 

Commercial Building. S33 Market. 

Cordes Building. 126 Post. 

Crocker Building. 620 Market. 

Cunard Building, 503 Market. 

Delger Building, 1005 Market. 

de\oung Building. 690 Market. 

Dunne Building. 15 .Stockton. 

Elkan Gun.'^t Building. 323 Geary. 

Exchange Block. 369 Pine. 

Expo>ition Building, 216 Pine. 

Fife Building. 1 Drumm. 

Fireman's Fund In^surance Co. Building. California and Sanso 

First National Bank Building. 1 Montgomery. 

Fitzhugh Building. 384 Pf>st. 

Flatiron Building, .^44 Market. 

Flood Buil.ii^^:, ^70 .Mark-t, 

Foxcroft Building', tl^ l'<i'-i. 

French Bank liuildiri)^'. UU Sutter. 

Fiimiiure Excliange Building. ISO Ne 

Garfield Building. 942 Market. 

OiUette Buildmg. 830 Market. 

Golden Gate Building, 25 Taylor. 

Gunst. M A Buildinp. 709 Mission. 

Hansford Building. 26S Market. 

Hearst Building, Market and Third. 

Helbash Building, 75 Sutter. 

Hind Building. 230 California. 

Hobart Building. 582 Market. 

Holbrook Btiildmg. 58 Sutter. 

Himiboldt Bank Building. 785 Market. 

Insurance Exchange Building, 433 California. 

Keil Building. 770 Mis-ion. 

Kohl Building. 486 CaUfomia. 



Lincoln Eealtv Building. 883 Market. 

Loew-Warfield Building. 988 Market. 

Macdonough Building, 333 Kearny. 

Manin Building, 24 California. 

Merchants Exchange Building. 465 CaUfcmia. 

Merchants National Bank Building, 625 Market. 

Mills Building. 2:^0 Montgomerj-. 

Monadnock Building. 681 Market. 

Nevada Bank Building. 14 Montgomery. 

NewhaU Building. 260 California. 

Oceanic Building, 2 Pine. 

Pacific Building. 821 Market. 

Pantages Building. 935 Market. 

Phelan Building. 760 Market. 

Postal Telegraph Building. 22 Batterj-. 

Rialto BuUding. 116 New Montgomery. 

Robert Dollar Building. 311 CaUfomia. 

Royal In>.urance Building, 201 Sansome. 

Sachs Building. 140 Gear>-. 

Santa Fe Building. 605 Market. 

Santa Marina Building. 112 Market. 

Schmidt Building. 12 Gearj-. 

Schroth Building. 240 Stockton. 

Sentinel Building. 916 Kearny. 

Sharon Building. 55 New Montgomer>-. 

Sheldon Building. 461 Market. 

Shreve Building. 210 Post. 

Southern Pacific Building, 65 Market. 

Standard Oil Building. 22^ Bush, 

Traders Building. 417 Market. 

Underwood Builcing. 525 Market. 

Union Square Buiiomg. 350 Post. 

Wells Fargo & Co. Building. 85 Second 



BURGLAR ALARM SYSTEMS 

AMERICAN DISTRICT TELEGRAPH CO.. 1.50 Post; Douglas 3355 

BURNERS— FUEL OIL 

Bethlehem Shiijl.mltling Corp.. Lid. (M). i;i.5 Market ; Davenport 1740. 
Bunting Iron Works, i MontKomiry , I)(n;g;a-s 1195. 
Coen Co., lue. iMi, 11^ Mark.-l ; .sutti-r 1J>3S. 
Fess System Co. ,M i, J-O Nat<ima: Sutter fi927. 
Main Iron Works iM-M-\l (Mechanical Systems). 1000 Msteenth. 
) Gas Heating Co. (Gas). 320 Market. 



BUTCHERS' SUPPLIES 



CYCLOPS IRON WORKS Ml K. fi II 
Pacific Butchers' Supplv Co '\\ , I'll Fn 
Western Butchers' Supply Co. (\\ ). 156 i 



BUTTER— COCOANUT 



Eng-Skell Co.. Inc. lAV). 20*8-210 Mission: Davenport 2812. 



BUTTER— DAIRY 



Hilmer. Fred L. Co. (W). 129 Davis; Kearny S04. 
Isleton Produce Co.. (W). 109 Clay: Kearny 1723. 
King. Fred E. (W). 310 Clay; Sutter 3382 



SAX FRAN'CISCO BUSINESS. APRIL 14, 1920 



BUTTER PEANUT 



Iximbard. J. A. .t <<, \T., I'L'L'-U.i:.' Frcml : Sudor 778. 
PLANTERS NUT & CHOCOLATE CO (Ml. .l.iO Davis. Doug. 8970. 
PurltanPrescrveCo, iM:. fi2'~ lirvant: .Market 2229. 



CABINET WORK 



Bateman. Wm. fSli. 1915 Uryanl; Market 2457. 

BorgerMfK. Co. iKB) iFlling). 1120 Mission: .Market. 

Emanuel. L. & E., Inc. (M). 26G5 Jones; Graystone 6400. 

Empire Planing Mill (M). 750 Bryant; Kearny 770. 

Fcnsky. Oeo. & Co. iM). 761 Tehama: Park 1071. 

Fink & Sehinrller Co . 22fi Thirfeenth; Market 474. 

Haas W<»i(l .V Ivory \Vnrk= IV4 I 'Icnu.niin:. Kramy 1477. 

Herrinph .Mill, liir M ",,"i7 I'.',]'. in, K.,iti'. i-it't 

Home Miiiiul.i. 111! iri- ( ,, ill, I Kearny 1514. 

Hooslpr SI, II, Kii, I, ,11 ~7i I - , . 

Karp. 11. ,>.•>,, I, .\l ,, 71 I, I., 1 ,:■ I,, , , i.i,i,,ijis4. 

Kragen. I^jiiis. U i>iMJ\\<rtKii 

Kruse. J. H. (Ml. Tncnn 

Levi, .S. (M). 2.39 Seventh 

Mullen Manufacturing c, 

MuUer & Petersen i.M). _• 

Oakley Lumber i Mill 



Ostlimd & John.s, 
Progress Woodw',rk 
Schemp. J. F. & I , , 
SchlL,«*ler Bros. ,M 



M 1', 



,.1 l:,,u<. h Hemlock 2858. 

mh M..iket 9110. 

I l.-«( Powell; Kearny 3385. 

vunt: Market 3212. 

2751 Slxioenlh: Market 5707. 

,>tweU: Mission 3294. 

ilarKet 902. 



CABLES AND WIRE 



(SEE ALSO WIRE 

Edwards. E. H. Co. ,:Mi. 225 Du-li '::,!■•', I,; i:- 
Roebling. John A. Sons Co. of Cal m". I u i. 
Safety Insulated Wire and Cable i , l I 
Simplex Wire *: Cable Co. iFB) .Kl. i .■ ,, 
Standard Underground Cable Co. (M l M 



vry': Kearny 4331. 



CALENDARS 



CAMPAIGN ORGANIZATIONS 

Pierce. L>Tnan L. Financial OrKanizalion. fi30 Market; Douglas 41C0. 



Alaska Packers Ass'x 
Alexander & Baldu in ltd 

Australian Fniit \ r < .in. 



CANNED GOODS 



rilifomia: Kean»y 91. 
t Davenport 2120. 

I .'OOO. 

I Market: Doug. 7300. 



. R. E. Co. ,iii. 11 



CANNED GOODS— Continued 

Deraartlni. L. Supply <o. IM-W). 125-135 Clay: Kearny 3.54. 
Eyre, E. L. * Co. (I-Ej, 465 California: Kearny 2h9 
Field. Walter M. & Co.. 200 California: Kearny 1440. 
Funsten Co. (I-E). 200 California: Sutler 162. 

Getz. M. 4 Co.. Inc. iW) (Fruits, for Confectioners. Etc.). 162 First. 
Golden State .AsT>aragtts Co.. 16 California: Kearny 1588. 
Grimth-Dtmiey Co.. 1 Dnimm: Kearny 262. 
Hall. Harry & Co. lEl, IB Callfm 
Hawaiian Pineapple Co. (FH/ I'lrn .i|,[,l. > 
Heinz, H. G. Corporation t-M Jl . ~, , ■ r ,i 
Hickmott. R. Canning Co. M j , ii rwDo 
Hothnan * Greenlee iBt. 11.' M , k, - ii, r .j.^o 
Horsi, E. Clemens (Fruit). 23.". I'lu... K, jnii 2655. 
Hovden. K. Co. Inc. (.M) i.Saidimsi. 20)> Market. 
Hume. G. W. Co. (Ml, 311 CaUfomia: Sutter 693. 
; Bros. Packing Co. (M), 2 Pine; Douglas 917. 



Islelon Calming Co. 2 Pine; Douglas 6410. 



1 Iln 



r.)20. 



Madison. James & .Son. 215 Market : 1 > 
MaiUiard & Schmieden (II. 203 Calif, i 
Montcverde-RolardelU & Parrdl. Inc \\ ir 
North American Mercantile Co. (II (CrabMvat, 
OXelll. Eugene M. (B-MA). 112 Market: Sutter 247. 
Pacific Coast Canning Co. (Ml. 1S16 Twelfth. Oakland. Cal. 
Ono Trading Co.. Ltd. (I) (Cralwi. 351 California: Sutter 5967. 
Rolph. William N. IB). 1 Drunm, K.-amy 2i;2. 
Shun Yuen Hing & Co. d-E I ,-' 
VIBDEN CAHNIHO CO. M r 

paragusl. 155 M<mtgoraer\ I ' 
Wlllits & Patterson iB-E). 1 1) i, , 
Winters Canning Co. (Ml. 21U ( alii,. 
Workman Packing Co. (M) (TamaKi 



. 432 Seienth: Market 367 



CANS 



Grimley. Frank J. (M). 255 Shipley: DouKias 964. 



Herbst Bros. _ _ 

Holbrook. Merrill \ ^ 

Jornensen. Carl & <'•■ 

itional Paper Pr' di 



rb;iRC . i5Jo Mi; 



'.t)5 Sixth; Sutter 60. 
ssion ; Kearny 2386. 
(Montgomery; Str. 7031. 



CANVAS GOODS 



Ames. Harris. Neville c : 
Haviside Company M ,',(( 
Henrix Luebbert Mfn ( ,■ 
Prior. John L. Co. (M ',_' 
Simpson & Fisher. lin' -M 
Stuart. J. L. Mfg. Co. (Ml 
Sun Tent & .\wuing Co. (M 



mt; Kearny .5560. 
Davenport 3643. 
Iciward: Douglas 6267. 
to; Kearny 3049. 

Davenport 3041. 




F. E, Booth Co» 

Pa cker s of 

"CRESCENT" Brand 

CALIFORNLA 



Sardines 
Fruits 



Vegetables 




Head Office 
110 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Canneries at Monterey, Pittsburg, 
Centerville, Calif. 



Cable Address 

Booth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



CAPITALISTS 



Cox. Elmer H.. 1 MontK 
Crocker. Charles Temi'l 
Dutton. Capt. Henry Im 
Esberg. Alfred I.. Jlfi I'l 
Gerstle. Mark I. :i"> ^ 
Grant Co.. 114 s,i:,^ .-, 
Hill. Horace L , .1 
HiU. Dr. Thos. 1. 
Hopkins. E. ^V , :<:, i Im 
Hynian IJros. C( 



1^ .H41. 

■ racry; Sutter 4836. 



Kohn. Geo. A.. 4S6 Califomi; , 
Ladunan. Albert. 417 Market. 
Law. Dr. Hartland, Rialto Kids.; 



h: Sutter 5716. 
amy 5903. 
27 Valleio: Fillmore 5905. 



Sutter 29. 
ter 4269. 
s .\ve. : Walnut 656. 

Oakland. Cal. ; Piedmont 3825. 



Ijebmann. Maurice. 216 Pine; S 

Leviston. Stella M.. 2101 V.-in N 

McCandless. John A 

Mack. J. J.. 220 Montgomery: Garfield 2280. 

Meyer. Julian J.. 310 Sansome; Kearny 758. 

Morshead. S. W.. 220 Montgomery. 

Parrott Investment Co.. 155 Montgomery: Kearny 1842. 

Phelan. Hon. James D.. 760 Market: Kearny 247. 

Bobbins. R. D.. Jr.. 620 Market. 

Sachs. Sanford. 140 Geary: Garfield 3969. 

Shannon. Samuel. 235 Montgomery: Keamv 5764. 

Sherritt. M. A.. 897 California: Kearny 6345. 

Tevi-;. Harrv L.. 486 California. 

Walker. Talbot C. Santa Barbara. Cal. 

Williams. Thos. S.. 693 Mis.sion; Douglas 1162. 

Win.ship. Emory. 350 Post: Garfield 150. 



CAPS BOTTLE 



Levingston. Lafavette iMt. 383 Fourth; Keamv 2172. 

National Paper Products Co. (M). 17S9 Montgomery: Sutter 7031. 

Western StopperCo. (M) (Metal CroK-n). 271 18th: Mission 4134. 



CARBONS 

National Carbon Co. (M). 509 Eighth; Park 8800. 



CARTONS— Continued 

Parafflne Companies, Ine iM). 475 Brannan; Douglas 9420 
Schmitt. Clias .1 M .^.j:i Folsom; Douglas 8521. 
SCHMIDT LITHOGRAPH CO. (M). 461-499 Second: Douglas 200. 
.. . „ 'Mj,,;. |.,,| ,,,. Box Co. (M). 515 Howaid: Sutter 1086. 

.M , ."i:)4-.,4K Fourth; Keamy 4986. 

UtlujKrapli Co.. Inc. (M). 962 Battery: Doug. 680. 



Tliiebaut Br. 
Tratmg Labe 

1 Paper Box Factory- (M). 1529 M 



York-Bradford Co. (M). 775 Braiman; Market ) 



: Park 7246. 



CASES— SHOW 



Diamond Patent Show Ca_ _ _ _ 
Ehlers. Charles W. & Son.. 557 Mis _ _ __ 

Schemp, J. F. & Co. (M). 411 Shotwell: Mission 3294. 
Western Fixture and Show Case Co. (M). 716 McAllister. 



CASES— WATCH 



Star Watch Case Co. (W). 704 Market ; Su 



CASINGS— SAUSAGE 



California By-Prcducts Co. (M). 2C67 San Bruno Ave. 
CaUforaia Casing Co.. 853-855 Mission; Douglas 770. 
Miller & Lux (I^I). 465 California: Garfield 4SC0. 
Pacific Butchers' Supply Co. (W). 211 Fourth; Sutter 6870. 
Western Butcher's Supply Co. (Ml. 156-160 Fourth. 
Western Meat Co. (M), Sixth and Townsend; Mission 7883. 



CASKETS AND COFFINS 

California Casket Co. (M), 959 Mission: Kearny 631. 
Pacific Manufacturing Co. (M). 177 Stevenson; Sutter 395. 
San Francisco Casket Co. (M), 321 Valencia; Market 1146. 



CARDBOARDS 



CARDS— PLAYING 

United States Pla>ing Card Co.. 681 Market. 

CARPETS AND RUGS 

(SEE ALSO BUGS) 

Bare Bros & Bron-n (Rl. 314 Sutter; Sutter 1177. 
Beach-Kobinson Co. (Ri. 2.'19 Geary; Sutter 580. 
Breimer. John Co. (W-R). 281 Geary; Sutter 1300. 



CASTINGS— STEEL 



(SEE ALSO FOUNDRIES) 
COLUMBIA STEEL CORPOEATIOK. 215 Market; Douglas 8760. 



2045 Mission; Park 8056. 
Si. 1017 Market; Market 382. 
. 2.59 Post; Sutter 460. 
c. (Hi. 2141 Mission; Hemlock 1442. 
), vH .Mission; Garfield 526. 
Kreiss. L. & Sons K). 4(1! sutler; Garfield 1216. 
HcOBEOOB, LINDGREN & CO. (I). 242 CaUfomia: Kearay 4204. 
Margetfs. Inc. (W-K). ysn Mark.t; Sutler 2253. 



Cohen. A. Furnitu 
Eastern Outfitting Co, 
Friedman. M. i Co. (1 
Gough Furniture Co.. 1 
Hulse-Bradford Co, (I- 



Milwatikee Fumit 
Sloane. W. & J. (1-W-Ri, _'l 
Towler. A. F. (M.\). 770 Mi« 
Volker, Wm. & Co, iW). fi:il I 
Walter. D. X. & E. Co. (Wl, 



l-.U\S -l( 



I.' Mission; Garfield 2335. 

Garfield 2838. 
■las 3336. 
.amy 5727. 
ission; Sutter 100. 



CARPET CLEANING 



Spaulding. J. & Co.. 353-357 ' 



CARTONS 

(SEE ALSO BOXES— Paper) 



Sutter 1912. 

Fleishhacker. A. & Co. (M). 401 Second; Keamy 930. 
Mission Paper Box Co. (M). 2005 Bryant; Mission 5895. 
Mutual Paper Box Co, (Ml. 775 Brannan; Market 106. 
Pacific Label Co. (M) (Druggists'). 1150 Folsom; Hemlock 1086. 



McGregor, Lindgren & Company 

Direct Importers 

Oriental Rugs and Carpets 

242 California Street San Francisco 



A Double Service 



of 



Double Value 



The addition of the very fintst, most com- 
plete and modern label printing and litho- 
graphic equipment 

Plus 



effi 



serious -minded, highly skilled group of 
nd label experts, ready to serve you 
y and pleasantly — 



Enables Us 

to now solicit your label — as well as carton 
business with the assurance that nowhere can 
you get a fairer price, better craftsmanship or 
more intelligent service and co-operation. 

fVe Would Welcome 

and value highly the privilege of figuring on 



The Carton-Label Corporation 

Formerl, 

THE CARTON CORPORATION 

645 Brannan Street San Francisco 



iAN FRANflSro Bl'SlNESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



CATALOG ILLUSTRATIONS 

HINER. CBAS. L., 85 Second: Douglas 4>I44. 

CATERERS 

Hay ward Catering Co.. 3210 <;car> ; IJayview 72. 

CEMENTMAGNESIA 

WKSTERN ASBESTOS MAGNESIA CO. uMI. 21-29 .So. Park: Doug 
3S60. 

CEMENT— PORTLAND 

Calaveras CcMncnl To, iMi. .Il.'j MimtBomiT) , DouKla'i 1052. 
rowrll, Ilonrv. r.inii- :iii<l fiiiTni l\i M J Mr.rket: Kearny 209.5. 
OLD MISSION PORTLAND CEMENT CO M 22.i Buah: .Sul. 3075. 
PACIEIC PORTLAND CEMENT CO \l ^_■l Market: Garneld4100. 
SANTA CRUZ PORTLAND CEMENT CO M i (120 Mkl.: Sut. 7500. 



STANDARD PORTLAND CEMENT CO. M. 



I -\Iarkf 



7,500. 



CEMETERIES 



CEREALS 

Albors Bros. Milling Co. (M). 332 Pine: Suiter 0161. 
Quaker Oats Co. (F-B), 525 Market: Kearny 4252. 
Sperry Flour Co (M), 141 California: Sutler 3.100. 



CHAINS 

KHi. S21 Maikft: SuHit (M7L 

rj '■.. M mil ^ii, llnii,., \ 
1,1'. W J K.iri,.,- I', 



II., 



,!-.,i 



II:. ni-son. Mission 345. 
\l:irlic.t SCO. 



CHAMOIS AND SPONGES 

National Spouge & Chamois Co. (FB). k09 Montgomery; Davenpt. 3299. 



CHARCOAL 



CALIFORNIA CHARCOAL CO 



CHECK PROTECTORS 



CHEESE 



Golden State Milk Prcducis Co i 
Hlliner, Fnd L.. Co. (W ). 129 Ila 
Kraft Cheese Co. of Califorria. 7;i; 
O'Neill, Eugene M. IS-M \ 11 _■ : 
Red Koox Creamer> if < .1 \i J 
.Schumacher Brcs. (\\ :'-:* I" rit 
Shoemaker. J. E Co , lii. M :i_ 
Cnlted Milk Co. iHi, .ijol MMi.i 
Wwitern Meal Co. (Mj. Si.xtli ai.d Townser.d: Mts.sinn 7SS3. 

CHEESE FACTORY EQUIPMENT 

PRISING, GEO. W. CO., INC., ss-06 Clay; Sutter 1723. 



I). 42.'> Battcrj-; Suttc 
i.s: Kearny H04. 
r^anstme: Sutter SiiM. 

irket; Slitter 247. 
'< Caiifomia. 

Kt-arny 2454. 

Davis; Kearny 1640. 



CHEMICALS 



Baker, H ,1 
Bower, Henr 
Bradley 4 Kl 



K, :,m Market: Sutter 1941. 

I Mm Co 1KB). 203 Calilornla: Sutter 6920. 

\ I :<20 Market: Douglas 4840. 
I' , W-Ml. 576-5S4 Mission: Kearny 3493. 
1) :-'74 Brannan: Douglas 1730. 
., 1170 Sutter: Pranklin 445. 
E 1. & Co. Il-E). 569 Mission: Sutter 6640. 

Douglas 3332. 



: Daveniwrt 3260. 



INTO CHEMICAL CO. iMl 



Di. .57:! M.irkct: Douglas 4432. 



on 1 1, K II .V Cn |.K Jl, . 
PACIFIC SILICATE CO M 
I'ai:.' .V .M. ,111, ill ■I'.inn, iv I 
R. li T CHEMICAL CORP 



Paul iMAi. 02.0 Marki.i 



: Sutter 6920. 
145 Second; Sutter 5375. 
i r .ieso. 
1 Kearny 1330. 





IMPORTER 


MANLFACrrRER 




Acids 


Ampoules ifor medicinal use) 


f)OD ^ M ■ oO 


Alcohols 


Ampoules (empty i 


idr/^ojPrfri!^^ 


Butanul ("Synthetic) 


Carbolic materials 




Butyl Acetate 


Chemicals 


X EBlablished In 1100 


Butyl Alcohol fSynrheticl 


Creosote Oils 




Calcium Chloride 


Cresylic Acids 




Carbolic materials 


Disinfectants 


527-535 Commercial Street 


Chemicals 


Dispensers - Liquid Soap 




Creosote Oils 
Cresylic Adds 


Insecticides 
Mercury Ointments 


San Francisco, California, U. S. A. 


Flotation materials 


Nauheim Baths 




Inks - printing 


Sheep Dips 




Lacquer materials 
Methanol (Synthetic) 


Soaps - Liquid 
Wax Liquid 


Telephone ji^-™V 1^0 


Methyl Alcohol (Synthetic) 


EXPORTER OF 










Waterproof Paints 


Minerals 


Cable Address "ROGERCHEM" 






I l_l-USTRATIONS 

FOR 
MACHINERY CATALOGS 

MADE FROM BLUE PRINTS PHOTOS OR SKETCHES 

PHONE DOUGLAS 4-844 
85 SECOND STREET 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 19211 



CHEMISTS -Analytical 



CHEMISTS— Manufacturing 

Bristol-Myers Co. (FB), ,543 Howaid. SiitUT ti;7J 
Scott & Gilbert Co. (M). 26S .\Ii.s.sitin; Sutler J,")!.! 



CHEWING GUM 



CHILDREN'S AND INFANTS' WEAR 



CHIMNEY SWEEPING 

. V. {■, & Co.. 222J Bush; West .OSL'K. 



CHINA AND CROCKERY 

American Import C(i ln' M I.li. 1(> First: Kearny 2C67. 
Danner & Baker, hi. ■ w liri,- i.iTO Mission; Park 8816. 
Dohrmann Conmxr- i:il ( " i; i ;<ury ard Stocktcn; Garfield 4343. 
Himmelstcrn Brcs <\\ 7l^ Mi^sii n; Douglas 1813. 
McGBEQOB. LINDGEEN &. CO. (I-E), (Per.sian). 242 California 



. S33 ^:i 



: Douglas 108. 



(Infants 

Baby Shop. Inc. (M). .55 First; Douglas 3253. 
Bauer Brcs. & Co. (W). 83 First; Douglas 731 
Benedict. C. MfB. Co. iMj fSanilary), 103S > 
Bien. I ,<t C,-, M. .flits' 7V\ Mnrkrt n.m-l 
CityofP:i'i- I)i> .;,,. .isCn \-. .;,,,» ^i,„i,,, 

Dinkelsi.nV l,''<'. In'r ■ H u:. 1'.,hi' i , '\L 
Econoni> MIl- I ■" M 1 1|. —. . ,,t ,l -mi. 7 ," ( 



Feisel, E. J. iW., ;i:)l .Mi 
Fleischntan. M. H. (Mi i 
Gantner..it Mattern C.i 
Hale Bros.. Inc. iR). s»n 
Israel Si Nussbaum Co 
Leyy. Ma.x iWi iCals 
Liebes. H. & Co MR 
Magnin. I. & Co H ' ■ 
Magnin. Josepli ' " In 
Marian Mfg. C" ^1 i 
Marks Brcs. iK'. Ml M 
Moore. Walton N IJr.\ ( i 
Nippon Dry Gocds Co. 
Normardin Brcs. Co. iM 
O'Connor. Moffatt * Cn 
Prinn-t.in KnillillL- Mill^ 



ion; Market 2482. 

>473. 

iFarrell; Doug. 4500 

c ; Douglas 3840. 

IS 19C0. 

rrell; Douglas 1265. 



Id O'Farrell; .Sutter 123. 



lid 6000. 
IS 5397. 
-K 4136. 



CHINESE MERCHANDISE 

(SEE ALSO ART GOODS J 

AMERICAN IMPORT CO., 16 Fiist; Kearny 2067. 
Chong Kee & Co.. 723 Grant Ave.; Davenport 723. 
Choy. Y. J. & Co., (R). 1415 Killni.iu-; Fillmore 7514. 
Hague. Wm. E.. Inc. (I). 5,-,n - ,. i.u .in.. Douglas 3473. 
Hai Ping Yong & Co.. 744 1 . . ina 320. 

Him Sing Chong & Co., II . hma 1251. 

India Company (I). 149 Cal l. 2>.55. 

Iwata, T. Si Co. (I-R). 248 (.(ram A\,.. IJuiirlas 5463. 

Kwong Hong Fat & Co., 751 Grant Ave,, China 1S2. 

Kwong Lee Chong & Co., 766 Sacramento; China 330. 

Kwong Yick & Co. (I-E). 941 Grant Ave. 

Lai Woh Lung & Co.. 824 Washington; China 1010. 

Meyer, Victorien M. (I-E). 883 Mission; Douglas 4285. 

Quong Ham Wah & Co.. 775 Sacramento; China 242. 

Quong Leo & Co., 848 Grant Ave.; China 17. 

Sang Chong Lung & Co.. 616 Grant Ave.: China 24. 

Shing Chong & Co.. SCO Grant Ave.. China 246. 

Shui Tai & Co. (I-B), 852 Grant Ave.; China 48. 

Shun On & Co.. 839 Grant Ave.: China 409. 

SHUN YUEN BINO &. CO., 849 Grant Ave.: China 45. 

Ti Hang Lung & Co., 846 O ' ~" ' 



Strauss. Levi i Co. i.\I-W), <J.-i Battery: Douglas 9440. 
Western Fancy Gords Co. (W), 544-546 Mission: Douglas 208. 
White House <R), Sutter. Grant Ave. and Post: Kearny .5000. 



Tie Y'ick. 757 Grant Ave.: China 15 
Tong Chong & Co.. 822 Wi,sl,i.,:ji. 
Tsue Chong Wing Lung K. . \ . . 
Wing Fung & Co.. 45 VVai. .i I 
Wing Hong Shing & Co.. .sli. (x -i 
Wing Tai Lung Wo Kee & ( ... .-..i 
Wo Kee & Co.. 949 Gr 
Y'ee Chong Lung & Co.. 824 Gr 



353. 



: H,..^i.iiit;lou. China 512 
China 351. 

China 164. 



3 Hing W'o Kee & Co., 764 Commercial: China 525. 



Santa Cruz Portland Cement Makes the Best Concrete 



Our 
Mott. 



GOLD MEDAL WINNER AT EXPOSITION 



THE UNITED STATES OFAMERICA 

PANAMA-PACIFIC INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION ^, 

SAN f RANCISCO,A\CA\Xy. ^|j|i 





SANTA CRUZ PORTLAND CEMENT COMPANY 



CROCKER BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANCISCO BISINKSS, APRIL 14, Ifll'O 



The 30-Stoiy 

Russ Building 

with 400 -car garage 



On the full block, frontage on 

Montgomery Street between Pine 

and Bush Streets— the largest office 

building on the Pacific Coast, 

with full modern equipment 

in every particular 



FOR SPACE RESERVATIONS APPLY TO 

Russ Building C o m p a n v 
315 Montgomery Street 



Qonstruction financed through the public offering of 
securities underuritte?i h\ 

E. H. Rollins & Sons 

a7id 

Blyth, Witter & Co. 



PABCO 
PAINTS 







24""- 




«w.ii^ 



Containers 

Solid fahre and corrugated containers 
are rapidly replacing wooden cases due 
to many points of proven superiority. 

These containers come to you knocked 
down and require a minimum of storage 
space. They are easier and cheaper to 
pack, seal and handle. When packed 
occupy less space. Vermin, dust, pilfer 
and weather proof. 

Their smooth printing surfaces otfer 
greater opportunity for attention- 
compelling advertising. These light 
cases show a marked saving in freight 
charges. 

One of our packing engineers would be 
pleased to discuss with you the subject 
of fibre and corrugated containers 
especially designed to carry your 
products. 

The Paraifine Companies, Inc. 
475 Brannan Street, San Francisco 

Portland Seattle Los Angele: 



GARNATlnij -"*"" 

mums 





"-S^o- 






<AX FRANCISCO BliSINE.sS. APRIL 14. I92i; 



Uniformly High Grade 
Burned Clay Products 



THE DICKEY PLANTS are devoted to the pro- 
duction of high grade burned clay products under 
a system of scientific control that affords a high 
degree of uniformity. 

There is a difference in burned clay products — let the 
name "Dickey" be your guide to those of thorough 
reliability. 

DICKEY MASTERTILE WALLS 
DEFY FIRE, TIME, AND WEATHER 

Dickey Mastertile are standard hollow building tile 
that not merely equal, but far surpass, the high stand- 
ards of strength and quality set by the Hollow Tile 
Association. 

They are made of hard-bumed clay, man's most last- 
ing and fire-proof building materiaL but, unlike other 
clay pnxiucts, have air cells that decrease their weight 
and provide insulation against heat, cold and moisture. 

Dickey Mastertile walls are approximately half the 
weight of solid masonry or concrete walls, but, never- 
theless, have ample strength, an average tile being 
capable of withstanding pressure more than 4,000 times 
greater than its own weight. 

An eight-inch Dickey Mastertile takes the place of 
six brick in the wall. This makes possible a saving of 
I 3 to 1, 2 the labor and 1/2 the mortar in setting up 
the waU. 

Dickey Mastertile are being used with ever-increas- 
ing frequency in the construction of schools, hospitals, 
hotels, apartment houses, office buildings, garages, 
stores, factories, warehouses, lumber dry kilns and fruit 
evaporators, as well as homes. 

DICKEY PARTITION TILE ARE 
MOISTURE-, SOUND-, AND FIRE-PROOF 

When you plan partitions for a building, make sure 
that they will be fire-proof, sound-proof, and moisture- 
proof and have ample strength. 

The partition that affords all these advantages is that 
of Dickey Partition Tile. 

A list of buildings with Dickey Tile partitions would 
include practically every great structure recently 
erected in Central California. 



DICKEY FURRING TILE 

for moisture-proofing the interiors of solid masonr>', 
concrete and stone buildings. 



DICKEY FACE BRICK ARE 
OF EVERL.VSTING BEAUTY 

The rich and distinctive tones and textures of Dickey 
Face Brick represent a high development of the art and 
science of clay burning. 

The well planned structure of face brick has a charm 
and beauty that cannot be equalled by less colorful 
materials. And this charm and beauty are more than 
"paint deep"; they last through the years — mellowed, 
not defaced, by time and weather. 

Dickey Face Brick are used as a veneer over frame, 
concrete, solid masonry, or Dickey Mastertile, the 
latter the most economical and satisfactory backing for 
face brick. 

DICKEY NEW STEP AND 
WALK BRICK 

are true to size and shape, finely finished, and in a series 
of particularly rich, dark reds. Very hard burned (semi- 
vitrified), they are yet so well tempered that they cut 
easily and perfectly for fancy brick work. Their size 
makes them ideal for herringbone and basket weave 
patterns. 

DICKEY LIVER.MORE FIRE BRICK- 
UNEQUALLED IN THE WEST 

The bases of Dickey Fire Brick are certain fire clays, 
mined and used exclusively by this company and which 
are the most refractory clays yet discovered in the 
state. 

These unequalled clays, plus scientifically developed 
methods of mixing and burning, have raised Dickey 
Fire Brick to a standard, to the best of our knowledge, 
never before attained by a Pacific Coast brick. 

In five grades, made for the various types of heat 
duty. Standardized shapes are carried in stock; special 
shapes and sizes are made to order. 

Dickey "Special Mix" Fire Clays and "High 
Temperature Cement" are recommended for use with 
Dickey Fire Brick. 



Dickey 

BURNED CLAY PRODUCTS 

DICKEY MASTERHLE • FACE BRICK • FIRE BRICK 

Manufactured by California Brick Company and Livermore Fire Brick Works. Inc.. Associated Companies 
San Francisco and Oakland 



.SA\ FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



CHIPS— Potato 

d: Sutter 2597. 

(M). 322 Da\-t'5; Kearny 1640. 

CHIROPODISTS 

Jackson. Dr. Edith P.. 476 .Sutter: Sutter 4593. 

CHOCOLATE AND COCOA 

Boldeman Chocolate Co. iM). 26 Bluxome: Kearny 4662. 
QHIBABDELLI. D. CO. (M). 900 North Point: Graystone 712. 
Guittard Chocolate Co. iM). 135 Main: Davenport 800. 
Upton. Thos. J., Inc. (M). 561 Mission; Sutter 18. 



CHURCH GOODS 

O'Connor Co (R). 341 Stockton; Sutter 178S. 

CIGARETTES 

.\merican Tobarco Co. of the Pacific Coast (V>). 1 So. Park; Sut. 4790. 

Benaderet. S.. Inc. iM), 566 California: Sutter 6570. 

Berco^^ch. H. Co. (I-W-R). 337 Sacramento; Kearny 866. 

Blaskower. M.. Inc. fW-R), 201 Montgomery; Douglas 2941. 

BoUman. John Co. (M). 615 Fourth; Garfield 400. 

Ehrman Bros.. Horn & Co. (1^1. .546 TMrd; Kearny 546. 

General Cigar Co. H-W). 601 Third: Garfield 1830. 

Glaser Bros. (W). 465 Fourth: Sutter 4450. 

Judell. H. L. & Co. (W-D-Il. 334-336 Sacramento; Douglas 1375. 

Liggett & Mvers Tobacco Co. (FBI. 615 Fourth; Garfield 400 



CIGARS 

.American Tobacco Co. of the Pacific Coast (W). 1 So. Park; Sut. 4790. 

Balfour Building Cigar Stand IR). 351 California; Douglas 6217. 

Bercoiich. H. Co. (I-W-R). 337 Sacramento; Kearny 866. 

Blaskower, M. Inc. (W-Ri. 201 Montgomery: Douglas 2941. 

Boskowitz. Frank (M). 329 Clay: Kearny 2111. 

Ehrman Bros.. Horn & Co. il-ji. .546 Third: Kearny 546. 

Elam. Edw. M. (Wi, 112 .Market; Kearny 458. 

General Cigar Co. (I-W). 601 Third: Garfield 1830. 

Glaser Bros. (W). 475 Fourth: Sutter 4450. 

Glynn. Chas. A. <R). 2003 Mission: Market 720. 

Goss. E. & Co. (M). 113 Front: Kearny .3957. 

Jerichau. Jas. L. (R). 30 Front: Douglas 5947. 

Judell. H. L. & Co. (W-D-I). 334-336 Sacramento; Douglas 1375. 

Lucas. Robt. B. (R). 2S Leidcsdorff. 

Marx Bros Cigar Co.. Inc. (I-W-R). 155 Montgomery: Douglai 

MichaUtschke Bros. &. Co.. Inc. (W), 129 First; Douglas 771S. 

Petri Cigar Co.. Inc. (M). 900 Battery; Kearny 3968. 

PoUak. Arnold (R). 465 California; Kearny 51S. 

Shaw-Leahy Co., Inc. (W). 207 Ninth; Hemlock 3610. 

Standard Cigar Co. (M). 670 Clay; China 911. 

Sutllff. Henry (M), 578 Market; Douglas 5036. 

United Cigar Stores Co. fW-R) ""' " -■ '■ - 



i33I2. 



CLAY PRODUCTS 



CALIFORNIA BBICK CO. (M). 604 Mission; Sutter 4345. 
CaUfomia Pottery Co. (M), 220 Montgomer>'; Kearny 87. 
Clark. N. & Sons. 116 Xatoma: Kearny 2830. 
Gladding McBean & Co.. 660 Market; Douglas 540. 

■ ---"— """«•= T — (M). 804 Mission; S 

„ s 580. 
1 Jcse. Cal. 

.^.,^™ ^ Montgomery ; Sutter 4884. 

Stockton Fire i Enamel Brick Co.. Rialto Bldg.; Garfield 4770. 



Marx Bros. Cigar Company 



EIGHT (8) STORES 



414 MARKET STREET 
700 MARKET STREET 
740 MARKET STREET 



loi POWELL STREET 
loi MONTGOMERY STREET 
isi MONTGOMERY STREET 
I STOCKTON ST.. COR ELLIS 
nds of Cigars and Cigarettes 



CLEANERS— Vacuum 

CalUott. Henry. J. B. (^I-\'. I.SO New Montgomery; Douglas 7552. 
Hooyer Co. (FB). 626 Golden Gate Aye.; Graystone 7120. 
Vacuette Distributing Co.. S21 MarKet. 

CLOAKS AND SUITS 

Alcone Knitting Mills (Ml ,Sport). 1663 Mission: Market 263. 

.\hrains Co. (R). 65 Stockton; Sutter 5115. 

Barry-Newberg & Co. (W). 154 Sutter: Sutter 5310. 

Blume. Harry (M). 15 Stockton; Douglas 4298. 

Chicago Cloak & Suit Co. (R). 987 Market; Garfield 6646. 

Cosgroye Cloak & Suit Co. (R). 398 Post; Douglas 6710. 

Eschen. Lee & Co. (MA). 130 Sutter; Douglas 3513 

Federal Outfitting Co. (R). 385 Geary; Garfield 3967. 

Furst, Mai.. Inc. (E). 1.54 Sutter. Kearny 259. 

Golden Gate Cloak & Suit House (R). 867 Market; Garfield 6363. 

Goldman. Harn- (M), 251 Post; Douglas 914. 

Goldman. I. (Ri. 78S MorKcf : Kearny 60. 

Goldman. Morris (^M). 212 Sutter; Sutter 2514. 

Hamburger Apparel Co iWi. 130 Sutter; Douglas 3169. 

Hon-itz Loui.-' iWl. 77 O'Faixell: Kearny 3400. 

Hoff. William iWj. 212 Stockton: Kearny 1632. 

Israel 4: Nussbaum Cu (Wl. 1.54 Sutter; Douglas 8.50. 

Juda Bros. iW:. 1.30 Sutter. Druplas 2325. 

Lees Bros. (W). 130 Sutter^ Douglas 313 

Le\^- & .\lbom. Inc. 

Le\"y. Louis M. ('W), 

Le\T. Max (W). 130 Sutter; Kearny 1677 

Loewy. Edmund & Co. (W). 130 Sutter: Kearny 1936. 

Meyer Cloak & Suit Co. (W). 130 Sutter: Douglas 2754. 

Miller. Ma.\ (W). 130 Sutter; Sutter 7059. 



Ransohoffs (R). 219 Post; Keary 7500. 
Ratner. H. (Ml. 233 Post; Garfield 197. 
Reich &. Lievre. Inc. (R). 125 Geary; Sutter 3975. 



Sweet Sixteen Co. (R). 870 Market; Douglas 546. 

Wallachs iR). 812 Market; Kearny 3279. 

WaUer Cloak & Suit Mfg. Co. (M). 228 Grant .^ve.; Garfield 1658. 

Wand. Jos & Co.. 154 Sutter; Douglas S3S. 

Westmaid Coat & Suit Co., Inc. (Ml. 991 Mission; Douglas 9o8D. 

Willards (R). 139 Gean'; Douglas 3940. 



CLOCKS 



CLOTH 

California Shade Cloth Co (M). 1710 San Bruno Aye.; Mission 8171 
California Wire Cloth Co. (M) (Wire). 587 MLision; Kearny 7897. 
Hockwald Chemical Co. (M) (Polishing). 436 Bryant; Sutter 1753. 
Roeblings. John A. Sons Co. of Cal (FB) (Wire). 624 Folsom; Ky. 2426. 
Spaulding, Horace R. (D) (Bolting). 898 Folsom; "— — - "<^ 



■ 4499. 



CLOTHING— Men's and Boys' 

Abrams Co. (R). 61 Stockton: .Sutter 5115. 
Ahronheim & Co. (MA-W). 821 Market; Douglas .5484. 
Alcone Knitting Mills (M) (Sport). 1663 Mission; Market 263. 
Atkins, Robt. S.. Inc. (R). 150 Sutter; Kearny 4520. 
Bereer's (R). 856 Market; Douglas 020. 



BullncK & Jones Co. iR). ,340 Post : Kearny 4246. 

California Clothing Co. (R). 39 Stockton; Sutter 2890. 

Columbia Outfitting Co. (R). 2600 Mission; Mission 9142. 

Cowan Frank Mfg. Co. (il). 612 Howard; Garfield 4039. 

Crocker. A. H. & Co. fW), 39 Battery; Douglas 4035. 

Davis. Simon E. & Co. (W). 51 Fremont; Douglas 5922. 

Edehnan. M. Co. (J). 153 Kearny: Douglas 9329. 

Eisner. Sigmimd Co. (FB). 4.53 Mission; Garfield 5331. 

Eloesser-Hevnemaim Co. (M). 77 Battery; Sutter 3630. 

Erbe Uniform Mfg. Co. CM) (UnifomLs), 111 New Montgomery; 

Douglas 2269. 
Everwear Mfg. Co. (M) (Overalls). 57 Batterj-; Douglas 3<96. 
Federal Outfitting Co. (R). 385 Geary; Garfield 3967. 
Fisher & Co. i R 1 , 650 Market ; Market 2465. 
Fook Co. (Ml. 1S65 Post; West 344. 
Foreman 4; Clark iRi. 105 Stockton; Garfield 2039. 
Goldstone Bros i Pants and Troirsers, ( iieralls' . 25 Fremont ; Sut. 5961. 
Goodyear Rubber Co. (M) (Oil,.! , ;'i ATi- in Douglas .3456. 
Greencbaum. Weil & MichaeK \' ' 7 10 Mission; Ky. 4548. 

Harris, Joe (R) (Uniforms. Etc .1 . 1, ro; Kearny 2504. 

Hastings Clothing Co. (R). P. -: ■: :->■ ; Sutter 5400. 

Hirsch Bros. iR), 949 Keam> . V' ^^!. 
Hirsch. L. & Co. (R). 245 ColumI iLs .- 



Hi uglas 4022. 



GREEINEIBAUM, WEIL & MICHEILS 

MANUFACTURERS AND WHOLESALERS 

Men's Furnishing Goods - Blankets, Comforters, Etc. 

740-742-744 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



KEY: B— Broker: 



-Distributor; E — Exporter; FB — Factory Branch; I — Importer; J — Jobber; M — Manufacturer; 
M A—Manufacturer's Agent; B — Retailer; W — ^Wholesaler. 



SAN FRANCISCO BISINKSS, APRIL 14. lic'ii 



CLOTHING— MENS' AND BOYS' 

Continued 



COFFEE ROASTING 



l,w, H I) 
jppilt s 



first: Oarflrltl JOB. 
Sutter 874. 

I lOvoralU). 718 Mission; GarflcW .•J4C. 
amy 3259. 



I i:irllild 3505. 
M-\Vj (OvpraUs. 
I 1 ). .UKlas 2700. 



Work Pants. Shirts, 



r 2378. 

\Miji. I)ucl<.). 833 Mission: Douglas 108. 

iKfuriiLsj. 114 Kiamy: Koamy 1213. 
I\camy: DouKlas 4640. 

Ouck). 216 Pinp: Kcamy 7675. 

Douglas 3053. 

:in(l SliK'klon Suiter 200. 

M! Khaki ) . 32 Battery: Sutter 2482. 

Ml iv.ri'oatRl. 122 Battery: Kcamy 5926. 

■. ,«. II ilarneld 1473. 

M.,rl,i I Kramy 1371. 

I^ii I .iliforiiia; Douglas 2561. 

M I ii~i i;..iiii\ 1.566. 

\\ <'v,, ,,,,!. 'IS Battery: Douglas 9440. 
Douglas 4191 



Pluniiii.r » \ \\ 
Prager, I. -.s? M;,, 
Roos 1)1-..- H \1;. 
Rough Hid.r Mfu.- c, > 
Samtcr, I. \ v,,iis 111, 
Sclig. .\l\m (■ I; IJ IV 

S.-llgBr I- M -.IS > 

Shirek. .\ \ s,„i, u 

Straus. Louis. Iii< M 

Strauss. U-vl Ik <:■ \ 1 \ 

Summerlleld * II .n. ^ I 

Sunset Hat * (':»i' w 'il.- ^I '"'it ... .Mission: Kcamy 1438. 

Swcct-Orr-Califiiniii u .'.iii :.i,f. \li.,..iiin: Douglas 6375. 

Swift. J .1. 'R'. Mli Marktt, SuMir II121I 

U. S. BtlBBEB CO. OF CAL. iFBl I Rain I. .'iOO Second: Sutter 2323. 

White Duck Cl.illiing Mfg. Co. (M). 45 Eckcr: GarBcId 2880. 



Caswell. Ceo. W. Co. iI-.Mi. 43s Sisv.rd Sutter 6654 
Folger. J. A. & Co. i.Ml. 101 Howard. Davenport 234. 
Hills Brcs. (M). 175 Fremont Davcni.ort 4242. 
Joncs-ThlerlMch Co. iMl. 437-447 Battery ; Kcamy 2761. 
Upton. Thos J . Inc. IM). .561 Mission: Suiter 18. 
Lomliard. J. A. * Co. (Mt. 222-232 Front: Sutler 778. 
Milo Coffee Co . Iiic . 759 Harri'ion. 
Schilling. .V & Co. iM). Second ard Folsom: Keamy 1201. 



COLLECTION AGENCIES 

Armp Collwilon ARcncy. Inc.. IMS Market: Keamy 681. 

faUfomia AdvLsory & ForwardinR Bureau. 74 New Mnnlgoraer>'. 

Colnntal I-aw & Aflju-tlment Co., "So Market. 

Commercial ClearlnK House. 1 Monlgoirer> ; Kcamy 5164. 

O'Brien and Stimmel. 465 California: Keamy 6f6I. 

Retailers Credit Association of San Francisco. 1^5 Taylor; Prospect 9 



COMMERCIAL PAPER 

Becker. A. G. & Co.. I Montpomerj-; Sutter 1?30. 

Burr. Geo. H.. Conrad & Broom. Inc.. 490 California; Douglas 142. 

General Motors Acceptance Corrxiration. 4C0 Sansome: Sutter 6740. 

Goldman. Sachs & Co.. 14 Montgomery: Douglas 6424. 

Hatliaway. Smith. Folds Sc Co.. 1 Montgomer>-: Sutter 2379. 

Merchants Security Co.. 5S Suiter: Douglas 4162. 

National Discount & Furding Corp.. 465 California: Garfield 5510. 



COAL 



City Coal Co. (W-R). IOO Brannan: Douglas 4620 

Colorado Fuel * Iron Co. (FB). 593 Market: Douglas 2469. 

GroK. Felix. Coal Co. (Rl. 4.s0 Ninth: Market 792. 

King Coal Co. (W). 369 Pine: Oarfleld 2700. 

Lewald Coal Co. (Rl. Fifteenlh ard San Bmno Ave.: Park I0€ 

Poston Fuel Co. (Wl. 112 .Market: Sutler 2699. 

Rolph. James Co. i W|. 60 Califomia; Douglas .3040. 

COCOANUT— DESICCATED 

Pacific Cocoanui Co. iMt. M7 > 



West American Finance Co.. 225 Bush; Douglas 8395. 

COMMISSION MERCHANTS 



I Finance & tommerte Co. (I-Ei. 1.50 California; Sutter 4357. 
Baruch. An>ert. 24 Califomia. 
Baruch. Frederick. 465 Califomia: Kcamy 2479. 



CODES 

Acme Cede Co.. 311 California: Carflcld 19 

COFFEE 

Adams. W. W. & Co. (B). 465 Califomia: Garfield 5661. 
Alexander-Balart Co. (I-El, 77 Bealc; Sutter 5705. 
ABON, J. & CO. (Creen), 233 CaUfomia: Keamy 1252. 



170. 



FOLOEK. J A & CO. 



JONES-THIEEBACH CO M 



Linares. J F. I 
Upton, Thos .1.. 
Lombard. J. A \ 



' . ' - . Thiid: Kcamy 2672. 
I >■ i;i:las 4I4S. 

lil'iiri.. Sutler3445. 

-,^.11.1 Sutter 66,54. 
H ll'iuard: Davenport 234. 
s Harrison: Kcamy 3264. 

ml (larneld9.54. 
avcniMirt 4242. 
rnia: Kcamy 16.50. 

160 Califomia: Douglas 31.55. 
, 437-447 Battery: Keamy 2761 
Iter 1093. 
'luglas 4467. 



SHUN YUEN HING & CO IK 
Teller. H. E, Co, dl. .550 Ki>lsiim: ? 
Tyler. S. H. & .Son i.\l). 1.54 Davii 



Eveleth Nash Co.. 442 From: Kcamy 2407. 

Freitas. J. T. Co.. 64 Clay; Sutter 1781. 

Galli Frait Co.. 538 Front : Douglas 4253. 

Garcia Brcs. & Aiken. 116 Washington: Keamy 5470. 

Garcia & Maggini. 240 Drumm: Kcamy 3988. 

Getz Bros. Co.. 280 Batterv: Sutter 3740. 

Ghiselli Brcs.. 230 Washington: Keamy 2708. 

Hague. Wm. E . Inc. III. .558 Sacramento: Douglas 3473. 

Hopkins. L. J. Co.. 430 Front: Sutler 5745, 

Hunt Hatch & Co.. 501 Front: Keamy 1389. 

Ivaneovich Trobock & Bergen. 201 Washington; Keamy 5121 

Jacobs. Malcolm & Bunt. 101 Washington: Sutter 6810. 

Jennings. C. B Co.. 24 Califomia: Sutter 6458. 

Jones i Pcttigrcw. 130 Washington: Sutter 6441. 

Kinsman. John R . 345 Davis: Keamy 1825. 

Land.slX'rKer \ Son. 315 Montgomeo'; Sutter 895. 

Larzelere. L R. i Co . iWi. 38 Sacramento: Keamy 807. 

Leutzinger & Lane. 76-78 Clay: Sutler 747. 

Levy &. Zentner Co.. 200 Washington; Keamy 5494. 

Lewis Simas Jones Co.. 429 Davis; Keamy 1542. 

Mailliard tc .Schmieden (B-M.\l. 203 Califomia: Sutter 6920. 



CUSTOMS BROKERS 

Internationally Established 

DAVIES, TURNER & CO. 



110 California St. 



Douglas 1670 



JONES-THIERBACH CO. 

IMPORTERS AND MAM FACrTL RERS 

TEA, COFFEE, SPICES, EXTR-\CTS 



ALTft 



'THE BEST YOU EVER DRANK" 



J.ARON&CO.,inc. 

Qreen Coffee 

IMPORTERS EXPORTERS 

233 Califomia Street 
San Francisco 

Telephone KEARNY 1252 



SAX FKAXCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14. lOL'M 



COMMISSION MERCHANTS — Co«//7n<.7^ 



XliUer. W, ().. 494 Pacific; Si 
Milchell & Goodall. 31S Dnu 
Moreggia & Son. 348-350 Fn 



■ 4754. 



1354 



: Garfield 37C3. 
Nauman. C. & Co., Inc.. 511 Sansome; Garfield 412. 
Newman Bros. Co.. 110 Market: Kearny 1981. 
Newman. Simon Co., 110 Market: Kearny 1981. 
Olney. Wm * Co. (I-E). 112 California: .Stitter 1351, 
Peterson, Frank B. Co.. 2 Pine; Douglas 6640. 
Porter. D. H. & Sons. 426 Front: Douglas 1464. 
Scatena, L. & Co. & .A. GalU Fruit Co. (W), 404 Washington. 
.SchtlcKl & Co.. Inc.. 16 Califorria 

SaUN YUBN HING & CO. IE, 'i40 Grant Ave.: China 4. 
Simoni & Pera. 4i'.'> I':i\i-^ Kiirii\ ii';s 
.Solari. Bottaro >^ D.n.m m^ w .i-lnn^Mnn , Sutter 1490. 
Taft & Suvdam ( M \ I in M.ni,, i K, iirny 703. 
Wetmore Bros. 4.',(i FiMUi l<r.iiTi> Jlii.t 
•\Volfen. Mux 4: Co. 44.-! Fn.iit , Kcaniy 1713. 



COMPOUNDS 



ASSOCIATED OIL CO 

Bennett. E. W. i: < " > 
Bird-Archer Co mI t i 
Dearborn Cheniii :il i .. 
DoUiver & Bro. \s I i 
Garratt-Callahan i ., .\1 
Great Western El.. . li. i 
Hnckwald Chenii.;.! i 
Hou.;ehold Nccf^-ir \ .,, 
Lacko SptTiah> <■'. M 



Mcln 

Mill.r ,^ l.u\ l-.i -\1 , c." 
PACIFIC SILICATE CO 
PARAFFINS CO.S. INC 

\Ifc C. .,n-;.i Fl 



Sll.-ll < 



lid Townsend ; Mi^ 



COMPRESSORS AIR 

SEE ALSO PNEUMATIC EQUIPMENT! 



Main Iron Works (M-MAl. 1000 si\ mli M .. k.l 

Oliver Continuous Filter Co. iM). .-.(J.f .\I;.rk. i ,-ui 
Ri.'C Compres.sed .\ir & Drill Co. iM-MA'. U'U K.n 
SMITB-BOOTH-USHEB CO. (,I-D-MAi. .50 Frc 



COMPRESSORS— AMMONIA 



CONFECTIONS— Co?i/r« iie-d 

Eagle Candy Store (Rl. 397 OFarrell: Prospect ,5437. 
Foster & Drear (M-R). i:!7-1.3!l Grant .\vc. : Garfield 2500. 
General Candy Co. iM). ,505 Tliii.l ilaiti.l.l S33. 
-■ ■ ■ - ■ "■■ --■ '■ ■ n. Kiarin 2.|7. 

li. :tl7 M:irkct: Kearny 2625. 
. , ^\..•l,ii^ ,171 Minna : Garfield 166, 
i.ssion. .Market 2201. 
. & Sons (Mi, 770 Market; Douglas .5000. 
■ ocolate. Inc. (M). 555 
I. 1614 Polk: Graystoi . 
_ _j California Glace Fruit Co. (M). .535 Folsom: Hemlock 3260. 
Malone's Candyland (M-R). 102 Powell: Kearny 4321. 
Maskey's (M-R). 52 Kearny: Kearny 1628. 
Nelson. Harrj- N. (B), 112 Market: Kearny 1740. 
Nichols. David B. (W). 1566 Howaid: Hemlock 3876. 



Noll Hill C.infittiiinery and Dclit 



iM. 



i D:. 



«■; 



\\. 



114,8-11.52 Taylor. 
Sutter 5656. 
,> , Douglas 4720. 

ii:i. 
i.sno. 



iMl. 40.5-415 Eighth; Park 190. 
Scalmanini Bros. (W), 149 Grove: Hemlock 50. 
Shaw-Leahy Co.. Inc. (Wl. 207 Ninth: Hemlock 3610. 
Spiliotls. John IR i. 307 0'F.irrrn. 
Spotless. Inr M' a.',l ■'ixtli «.iii.'r 4676. 

TEE PEE. THE I: -■'■■< ' ' .itt ., 

Townsends' ' ' I ' M).,59Grant .4ve.: Kearny 7000. 

Varellas. I' ' I: " - I I -uittT92. 

Wilson Erih- . - I'm Ml: ; ;.i ( ;earv: Douglas 4700. 

Wri;;llt P.ii..-,.ni i .. M IMp.'.irin. :«5 Si.vth: Sutter 4676 

CONSTRUCTION MACHINERY 

BACON, EDWARD B. CO., Folsom at Seventeenth; Hemlock 3700. 
Davis. Norris K. iMl. 400 Seventh; Market 1675 
Smith. Stephen & Co., 639 Mission: Douglas 8033. 

CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

AW, G. E.. 2127 Market: Market 5246. 

American Concrete Co.. 785 Market: Kearny 1745. 

American Dredging Co. (Dredging). 255 California: Kearny 1449. 

American Plan & Building Service Co.. 220 Montgomery; Kearny 3403. 

Austin Co. of California. 244 Kearny: Garfield 6165. 

Barrett & Hilp. 918 Harrison; Douglas 700. 

Bechtel. W. A.. 625 Market: Sutter 2805. 

Bender. J. W.. Roofing & Pavhig Co.. 18th and Bryant ; Hemlock 892. 

Biller. John. 460 Montgomery: Sutter 2034. 

Bishop. Thos. B. Co.. 166 Geary: Kearny 4295. 

Born. S. A, Building Co.. San Mateo. Cal. 

Builders Exchange. ISO Jessie; Sutter 6700. 

Butte Klecrric Equipment Co.. ,530 Folsom: Douglas 2046. 

Ciliill Hi. s Iiu- , 55 New MontL'nnui \ ; Suiter 1740. 

Caiiii.lu II '.. .. \! :ili:i -.•v.-i.ii.'iiih \l,.il,.-t 7079. 

CI.M I ■ n . I . . : . ■. ' 'I I I .■! Douglas 2903. 



COMPUTING DEVICES 



Scale Co., 
tional Bu 
LIETZ. A. CO 



31. 



\I:ic hiij. s Corp'. (FBI. 640 Mission : Kearny 

.;i I'.i-t Kearny 1552. 
Machme Co. iM). 277 Ptae: Sutter 453. 
Nati.iii,.! ( ;isli H.-isi.r Co.. 519 Market; Sutter 2782. 
\'..\K,r~ A.-..,iiiiniii! Ma.hine Co.. 525 Market. 
TORSION BALANCE CO.. 49 California; Sutter 1685. 

CONDIMENTS AND SAUCES 

California Conserving Co. iMl. 110 Market; Sutter 6420. 
California Packmg Corp. (Mi. 101 California; Sutter 77(;0. 
California Supply Co. iM). 738 Folsom; Su"*- 



CONFECTIONS 



Alberta Candv Co.. Inc. (M-W-Dl. 2201 Third: Park 5668. 
Barr & Blair (M-Ri. 243 Mason: Pro,spect 8160. 
Baum. Beni J. Co, (Ml. 586 Howard; Douglas 5102. 
Berg Bro« .W-MAi «4;! M-v, ham n.niirlas 3298. 
Blums, 111.- M-l; I 1...-. I'.ilk .,.,■.-:. ,11. '3100. 
Cerf. K M U I I-' \l . '. ■ ■ - :'' ■".'. 
Collins-ll. ii.k. . .I..I1 1- I ..J.' I . V „i,; Sutter 721. 
Crutch. 1- 11 I-. <"" -\l --I l'"ik . .l■,l,^ stone 5<., 
Davis. I' Li..ii.i, .Ir- il)!. ,>_'.^. .\laikil, lJ..uglas 7222. 




Confectaurant 



f:,\NDIF,S 
ICE CREAMS 
LI NCHEON 



333 California Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



Cochrane- Uutlun Co.. 74 New Montgomery: Douglas 5221, 

Cohn. Louis J.. 1 De Haro; Hemlock 2717. 

Construction Co. of North America. 225 Bush: Garfield 2180^ 



; Kearny 1950. 

inter 4645. 

•..!•• : Douglas 1282. 



Decker Electrical Construction C. 

Dinwiddle Construction Co r 

Dutton Dredge Co. (Dredfiiiu- 

Farquharson. D. B. 1760 Kll- >' 

Fav Improvement Co.. 760 .M i 1(144. 

Federal Paving Co.. 225 Busl h. .1 -i' 

Fm-long. James (Generall. 6sl Mark.t Sutt.-r3849. 

Garfield & Co.. Hearst Bldg.: Sutter 1036. 

Hatmah. Jesse D.. 602 CaUfomia: Douglas 1577. 

Harris. N. R.. 255 Cahfomia. 

Healv-Tibbitts Constrtiotinn Co , 64 Pine: Kearny 

Henderson. W. D. lis I Ma.k.i K'.ainy 45.37. 

Hever. C. W. Jr.. 22(1 .M. mi v-.m, i ,\ Douglas 8420. 

Hogberg. Emil. ISO. 

Home Builders As.si » 

Industrial Constru.'i 

Keystone Electric i; 

Kitchen. A. W. & c- i k. l : l I -'k.38. 

Larsen. H. N.. Hiar- In :- I ■ 

I,arsen-Siegrist Co , I- V.' ; \1 - l . i . . i . kl .-,1(1(1 

Lawson Roofing C.I K.,..lii-^ iki i - -■ ■ ■■:rh Mnl 

Letter. E. T. & Son. 71 Nrn M..iiiL-.i,. ''i^l 

LINDGBEN & SWINERTON. INC I: I'.ii 

Livcrmore. Norman II i I ■.,-.-,>...; . . : i ; 

McKillop Bros.. 46 KLain.\ . U..ll;;las u .:_ 

McLeran. Ralph & Co.. Hearst Bldg,; Douglas 2370, 

MacDonald & Kahn. 130 Montgomery: Kearny 4610. 

Mahony Bros.. 870 Market: Sutter 445. 



; Kearny 20.50. 
i» Hemlock 3090. 
! .'I Kearny 3769. 



Matthies & Gale. ISO Jcs 



. & Mads, 
. 1. 



: F,,- 
I Buiklint; I 
Pacilie States Cons. 
Palmer & McBr\d 
Parker. K E C. 1 
Petersen. H. L . l.'.: 
Robinson & Gill«pi 



■ 6700. 
nniiglas 321. 
M .'.a 638. 
- . II. r 5333. 



-'Oniery: Douglas 879. 



Tee Pee Confectaurant 

ART CONFECTIONER 

LO SCHIAVO BROS. 



I. M. SOMMER & CO. 

General Contractors 
Repair and Maintenance Specialists 
901 Bryant Street Telephone Hemlock 1100 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAN FRANXISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS 

Continued 

San Francisco Bridge Co.. 14 Montgomeo': Douglas 2288. 

Sanderson & Porter. 14 Montg«)raer>'; Douglas 7300. 

Savage, M. J,. 544 Market: Douglas 5120. 

Schtiltz Construction Co.. 46 Kearny; Keamy 648. 

Seghierl. D. & Co.. Inc. <Tcrrazzol, 35 Cook: Pacific 891. 

Sibley Grading & Teaming (Grading). 135 Lander: Market 766 

80MMEB. t. M. & CO., tlOl Ilrvant: Hemlock 1100. 

Spargo, .Tohn. 333 Kearny ; Garfield 2456. 

Stockholm. Chas. & Sons. 681 Market: Douglas 4657. 

Stone. Alien L.. 105 Montgomery': Kearny K240. 

Thorpe. J. T. & Son. Inc (Brick). 525 Market: Kearny 2442. 

Tlbbitts-Paclflc Co . 16 CaUfomia; Sutter 5935. 

Dtah Construction Co . 760 Market: Garfield 6650. 

Wagner. Geo.. Inc.. 181 South I>ark: Suiter 670. 

Walker. P. J. Co.. .55 New Montgomery: Sutter 6096. 

West Coast Construction Co.. 519 California: Sutter 4613. 

WESTEBN ASBESTOS MAONESIA CO. (M) (Rooflog.) 21-29 So. 



CORK PRODUCTS 



CORPORATION EXPERTS 

Corporate Sen-Ice AssociaUon. 155 Montgomery; Douglas 8263. 

COSTUMES— THEATRICAL 



COTTON 

Adams. W. W. & Co. (B). 465 CaUfornla: Garfield 5661. 

COTTON GOODS 



CONTRACTORS' EQUIPMENT 



COOLERS— MILK 



COOPERAGE 

Bauer. S, (Till. h33 FInrlcIa: Ml 
CALirOBNIA BAKBEL CO. 

nois: Sutler 5430. 
Hogan * Co. (Ml, 326 Twelfth; Market 568. 
Western Cooperage Co. (M). 1 Fourteenth: Hemlock 3600. 
Windeler. Geo. Co. (M). Eighth and Hooper: Market 5280. 

COOPERAGE STOCK 

CALIPOBNIA BABBEL CO. (M). 433 California: Factory: 1101 Illi- 
nois: Sutter .5430. 
Huddart i Baker (MA). 681 Market: Kearny 1871. 
Richards. J. W. (MA). 681 Market: Kearny 1871. 

COPPERSMITHING 

Klreten. Oscar (M). 51 Tehama; Douglas 2420. 

Smith, C. W. Copper Works )M). 16 Washington; Kearny 3992. 

Wagner, L. & Sous Pacific Copper Works iM). K5 Minna: Kearny 1388 



Ford. C. W. R. Co. (W). 164 Sutter; Sutter 4731. 

Hopkins. H. B. OIA). 400 Lick BIdg.: Douglas 2560. 

Himter Mfg. Sc Commission Co. (W). 22 Batt«r\*: Sutter 5156. 

Lcighton-JeUett Co.. Inc. (I-W). 526 Mission: Douglas 1793. 

Leon. S. R. & Co. (W). 40 First: Douglas 1.59S. 

LiUenthal. Lee i Co. (J). 26S Market; Garfield 938. 

Moore. Walton N. Dry- Goods Co. fW). Mission & Fremont; Day. 841. 

Munier. Carl * Co. (W). 517 Mission: Kearny 3126. 

NIPPON DBT OOODS CO. (Vi>. 70 Pine: Sutter 690. 

Plummer. W. A. (Bleached and Brown. Ducks). 216 Pine: Kearyn 7675. 

Rosenthal. Maurice (W). 49 Battery; Kearny 7213. 

Shapiro. D. R. (MA). 38-10 First: Suiter 4121. 

SHUN TOEN HINO * CO. (I-E). 849 Grant Ave.; China 45. 

Simpson & Fisher. Inc. (M.\). 240 Steuart: Davenport 3041. 

Wellington Sears & Co. (W). 22 Battery: Douglas 7430. 



HOW.\RD COOPER CORPORATION 

of California 

Agents for all lines of Road Builders' and 
Contractors' Equipment 

STUTZ FIRE ENGINES 
124t Howard Street Phone Hemlock 4;t>7 San Francisco 



Lindgren & Switierton, Inc* 



BUILDERS o 



'f 



STANDARD OIL BLDG. TELEPHONE BLDG. 

MATSON BLDG. SOUTHERN PACIFIC BLDG. 

HUNTER-DULIN BLDG. 

San Jrancisco's Skyline Jeatures 



Telephone Douglas 2647 



225 BUSH STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192tj 



CRACKERS AND BISCUITS 

American Biscuit Co. iM). SITi Battery; DouRlas 100. 
Mutual Biscuit Co. iM), 3402 Sixteenth; Market 2009. 
STANDARD BISCUIT CO. (M). 83L' Sansome; Kearay 4032. 
Zed Corporation (M), 4Go California. 

CRANES AND HOISTS 



CREAMERY EQUIPMENT 



CREAMERY PRODUCTS 

Alpine Evaporated Cream Co. (M), 112 Market: Kearny 2070. 

Dairy Delivery Co. (W-R). 3550 19th: Mission 196. 

Golden State Milk Products Oo. (M), 425 Battery; Sutter 1820. 

Hilmer, Fred L. Co. (W). 129 Davis; Kearny 804. 

Isleton Produce Co. (W). 109 Clay; Kearny 1723. 

Kraft Cheese Co. of California. 757 Sansome: Sutter 3584. 

Meyenberg Evaporated Milk Co. (M), 1 Dnimm; Douglas 158. 

Nestle'sFoodCo.. Inc. (M). 112 Market: Kearny 2070. 

San Francisco Dairy Co. (R). 1553 Turk: West6110. 

Spreckels Creameries. Inc. (M). 1405 Mission: Hemlock 939. 



Standard Quality 

Crackers and Cakes 

Paradise Soda Crackers 

Graham Flake 
Parastan Sugar Wafers 

Standard Biscuit Company 

Manufacturers 

SAN FRANCISCO , KEARNY 4032 



CREDIT RATING BUREAUS 

Bradstreet Co.. 486 California: Sutter 7420. 

Dun, R. G. & Co.. 86 Third; Sutter 31. 

Retailers Credit Assn. of San Francisco, 25 Tavlor; Prospect 9622. 

San Francisco Assn. of Credit Men. 85 Second: Douglaa 7876. 

CRUCIBLES 

DLton. Joseph, Crucible Co. (FB), 444 Market; Kearny 1062. 

CULTURES— MILK 

Vitalait Laboratoi-y. 870 Market; Sutter 5139. 

CURIOS 

American Import Co. (I-E). 16 First; Kearny 2067. 
Bloch. E. Mercantile Co. (R), 70 Market; Douglas 1746. 
Gump, S. & G. Co.. 246 Post; Douglas 6200. 
Hague. Wm. E.. Inc. (I). 558 Sacramento; Douglas 3473. 

CUTLERY 

Baker. Hamilton & Pacific Co. (W). 700 Seventh; Park 9000. 
Deckehnan Bros.. Inc. (W) (Barber, Etc.). 48 Turk; Franklin 2870. 
Remington Arms Co., Inc. (FB) (Pocket). 12 Geary; Kearny 3176. 

CYLINDERS 



Otis Elevator Co. (M) (Elevator). 1 Beach; Kearny 3030. 



DAIRY PRODUCTS 



Casperson, O. & Sons (W). 359 Twentieth; Mission 4078. 
Dairy DeUvery Co. (W-R), 3550 Ninet«enth: Mission 196. 
Golden State Milk Products Co. (M). 425 Battery; Sutter 1820. 
King. Fred B. (W). 310 Clay; Sutter 3382. 
Liberty Dairy Co., 271 Tehama; Douglas 5829. 
Makins Produce Co. (W). 310 Davis; Kearny 663. 
Monotti-Larimer (W). 250 Sacramento; Douglas 4460. 
San Francisco Dairy Co. (R). 1553 Turk; West 6110. 
SchaUinger, Carl, 325 Davis; Garfield 448. 
Scheer i Co. (W), 314 Front; Kearny 3368. 
Sherry Bros,. Inc. (W), 249 Davis; Sutter 4747. 
Smith. Lynden & Co. (W), 231 Davis; Sutter 4220, 
United Milk Co. (R), 3201 SLiteenth; Park 6400. 

DAIRY SUPPLIES 

Creamery Package Mfg. Co., 699 Battery; Sutter 6880, 
De Laval Pacific Co. (W-D). 61 Beale; Davenport 727. 
PEISINQ, OEO. W. CO., INC., 88-96 Clay; Sutter 1723. 




Everything 

For Handling 

Milk and 



EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

FOR 

Creameries — Cheese Factories — Ice Cream Plants 
Milk Producers and Distributors 

Geo. W. Prising Company, Inc. 

88-96 Clay Street 



Cable Address "Prisingco" 



SAN FRANCISCO 



California Barrel Company, inc. 

433 CALIFORNIA STREET — SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Barrels, Barrel Shocks, Kegs, Pails, Kits and 
Cooperage Stock 

of All Kinds — for All Purposes 



OAK, - - SPRUCE - - 
CALIFORNIA HARD DOUGLAS FIR 



Cable Address: "KOSTER" 
Codes: ACME 

BENTLEY'S 

WESTERN UNION 



SAN FRANCISCf) Bl".SIXESS. APRIL 14. ia2B 



DANCING PAVILION 

Fisher's Dancing Pavilion, Eddy and Jones; Prospect 31C. 

DECORATING EXTERIOR 

CAPITAL DECORATING CO , 11^ i'.ii ll,.>.~ \I ark. i 72'.).', 



DECORATING— INTERIOR 



Bcach-H.i 
CovU-, ii.i 
CraiK. l-t 



«ary; Sutter 580. 
'< 'wetl : Sutter 36."J4. 
Id 207S. 
I'n>si>ect SflOA. 
' Market : Oarfleld 5613. 



McCann. Win. » dij. J(H l>i 
Marten. A. P.. ("o . 1.501 Sutter; West 4512 
Kumpf. Herman. 507 Howaid; DoUK)as3ini 
.Sprlnner & Duncan. KlfiO Sutter; I'rcsiiect 53 



DELICATESSEN 

Nob HIU Conr«-lii.nci.v and I)(licali-s.s.n Hi. 1 1 I'^l 1.52 Ta.vlor 

DEMURRAGE BUREAUS 

Pacific Car Demurrage Dureau. S5 Second, Keani> I2(H. 

DENTAL LABORATORIES 



EDWARDS, JAMES W 

Ciracicr. S. n. <<i hi.- 
ShreveGold I'nilu. i>. ( , 
Strobridge. T. 



DENTAL SUPPLIES 

Vi. 323 Geary; Douglas 4470. 



I .Market; Suit. 



Bristol-Myers Co. (FBi. .„ 

Drucker. August E. Co. (-M i, Ji 
Langley & Michaels Co. i.M-U 



DENTIFRICES 



r 4672. 

a ; Fillmore 2138. 

; Suiter 7272. 



DENTISTS 



Brown, Dr. James A.. 31 
Bruhsn. Dr. Harold J.. 
Curtis. Dr. Geo. B., 94n 
Day. Dr. Roscoe A . l'i( 



Hart. Dr. Chas I. 



u-r20«l. 

rlicld 257. 
! 2209. 
i.uBias4414. 



Keeffe. Dr. E, I) l.i.", suh ., _. 

Ogawa. Dr. Eiich. i73M Hiictianan; KiilniureOlO. 
Parker, E. R. Sv.,iteni of DcntLstrv. 15 st*ickton. 
Phillips. Dr Henry I I3.i siorklon; Garfield 4586. 
Rietz, Dr. H. V v<:< Mirk. i -iunerB156. 

[ i; . -ii,<kton; Douglas 1579. 



Rulofson. Dr. .. 
Scannavino. Dr .1, 
Schord. Dr. M. II 

Sharj). Dr .las ( , 



. Dr. Kd«. A . i;i,5 



nbus Ave 
ni-las2021. 
Douglas 3912. 
\^e.; Park 0208. 
• amy 66. 
I 2019. 
i.arlield S23. 
iiiTield 10. 
ion; Douglas 3196. 



DEODORANTS 



DEPARTMENT STORES 

City of Paris Dry GoodsCo. (R ). Geary. Stockton i f ) Farrell ; Doug 4500 

Emporium, The (R), 835-865 Market; Kearny 6S00. 

Hale Bros.. Inc. (R|. 901-921 Market; Sutter 5000 

Li\Tngston Bros., Inc. (R). Grant Ave. and Geary; Douglas 3060. 



ry; Sutter 123. 



Magnin. I. & Co. (R). Grant Ave. . ... _ _„ 

0;Comior.MoiraU & Co.jJJK 119-129 Post; Garfield 6000. 

., ^ , ,-„ . . - t Ave. and Pest; Doug. 4500. 



Weill. Raphael i.Co.. Inc. Cn'-R). Sutter. Gtl 
Weinstein Co. (R). 1041 Market; Market 985. 

nd Post ; Kearny 5000. 



DETECTHT; AGENCIES 



21 .M;. 
.-1 M.. 



7C.99. 

2238. 



Hum«. Win .P , [ill. riiui.c.Mi 

CoMlello Hur.-aii ..f liu.-liKati,. 

Field. W II . D,i.,<iiM, H,ir.a. 

General Service {'orp . 995 .Mark, i i .iirl . :il 1359. 

Gignac Secret Service Bureau, (i^l .Maikit Douglas .5469. 

Jenime Detective Service C.i. ;(.'] Hii-li I). uBias 9199. 

'.illfurnia; Sutler 1900. 

70 Market: Kcamy 5330. 



DIES 



.\mericiin Forge Co. (Ml. 25-37 Tehai 
K-n Mff fi. M .-,4 W;i-lil liiii M.I 
Kcirluk Mfk- <■., M :«.-. 1. .■ - , I 



SMITH-BOOTB-OSHER CO I 
rniliylsluH- Machinery Co FH SI 
Waechller. Waller E. IM). 204 Fin 



DISINFECTANTS 



Uincn. John F.. Sanilation Co. (M). 1415 Folsom; Hemlock 4144. 

llixkwald Chemical Co. (M). 436 Bryant; Sutter 1753. 

Rogers. K. R.. Chemical Co. IM). 527 Commercial; Kearny 150. 



DISPENSERS 



Eng-Skell Co., Inc iW., 2IJs-21li -Mi».sii 
MAGNUS FBUIT PRODDCTS CO. 
.301 Howard. Douglas 2471 



.M I (Root BtH.>r; Soda Founta 



United Stales Faucet Co. iMj. 337 tiolden C;ate .\ve.; .Market 41. 

DISTILLATE 

Associated Oil Co. (.Ml. 79 New Montgomery; Kearny 4800. 

Shell Co. of California (Ml. 200 Bush; Garfield 6100. 

Standard Oil Co. (.M ), 225 Bush : Sutter 7700. Refinery. Richmond. Cal. 

Union Oil Co. of Cal.. 220 Montgomery; Sutter 1400. 

DOORS 

.\cme Planing Mill IM). 1899 Bryant; I>ark 8043. 

Anderson Bros Planing .Mill (Mi. Qumt and Custer; Mission 8624. 

CALIFORNIA DOOR CO. iM). 4.3-15 Main; .Mills, Oakland. Cal. ; Dav- 

(■npnn ;nf,n 
Di-an K,M i>il.]. \\ iiKliiM Co. (ill, 551-5,55 Braiuian; Kearny 1516. 
Emiiirc nariMif Mill .M ,, 7,50 Bryant: Kearny 770. 
Eui.ka -ivh li,,„ \ Miiiililjng Mills i.Mi, 1715 Mission; Market 600. 

l-'niil. - I ,:ni.- \\,,ii, \i I,,, -,■,,. I'otrero Ave,; Hem. 4100. 

<■"''■' '■'■ ' ■' "'I \ -I. ill;,, J 111 Market: Sutter 2720. 

H''l " ' :■"■ ■,\,,,i, \i [ i,, r,j-H, 'I First: Kearny 3,587. 
J"|-'"-" I .,,,■. I,, \i \ \i I M .Mis.sion: Kearny 2386. 

Kji|j. II, .V .-i.lj ,.M 71 :-: !,; 1 ,:, I,, M M,,rkc-I 2484. 

■I ■ 'I -la.iurll: Mission 2576. 
1 M a I r< ,\i , II Kearny 3385. 



PaciflcMfg. Co. i-M 
Phoenuc Sidewalk l.inl 
Portmans Planing .Mi 



, M -Hl,«alk, 317 Harriet; Mkt. 4.505. 
.Ml. li.l» .Mission; Park 6204. 
Redwoed Manufacturcis .M,. .5»2 .Market; Garfield 1910. 
United Slates .Metal Prudacts Co. (M). .^lO Tenth; Hemlock 3160. 

DRAPERIES AND CURTAINS 

Bare Bros ,V Hiansn Ki :ill. sun. r Suiter 1177 
Beach-Roliiii.«.iii c. .M L';iii ( .,.,,r\ sum i- 5so. 
Breuner. John, Co, W-K , 2sl (,.,ar\ suiu-r 1300. 
CaUfomia ('..Uon Mills .M;. 3U) California; Douglas 2643. 
Caro& Upright iW-li. 717 Market; Douglas 1507. 
Dinkelspiel. L.. Co.. Inc. (W). 125 Battery; Douglas 1900. 
Fisher. Chas. (MA). 49 Geary: Kearny 1669. 



CALIFORNIA DOOR COMPANY 

M.VNt FACTLRERS OF AND I>E\LF,RS IN 

DOORS and WINDOWS 

of every description 
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL 

For sevent>'-four years we have supplied the 

discriminating home builder with Doors 

and Sash of the highest quality 

SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE AND WAREHOUSE 

43-49 MAIN STREET 

Phone Davenport 3160 



THE JAS. W. EDWARDS COMPANY 

Dental Supplies 

323 GE.\RY STREET, SAN FR.\NCISCO 

Branches at 

OAKLA.ND S.\CRAMENTO S-4N JOSE FRESNO 

Pioneer Dental Supply House of the Pacific Coast 



SAX FRAXCLSCO BUSIXE.SS. APRIL 14, in2ti 



DRAPERIES AND CVRT MNS—Contlnued 



Friedman. M. 

Harris, S. & Cu : W ; v 

Hubo-Bradfonl < ^ l-V 

Kalischer. N. vS: "-__!- \* 

Kemp, John H , , , n M - 

Kreiss, L. & S(m> i; i 

Lev>Mfg. C. -M-W ( 

McCann. Wm D. K 

Marten, A. F. Co.. looi 

Moore. Walton N.. Dr\ 

Noel, Thos. E.. S21 Mar 

Rosenthal. Maurict- i \\ .1 l.f.uny 7213. 

Rumpf. Herman r.<,': ||.. ■ i i - :U61. 

Sloane. W. & .1 1 w i , ■ - . Garfield 283S. 

Sonnenscheiji Ivi' ~ ■■larket 1145. 

Springer & Dun. ..n i.i.i. - r. . -i.r. t 53. 

Sterling PumiiuiL e L., i;,. luiu -M,u l.i.i , Market 1782. 
Walter, D. N. & E. Cu <W. .Vi2-.-.72 Mission; Sutter 100. 
Walter. D. & N. E. (M), 562 Mission; Sutter 100. 



DRESSES— CowawM^^ 



1 & Fremont ; Dave 



DRAUGHTSMEN 



t , Kearny 3670. 



American Plan & Builriii 

Wichman & Albers (Mj > 

mental and Model Dr^ 



DRAYING AND HAULING 

Bekins Van & Storage Co.. Thirtrenth and Mission; Market 1 
BOCABDE, J. B., DrayaKeCo.. CS Sacramento: Kearny IK 
Brizzolara Draying Co.. 20 Wasliin^en; Ivearny 3.505. 
CarJey & Hamilton. Inc.. 1.5 Maiji; Da\enport 1315 
Clark. J. A.. Draying Co . 3fl Beale Kearny 3737. 
Consolidated Motor F ' " 
Emmons Draying *: ;• 

Englander Drayage \ .. „ 

Famsworth ■& Kusglt-s tii : ,i " 

GaHnev Dravage & Dciiv I \ < . i^< i r. im..mi\3&48. 

Gross. F.. Coal Co.. 4su Nimli. ilaikii ;u--. 

Keating Drayage Co.. 243 Dayis. Douglas 40tjG. 

King & Co., 625 Second; Kearny 1040. 

McCarthy. John & Son. 146 Battery : Kearny 848. 

Mangini. Joe. Draying Co.. Inc.. 240 Pacific; Sutter 112. 

Nolan Drayage i Warehouse Co , 1.".3 Second: .Sutter 6160. 

Overland Freight Transfer Co . 217 Vn 

Pacific Warehuuse Co . fi'.i'i lifili K.;ri 

Robertson Dravage Co . 71 rlirn. iiiiii:i 

Schussler. J. & Co.. 43 Piii.v K, .ini\ 1 

Signal Transfer & Storaj;.' i -. IJ .o 1 ■, 

STETSON-BENNEE DRAYAGE CO 

Thomas. G. W.. Drava^■. >, Ki^-n - ■ 

Thomp! 



; Garfield 3600. 
712 



Walkup Dravage & Wan li.u 
Worth, C. A. Si Co.. 14.5 Ma 



lt',0 First; Kearny 3298. 
K...my .5401. 

J.,s Bryant ; Douglas S660. 
upon 741. 



DREDGES 



DREDGiyC 



Natomas Company of Cal.. 310 S:iii- n . -wi. v I(i03. 
Powder River Gold Dredeing Co . 4.j.s i aiii.M ma . Sutter 2345. 
Union Dredging Co. (Reclamation). 4ti.j C'aiilurnia: Kearny 12C 

DRESSES 

Alcone Knitting Mills CM) (Sport). 1603 Mission; Market 263. 
Anthony Bros. (M). 516 Mission; Sutter 7246. 
Barry-Newberg .t Co. (Wl. 154 Sutter; Sutter 5310. 
Bauer Bros. & Co. iM i. .<3 First: Douglas 731. 
Cowan. Frank Mf;; ( 'n M i Ijil,!,-..!] s 
DINKELSPIEL. L CO , INC \V li -n. 



Dolii 



Ur. 



Eschen. Lee 
Economy MfL' 
Fleischman. .M 
Furst. Mai. Im- 
Goldman. .M..11 
Hamburger .\pi 
Handelsuian. L 



Kearny 1632. 
Kearny 3400. 
-litter; Douglas 850, 



Hoff. WUliam (W 
Horyitz. Louis iV 
Israel «: Nu,~h:.u 
Juda Bros \\ 
Lees Brus \\ 
I^vv. I.onh M 

l.,-vv \I:„ W 



Miller. -M,. u ^ ;" - ■■ -.'.i^Ooy. 

Modern (I ' \; :h-, 1 ;rant Ave. : Kearny 5833. 

Moore. \\ . n i-i . \\i. Mission and Fremont; Daven 

Normardin I: . - 1 r, M i|,,i.v. . 330 Mission; Kearny 2891. 

Reynolds- G W. *: I'o. iMt ,House). 120 Battery; Douglas 4136 

Rosenthal. Maurice iW). 49 Battery: Kearny 7213. 

Segall. Leon & Co. (W), 154 Sutter; Sutter 4364. 

Smoot Mfg. Co. (M) (House). 783 Mission; Garfield 2794. 

Sunshine Mfg. Co. (II) (House), 330 Mission; Davenport 3547. 

Van VUet. George (MA). 1.S4 Sutter; Garfield 2152. 

Waller Cloak & Suit Mfg. Co. (M). 228 Grant Ave.; Garfield 1658. 

Westmaid Coat & Suit Co.. Inc. (M), 991 Mission; Douglas 9580 



DRESSING— SALAD 



Best Foods. Inc. (^Ii. 
HeUmann. Richard. I 
BICKMAN PBOOUCE CO _ ^„ 

Leggetj Francis 11. *: Co. (D). 681 Market; Douglas 4269. 



900 Bryant ; Hemlock 3500 

■fixteenth and Harrison; Hemlock 3817 
D;. 910 Harrison; Douglas 8355. 



VIEDEN PACKING CO. (M). 155 Montgomery; Douglas 8185. 

DRUGS 



.Abraham. Chas. J. (R). 1198 McAllister; Fillmore 6501 
.\nchor Drug Co. (R). 509 Columbus A\e.: Kearny 6553. 
' ~ " M I'D ii Franklin 406. 

' -utter 2694. 

I F. lisom and 106 Powell ; 



.\rcade Pharmacy 
Bayer Co.. Inc. \\ 
Boericke & Runyu 
Bowerman's Pharu 
Bristol-Myers Co 
Broemmel's Prescn 
Calegaris. .\rnold 
Coffin-Redington < 



Dook Letm Hong & Co. il 
Dugan. Herbert F. (R). 11 
Emerson Drug Co. (W). 1; 
Everybody's Drug Co. (R 
Fauda. C. O. & Bni Drn' 

Geary-Mason Pha r I 

Hirsh, W. V. (D. :!■ ■ 
Hotalmg. A. P. & I . » 
Joy. Edwin W 



; Garfield 46. 
:a Sutter 4672. 

K 1. 2501 CaUfomia. 384-490 Pest. 

Davenport 333. 
sion; Douglas 9300. 
1 : Franklin 3771. 



>avenport 3471. 

ission 3077. 

u tubus Ave.; Doug 

iiiklin40. 

rny 4695. 

1(16. 



Kecks Prescription I'liarniarns Ki. 

Langley & Jlichaels Co. u\I-W). 42-60 First: 

Lengfelds Pharmacy (R). 216 Stockton; Sutter 80. 

No Percentage Drug Co.. Inc. (Ri. 955 Market; Kcamv 3614. 

Owl Drug Co. iJI-W-R). 611 Mission: Sutter 4700. 

Personeni. Joseph. Inc. (I-W). 634 Montgomery; Douglas 4720. 

Prior. Toney (R). 799 Valencia: Market 6025. 

Rees. D. R. (R). 601 Laguna: Wahiut 562. 

Rockstroh. P. E. (R), 1097 Valencia: Mission 692. 

Schmidts. Val.. Inc. (R). 1845 Polk; Graystone 3200. 

Siumiate's Prescription Pharmacies (W-R). 1640 Di^isadero; West 609. 

Star Pharmacy (R). 492 Castro. 

Tai Sang Tong Co. (R). 838 Washington; China 1259. 

United Drug Co. (FB-W-Rl. 978 Howard; Sutter 4432. 

Upjohn Co. (FB-Wi. 199 First: Kearny 2346. 

Wakelee's Pharmacies (M-W-R). 1158 Howaid; Hemlock 344. 

Wing On Tong. 755 Grant Ave. 

DRUGGISTS' SUNDRIES 

(FBI (Rubtor: 



DRUMS— VENEER 



FRED J. RENNER 

President and Manager 






Telephone SUTTER U45 


STETSON-RENNER DRAYAGE CO. 






320 


BATTERY STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 






Freight Forwarding 








Warehousing 



■SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



DRY GOODS 

American Imports Co. (I-E). 16 First; Iveamy 2067. 
Anderson-Cam .--_.. 

California Cot 
China Tort' 
City of I> II 1 



. OFarrcU; Doug. 4500. 



, L CO , INC 



DYES AND DYE STUFFS 

Braun-Knccht-Ileimann Co. (W-M). 576-5*4 Mission: Kearny 3403. 

California Ink Co.. Inr (M). 426 Battery; Kiamy 4688. 

Genera] DycstuIT Corporatitn. 20 Natcn-a; Suttfr2C.17 

National Aniline A: Cliemital Co.. Inc. (KB). 145 Swor.d Sutter 5375 

Paleck i Co. (\V-U). 513 Sixth; Douflas 5988. 

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 



HaleBros.. Inc. (R). <)OI-'i; I n i ii.r.-)600. 

Harris. S. & Co. cWj .v.ii \!, ). I. i.,!i,v lose. 

Hai^. Geo. H. & < .. w iir. M, -M Kearny 7043. 

Hart Silk Co. I W .,.,,,,--„ ;lI -.■(•,. 

Hopkins. H. B. i M \ lil i;iru ijjliis 2560. 

Hunter Mfg. & ((im. ,.„..ii . ^. » _j limtery; Sutler 5158. 
Kalischer. N. 4: .'<. 1, U ,. .,7 I ubI. Ik.unlas 296,5. 
Kessler. Richaid 11. MA;. .s;i3 .Market; Sutter 5963. 
Kraft. Karl F. (\V). 144 -Market; Sutter 6460. 
Lazar-Klein Co (W). 87 First 
Leighton-Jellc 



ciol. 222 Second Ave. 



\\- 



Moore. \\ all'. II ■-. I 
Munter. Carl \ i . 
Nippon Dry Uord.s 
O'Connor. MolTalt . 
O'Keeffe & Co. (\\ 
Pacldc nrv Oni (l.s ( 



SHDN YUEN HINO A 
Strauss. Levi \ (n \l 
Weill. Raphael &(, I In 
Wellington Sears .V * '■ 



^6 Mission; Douglas 

iiiuglns 1598. 

I.I 1 ; Garfield 938. 

Mission 1666. 
Douglas N29. 

Wi. .MLssloni F 
Mil K.;iniv 3126 

I. -i.ii.T C'.IO. 



.Its). 875 Market; Garfield 1774. 
:lav 8408. 

M9 Grant Ave. ; China 45. 

ury; Douglas 9440. 
fitter. Grant & Post: Kearny 5000. 
nery: Douglas 7430. 
vi. and Post; Kearny 5000. 



DYEING AND CLEANING WORKS 



Dohra ^ - , _ . 

GaltiePrenchCleaiiiiit .v innnK ;i;i;i Licinii r.uk ii;2. 

Liberty Dyeing & CkMiiiiii; \\ uiks. ;i;ui 1 illiiioiu, West 276. 

Messner's. Inc.. 240 Kiglith; Market Nl. 

National Cleaning & Dyeing Co.. 535 Bryant: Douglas 1404. 

Thomas. F. Parisian Cleaning & Dyeing Works. 27 Tenth: Park 86S0. 

White Way Cleaning * D\elng Co.. :in0 Gnive; Evergreen 091. 



:x 



San Francisco 
Made* 



For ^Vestern 
Trade 



Architects, contractors and purchasing 
agents around the Golden Gate buy 
Brown iT Pengilly products tirst for 
quality, second for civic pride. 

S'witchboards 
Panel Boards 
Safe-Line S'witches 
Testing Equipment 
Fire Alarm Central 
Stations 

For Sale by Jobbers All Orer the IVest 



Bl&WN^N^fl^lNC. 



Charing ( n .^ 
Ueald's Bu.sii 
Heald'sEngli 
Hemingway s 



McDowell School of I 
Modem Automobile a 
Munson School for I'l 
Nelson School of I.eti 



■ Ave.; Wist 711, 



I iiket 5558. 
iiiklin 306. 
Douglas 6168. 



EFFERVESCENTS 



adoni; Diivcnport 3471, 



ELECTRIC APPARATUS 



Dahl. Chas W 
Drendell Elm i 
Enteri'rise I-il. . 
Fobes Supph I 
Garland-.Mrili 



PaclBcKlii II 
Safety Elect r: 
Sangamo EIi^ 



- r 2967. 

. 171 Second; Str. 2071. 

Ksion; Davenport 2460. 



iM). 172 Steuart ; Davenport 4257, 



; Hemlock 4738. 
; Sutter 1378. 
Ilusiiilal), 372 Sutler: Douglas 9477. 



(Hospital). 524 Market: Kearny 1431. 



Vandever. C. (; 

Westlnghouse Electric & Mfg.'Co . 1 Montgomery; Kearny 5353. 
Wholesale Electric Co.. 817 Mission; Garfield 3016. 

ELECTRICAL APPLIANCES 

Bylngton Elect lii. IMili Fillmnrc- Wi.st ,v_' 

Chemoff. A. M. c. .M.\-I),.41 Fell, IkniliiC^ S20. 

Electric ,\npliaint. Cm . S(I7 Mission Suttt-r 4!)00 

Electric Mtg. Co., i«lB Mission; Kearny 310. 

Electric Novelty Works (M). 965 Howard: Kearny 2094. 

Hamilton, F, A. (MA). 315 Sutter: Kearny 2249. 

Hurley Maclilne Co. (FB) (Washing Macliines), 124 Post; Sutter 3354, 

Lei-y Electric Co,. 1230 Polk: Prospect 230, 

Llstenwalter & Gough. Inc. (W-D), 325 Fifth: Kearny 7640, 

Majestic Electric Appliance Co,. 590 Folsom; Douglas 8200. 

Mamiing. Bowman & Co, (W) (Table Appointments). 150 Post. 

ODonneU. J, R, & Co,. 1377 Mission: Sutter 2955. 

Schlueter Commercial Co., 2762 Mission: Mission 390, 

Schwerin Electrical Appliance Corporation, 1067 Market; Market 3886. 

Wells Manufacturing Co. (M). 673 Folsom; Kearny 5756. 



SAN FRANCISCO LAW SCHOOL 

Co-Educational — Evening Sessions 

Term Starts Wednesday. August IS, 1926. Annual 
announcement outlining complete four-year cur- 
riculum will be mailed on request 

Seventh Floor. Call Building 




L. DINKELSPIEL CO. 

I N C O R P O R A T K D 

Dry Goods, 
Notions and 
Ladies' and 
Men's Furnishings 

113-141 BATTERY ST. SAN FRANCISCO 
Telephone Douglas 1900 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



ELECTRICAL DECORATIONS 

DECORATIVE CONSTRUCTION CO.. 34S-3oO Huyra. Market 7295. 

ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

Automotive Ser\ ir.- \^'i nr\ m.mi \ :,n N..^> \\r I'luspect 2437. 

Baker-.Ioslyn C M-Ii I'mi v,.,..iid. I inu'-ki^ i.7i)0. 

BBOWN a PENGILLY. INC s^ifiiv li.-M.v^i, 1264 Folsom: Hon 

lock 3874. 
Butte Electric Eciuipment Co.. 530 Folsom: Douglas 2040. 
Fobes Supply Co. IW). 260 Fifth; Garfield 4120. 
Garland-Affolter Engineering Co.. 323 Eialto BIdg. : Sutter 6S06. 
General Electric Co.. Rialto BIdg. : Sutter 3535. 
Green. E. A.. 401 Van Ness Ave. 
HolzmueUer. C. J. (M). 1108 Howard; Park 6169. 
Johnson. C. H. (MA). Rialto BIdg.; Sutter 1070. 
K. P. F. Electric Co.. 855 Howard; Ke.irnv 3642, 
Maydwell & HartzeU. Inc. ID-M.\' l.^x Kl.- 



Safety Insulated Wire and Calil 
Scheer Electrical Engineering d 
Simplex Wire & Cable Co. iFBn 
Standard Undergroimd Cable Cn 



ELECTRICAL ILLUMINATION 



Decorative Construction Co.. 348-350 Haves; Market 7295. 

Holzmucllcr. C, J .Mi. UO.'i Howard, Park 6169. 

STANDARD ELECTRIC SIGN CO. (Mj. 1047 Mission; Market 223. 



ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES 

Baker. Hamilton & Pacific Co. ( W l. 700 Seventh; Park 9000. 
Baker-Jtslyn Co. l,W"). 490 Secord; Douglas 6700. 
Bos.singer. Robt, O. t\V). 55 New Montgomery; Garfield 5861. 
BROWN & PENGILLT, INC., 1264 Folsom; Hemlock .1R7i 
Electric Appliance Co., 807 Mission; Sutter 4900. 
Electric Manufacturing Co.. 960 Mission; Kearny 310. 
Fobes Supply Co. fW). 260 Fifth; Garfield 4120. 
Graybar Electric Co. CW). 680 Folsom; Kearny 6700 
Hetty Bros.. 373 Ellis; Prospect 333. 
Holtermann, A. H.. 89 Market; Davenport 1036. 
Keystone Electric Co., 708 Mission; Kearny 3769. 
LevT Electric Co.. 1230 Polk; Pruspcct 230. 
Meyberg. 1^0 J. (W), 973 MN-hui 1 1..11-1,,., tni.-i5. 

Mo^Bridges & Co. (W). 93;i -M I >' iiil;is 64S0. 

O'Donnell, J. R. & Co.. 1377 Mj i-.i! -him 1 2955. 
Pacific States Electric Co. ON ,'. 07,, Mi-^aioii: Sutter 7301. 
Panama Lamp & Commercial Co. tDj. 1066 Mission; Market fi 
Smith. Frank E.. 418 Eugenia. 

Sterling & Harkness (MA). 311 California; Garfield 5820. 
Western Electric Co.. Inc. CW), 680 Folsom; Kearny 0700 
Wholesale Electric Co.. 817 Mission; Garfield 3015. 
Young. Garnett ,Si Co. (MA). 390 Fourth; Douglas 4220 




Representative 
Installations 

SPENCER ELEVATOR COMPANY 

166-180 Seventh St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Manufacturers of Elevators 
for every conceivable purpose 




OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY 

An industry closely allied with the development of the Pacific Coast, owning the property 

and buildings which it occupies in the principal Coast cities and maintaining 

permanent organizations and ser\ ice establishments therein 




Main Executive Office and Plant for the Pacific Coast 

OTIS ELEVATOR BUILDING, San Francisco 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1920 



ELECTRICAL WORK 



ENGINEERS— CONSULTING— Co«n/n/<V 



Kearny 1950. 
'I Market 1753. 
iut>r4600. 
.11 1526. 
-Sutler 688. 
I" BIdK.. Sutler 6806. 
I Sutter 3286. 



Chew. K. s. Kialto BIdg ; (iarfldd 14'J. 

Clinton CVinslruction Co. of Cal . 1123 Kolsom; Sutter 3440. 

Con'<tant .AnKle Arch Dam Co. (Hydraulic and Electric Construction). 



.W2 Market: (iartleld 4.5.50. 



CYCLOPS IR3N 



ElliMin * I(u*icll (Sir 
PaKet BnidneerinK C< 
Ferguson. .Jas. C. H,, 



25 Rush; CiarHeld 2180. 



l<T68fl2. 

utlcr34fl7. 

I .Mills BIdK.: DouKlas 1282. 



Schoer Electrical BneinecrinK Co.. 779 Folsom: Douglas 9223. 

Smith Electric Co.. »75 Howaid: Sutter 1378. 

Stewart Electrical Mfg. Co.. .59 Columbia Square: Market 2949. 



ELECTROTYPING 



American, EnKraviiiM A Color I'la 
Fllmcr Bros. Elcrtrot> pi- Co (M 



ELEVATORS 

Atlas EleViiior ('.. .U H:,rr„.| II.-. k .M.-.l 

Elevator Sill. iili.- I '.i III. i-i.lr-'. I i. ..■! i- _'-■■-.. 

General I'^l' -. .I'.r < . . i l /i li. ■. . ■! I ■ ■ -n- 

Gray. Ji.li" i: i" " ■ 1 >ouglas 2362. 

OTIS ELEVATOR CO \l I ';■..'' 1m.,;' i in. Ill 

Pacinc i:ir\:iiiir .V l'..iiiiriiii-iii « "■ ■ ^^ ' L* K.>u...«it. Hemlock 4476. 
Snniildiini Ihii.i.f K ,l>i itirain). .s'.m KuUom. Sutler 4499. 
SPENCEB ELEVATOR CO. (.Ml. 166-180 .Seventh: Market 1535. 

EMBROIDERIES AND LACES 

Adc-S Urn- l-\\ |-,:i k.-;,iii> I i.hiuIms IssT. 

Ahninllcilii I Im ii M\ ll.n.l sjl M:irkit : DougIa.S .54>H. 

AMERICAN IMPORT CO I'l.k.ii;!^ , IC. First: Kearny 2067. 



DINKELSPIEL. L. CO , INC « I 

Khlirr, l|i:is \l \ .mi.> jmhh 

INDIA-AMERICAN TRADING CO 



..iny 178.5 

ittory: Douglas 1900. 

25 California: Doug. 1229. 
nicer 2558. 

i:>iun & Fremont: Daven. 84 
Market 100. 



MiK.n-. Walton .N, IJi J l.iKib. to, lU i. 

Pacillc Embroidery Co. (M). lO'JO .Miiisl 

Pacific Buroijean Import Co. (W). 86 Third: Sutter 3488. 

Shainln. I. & Co. (I). 268 Market: Garfleld 4570. 

EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 

BUSINESS MEN'S CLEARING HOUSE PLACEMENT BUREAU, 



Gould. I(:.l|.l 
Gray. John i( 
Orunsky. C I 
Haas. Edwaiil 
Hamillon. H. 
Healy-Tilibill 



al.l Ki 



LoriiiB 
Mac 1)1 
MacUonalil ,v 
MacRorie-.M' 
.Marlln. J. (' 
MerriU Co. i > 
Molcra. E. .1, 



Morshead. Merrill c 



"' I iilifornla: Kearny 1206. 

1 Market: Sutter 5266. 
...ii-nv .MSI. 
ilia Suiter 6104. 

\I;irkel: Douglas 5583. 



l:il-. Ufiii! I'llci. I10Market:Keamy2638. 

,\ ];i I., u Iks ciicmical). 612-634 Bryant. 

\ III iiiiil: .ir.ii Steam Power). 417 Market. 
Ilk. .-,s >i,n.i Sutter6931. 
hanicali. .is Suller: Kearny 3857. 

ili.SSl Bash: .Sutter 3157. 
■irical). 58 Sutter: Sutter 6931. 
ji. 440 Gearv: Prrspecl 372. 
ni: C„ . 149 Califcrnia: (larfleld 547. 
' III-' t 'ill i.n i,:n Mull I ginnery: Kearny 4610. 
I II il. II . Vi.ii M iikrt; Douglas 4442. 
'II' .1 ".'I.; M I' 1.1 I Kramy 5312. 
I'll .1. iji ill -uiii'i- 1.556. 



»t: Kearny 1930. 



, Sutler 1061. 



isl ( :arlield 5532. 
me: Kearny 2494. 
lent ..\gency. 7H4 Ho 



ard; Sutter 1205 



ENAMEL WORK 



ENGINEERS- CONSULTING 



Adams. Henry P. ( 
Anderson. A. P. ■ N 
Austin Co. of Calil 
Bacon. Edw. R. ( 



Bni 



Hf 



Bollard, E. D. C. 
Bullock. Fred W. 
Bureau of Mana^ 
Bulle Electric Ei 
Cahill Bros . Inc. 



Ml 111) , Carfleld 6165. 

I I'i.ls.>ni: Hemlock 3700. 

Douglas 3466. 

II Douglas 700. 

ii , Sutter 2805. 



",.", Xi w Montgomery: Sutter 370. 
II "V, 1,1 Douglas 6320. 
11 ! \l.i ki 1 Carfleld 4177. 
ii -.11 M,uket: Douglas 6226. 
:'.ii I 111- 1111 Douglas 2046. 

.■».'> New .Montgomery: .Suiter 1740. 



Stalder. Wallir i 
.standiid Elect lit 
stcelform Coiilr.i 
sturtevant. B K 
Theto. Starr .i^ ' 
Transportaii'iii i 
TremoiwcuN i : 1 
Tucker. Ed«iii \N 
L'nited Engin- , 



: Sutter 2821. 
itu-r 4499. 
la- 1425. 



For Competent Office Help — Men or Women 

Call Sutter 5406 

BUSINESS MENS CLEARING HOUSE 

407-408 Underwood BIdg. 525 Market Street 



NORTHWEST ENGINEERING COMPANY 

CRAWLER EQUIPMENT— SHOVELS— CRANES— DRAGLINES 



Western District Manager 

W. W. MUTTER 
Telephone Davenport 686 



SALES OFFICES IN ALL PRINCIPAL CITIES 

General Sales Oflice 

28 EAST JACKSON BOULEVARD 

CHICAGO. ILLINOIS 



Office and Warehouse 

23 MAIN STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 



SAN FKANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, in2B 



\Vai?ner. Geo., In( 

Walker. P. J. Co. 

Walsh. James J., 112 Market: 

Walsh & Wiedner Boiler Co i 

West Coast ('..n- i i. li < " 

West Coast Nu ' l 

Whittlesey. I.u. . . i ■ - , 



2-2_ Powell; Sutter 3034. 
I'ine'; Garfield. 262. 



Whitton. Fi 

Wichman & Aiixi^ .-\1-. :,-.; M.iikti. 

Wieland. C. F. iMj. 703 Market. lieamy 124. 

WilUams. C.vril. Jr. (Cnll). 369 Pine; Garfield 3359. 

Zucco. Pierre & Co.. 166 Geary; Garfield 1292. 

ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES 

Bailey. Chas. M. Co. iM.\i. 661 Folsom: Kearn.v 2.i(IO. 
Dieterich-Post Co., 79 New Montgomery; Douglas 6110. 
Dietzgen. Eugene Co.. l.S First; Kearnv 26S0. 
Keuffel & Esser Co.. 24 Second; Kearny .5706. 
LIETZ. A. CO. (M). 61 Post; Kearny 1552. 
jMarwedel, C. W. (J-D-M.\). 76 First. 



ENGINES 



h and Folsom; Hemlock 3700. 



Bacon, Edw R. Co. (Ml. 

Baker. HamUton & Pacific Co. ( W l. 700 .Seventh: Park 9000. 
Bethlehem Shipbuilding Corp.. Ltd. iM). 215 Market; Davenport 1740. 
California HydrauUc Engineering & .Supply Co.. 543 Howard ; Sut. 1 180. 
Davis. Norris K. iM). 400 Seventh; Market 167.5. 



The a. Lietz Co. 

(EST.'VBLISHED 188i 

M.\NUF.\CTURERS OF 

Engineering, Surveying, 

Mining and Nautical 

Instruments 

DRAWING MATERIALS 
FIELD EQUIPMENT 



Main Office and Salesrooms: 

61 POST ST. 

Factory: 632-4 COMMERCIAL ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 

Kearnv 1552 



OAKLAND 

336 12th St. 



LOS ANGELES 

1001 So. Hill St. 



Davenport 120, 



Harron. Rlckatd \ 
Hendy. Joshua, In 
Kortick Mfg. Co 
Krogh Pump \- M; 
Mainlron «..,),. ^ 
Moore, (li;!- < .v 



SMITH-BOOTH-USHER CO 

sturi(i;iiii I! I-' r,, ll; i.^i 
Sullivan .\I;i.iiini 1 v ' .. ".-_■ M.i 
Cniled KiiLriiir. i in_ ^ .. M _';j 
Wagner, ,I< ^ Ml;: ' " M 1 1: ■ 



Tiport 1113. 
vnth; Market 752. 
1930. 



Wocdin & Link' M, 



ENGRAVING 



American Engraving and Color Plate Co. IM). 24S First: Kearny 7325. 

Blanchaid Press. Inc. (M ) ( Wocdi. 222 Golden Gate Ave. ; Franklin 222. 

Borden Printing Co. iMi. 251-253 Mitma: Douglas 7515. 

Bowles-Broad Printing Works (M). 75 Thiid: Sutter 135. 

Brunt. Walter X. rMl. 111-121 Seventh: Market 7070. 

California Photo Etigravini; Co M i iPholoi. 121 Second; Sutter 7S9. 

Duddv-Kihhee Pnmiiiu- I .. Al i i: - iii~..iiic Omu:!;. "'^ 



-347 



Mann, Walter. J ' ,1 !',• .i!,,;, I)..ut-I.,s 'U-','. 

Moise-Ivlinkner <-i.' .Al M.'.sl ,:i.'i M.nkii , sutlii- 71140 
Olsen Lithograph Co (Stationery), .547 Sansome; Keamy 1282. 
Salter Bros, (M) (Photo). 138 Columbus Ave.: Davenport 425. 
Sierra -Art & Engra^-mg Co. (M) (Photo), 343 Front; Douglas 47 
Sterling Engraving Co., 460 Fourth: Sutter 6064. 



ENVELOPES 



Barry. Chas. R. Co. CWl 
Blake. Moffltt & Towne 



FIELD-EBNST ENVELOPE CO 
Pacific Coast EnM i-i I I,. \1 li. 
Pacific Coast Pain 1,1 w ,.1,. \l 
ZeUerbach Paper Co, (Wi. .534 Batic 



Douglas 3429. 



ETCHING SUPPLIES 

Reed. Geo. Russell. Co.. Inc. (M), 416 Jackson; Douglas 172 

EXPLOSIVES 



Hercules Powder Co. (M --'■ l: ~ I ' ;o 

National Lead Co. of CaL ,\1 l-.i ,1.11: I ...imlas 5560. 
Trojan Pow Jer Co. of Cal. i.\L.i,Ju .M.ukvi ,~,Miti .i'Jai. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

American Railway Express Co.. So Second; Kearny 3100. 

EXPRESS AND TRANSFER 



.\cme Transfer Co 


SSoTa 


vlnr 


Prospect 25. 












. Broat 


«av, (iraystone 200, 






Bekins \ 
Bri220l;ii 














vi' ■ ■ 




. 


< \\', 


l,in-n ,1 Keamy 3595. 






City Tr. 










;,hl,l,n HUlO. 
















i~ Kr.irnv 5270. 
















(v (lax : Keamy 3648. 






Geid.s 










11^ Co,. 4.56 McAllister; 


M: rket 


Hans.ii 1 










.. ,irnv; Keamy 3953. 






King ,\ ' 










> 1040. 






Lark 'li,. 










Ill 4191. 






MiUel 111 


*l,l.,.,l ~ 








1 Turk; FrankUn 531. 








dolpli I-- 


1- 


',(1 


Kddj 


, West S2S. 






Red Line 




Cn 


:u 


7-361 


Ellis; Franklin 750. 






Signal Transfer S: 


stnra 




Co,. 


250 Polk: Franklin 318 






Union Transfer Co.. Fe 




HW? 


,: Douglas S3. 






Wilson B 


OS. Co.. 


1636 


M 


drket 


Park 271. 







Field -Ernst Envelope Co. 

Envelope Manufacturers 

45 Fremont Street 
SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Davenport 1720 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



EXTRACTS AND FLAVORS 

r'aswell <U-«> \V <"o I-M ^ 43S Second; Sutter GOo^. 

Oemart'ini, I- m h <<i M-«i. IL'.'i-ia.'; Cla> : Kearny 354. 

POLOEE. J A & CO M , 11)1 Howard. DaveniKi 
OETZ, M. & CO , INC. lUi, II. 
Herrmann, '.<•■ < " " "Hi Fn.. 
JONES-TBIEEBACH CO M 



Kearny 1^00. 
tiarflcld lUSO. 
-M7 Battery: Kearny 2761. 



MaiJUard & SrhraK-.Ml H-.M .\ -'"3 falifonila; Sutter 6930. 

NICHOLS. W. R W CO . INC 1) , 24-30 Main: Davenport 153S. 

Ricser. Paul *: <'.■ M 11^-1-1 1 in;!: Kearny 3474. 

SchiliinK A A: Cm M ). S(.<ond and tolsom: Keamy 1201. 

TvliT s'll \- Son .Mi, l.Vl Uavis: .Sutter 1364. 

Inited Ciiltc... <'or|».rTilii.ii I-Wi, 306-308 Sacramento: GarHeld 87. 

VIRGINIA DARE EXTRACT CO., INC.. 24-30 Main: Douglas 6830. 

FACE AND SCALP SPECIALISTS 

Maud K., I»i6 C.ian . Douglas 124. 



FEATHERS 

Sunset Feather Co. (M). SUteentli and Harrison: Hemlock 3030. 

FEED 

(SEE ALSO BAT ALSO ORAIN) 
Albers Bros. Milling Co iMi. 332 Pine; Sutter 6101. 
California Charcoal Co. I M ) " ' -•■-• 

California Hawaiian Milllnf. 

California Sea Products Co m i' "' iii'.i i-me: sutter i 

Cook. H. H. (J-MAI. 465 Calil - - ,".725. 

Coulson Poultry & Stock K... .i ' I i ( al. 

Croley. Geo. H. Co , Inc. (M ■ I .it l,.rket 3100. 

Custom Feed Mills. 925 Bryant; Market 2M27. 

Dial Grain Co (W(. 465 California: Douglas 6545. 

Evans-Breckenridge. 405 Caliromia: Sutter 362. 

Eyre, Edw. L. i Co. (I-E). 465 California: Kearny 289. 

Himt & Behrens. Petaluma, Cal. 

Kettenbach Grain Co.. 465 California: Garfield 5884. 

Mailliard & SchnUedell (B-MAi (Specialties). 203 California: 

McDaniel. D. L . 465 California; Garfield 955. 

McNear. Geo. P. Co.. Petaluma. Cal 

Mason Bv-Products Co. iM). 2 Pine; Douglas 6720. 

Means MlUlm! Co , 1K3I Harrison: Market S270. 

Gutsen. Jas. B.. <>25 Bryant: Market2927 

Petaluma Co-Gperativi 

Producers Hay Co 



Pryt 



, Riclii 



, M. Co.. Petalu 



md Berry: Market 356. 
...rfleld 0910. 
I);ivenp<irt 2160. 



FILING EQUIPMENT 

Baker- Vawter Co. (M-FB). 1.34 Fremont ; Sutter 51.33. 

Crocker. H. S. i Co. (Ri. 565 Market: Douglas 5SO0. 

Enterprise Paper Box Co. (M), 73 Beale: Davenport 1772. 

General Flreprooflng Co. (FB), 20 Beale: Douglase616. 

Jamestown Metal Product* Co. (FB). 444 Market: Garfield 59.54. 

Kardex Co. (FB), 36 Second: Sutter 1630. 

Kaslidex. Inc.. 369 Pine; Kearny 340. 

Pacific Manifolding Book Co. (M), 210 Post: Sutter 118. 

Patrick & Co. (M). 560 Market; Kearny 1107 

Kucker-Fuller Desk Co.. 677 Mission; Douglas 3700. 

.Schwaharher JYey Stationery Co. (R). 7.35 Market: Garfield 5700. 

Visible Records Bureau. 134 Fremont: Garfield 4738. 

Weber, C. F & Co.. 601 Mission; Douglas 3601. 

Wcntworth. F. W. & Co . 39 Second; Sutter 4424. 

Yawman & Erhc Mfg. Co.. 132 Sutter: Douglas 2357. 

FILTERS 

CALIFORNIA FILTER CO., INC. i.Mi. 465 CaUfomia: Kearny 1399. 
Duplex Percolator Co. <.r San Francisco (Water), 20.'>4 Market : Pk. 72S5 
BENDT, JOSHUA, IRON WORKS (M). 75 Fremont: Kearny 3430. 
Oliver Continuous Filter (.'o. tM i. .503 Market ; Sutter 2475. 

FINANCIAL AGENTS 

Abrams. Henry M. Co.. 41 Sutter; Keamy 979. 

Cole-French Co.. 220 Montgomery: Garfield 660. 

Commercial Debenture Finaiicc Co., 942 Market; Keamy 7206. 

Cox. F. G.. 681 Market. 

Miller. H. M. A.. 34 T Montgomery: Keamy 1600. 

Snodgrass &, Myers Inc. (B), 333 Pine; GarfleM 5800. 



FIRE APPARATUS 



.\meric:an Ln Franc Fire Engine Co, 
.\utomatic Sprinklr Co, of .\merica (KB 
BROWN & PENOILLT, INC., Central Statii 

Folsom; Hemlrick 3M74. 
COOPER, BOWARD. CORP. OF CAL., (St 

Howard: Heml.x-k 45s7. 
Fire Protection Epsfini^' 
Garralt. W. T. A; ('■. " 
Greenljerg's, M s.,iiv 



1 Alarm Sysnems), 1264 
utz Fire Enghies), 1246 

; Douglas 2880. 

Fremont ; Kearny 168, 

Kolsom: Sutter 2040. 

irannan: Garfield 6700. 

.Newbegin Fire .\|.pli,. <'■■ Inc.. Oakland. Cal.: Oakland 3218. 

PACIFIC AUXILIARY FIRE ALARM CO.. 703 Market: 
Pacific Fire Extinguisher Co., 440 Howard; Sutter 766. 
Pyrene Mfg. Co., 977 Mission; Sutter 11.5 

FIRE AND BURGLARY PREVENTION 



FELTS 

PARAFFINE CO., INC. (M). 475 Itraiman; Douglas 9420. 

FENCE CONTRACTORS 

STANDARD FENCE CO (Ml. 432 Bryant. Douglas 2676. 

FENCES AND FENCING 

American Chain Co (FB). 821 Market: Sutter 6470. 
California Wire Cloth Co. (M). 587 Mission: Keamy 7R9<. 
Michel & Pfeffer Iron Works (M). 1415 Harrison: Hemlock 3080. 
Monarch Iron Works (M). 262-264 Seventh: Market 8404. 
R.H-blings. John A. Sons Co. of Cal. (FB), 624 Folsom: Keamy 2426. 
STANDARD FENCE CO. (M). 432 Bryant; Douglas 2676. 

FERRY OPERATORS 



MonticeUo Steamship Co.. Clay St. Wharf; Sutter 371. 
Northwestern Pacific Railroad Co.. Ferry Bldg.. Sutter SoOO. 
Richmond-San Rafael Ferry Co.. 564 Market; Garfield 5545. 
Southern Pacific Co.. Ferry Bldg.: Davenport 4000. 



FERTILIZERS 



Baker. H. J. & Bro. il-El. 503 Market: Sutter 1941. 

Blunter. A. M (Ji. 433 CaUfomia; Sutter 1396. 

California Charcoal Co.. 311 California: Garfield 459. 

California Fertilizer Works (M). 444 Pine: Douglas 3745. 

California Sea Products Co. (M). 369 Pine: Sutter 5877. 

Layton. John Co.. Inc. (I). 510 Battery; Garfield 1S4. 

Pacific Bone Coal & Fertilizing Co. (M). 485 California; Sutter 7117. 

Pacific Guano and Fertilizer Works (M). 215 Market ; Davenport 313. 

Pacific Manure & Fertilizer Co.. 429 Davis; Keamy 1542, 

Pacific Portland Cement Co. (Ml. S21 Market: Garfield 4100 

PACIFIC SILICATE CO. (M). 351CaUfomia;Plant. Redwood City. Cal: 

Keamy 1330. „ „ 

Union Superphosphate Co. (M). 215 Market: Davenport 313. 



FISH PACKERS 



Booth. F. E. Co. (M). 110 Market: Douglas 7300. 

Bristol Bay Packing Co. (M). 141 Clay; Sutter 2493. 

Carmel Caimlng Co. (M) (Caimed). 110 Market: Sutter 1876. 

Hovden. K. Co.. Inc. (M) (Sardines and Tuna). 268 Market. 

Hume. G. W. Co. (M) (Caimed). 311 California: Sutter 693. 

Mailliard & Schmieden (B-M.M (Canned), 203 CaUfomia: Sutter 6920. 

Xaknek Packing Co.. 2 Pine; Douglas 6640. 

North American Mercantile Co. (I) (Crab). 318 Front: Sutter 655. 

ONeiU. Eugene M. (B-M.\). 112 Market: Sutter 247. 

Paladini. A.. Inc. (W-R). 540-554 Clav: Sutter 6233. 

Peterson. Frank B. Co., 2 Pine: Douglas 6640. 

Sakai Co. (1-R). 16S4 Post: West 2779. 

San Francisco International Fish Co.. 535 Washington: Keamy 1700. 

Shim Yuen King & Co. d-E) (.Sardines). )v49 Grant Ave.: China 45. 

Union Fish Co.. 141 Clay: Keamy 2165 

Western California Fish Co.. 556 Clay; Keamy 4360. 

YamateBros. (I) (Crab), 510 Battery: Garfield 3457. 



FITTINGS 



PIPE 

w Montgomery; Doug. 1560. 



TaUow Co. (M). 1599 Ev 



Works: 1501 Eva 



Byron Jackson Pump Mfg. Co. (M). 55 Ne 

Crane Co., 301 Braiman: Sutter 7S40. 

JeweU Steel & MaUeable Co.. 1375 Potrero Ave.: Mission 26. 

Pacific Foimdry Co. (M), Eighteenth and Harrison: Mission 1105. 

Stockham Pipe & Fitting Co. (FB). 324 Tosnsend; Garfield 5171. 

United States Cast Iron Pipe & Foundry Co. (FB), 681 Mkt.: Gar. 5140, 

Weissbauin. G. & Co. Pipe Works (M). 133 Eleventh; Market 272. 

FIXTURES— DISPLAY 

Cohu, Mervyn D. (Wax), 109 New Montgomery: Keamy 496*. 
Ehlers. Charles W. & Son. 557 Mission: Douglas 7446. 
Kehoe Display Fixture Co. (M). 541 Market: Douglas 1270. 
Pahnenbergs. J. R. Sons. Inc.. 11 First: Douglas 5062. 
SUver. S. M., 785 Mission: Garfield 126. 
Worley & Co., 525 Market. 



PACIFIC SILICATE COMPANY 

Industrial Chemicals 

B.\LFOUR BUILDING, S.\N FRANCISCO 
Phone Keamy 1330 



California Filter Company 

THE MERCHANTS E-XCHANGE - SAN FRANCISCO 

WATER FILTERS and SOFTENERS 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



FIXTURES— LIGHTING 

Boyd Lighting Fixture Co. iM), 27S Post; Sutter 17. 

Brass and Bronjie Lighting Fixture Co. (W-R). 1061 Mission; Mki. 6866. 

BurtchaeU. J. W. (M). 434 LarKJn; Franklin 1002. 

CoUonan Electric & Mfg. Co.. 3211 Mission; Mission 7282. 

Day. Thotnas Co. (M). 725 Mission; Douglas 1573. 

Holzinueller. C. J. (M). 1108 Howard; Park 6169. 

Incandescent Supply Co., 726 Mission; Douglas 6130. 

Kovon Mfg. Co. (M). 444 Hayes; Walnut 1705. 

Moe-Biidges & Co (W). 933 Mission; Douglas 64S0. 

Robeils Mfg. Co. (M). 663 Mission; Douglas 6575. 

United Lighting FL-rture Co. IM), 1149 Mission; Park 676. 

FIXTURES— PORCELAIN 

Crane Co.. 301 Brannan; Sutler 7S40. 

Pacific Sanitary Mfg. Co. (Mi. 67 New MontgomeiT: Garfield 105. 

Richmond Sanitary Mfg. Co, i W) (Plumbing). 441 Second; Park 650. 

FIXTURES— STORE AND OFFICE 



tnt; Market 2457. 
1120 Mission; Market 794. 
). (M). 29.S Eighth; Hemlock 4091. 
Mission; Dotigla; 



nond Patent s1im^\- 
Ehlers. Charlre W . A: ■ 

Emanuel. L. & E . Im- .M . 2665 Jones; Graystone 6400, 
Empire Planing Mill iM,. 750 Bryant; Kearny 770. 
Fensky. Geo. & Co. (M). 761 Tehama: Park 1671. 
Fink & Schindler Co.. 226 Thirteenth; Market 474. 
Herrings Mill. Inc. (M). 557 Braiman; Kearny 1909. 
Home Mantifacturing Co. (M). 543-545 Braiman; Kearny 1514 
Kragen. Louts. Woodworking Co. (M i . 661 Golden Gate Ave. ;Mkt. 2450. 
Latham. A. J. Mfg. Co. (M/, 475 Bryant; Douglas 9171. 
Ijevi. S. CM). 239 Seventh; Market 2216. 
MuUen Mfg. Co. (M). 64 Rausch; Hemlock 2858. 
Muller & Petersen (il), 243 Seventh; Market 9110. 
Oakley Lumber & Mill Co. (M). 1430 Powell; Kearny 3385. 
Ostlund & Johnson (M). 1901 Bryant; Market 3212. 
Ostrowskl. Frank S. & Son (M), 1144 Howard; Market 6436, 
Progress Woodworking Co. CM). 2751 Sixteenth; Market 5707. 
Schemp, J. F. & Co. (M). 411 Shotwell; Mission 3294. 
Western Fixture and Show Case Co. (M). 716 McAUister. 

FLAGS AND BANNERS 

Emerson Manufacturing Co. (M). 161 Natoma; Douglas 2721. 
Simpson & Fisher. Inc. (MA). 340 Steuart: Davenport 3041. 
VOWINKEL, HENBY (M). 348-350 Hayes: Market 7295. 
Weeks-Howe-Emerson Co. (M), 90 Market; Douglas 869. 

FLANNELETTE W^AR 

Ahronheim & Co. CMA-W). 821 Market: Douglas .i4.94. 

American Import Co.. Inc. tM-I-J) (Children's i, 16 First ; Kearny 2067. 

Bauer Bros. & Co. CW). 83 First; Douglas 731. 

Dinkelspiel. L. Co.. Inc. (W). 125 Battery: Douglas 1900. 

Fleischman. M. R. CM). 15 Battery: Kearny 4741. 

Greenebaum. WeU & Michaels fW) iTSIen's). 740 Mission: Kearny 4548. 

Moore. Walton, N. Dry Goods Co. (\V). Mission and Fremont: Daven. 841. 

Normandin Bros. Co. CM). 330 Mission; Kearny 2S91. 

Reynolds. G. W. & Co. (M). 120 Battery: Douglas 4136. 

Roeentbal, Maurice (W). 49 Battery: Kearny 7213. 



FLOORING 



■ MontRomery: Douglas 6565. 
Co. (M) (Bridge). Tenth and Brya 
Certain-teed Products Corp. <M). 315 Montgomery: Sutter 2110. 
INLAID FLOOB CO., 600 Alabama; Mission 1575. 
McWilUanis-Maroskv Co.. 55 New Montgomer>"; Garfield 4980. 
Malott & Peterson (M-J), 3221 Twentieth: Atwater 1600. 
Parafflne Companies. Inc. (M). 475 Brannan; Douglas 9420. 
Phoenix Sidewalk Light Co. (M). 317 Harriet; Market 4565. 
Rock Products Co. (Composition). 582 Market; Kearny 7461. 
Van Fleet^Freear Co. (Cork). 557 Howard; Sutter 4073. 



FLORISTS 



Avansino Bros. & Co. (R), 257 Geary: Douglas 3880. 
Gooch, A. J. (R), 1036 Hyde; Franklin 208. 
Jaeger. F. C. & Sons (R). 141 PoweU; Douglas 4946. 
Joseph. Benj. M. (K). 233 Grant Ave.: Douglas 7210. 
Le\'in. Herman (R). 1803 Fillmore; West 4615. 
PeUcano. Rossi & Co. (R). 123 Kearny: Douglas 426. 
PODESTA & BALDOCCHI (R). 224 Grant Ave.: Kearny 4975. 
Shellgrain & Ritter (R). 14.8 Kearny: Kearny 3999. 
Stappenback, Chas. <R). 1217 Polk; Franklin 314. 
Stein. Albert O. (R), 1150 Sutter; Franklin 7120. 



FLOUR MILL PRODUCTS 

Albers Bros. MiUing Co. (M). .332 Pine: Sutter 6161. 

California Hawaiian Milhng. 330 Ritch: Kearny 5529. 

Centennial Mill Co.. 485 CaUfornia: Sutter 3289. 

Coast-Dakota Flour Co.. 150 California: Douglas 2848. 

Cook. H. H.. 465 California: Douglas 5725. 

Dalton. H. L.. 465 California: Sutter 4715. 

Enclnal Mills. Oakland. Cal. 

Evans-Breckeru-idge. 465 California; Sutter 362. 

Ferguson. A. S., 315 Montgomery: Douglas 5567. 

Fisher Flouring Mills Co.. 465 California: Sutter 404. 

Globe Grain & Milling Co.. 465 California; Sutter 2745. 

Golden Eagle Milling Co.. 37 Dnimm: Douglas 5577. 

Gould. H., Co., 401 Washington. Oakland. Cal.: Lakeside 4695. 

Hartter, L. H.. 243 Davis; Douglas 4066. 

Hutton Flour & Warehouse Co., 465 CaUfornia: Kearny 126. 

McDaniel, D. L.. 465 California: Garfield 955. 

Means Milling Co.. 1831 Harrison: Market 8270. 

Moore Fergtison & Co. (W). 244 California: Kearny 1278. 

Phillips Milling Co. (M), 310 CaUfornia: Sutter 5864. 

Riverside Mill Co.. Reno, Nevada. 

San Francisco Milling Co., Seventh and Berry: Market 356. 

Seattle Flour MiU Co.. 465 CaUfornia: Sutter 2064. 

Sharp Flour Co., 315 Montgomery: Douglas 9073. 

Southern Pacific Milling Co.. 201 Sansome: Kearny 816. 

Sperry Flour Co.. 141 California: Sutter 3300. 

STIEFVATERS, 225 Sacramento: Douglas 6363. 

FLOWERS— ARTIFICIAL 



FOILS— TIN AND LEAD 

United States Foil Co. (FB). 500 Howard: Douglas 7834. 



FOLDERS— PHOTO 

California Card Mfg. Co. CM). 500 Potrcro Ave.: Maruet 2151. 

FRAMES— PICTURE 

BANFIELD-HULLINGEB CO. (M). 501-503 Geary: Prospect 3216. 
Schussler Bros. (M i (Wood and Composition). 326 Grove; Rlarket 962. 
VicKery, AiKdns & Tnrrey (Ri. 550 Sutter: Kearny 5371. 
West«m Portrait & Frame Co. (AV). 2026 Addison; Berkeley, Cal. 

FOOD PRODUCTS 

(SEE ALSO OBOCEBIES) 

Brown. A. A. Co. (B). 215 Market: Davenport 2040. 
California Conserving Co. (Til), 110 Market: Sutter 6420. 
Califomia-ItaUan Products. Inc. 314 Clay; Kearny 2783. 
Connor Sales Co. (MA), Hearst Bldg.: Garfield 6956. 
Goldberg. Wm. G. (MA). 48 Davis; Sutter 7256. 
HoSfman & Greenlee (B). 112 Market: Sutter 586. 




BRAND 



Food Products 

THE J. E. SHOEMAKER CO. 

San Francisco Oakland 



HARDWOOD FLOORING 



Incorporated 1897; since ther 

No better floors 

Laid an\^vhere. 

At reasonable prices; mostly 

In Bay Cities. 

Do it now. Give us a trial. 

For twL-nty-nine years we hai 
Laid and finished floors 
Of our own manufacture, 
Over acres and acres. 
Recent and Antique styles. 

Come and see our plants, 
On both sides of the bay. 



Inlaid Floor Company 

Incoipotated 1897 

Manufacturers 

PLAIN AND ORNAMENTAL FLOORS 

MACHINE FLOOR SANDING 

600 Alabama Street 

San Francisco 

4067 Watts Street, Emeryville 

Piedmont 5S1 Mission 1575 

Emer^-ville San Francisco 



SAN FRAN'CISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192(i 



FOOD PRODUCTS— Continued 

HOLCOHBE, R. A & CO. i lii. 24 C'^iromla: Kearny 2441. 



J E CO . INC 



\Varimnpon-Uuir to. iW-I),. 2 Pine; Douglas (H 10. 



.•r> ; Garfleld 1«4. 

til-: Sullcr .•JK40. 

iiltlesi. 203 Oalifomia: Sutter 6920. 

rnla; Sutler l.l.'il. 

Ml. 322 Uavia: Kearny 1640. 

: I)aveniM)rt 2240. 



FORCINGS 



American ForpeCo 
Kortick MfK. Co O 
Liberty Machine < 
Pacific KollinK Mill 
Pennington. tJeo. \V 



a: Sutler 2998. 

r 516. 

57 Twenty-sixth; Minion 5528. 



FORWARDING— FREIGHT 



Oavio. Til 
Dow. KranI 
Harper. K. 



,;!l. r:i;, Douglas 1B70. 
. \\ .[-■iinnton; .Sutter .558. 
liiM. r> Kearny 1072. 



1 & [lerrv. ml Market: DoUKlas 3464. 
Thomas. H H. '& Co.. .'ilO Battery: Sutter 4566. 



FOUNDRY EQUIPMENT 

Bulotti. C:. F. Macliinerj f 'o . K2'.l KoLsom. 

Butcher. 1.. H. Co iW-Di. 274 Urannan: Doudas 17.30 

Dixon. Joseph Crucible Co. (FBi. 444 .Market: Kearny 1CB2. 

Herljerts Machinery & Supply Co. (M,\-J-D). 140 Second: Kearny 4131. 

JiidKon .MfK. Co. (M) aloulds and Fl.-«k.s i . 604 Market: Sutter 8820. 

Kix Compressed .\ir i Drill Co. <M-MA). 400-404 Fourth: Kearny 2S73. 

FOUNDRY PRODUCTS 

.\merican Brake Shoe i Foundry Co .,f ( ;il M .1 New MontBomerj . 
Best Steel Cast inc Co. iM). .5S2 .Mark.l c,:iifi,-lil 11 
California Arii.slie Metal A Wire Co -M :M'i..ii.-, s, a enlh: Market 2162. 
COLUMBIA STEEL CORP. (.Mi. 21.i Market : Plant : PittsburK. Cal.: 

M:irk.l V7t,ll 
Da\ici,I' ("n .M. S07 Twcnty^econd: Mission 8021. 
Ent.riiri-.- l-.mrfirv Co. iMl, 2902 Nineteenth: Mission §63. 
(;.irr:.ii U T ,v I m i M iHrass' 2"I9 Fremont: Kearny 168. 

lin-ii rf s M ~.,ii>. ,M . iHras* 765 Fokom: Sutler 2040. 

HENDT JOSHUA. IRON WORKS (M). 75 Fremont: Works: Simny- 

\:il.' l-.il l^.-ariiv :u:mi 
.lewill M..1 ,>, Mi.ili.ilil. I'l. , l.!7.-. I'olrero.\ve. : Mission 26. 
Jiid.-iim .Mft ( .i M i.iil Market: Sutter 6S20. 
KinKMcll Br. - M Hn^s 444 -Vatoma: Garfield .ISSS. 
McKav K.iiiiHlti I,. M Seventwnth and Missouri: Park 293i>. 
Main iron W i.rk- \1 ^i\ .-nth and DaKpett : .Market - 



Pacific Bras* & Bronze Foundry (M I; 
Pacific Coast steel Co i.Mi. Rlalto Iti.! 
Pacific Foundry Co iMl. EiKhteenll. 
Pacific Rolling Mill Co (.Ml. 1100 Sm i. 
standard Brass i Bronze .MfK. Co. .M 
Western Pipe i Steel Co. (M). 444 Mar 



Marke 



Suiter 681. 



(h: Market 2631 



FOUNTAIN EQUIPMENT 



r>a\r'ni>ort 2S12. 



MAGNUS FRUIT PRODUCTS CO. M .'iOl Ho 



FRUIT 



Butler. F. W. & Son (R). Fer , 
California Fruit Distributor?- - ■ -■■' m d I i 
CaUfornia Fruit SellinK Ct> i' ' 
CaliforniaGrowersandShipi ■ - i ■ ! 

Colonial Grape Products C" 1 .i^i ■.! 
Demartini. L. Supply Co. iM-\\ . lJ.:-i:;.: < 



Doiigla 
ter 7236. 

i-arn\ -i:ti;0. 



- ■<ond:Doug.S020. 



FRUIT— Co«//7n<^(/ 



I & MaifKini iM > fFresh and Dritdi. 240 Drumm. 
tJarin. H. P. Co. (W;. 405 Sansome: Douidas 2451. 
(Joldberg. Bowen 4 Co. (W-Rl (Dried). 242 Sutter: Sutler 1. 
OuKgenhime & Co. (M) (Dried). \M California: Garfield 1984. 
Hau: Harry & Co. (E). 16 Caliromia: Douglas 1047. 
Hopkins T J C.i iWi. 430 Front: .Sutter .5715. 
Horst K 'i.nirns nrirdl. 2.35 Pine: Kearny 2655. 
IndiTif. .(. 'I I H ' ■■ Driid). 112 Market: Kearny 1974. 
Lcoi.i ■! I ' Inc (M),.')72-.'>76 FoLsom: Garfield SS74. 
Lloni I ■, t ■^ ! I..- Co. (Packing). 21 Columbus Ave.; Douglas 286.5. 



PionixT Km. I ii. -Inii,.. I. -." 
RosenlKTB B^..^ ,V l .i In. 1) 
Scatena. L. A ( M .v \ '.lih li 
SpilioiLs. John I; ; c ' ' I ..m Jl 
.Stewart Fruil < " \\ 



Traey-Waldn 



id: .Sutter 761. 

K.''. Second: Garfield 5814. 
VIRDEN CANNINO CO. .Mj (Canned). 1.55 Mont«omer) : Doug. 8185. 
White Bros. & Crum Co, (B). K5 Second: Sutter 2.576. 
Willits& Patterson (E) (Dried and Canned). I Drumm: Douglas 2510. 



FUMIGATING 



Bekins Van & StoraRO Co.. Thirteenth and Mission. Market 15 
Guarantee Fumigating: Co.. I'.tli Stcuarl : Davi-nport 725. 
Haslett Warehouse Co.. 60 California; Kearny 2.522. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS 

A8HLET A McMULLEN, .'l'.t'.l Sixth Ave : Pacific s4tM. 

Godeau. Julius s . 41 Van .Niss .\ve : .Market 711. 

Gray. N. & Co.. 1.545 Divisadero: West 4707. 

Haffiin. Joseph & .Sons. 1710 Sacramento: Grayslone 1905. 

Habted & Co.. 1123 Suiter: Franklin 123. 

Martin & Brown. 1515 Scott: West 10. 

Suhr. H. F. & Co.. 2919 Mission: Mission OS 

White. S. A.. 2200 Suiter: Wist 770 



FUR GARMENTS 



Alaska Siberi. 
Behlow. Inc 
Beniofr Bros 
Borck. L. J 

■ Br. s 



111 New Montgomery. 



\\ 



"UKlas 12.55. 
I Sutter 4726. 
ary : Sutter 6226. 



M-Hl. 112 Geary: Sutter 380. 
<t Douglas 2925. 
ram Ave. : Kearny 5277. 



(iarl 

OASSNER LOUIS, INC 

Hud*.ri li:l^ lui I .. J7J 

Jani.s ,^; IliillniMkil U j; 

Kantner. B . 47(> Gearv: Franklin 1352. 

LielHs, II, & Co, i.M-Ki. I(i7 Post: Garfield 6240. 

Morris. Robert iM). 2.39 Geary : Douglas 4763. 

Orgler. S, (M). 251 Kearny: Kearny 2521. 

Pinku*. Wm.. 1.33 Gearv: Sutter 2146 

Powell. J. L.. 742 Market: Sutter 7158. 

Salaman. J.. 355 Geary; Garfield 976. 

Stark's Millinery & Furs (R). 811 Market: Douglas IS 

Wallace, Robert (.M). 146 Geary: Garfield 3872. 

FURNACES 

Atlas Heating and Ventilating Co. (M). 557-567 Fourt 



Babe. 

Grali:.r;, T , > 
MANGRUM 



■k, C B. Co. iMi 



. r 32.35. 
Id 3877. 
Kearny 3155. 



FURNITURE 



. i Hnmn 
Barnes. L. E, :.M.\ , 1 
Beach-Robinson Co i . 
Berger Mfg. Co i FB 



Bradley. Milton Co. 



rin Market 794. 
::!;) Mission: Kearny 700. 
imtrv Douglas 6565. 
I ; f Garfield 4266. 



EARL FRUIT CO. 

Growers and Shippers California Fruits 

Wells Fargo Building. S.\N FR.\.NCISCO 



LOUIS GASSNER, Inc. 

FURRIERS 

112-114 GE.\RY .STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



CONSOLIDATED C.\R SERVICE SAVES IN FREIGHT RATES 





OFFICES 










Boston 




Phlladelpti 

















utomo biles — Merchandise 

Movement to and from Pacific and Atlantic seaboards and intermed: 
points. Communicate w-ith nearest office for rates and detailed informat; 

JUDSON FREIGHT FORWARDING COMPANY 
SHIPPERS' AGENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192() 



FURNITURE— Continued 



Breuner. John Co. iW-R) 
Butterfleld Furniture Co 
California Wall Bed V„_ 
CalUott. Henry J. B. iM \ 
Cohen. A. Furniture ("u 
Crocker. H. S. & Co 1; 
Day, ThnniMv c, ,\l ..■, 



.",soo. 



Dieri) 



725 Mission ; Douglas 1573. 
I, 1169 Folsom; Park 4590. 

[■■ward: Sutter 4996. 
■I , Market 382. 

.!199. 

■ ilumbus Ave.; Garfield 4020. 



S.53. 



General Fini 
Gougli Furnii 
Gullixson Bn 
Haas Wood A 
Hall-Glockk'T 
Harder. F H 
Keyword Wa 
Honi.'Mi^riiir, 

Karl 



Kloii«>> 



Schwabacher I 
Silver. S. 11 
Simmons Cc^ 
Sloane. W. ,\- . 

St*rlin'..- I !■■■: 
SulUiii I ' 
Swe\.l .! 
Tra\^i- - :-i. 



til; Market 474. 



iiiiry; Douglas 656.5. 
I Inuglas 6616. 
■ nilock 1442. 



McC'i.Tiii « 1 
MarslKill \ - 
Metropolitai 



New York Furnii ■]■■■■.>. [u.i 
Newman. Leslie li, ..M.\;, I 
Oakley Lumber & -Mill Co. 
Ostrowski. Frank S. ..S: Son 
Phoenix Desk & Chair Co. 
Premier Bed & : 
Redliek-Ne« u 
Reid Bros.. In 
Rucker-Fullii 
San Francisci^ 



Will li'.;- .'■■■ Market; Douglas 34,s 
I ■■ iMl, 1(117 Fnlsom: Market 3392. 
I-W-E). 832 Mission; Garfield 2335. 



.Market 6436. 



\ 



735 Market; Gar. 



: Garflpld 2838. 



GARAGES 



Bohemian Garage. 415 Tayhii; i-'ranklin i;i37. 
Denman Garage, 902 Busli !'■■ ^p^^ t li.'-n 
Fairmont Garage. 12.55 C;ili(' ■■■■■ i I'c -; ■it 5.545. 
Hamilton .Square Garage i^-i 1.11. w . si 141. 
Highway Garage. 1234 Piiii 1 1 1 !i 1 ; 

Hoffman. Dan E.. 125 VaN I 

Hoyle's Garage. 1945 H\^^ ■ 1 Vi; 

Kelly. P. .1.. 731 Van X.ss \v rn,p..i r.llil. 
Merwin. George S (■■, , l'iir,l'iilk 1 .i,i\ si.me 792. 
Nathan. S. & Sons, lii^ .l.-nksmi K, .hh^ L'M.-fS. 
Palace Garage. 11'.'. .^u\rn,s^>ii , I>nn[.'l;is _M;i, 
Pearson Garage, .ll,'-. Hush: li.int'las J1L-(i 
Post-Taylor Garage. 530 Taylor; Pnspecl 331. 
St. George Garage. 410 Bush; Garfield 165, 
U. S. Garage. 750 Bush; Garfield 713. 

GARDENERS^LANDSCAPE 

Bullock, Fred W,, 703 Market ; Garfield 4177, 



GAS APPLIANCES 



Babcock, C, B. Co. (M-Di, 



GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANIES 



rnrnia; Sutter 3246. 
.1100. 

lenport 1234. 
nv 2181. 
s Ninth; Market 42.36. 



GASES 

Certified Laboratory Products Co.. Inc. (Ml (Nilrous Oxid). 1 

Folsom; Market 4227. 
Mason By-Products Co. (M! (Carbonic). 2 Pine; Douglas 6720. 
Pacific Silicate Co. (M) (Carbonic). 351 CaUfomia; Kearny 1330. 



GASFITTING 



(SEE ALSO PLUMBINGi 

Ahlback & Maver (M). S5 Di.iland .Maikil 4426 
Snook. Frederick W. (M). .V.m Clay; Kearny 1374, 



GASOLINE 



RICHFIELD OIL 



y : Kearny 4800. 
, Kearny 989. 
nport 1420. 
■ Id 6100. 



! Co. (W). 760 Market; Sutter 3176. 

GALVANIZING WORK 

Galvanizing Works IM). 1176 Harrison; Market 1163. 



GATES— IRON 

(SEE ALSO FENCES) 



Hendy. Joshua. Iron Works (M). 75 Fremont; Kearny 3430. 
Michel & Pfelfer Iron Works (M). 1415 Harrison; Hemlock 3080. 
Monarch Iron Works IM), 262-264 Seventh; Market 8404. 
West Coast Wire & Iron Works (M), 861-863 Howard; Douglas 4397 



California Fruit Distributors 

Organized for a nalion-imide, sane distribution of Deciduous Tree and Vine Fruits 

WiLMER SiEG, Secretarj'-Manager 
WELLS FARGO BUILDING - SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Our service obtainable by all shippers of fruits through any of the following members: 



Earl Fruit Company Pacific Fruit Exchange 

F. B. McKevitt Company Pioneer Fruit Company 

Producers Fruit Co. of Cal. 



ChasS. E. Virden 
W.J. Wilson & Son 



iO salaried offices throughout the East; 150 distributing brokers 

Efficiency of Distribution-Dependability of Service 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



GEARS 

Herzog Electric & EnelnoerinK Co. (M). 172 Steuart; Davenport 4257, 

Johnson Gear Co.. Berkeley, Cal. 

Marwedel. C, W. (J-I)-MA). 70 First; Dougla-f 4 1 SO. 

Mitchell, J. F. Machine & Ccar Works (M). 840 Folsom. Sutler 410, 

Padflc Gear & Tool Works (M), 1035 Fol.«)ni; MarKct 880. 

GELATINE— EDI BLE 

Crjstal Gelatine Co.. Fairfax Ave. and Kankin: Mission 808, 

GLASS 



Habenicht \- (I-. 
Hayes. J. I' \ < 

llUnoLs r.i 

MacBelli )■ ,..'.- 
Pacific < 



iitli iind Folsom; Market 415. 
New .Montgomery: Kearny 7231. 
. .Seventh and Irwin: Market 328. 
1026 Mission: Market 72K. 
7 Commercial; Kearny 160. 



8chiLssler Bros. (W). 320 f: 

Smith. P. A. Co. (W-K). 638 Kourth; Sutler 4l.'>l. 

Tyre Bros. Glass Co. (W). 608 Townsond: Heriilock 3113. 



Block. H. & 
Carson Glove Co. 
Consolidated Gl< 
Elkus Co. (M-\V 
Fownes Bros. & ' 
Greenebaum, W 
Gruhn Bros. (Wc 
Kayser, Julius & 



Roos Bfi- 
RDsentlia] 
Steinber*;. 
Woods Exi 



GLOVES 



(M). 14<i-l.-.I : 



iliai. 
.uKlas78Sl, 
HUT 8744. 



1 and Fremont; Dav. 841. 



GLUES AND PASTE 



American Olm 
Burd. Win . \ 
Butcher. I - M 
Robinson i I.. ■ 
Russia Ccrm ri 
Western Mt-.ii 
Western TaUu 



iid K;inkin; Mission 808. 



Pacific Coast Glass Company 

FACTORIES and MAIN OFFICE 

S.\N FRANCISCO, CALIFORNL\ 



TRADEMARK 




The Sign of Quality For Over 60 Years 

Flint, Green and Amber 

Glass Bottles, Jars 

and Tumblers 

The |use of scientifically developed ap- 
paratus and the exercise of an exacting 
physical and chemical control have 
enabled us to create 

A NEW STANDARD OF QUALITY 
All Food Products Sell Better in Glass 

BRANCHES 

Seattle Portland Los Angeles 

Ogden Salt Lake City 

Honolulu, T. H. Wellington, N. 2 



Hankernnn < : i 
Hart-Hlli (ir 
Horst. K. rill 



GRAIN 

Adanis. Schwab i Adams (W). 465 CaUfomia; Garfield 6101 

Adanw. W. W, & Co. (B), 465 CaUfomia; Garfield JjClBl. 

Albers Bros. MllUnK Co. (W), ,332 Phie; Sutter 6161 

Allen. W. H. (R), 245 California; Douglas 218 

Arendt, J. N, (B), Ploasanton. Cal. 

Baker Sc Co., Inc.. Modesto. Cal. 

Beanston. Geo. A. (W-K), 240 Battery; Keariij 4100 

Berg, William (B). 454 CaliTomla. 

Berringcr & Russell IE). 1000 Sbcth: Hemlock K61. 

Blum, NI. & Co.. 465 California; Kearny 558. 

Blunienthal, Alfred J.. 465 CaUfomla; Kearny ,558 

Bray Bros. (R). 200 Sacramento; Douglas .3127. 

Bruns. J. C, C (Rl. 150 Clay: Kearny 5986 

Cutter. E. B. (R). 465 California; Kearny 518 

Dial Grain Co. f\V). 465 California; Douglas 6545. 

Evans-Breckenrldge. 465 California; Sutter .362. 

Eyre. E. L. i Co. (l-E). 465 CaUfomla; Kearny 289 

Frankenhelmer Bros.. Stockton. Cal. 

Goss. Chas. E. & .Son (W). 465 California; Douglas 960. 

^„..ij .i.iiii- r. . ., n_ 465 California; Kearny 112. 



K-W). 465 California; Garfield .5.520. 
' ilifomla; Garfield .377. 
. ( 'alifomla; Kearny 671. 
-'■ir. Pine: Kearny 2655. 

JIM ' rlihimia; Sutter 6462. 

I III r. Douglas 921. 

!'■ - I ir.irnla; Douglas 4802. 

1 .Hi 111., (iarfleld 5884. 



McDanlel. D. L. (R), 465 CaUfomla; Garfield 955. 

McNeal. E. P.. Colusa. Cal. 

McNear. Geo. P. Co, . Petaluma. Cal. 

McNear. G, W. (I-E). 400 Sansome; Keamy 989. 

Miller. A. C. (R). 219 Battery: Douglas 4172. 

Moore. Ferguson & Co. <W). 244 Califoraia; Keamy 1278. 

MuUor. Chas. W.. 405 CaUfomia; Douglas 160. 

.Newman Bros. Co. (R). 110 Market; Keamy 1981. 

.Newman. Louis J.. 110 Market: Keamy 1981. 

Newman. Simon Co.. 110 Market; Keamy 1981. 

Petaluma Co-operative Mercantile Co.. Petaluma. Cal. 

Producers Hay Co. (R). 176 Townsend; Sutter 350. 

Prytz. Geo. G.. Richmond. Cal. 

Ratio. John M. 4 Bro.. 137 Drumm; Keamy 339. 

Russell & Macaulay. Sacramento, Cal. 

Salz. Edward. Inc.. Decoto, Cal. 

Salz, E. & Son (R), 465 California; Douglas 921. 

Salz. Ferdinand. 465 California; Graystnnc 1087. 

San Francisco Milling Co. (W), Seventh and Berry; Market 3,56 

Sawyer Grain Co., 465 CaUfomia; Garfield 6916. 

Scott. A. W. Co. (Wl. 215 Market: Davenport 2160. 

Smsheimer & Co. (R). 149 CaUfomia: Keamy 2401. 

Smith-RiddeU Co. (Wl. 582 Market ; Sutter 3153. 

Sperry Flour Co. (W). 141 CaUfomia; Sutter 3300. 

Stephens, Thos. & Mattel. Woodland. Cal. 

Stem. J. & Co., Inc.. 465 California. 

Strauss & Co. (R). 465 California; Garfield 394. 

SuiUvan. F. J. & Co. (R). 310 California; Sutter 808, 

Volmer, Rudolph (R), 465 CaUfornia: Keamy 1750. 

Volmer, W, W. (R), 465 CaUfomia; Keamy 1750, 



Westrope, C, B., 465 CaUfornia: Garfield 1782. 



Asti Grape Products C. 
CaUfomia-Italian Pn di 
CaUfornia Wine A.s.si«i; 
Italian-Swiss Colony i! 



GRAPE PRODUCTS 



Asti. Cal.: Sutter 6154, 



GREASES AND TALLOW 



Bissinger & Co, (J-B-E), 555 Front; Sutter 5343. 
CaUfomia TaUow Works. Inc.. 214 Front: Garfield 548. 
Dixon. Joseph Crucible Co. (PB), 444 Market; Keamy 1082, 
McGulHck, J. R. & Co. (M). 168 Steuart; Davenport 1625. 



FULLER &GOEPP 

M.anufacturcrs of 

Mirrors and Art Qlass 

Jobbers in Glass for all Building Purposes 

Automobile Glass 

Plate Glass Tops for Furniture 



San Francisco: 32 Page Street, Market 49) 
Oakland: IIth C'' Jackson Streets, Lakeside 7272 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, in2(i 




UNFAILING 
in its combined 
qualities of speed, 
power and mileage 
plus easier starting. 

Winter or summer, rain 
or shine, year in and year 
out, you know that Rich- 
field is always the fine^ 
gasoline you can buy. 



PICHLUBF 




vW FRANCISCO BUSINRSS. AI'RII. 14. lii-'ii 



I^^H/ND THE COrDrKDCATEA- 




/C)UR new puhlica- 
^y tion "To Europe 
Through America" 
and our National 
Parh folders contain 
detailed information 
which will he of as- 
sistance, in filanning 
>0UT trip. We will 
mail thcrn any where 
upon request. 



J. F. MOSES 

Assutiint General Passenger Agent 

601 Market Stieet 

San Francisco, Caiiiomia 



Railway System 

proxndes an unequalled trans-continental 
transfxirtation service coimecting the im- 
portant cities of the United States. 

The route traverses the America of 
humming activity, through the monu- 
ments of a prehistoric civilization, and 
reaching world famous scenic spots — 

Yosemite Valley and Big Trees 

Grand Canyon National Park 

Petrified Forest 

Mesa Verde National Park 

Colorado Rockies 

may be included in your SANTA FE 

itinerary en route east. 



W. J. BLACK 

Passenger Traffic Mariager 

Railway Exchange Building 

Chicago, Illinois 



JAS. B. DUFFY 

General Passenger Agent 

Kerckhofl BuUding 

Los .Angeles, Caiiiomia 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



GREASES AND TALhOW—Continned GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS-CoMiwrM^cf 



Shell Co. of California (M). 200 Bush; Garfield 6100. 
Standard Oil Co. (Mj. 225 Bush: Sutter 7700. 
Sumner. V,'. B. & Co. Inc.. 220 Townsend: Kearny 3337. 
Union OH Co. of Cal.. 220 Montgomery; Sutter 1400. 



GRILLE WORK 



-ft."*! Florida; Mis, oS. 
Hemlock 3080. 
k.'t 8404. 
^ I'olsom; Market 35S5. 



Central Iron Works (Mi. 20.50 B 
Michel & Pfefter Iron Works >I 
Monarch Iron Works (M ■ _'i>_'._' 
Peerless Ornameutal Iruii .v I'.ii- 

Roberts Mfs. (■". iMi.K.i::; ^li.-i .ml!,,. (■.::, 

Schrader Iron Works. In. M , 1_|T il.mi^.ni Mission337. 
Sims & Grav Iron Works (-\1 1. .5.511 Bivant : i-iarticid 1695. 
West Coast Wire & Iron Works (M). S61-S63 Howard; Douglas 439' 
Western Iron Works (M). 141 Beale; Davenport 2575. 

GRINDING^COMMERCIAL 

Cro\\-n Ore Mills M). 1919 San Brimo Ave.; .\nvater 3300. 

GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS 

Bulottl. J. & Co. (R), 2201 Steiner; West 1582. 

Costello. Geo. (Rj. 2699 Howaid; Atwater3806. 

Danvers Market (R(. 4697 Eighteenth: Hemlock 2896. 

De Bemardi. D. F. & Co. Inc. (W), 259 Front; Kearny 730. 

Delanev Bros. Inc. (AV). 134 Sacramento; Sutter 5800. 

Dodge Sweeney & Co. (W). Third and Berr>-: Douglas 6800. 

Foster. S. ..t Co. (W). 59 Main; Davenport 246. 

Gatt. Paul (Ri. 800 Cortland Ave.; Mission 7042. 

Goldberg Bowen & Co. (W-R). 242 Sutter; Sutter I. 

Haas Bros. (Wj. Third and Channel; Garfield 1234. 

Hartter, L. Co. (W). 339 Davis; Kearny 1891. 

Holcombe. R. A. & Co. (B), 24 California. 

Hooper & Jennings (W). 100 Howard; Davenport 900. 

Ishimitsu. S. Co. (W). 225 Clay; Sutter 2359. 

Jacobson-Eeimers Co. (W I. 148 Davis: Garfield 2801. 

Jenny Wren Stores. Inc. iRi; 149-151 Bluxome: Kearny 1473, 

Johnson Bros. Inc. (Rl, 2183 Fillmore; West 240. 

KoCkosBros. (W), 779 Da ' " 



LunChong& Co. (Ri. 



Mailhard ^ Schmieden 1 
McLEAN, L. D. CO. I-' 

Martha Wasliington Gror 
Martin-Camm Co. (W i , l 
Matteucci Bros. Co. CWj. 
Matt«ucci & Vannucci tR 



fni-nia; Sutter 6920. 
Ill-; Prospect 1, 

K). 112 Market; Douglas 4127. 
, Kearny 4796. 
utter 5178. 
; Kearny 2116. 

. Gar. 791. 



Xewbauer. J. H. & Co. (\V). Berrv and Channel; Douglas 6868. 

OLooney. Madigan. Buckley & Co. (W), 517 Da%TS; Sutter 2386. 

Peters Bros. (R). 901 Cole; Park 360. 

Rothschild. John & Co. Inc. iWi. 105 Market; Davenport 3340. 

SakaiCo. (I-R). 1684 Post; West 2779. 

Scheer Si Co. fW). 314 Front: Kcainy 3.3BS. 

Schimiacher Bros. OVI. 323 I'r 



Schwabacher Bros. & Co. 
SHOEMAKEB. J. E. CO. INC 

Shim Yuen Hing & Co. II-F. ' ^ I 
Skaggs. O. P. (R). 117 



Snow, Louis T, 
Sunshine st< 
Supreme Focd Shop 



Wellman, Peck & Co. (W), 



rSIO. 



. > k 14.83. 

M.iiket: Douglas 7200. 
1 1 :ind Channel; Douglas9400. 

:'03S. 

Kearny 1672. 

l>:iVfnport 2522. 

nMUglas4406. 

■kcl 5436 
. " I ;arfield 3500. 



GYPSUM— AGRICULTURAL 

PACIFIC POETLAND CEMENT CO. (M). 821 Market; Garfield4100. 

GYPSUM— PARTITION TILE 

PACIFIC POETLAND CEMENT CO. (M). 821 Market: Garfield 4100. 

HAIR— ANIMAL 

Bissinger & Co. (J-B-E). 
~ M) 

HAIR GOODS 



HAIRDRESSING 



BON VOYAGE BASKETS 




The ideal remembrance for anyone going on a 
trip is one of McLean's Bon Voyage Baskets. 
Your departing friends will be delighted to find 
one of these gorgeous baskets awaiting them. 
Our connections enable us to deliver them to any 
steamer or train leaving — 



San Francisco 
Los Angeles 
San Diego 
Seattle 
Vancouver, B. C. 



New York 

Boston 

New Orleans 

Quebec 

Montreal 



Prices range from $5.00 to $50.00. We do not 
ship Bon Voyage Baskets by Express or Parcel 
Post, 



L. D. MCLEAN COMPANY 

Two Stores: 60 Geary St, and 1158 Sutter St,, SAN FRANCISCO Telephone PROSPECT 1 



KEY: B— Broker 



-Distributor: E— Exporter; FB— Factory Branch: I— Importer; J— Jobber; M— Manufacturer; 
MA — Manufacturers' Agent; B — Retailer; W — ^Wholesaler. 



SAX FR-^'CISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



HANDKERCHIEFS 

Ades Bros. (1-W). lis Kearny: DouKlas 4SS7. 

Ahronhcim & Co. IMA-Wi 821 Markil. Douglas .>4S4. 

American Import Co. (I-Ei. IB First; Kearny a067. 

Bauer Bros. & Co. (I). S3 First; Douglas 731. 

Butler-Schutze Co. (W), 731 Market; Douglas 5124. 

Cluett Peabcdy it Co. (W). 100 Battery; Douglas 417. 

Cohen. J. M. li Co. (M). 15 Battery; Douglas 3605. 

Cronley. J. B. (W). S6 Thiid; Kearny 482. 

Dlnkelsplel. I,. Co. Inc. (W). 125 Battery: Douglas 1900. 

Fleischman. M. R. (.Mj. 15 Battery: Kearny 4741. 

Levy. Jules i Co (Wi. 340 Mission: Douglas 2873. 

McLeod Mercantile Co. Inc. (W). 28 Battery: Sutter 3935. 

Moore. Walton N. Dry Oocds Co. (W). Mi^on and Fremont: Dav. 841. 

Nippon Dry Gotds Co. (W). 70 line: Sutler B«0. 

Sbamin. I. & Co. ill. 268 Market: Gartleld 4570. 

Sing Fat Co. (I-R). Crrant Ave and CaUfomla: Douglas 1212. 

Western Fancy Oocds Co. (W). 544-546 Mission: Douglas 2086. 

HARDWARE AND TOOLS 

Atkins. E. C. & Co (IB). 2.';7 .Mission; Kiamy 3484. 
Babin. George (R). 2'.)4n T»tnl,v-fi)Urlh; Mission 111.5. 
Baker HainUton i P;icilic Co. (W). 700 .Scvenlh; Park 9000 
Bossinger. Robt. f). (W;. 55 New Nionlgomery ; Garfield 5S61. 
Bowman. C. A. (R). 1661 Dlvlsadero. West 1643. 
Brown, Chas. & Sons (W-R). 871-873 Markel : Sutter 6030. 
CaliTomia Saw Works (M) (Saws). 721 Brannan; Market 145. 
Chubbuck. E J. Co. uM) (Specialties). 731 Market: Douglas 1336. 
" " ;Co. " "" 



Donnelley. W. J. (R). .. - 

„ .'. .. - « „.. ■■ - -pfiM.i.r*,. 039 Howard: Ky. 7265. 

,\ lu Kansas; Park 9500. 

1. cry; Douglas 2366. 

1 ) iiglas 5290. 

t I), 140 Fii^l: Kearny 4131. 
lis. ,n: Douglas 1989. 
J -Market; Jlarket 995. 

I. li i Etc 1.335 First: Sutter 516. 
Kioeder. John & Henry Rpulx I ( 'o. Drai er> ). 938 ML^cion: Doug. 3697. 
Knise. J H. (W-R) (Builders). Twenty-lhlrd and Sholwell; Mis. 2576. 
Liberty Macliine Co. (.M) (Pole Une). 2857 Twenty-sixth; Mis. 5528. 
Macklllop. An^is W. (R). 658 Clement; Paclllc 2047. 



Granuccl Hardwa 
Herhens Machinery & ."^di' 
Hundley, E, .M, (R) (Build 
Jones, Ed, Hardware & T'" 
Joost Bros, IR), lO.IS Mail 
KortickMrg. Co. (Mi (U 



Palace Hardware Co. (R). 581 Market; Sutler 6060. 

Pike. A. W. & Co. (W). 715 Mission; Sutler 898. 

Prav. Mlllon Company (MA). 681 Market; Garfield 453. 

Presidio Plumbing and Hardware Co. (R ) . 3328 Sacramento; West 3198. 

Rien Hardware Co. (R). 84 Fourth: Garfield 1848. 

Rowntree. Bernard (MA) (Specialllcs). 681 Market: Kearny 687. 

San Francisco Saw and Tool Works (M). 236 Fremont; Kearny 1629. 

Saul. Eugene Co. (MA). 681 Market: Suiter 6873. 



HARDWARE AND TOOLS— Contmued 

Schla^e Mfg. Co. <M; (Locks). 485 California; Garfield 4272. 

SeUer liros. & Co. (W). 14 Spear: Davenport 2^30. 

Slmonds Saw & Steel Co. (KB (Sawsii. 14 Natonia; Kearny 4467. 

Sloss & Brittain tW». 1400 Howard: Hemlock 2M0. 

Smith. F. P. (Saw FUingj. 411 Tenth; Park 6010. 

Smith. P. A. Co. (W-Kj. 638 Fourth: Sutter 4161. 

Stand:ird Brass & Bronze Mfg. Co. (M). 159 Fourteenth; Market 2631. 

Sterling Hardwan- Co. (R^ 535 Montgomery-; Davenport 2179. 

Voorhei*. W. K. & Co, (MA). 417 Market; Sutter 6574. 

Waterhoiise & Lester Co.. 540 Howard; Garfield 4040. 

Winchester Simmons Co. of the Pacific (W). 164 Towosend; Sutter 5580. 

Wlrtncr. John J. (MA). 85 Second; Douglas 669. 

HARDWOODS 

SEE ALSO LUMBER; 

Comlllus, Geo, C. 485 California: Garfield 129, 
Davis Haidwocd Co,, Bay and Mission; Suiter 1185, 
Dleckmann Hardwocd Co,, Beach and Taylor: Franklin 2302. 
Dieckmann J. H . Jr.. 110 Sutter; Kearny 3660. 
ForsMh i Co . 1',H17 Bryant; Park 8043, 
Hit'i-ins ,r K l.iiii.Ur Co.. 423 Sixth: Kearny 1014. 
Ho»:.iil K A .V Co 80 Howard: Davenport 139. 
INLAIO FLOOR CO., 600 Alabama: .Mission 1.57.5. 
Rldi;,i<Js ll;ud»." d Lumber Co.. 480 Brannan; Sutler 572. 
WHITE BROTBERS, Fifth and Braiman; Sutter 1367. 
WiiUtk. K C . 1 -Montgomery : Sutter 2634. 

HARNESS AND SADDLERY 

Keyston Bros iMk 755 Mission; Douglas 470. 



HATS AND CAPS 



AlKins. Robt. S.. Inc. (Ri. 1.50 Sutler; Kearny 4520, 
Bloom Bros Inc, (.\Ii, 206 Stevenson: Douglas 2600. 
Cahfomla Cap Co. (Mi. 16 Beale; Garfield 6745. 
Carroll. Paul T. (Ri. 764 Market; Kearny 3965. 
Cohl Bros. (R). 38 Powell: Douglas 2730. 
Fisher & Co. (B). 650 Markel; Kearny 2465. 
Hardeman Hat Store (Rj. 22 Powell; Sutter 4693. 
Helbing Hat Co. (W). 89 Battery: Kearny 5759. 
Herrmann Co. (R). 249 Kearny: Douglas 2558. 
Knox Shop (R). 51 Grant Ave.; Garfield 12. 
I.ce. H. D. Mercantile Co. (W), 718 Miision: Garfield 340. 
Lundslrom Hal Works (Mj, 1114 Mission: Park 2619. 
^Ieussdorf^er. J. C, Sons 'K ^22 M;irkel: Kearny 5169. 



'\\ 



I Fremont: Keamy 2421. 
: Keamy 7213. 
Douglas 2739. 
Mission: Keamy 1438. 




Fine FoodProducts 



S & W Canned Fruits S & W Dried Fruits 

S & \V Canned Vegetables S & VV Presert'es, Jellies and Marmalades 

S & W Canned Fish S & W Condiments and Spices 

S & W Mellow'd Coffee 

"CONSISTENTLY THE BEST" 
Unusual Care is exercised in Packing for tlie Export Trade 

SUSSMAN, WORMSER & CO. 



LOS ANGELES, CAL., 747 Warehous. 
NEW YORK, 53 34th St.. Brooklyn 
SHANGHAI, 25 Jlnkee Road 



Head Office: SAN FRANCISCO 
BRANCHES : 

HAVANA, 230 Edlficio Larrea 
SEATTLE, WASH.. 1310 Wesle 
MANILA, 14 T Plnpin 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192(j 











HAY 






(SEE 


ALSO 


GRAIN; ALSO PEED) 


Arendt, . 


\ 


(B). Pk-: 


Clinton 


Cal. 


Beanstnn 


Cn 


. A "li 


Hiiit.T 


V, Kearny 4100. 


Berrinm'i 


t^; I 




111(11 


^*ixth; HenUock SSI. 


Goss, 111 
Gran?.' I 
GrimaviiM 


s, 1- 


A ■'" 


W I., 


1 California; Douglas 960 


M 


111/ !:■. ' 


II 1 '.ll 




Kettenbii 


•h ( 


null Cn 


ir..-. ( ', 


lifomia; Garfield 5SS4. 


Produrei 


Hi 


V <U. l« 


■ . 1 . B ' 


ownseEd; Sutter 350. 


Russell & 


\la 


■auhiy, s 


Lcranie 


ito, Cal. 


Salz, Feidina 


d. 16o < 


iiifi.rni 


a ; Graystone 1087. 


Sawjer G 


rain 


Co.. 40.5 


Califor 




Scott. A. 


W. Co. (W), 


213 Ma 


rket; Davenport 2160. 



Somers & Co., 485 California; Kearrj- 1234. 

HEARING APPARATUS 

Dictograph Products Corp (FBi (Sound Intensiflei-s), 681 MaiK 

HEATERS 

(SEE ALSO BDBNEES— FUEL OIL) 

las 4654. 

Iter 2838. 

■ Bldg. ; Keamy 4496. 



Day, Geo. F. & Son iMi 
Graham. James Mfg. ( '<> 
Hoyt Heater Co, . 2s.', t > 



HEATING SYSTEMS— Continued 

Standaid Milal J'n iliicts Co. (M). 55S Bryant; Sutter 5690. 
Stulsaft. -M. Co. iW-Di. 1338 Mission; Hemlock 1940. 
Sturlevant. B. F. Co. (M). 681 Market; Sutter 5447. 
Walsh & Wiedncr Boiler Co.. 681 Market: Douglas 9396. 
Walworth-I^Uy Co. (D), 235 Second. 



Davenport 2812. 



alto Bldg. ; Garfield 387 



HERBS 

Eng-SkellCo. Inc. (W) (Hoarhoundl. 20S-210 Miss 
Ireland. B. C. (B-MA). 24 CaUfomia; Kearny 1650, 
Robertson. McCUntock Co. Inc. (I). 305-307 Clav; Sutter 6262. 
Wing On Tong, 755 Grant Ave. 

HIDES 

Bissinger ,.<c Co. (J-B-E). 555 Front; Sutter 5343. 
Stunner. W. B. & Co. Inc.. 220 To»-nsend; Keamy 3337. 
Zacharonsky. Samuel. 45S-460 Jackson; Sutter 5079. 

HOISTS AND CRANES 

Bulotti. C. F. Machinery Co.. S2 

CYCLOPS lEON WORKS iM), 

l>n\l!i .\uriis K. iMi, 40(1 Si\.llth; Market 1675. 

l.aidil.l .\ Cn , H,ai-,t lilili;. SuKcr 1036. 

HEKDY, JOSHDA, IRON WORKS (M). 75 Fremont; Kearny 3430. 



Pittsburg Water Heater Co.. 478 Sutter; Sutter 5025. 

Potter Radiator Corp., (Gas). 1345 Howard; Hemlock 1812. 

Wagner. L. & Sons Pacific Copper Works (M). 85 Minna; Keamy 1388. 



Wheeler-W under Co. (W-D j . 7S7 B 



Market 465. 



HEATING SYSTEMS 



Fourth; Douglas 378. 



Atlas Heating and Ventilating Co. (M, . _ 

Babcock. C. B. Co. (M-D). 135 Bluxome; Sutter 4474, 

Bailey, Chas. M. Co. (MA). 661 Folsom; Keamy 2500. 

Fess System Co. (M). 220 Natoma; Sutter 6927. 

GiUey-Schmid Co. Inc. (M). 192-198 Otis; Market 965. 

Johnson Service Co.. Rialto Bldg.; Sutter 2794. 

KaufTman-Norton Co. (M). Rialto Bldg.; Garfield 3877. 

Krueger. James I. (MA). 417 Market; Sutter 7057. 

Mangrum & Otter. Inc. (Ml, 827 Mission. 

NELSOK, JAS. A., INC. (Ml. 1375 Howard; Hemlock 140. 

O'Mara, J. E. Co. (M). 21S Clara; Douglas 3137. 

Pacific Gasteam Co.. 571 Mission; Douglas 8230. 

Bay, W. S. Mfg. Co. (M) . 1 18 New Montgomery ; Douglas 8C 

Reeves, M. J. Heating Co.. 959 Natoma; Market 7755. 

Scott Co. (M). 243 Minna; Douglas 3048. 



HONEY 



BOTDEN, A. L. CO., 52 Main; Davenport 519. 
Demartini. L. Supply Co. (M-W). 125-135 Clay; Keamy 354. 
Garcia & .Maggini (W). 240 Drunmi. 
GETZ, M. & CO., INC. (W). 162 First: Keamy 200. 
Mailliard & Schmiedell (B-MA). 203 California: Sutter 6920. 
Puritan Preserve Co. (M). 928 Bryant. 



HOPS AND MALT 



Bach. Chas. Co. (M). 2108 Stockton: Keamy 754. 

Bauer-Schweitzer Hop & Malt Co. (M-W). 660 Sacramento; Ky. 948. 

Herrmann. Geo. Co. (W). 300 Front: Garfield 1980. 

HOBST. E. CLEMENS, 235 Pine: Kearny 2655. 

Wolf Hop Co., 245 California; Douglas 3021. 



HOSE 



ESTABLISHED 1872 



HARDWOOD HEADQUARTERS 



ASH-BASSWOOD-BIRCH 
AROMATIC RED CEDAR 
COTTONWOOD-ELM-HOLLY 
SOUTHERN RED GUM 
HICKORY-LAUREL- MAPLE 
OREGON MAPLE-PLAIN OAK 
- QUARTERED OAK - 
WYBROCK BENDING OAK 
POPLAR- -WALNUT 




WHITE BROTHERS 



FIFTH and BRANNAN STREETS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



CABLE ADDRESS -"WHITEBRO" 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APKIL 14, 1(126 



HOSIERY 



Ahrams, N. (VV). .'>20 Mission: D<iuk1;is a.'iHO. 

Andorson-fanicron & Co.. SCO .s.i<iamcnto: Douglas B160. 

Bauer Bros. & Co. (W), 83 First: DouKlas 731. 

Beaton. J. R. Co. Inc. iW). 133 Kearny; Douglas 3081. 

Blue Kitjbon Co iRi. 821 Market: Dougla." 7IK)». 

Clark Gandlon Truss Co. (M) iKIastlo. UOM Market; Mkt. 7004. 



Cohen. J. M. \- Co. 
Consolidated I ; I' pvp .<; II 
Crocker. .\ . .V ' " M 
Dinkelspii-i. I < < h . 

ElkusCo. iM ^^ '■■'■ " 
Feisi'l. F,. .1 \\ ' iMlrl, 
GERSON ,'. BRRYER 



11.11 

llcl. i I M. -I. ■. ( .. \'. 

Ka>.s(-r, .Julius .Vic I i: 
Luscomhe & Isaacs M \ 
Maltzcr & Kiefer M I M 
.Moore. Walton N. IJr> i .■.. 
flnyx Hosiery- Co, Iii' w 
Phoenix Hosiery Co \\ 
Heal Silk Hosiery -Mill i i 
Koos Bros. (R). Niark ,i 
Rosenthal. Maurice \\ i' 
Rudcc. Sidney (MA i.'.i li 
Strauss. Levi & Co. i.M-\N j 



, 15 Battery : Douglas 3605. 
rv Co. (W). 116 First; Sutter 4572. 
IS) , 32 Battery; Douglas 2860. 
125 Battery; Douglas 1900. 
-'11-733 Mission; Kearny 745. 
, :13I Mission; Garllcld 4264. 
^ m Mission; Douglas 594. 

w M«>n's;. 740 Mission; Kearny 4548. 
! .;i:n. 
I.I amy. 



Kcamy 7213. 

uy 44. 
TV ; Douglas ;>440. 



HOSPITAL SUPPLIES 



Bauscl) & Ix)mb Opt 

Cenifled Lalwratm > 

Oxid). 1379FoImi 

Eamrs Company ' ^ 



HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES 



Hii 



I Dr. 



i. iWi 



iFIl 



Hurley .Ma 

Lasar Kh^-iric Co. cD, (H;^,iiMt^' i 
Maugnuu A Oticr (M I. sL',-v;ii m,- 
Manning. Bowman \ c. « r i 
Suri>a-is Table Mat Co. (M). 783 .Mi.s,^i. 



Kl. if. First: Kearny 2()«7. 
). 136(1-1370 Mls.sion: I'ark 8S16. 
■o. Hi. (;.ar\ aii.l SI. ickKin; Garfield 4343. 

risMi--: ■ n...i--.. iM:i. 



I'i>st: ProspcCT 8694. 
HI55. 
ritnients), ISO Post: 



ICE 



ICE CREAM 



ICE CREAM PLANT EQUIPMENT 

CYCLOPS lEON WORKS M-J. i Refrigeration). S37-S47 Folsom; 

Suiter .'tiKiO 
PBISINO, GEO. W. CO.. INC.. 88-90 Clay; Sutter 1723. 

ICE FACTORY SUPPLIES 

CYCLOPS lEON WOBKS M-.I). K37-K47 Folsom: Sutter 3030. 

I M PLEMENTS— AGRICULTURAL 



iiiE Mac h: 
. Co. I FH 



hlneCo.. 235 Flfle 



Frazicr. F. A.. 202 Davis (Sprays); Sutter 3524. 



HOSPITALS 



HOTEL EQUIPMENT 

II. i H. Mfe Co (M). lai Eddy; Prospect 3079. 
MANOBDM ti OTTEK (.Ml. 827-831 Xlbision ; Kearny 3155. 
NELSON. JAS. A., INC. (M). 1;175 Howard: HcnllocK 140. 



HOTELS 



Alpine House. 480 Pine; Sutter 2850. 
Altamont Hotel. 3048 Sixteenth; Park 7625. 
Arlington Hotel. 480 Ellis; Franklin 3800. 



7.iO Sutter- Prosiiect 10400. 
.•j24 Sutter: Sutter 7070. 
i:!3 Powell; Douglas 2004. 

1 L'O Twclftli: Market 588. 
I 4700. 



i;o. 



Hotel Coiu-l. .5.5.=. liusli; Sutter 27110. 
Hotel Larson, 56 Eddy; Douglas 3711. 
Hotel Manx. 225 Powell; Douglas 4000. 



I I -' 



II. I 
11.1 

HOTEL SENATOR. .-,..i..l 
Hotel Shasta. 314 Keaniy; s 
HOTEL STEWAET, 353 G 
Hotel Sutter. Kearny and Si 
Hotel Thomas. 971 Mis; 
Hotel Van Dom. 212 Ti 
Hotel Wasliingt 



U : Fi 



Palace Hotel. Marlii i .mil 
Plaza Hotel. 310 P.isi mh 
Roosevelt Hotel. 240 .I.ii.- 
Terminal Hotel, tio Markci 
Turpiii Hotel. 17 Powell: 



YO! 



ile Park & Curry Co.. Y 



ter ■1S20. 

•V. near PowcU; Sutter 3640. 

bV; Sutter 3060. 

liter 2730. 

inklin 3666. 

\\r : .Sutter 3570. 

Ill liilock 3200. 

Sillier 5050. 
nil r.i720. 
1.1 lli.lcl. 1104 Post: Franklin 2960. 



National Park ; Kearny 4794. 



IMPORTERS— EXPORTERS 

Ades Bros. (iHJapanesei 

Ahlcrs. H. C. Co. il-Rl. : 

Alden. Max (Leather Gocds. Clocks. Etc. ) , 525 Market ; Douglas 4447 

Aiexandcr-Balart Co. (Colfee. Spices. Etc.). 77 Bcaie; Sutt«r 5705. 

American Factors. Ltd (FB). 215 Market; Davenport 2330. 

American Finance & Commerce Co , ] .50 California ; Sutter 4357. 

American Foreign Trading Corp f's \iv-'.'l.* cal. 

American Import Co.. Inc. (M-l-1 i.j-lii.i Keamy 2067. 

American Sales .Agencies Co., 11-' l ii' I i. i.^his 177. 

American Trading Company. 3:i_' I ,i . - , ■ ir.o. 

.\msnlck, G. & Co.. Inc.. 64 Pin. H lI - jlii 

Anderson- Ca meron & Co.. .5611 sacraminio Douglas 6160. 

Amstein. Simon i Co.. 86 Third: Keamy 4072. 

ABON, J. & CO. (1) (Green ColTeei. 233 CaUfornia: Kearny 1252. 

.Asia Commercial Co.. 722 .Sacramento; Garflcld 1788. 

Associated Manufacturers Importing Co. (1). 871 Market; Sutter 2683. 

Atkins. KroU & Co.. 260 CalKfamia; Keamy 2543. 

Austin-Western Road Machineo' Co., 435 Brannan. 

Atistralasian Imptg. & Exnt. Co., 430 Golden Gate Ave.; Frank, 



Trading Co . 214 Front; Sut. 2960. 
Is I, .503 Market; Sutter 1941. 
ilifomia; Sutter 6427. 
(11 California; Garfield 1102. 



ih llrinl.ick 881. 



. - XI) 

Australian-New Zealand-.\ 

Baker. H.J. * Br.. 'Ii. 

Balfour. Gutlin. .\ ' " 

Barg Lumber .v - ' i i 

Baruch. Albcri -i < i i- 

Basliaw & An ;. * " ■ 

Bercori.-li, 11 I I. I \\- 

Berriiifir .v Hii.— i II, liin 

Bissiiim r .V i ,. , -„5.5 I'm 

BLEY, SIMON, .'.^ Mill, r r.aili. Id S^12. 

Block, .\lfl-.ci 1, , :!mi I'iTii', (iarli.ld 4404. 

Bloom liros. (CoUeei. 4S6 CaUfornia; Kcamy .515. 

Blum. Harold F., 149 California: Douglas 7449. 

Bond Bros. & Co., 310 CaUfornia: Douglas 3570. 

Borgfcldt, Geo. & Co.. 717 Market ; Keamy 2858. 

Brandenstein, M. J. & Co. (I). 665-685 Third; Kearay 2672. 

Brockmaim. G. Robt.. 320 Market; Douglas 5065. 

Butler. C. C. & Co.. 690 Market: Sutter 2481. 

C. T. Importing Co.. 445 Grant .Ave.; China 1416. 

Cable. Chas. Co., Inc., 200 Davis; Kearay 1753. 

Cady, C. H.. 52 CaUfomia. 

California Jewelrv Co. (I-W) (Diamonds). 704 Market; Keamy 2300. 

Caro & Upright (I-J). 717 Market; Douglas 1507. 

Carpentier. A. & Empire Trading Co.. 486 California; Sutter 5694. 

Casse. Joseph. 369 Pine; Douglas 7649. 



SIMON BLEY 

EXPORTER— IMPORTER 
58 Sutter Street, San Francisco, Calif. 

Phone Garfield 892 



GERSON & BREYER, The Exclusive Hosiery House 

540 MISSION STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. TELEPHONE DOUGLAS 594 

Selling Agents 

KISMET, FRANKLIN and IPSWICH HOSIERY 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192B 








1^ J''^ ^A^rJfi^M^r 



ETS? 



'^'y>^^^L 







HOTEL STEWART 

ON GEARY STREET, ABOVE POWELL 
JUST OFF UNMON SQUARE 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Close to the principal stores, restaurants and theatres. 

Homelike comfort rather than expensive luxury. For 

high-class accommodations the rates are quite moderate. 

The Stewart meals are famous throughout 

the United States. 

Breakfaa 50c, 60c, 75c. Luncheon, 65c (Sundays 75c). 
Dinner ^1.00 {Sundays $1.25) 



CHAS. A. STEWART and MARGARET STEWART 
Proprietors 



.SAN FRANCISCO BCSINKSS. APRIL 14, 1926 



I M PORTERS— EXPORTERS— Co7!n« u^^ 



City of Hankow Tassel Co.. 406 Grant Ave. 

Clausaen. Carl G.. Rlallo Bid*.. Sutter 4II6. 

Colombia California Corp.. 1 10 Sutter. 

Comyn. W. L. & Co.. 310 Califomia: Sutter 6122. 

Connell Bros Co . 351 Califomia: Garfield 2274. 

Continental Trading Co.. 833 Market: Douglas 8054. 

Corse, G. H.. Jr. & Co.. 465 California: Garfield 1322. 

pa\'ldmn, Wm. (Diamonds and I»r«rlous Stones). 7(M Mkt.:Dougl 833. 



Echeguren & Co . 2 line: (iarfleld 1290. 
Edelsteln. D. (ChcmlraLi). 80 Clay: Douglas 3332. 
Ehrman Bros . Horn & Co. Il-J). 546 Third: Kearny 546. 
SSCOBOSA, I., JE., 214 Front: Kearny 3130. 
Eyre. E L 4 Co . 465 California: Kearny 289. 
FALLOH, THOMAS H., 112 Market: Sutler 3199. 
Fisher. Wm * Co . 112 Market: Garlleld 905. 



Flelsrhman. M. R. (I). 15 Battery: Kearny 4741. 

Fook Co. (Ml. 1865 Post: West 344 

Friend. .Samuel H. (Diamond*. Jewelryl. 704 Market: Douglas 5700. 

Fruil Disp^ti-li ("(».. rtM) Montgomery : Douglas 2869. 

Fujliii-,Ni fi. r:i.. J.'is Jaekson: Douglas 1216. 

Funs' ■ ' 1 I :i<id»i. 20O California: Sutter 162. 

Fursi M I I ' o:ils. Suits. Dresses). 154 Suiter: Kearny 259. 

Oalv.v I HI) .Mitchell. Tampa. Florida. 

Gcnir:i; ' ,.,! ' 1 w 601 Third. Garfield 1830. 

Cieneral < ■oninurr-ial Co.. Lid . 311 Califomia: Douglas 3M8. 

General Motors Export Co. (E). 400 .Sansome: Suiter 0740. 

Getz Bnw * Co . 2S0 Ballery: Sutter 3740. 

Golden (iate Import Co il i, 510 Batter)-: Keamy 7021. 

l"'n ing i Expon ing Co. . 1570 Ellis : West 7322. 

fi^ :ind Commission), 332 Pine; Sutter 3700. 

- rm- Keamy 1432. 

- H ramento: Garfield 3147. 
-Monni. 11 ):i,. J n Front : Garfield 41.39. 
Manley At < u. 417 .Montgomery: Douglas 8739. 

i Co.. 012 llowaid: Keamy 4072. 



Goodman's Int.- 
Grace. W. R ,v 
Gray. Henry .V 
Great PaclHc i 



Hale Company. 18 California: Douglas 1047. 

Hall. Harry * Co lE). 16 Califomia: Douglas 1047. 

Hamberger-Polhemus Co.. 149 California: Keamy 2540. 

Hammer & Co.. 310 Clay: Sutter 2.54. 

Hard 4 Rand. Inc (KB) (Coffee). 220 Front. GarHeld 954. 



OTISJcALLISTERKO. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CALIFORNIA 
Cable Address: ALISBE Established 1842 



Import and Export 
Merchants 

MEXICO, CENTRAL & SOUTH AMERICA, 

CUBA, PORTO RICO, WEST INDIES, 

JAVA, CHINA, PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

EUROPE 



Importers of: 
COFFEE 
SUGAR 
RICE 
MATTING 
HARDWOOD 
SPICES 
CINNAMON 
KAPOK 
JUTE BAGS 



Exporters of : 

FLOUR - LUMBER 

CANNED SARDINES 

CANNED SALMON 

C.VNNED FRUITS 

DRIED FRUITS 

OILS 

KEROSENE & GASOLINE 

SPICES 

BAGS 



American Finance and 
Commerce Co. 

150 California Street, San Francisco, California 
Importers and Exporters 



Finance and Con 
IMPORTS 



Paper of all Classes, Boards 

Peanuts 
Rice 
Sugar 

Vegetable Oils 
Wood Pulp 



IMPORTS FRO.M 



Ecuador 

Peru 

Hawaii 

China 

Straits Settlements 

India 

Colombia 

.Scandinavia 

Germany 



EXPORTS 
Barbed Wire 
Canned Fiults 
Canned Vegetables 
Cotton Fabrics 

Lumber (Fir and Redwoodl 

Matches 

Potatoes 

R. R. Ties 

R. R. Materials 

Machinery 



General Merchandise 



Guatemala 
Salvador 

Honduras 
Mexico 

Peru 

Bolivia 

Uruguay 

.\rgentlna 

Hongkong 

China 

Australia 

Canada 

England 



EXPORTS TO 



OflBces in the Principal Cities Throughout the World 
ESTABLISHED SINCE 1877 




The Original Pioneer 
Brand 






The Leading Brand for these 20 Years, 
Living Proof of Real Quality and Service. 



Beautifully 
illustrated Re- 
cipe Booklet 
Free 
on 
Request 



NORTH AMERICAN MERCANTILE CO. 

330 FRONT STREET SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



PARROTT & CO. 

320 CALIFORNIA STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



All Standard Code! 



Cable "lATCO" 



INDIA-AMERICAN TRADING CO. 

25 CALIFORNIA STREET 

SAN FR.\NCISCO, U. S. A. 

IMPORTERS 

From China: Brass, Linens. Silk Shawls. Antiques. Embroideries. 
Ladies' Handkerchiefs. Mandrin Suits and Coats, Silk Em- 
broidered Slippers, and other novelties. 

From India: Kashmir Rugs. Prints. Brass. Chutneys, Incense. 
Perfumes, Groceries, and Curios. 

Also RAW MATERIALS such as: Pepper. Cassia. Cloves. Tur- 
meric, Nutmegs, Rice. Cardamoms, etc. 



Exporters of Amei 



nufactured goods. 



Representing: 

Messrs. SHAMDAS MEGHRAJ, Calcutta. India 
Messrs. LACHHMAN DAS & CO.. Hongkong, China 



IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS— Continued 

Harris, F. K \ r,,. \ivr Hi.in^, Ef i, ^lOn Battery: Sutter 2553. 

Havre. .1- li. Ic Co , Jill] Hush; Kianiv 47llli, 

Hecht, D. & Ci>.. 510 Battery; Dc uglas 4ys(>. 

Hellman Bros. & Co.. 22 Battery; Keai-Dy 2103. 

Hildebrandt. Stmven & Co. |MA-I-E(, 320 Market ; Keaniy 4459. 

Holland, Montier & Sons. Berkeley. Cal. 

Horton Lime Co. (E) (Lime). 681 Market: Kearny 4408. 

Hulsi^Bradford Co. tl-WI. 844 Mission: Garfield 526. 

INDIA-AMERICAN TSADING CO., (China and India Merchandise) 

25 California: Douglas 1229. 
India Company (I). 149 California; Douglas 2855. 
International -Agencies, Inc., 525 Market: Keamy 1378. 
Ireland. B. C. (B-MA), 24 California; Keamy 1650. 
Irwin-Harrisons-Whitney, Inc. (Tea), 25 California: Sutter 7398. 
ISHIHARA, K. CO., 510 Ba tery: Keamy 2447. 
Isliimitsu, S. Co. (Food Products. Groceries), 225 Clay; Sutter 2359. 
Islands Commercial Co.. 255 California: Douglas 2597. 
Israel-Leon & Bros.. Inc. (Coffee). 160 California: Douglas 3155, 
Iwata, T. & Co. (Oriental Goods), 247 Grant Ave.: Douglas 5463. 
Johnson, Victor & Co., 503 Market; Keamy 4186. 
Jones. S. L. & Co., 140 California: Sutter 3320. 
Judell, H. L. & Co. (W-D-I), 334-336 Sacramento; Douglas 1375. 
Kahn & Co. (M-I), 54 Geary; Douglas 2212. 
Karsky, Samuel, 595 Mission. 
Katz. M. A. & Co., 311 California; Keamy 474. 
Knox & Kaye (I-W) (Diamonds), 704 Market: Sutter 2858. 
Kurata Company, 24 California : Douglas 9279. 
Kwong Yick & Co. (Chinese Goods), 941 Grant Ave. : Cliina 39. 
Lastreto & Co.. 260 California: Keamy 1357. 
Layton, John Co.. Inc. (I), 510 Battery; Garfield 184. 
Leighton-Jellett Co., Inc. 526 Mission: Douglas 1793. 
Levy, Jules &. Co.. 340 Mission; Douglas 2873. 
Lewin, Leon (Coffee), 112 Market; Sutter 1093. 
Lewis. Inc. (I-W) (Jewelry, Diamonds), 133 Keamy: Douglas 406. 
Lilienthal. Lee & Co., 268 Market: Ciarfleld 938. 
Linares, J. F. (1) (Coffee). 25 Drumm: Douglas 4467. 
Lindo, Donald & Co.. 214 Front; Douglas 5764. 
Logie, -\lexander (I). 260 California; Sutter 5970. 
Long JJros . 220 Montgomer>'; Douglas .53.54. 



All Standard Codes Used 



DUVAL MOORE 
& COMPANY 

MERCHANTS 

IMPORTERS EXPORTERS 

212 California Street 
San Francisco, U. S. A. 



MITSUI & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

(Mitsui Bussan Kalsha, Ltd. I 

Cable Address: •MITSUI" 

GENERAL IMPORTERS— EXPORTERS 

Coal Suppliers Ship Operators Shipowners 

Ship Builders Etc., Etc., Etc. 

Head Office: TOKIO, JAPAN 

San Francisco Office; 

301 MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BLDG. 

Other Branches: 

New York, London, Seattle, Portland, Lyons, Hamburg 
and all other important comers of the world 



Cabh 


Address: CLIFFMOORE 








J. 


J. 


MOORE & CO., Inc. 








Shipping Merchants ^^ Importers and Exporters 




233 


Pine Street 




SAN FRANCISCO, 


CALIF. 



Established 1887 

SUZUKI & CO., Ltd. 

351 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Importers — Exporters — Manufacturers — Shipowners 
General Agents "K" Line 

Cable .Address "Suzuki" San Francisco 

Head Office: KOBE, JAPAN 

BRANCH OFFICES 

Fort Worth 

iBdg. 





New York 


29 Mincing Lane 


220 Broadway 


Singapore 


Tslngtau 


Shanghai 




Hongkong 


Vladivostok 




Tientsin 


Harbin 


Bombay 


Hamburg 


Alexandria 



Portland 

1018 Bd. of Trade 


Bdg. 


Fort Worth 
701 Nell P. And 


Calcutta 

Tokyo 

Yokohama 

Osaka 

Nagoya 

Sourabaya 




Mojl 

Shlmonosekl 

Otaru 

Hakodate 

Sapporo 

Melbourne 



Takow. Formosa 
Keljo. Chosen 
Asahigawa 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14. 192G 



IMPORTERS, EXPORTERS^Continued 



MarkcU. L. R.. 21 Drumni 
Martin. C. U.. Rlalto Bldi; 
Marx Bro6. Clftar Co.. Im- 
Meyer. Victorien M.. 8,s;f Mi 

Me - " - 

MU 



M.intKomerj-; Douglas S554. 
amy 1577. 



Mitsui & Co., Ltd. (Sliip Operators). 465 CaUromla: Sutter 3414. 
Mogenson. J. P. & Co . IBl Callfonila: Garfield 3187. 
Monteverde-Rolandelll & Parcdl. Inc.. 517-531 Washington: Gar. 791. 
MOOSE, DU VAL, & CO. (Charters and Ship Agents). 212 Caliromia: 

Suiter 57.i2. 
Mooro. .1. J. .V Co. (Shipping), 233 Pine: Kearny 406. 
Mutual Supply Co.. 444 Sansome: Sutter e.iei. 
Naftaly. P. & Co.. 268 Market: Douglas 79G4. 
NcwhaU. H. M. i Co.. 260 CaUTomla: Sutler 1886. 
Nippon Company. 323 Clay; Sutter 27311. 
North American Mercantile Co.. 318 Front: Sutter 655. 
Norton i Harrison Co., 311 California: Garfield 450. 
Novelty Import Co.. 717 Market: Kearny 748. 
Occidental 4 Oriental Trading Co.. 5.55 Bush: Sutter 4570. 
O'Connor-Harrism Co. (I). 124 Front: Suiter 3872. 
Olcovich & Onpenheinier (I) (CofTra). 351 Caliromia: Douglas 6457. 
Obiey. Wm. * Co. iI-Ei. 112 .Market: -Sutler 1351. 
Ono Trading Co . Ltd.. :i.'il Califoniia: Sutter 5967. 
Oriental Trading Corp.. 4;i3 Clav: Keamv 544. 
Orrett. H. A Co. (F.l. 22U Montgomery: Sutter 7183. 
OTIS McAllister & CO. (shipping and commission). 310 Call- 

foniia; Ki'aniy 4S51. 
Otto, E. H. & Co.. 245 California: Sutter 3680. 
Parttlc Coast .Mirrantlle Co . .'■.Of.-S Pine: Sutler 6671. 
Pacific ConimiTcial .t; Inrlustrial Co. of (.'hina. 722 Sacramento. 
Pacillc Commercial Co . .151 California: Sutter 5920. 
Pacific Dry I iooiis Co . 440 (irant Ave; Sutler 4088. 
Pacific European Import Co.. SB Third; Sutler 3488. 
Pacific < irient Co.. 10 Califi>rnia: .Sutter 1292. 
pacific TSADINO CO...i:ii natiery : Smter 270. 
Padilla. Ben & Co., Inc., ,«2 I'inc: (iarfleld 825. 
Parodi. Erminio & Co.. 334 Wastiington : Douglas 4446. 



I.ESCOBOSA,Jr. 

IMPORTER— EXPORTER— LNSLH-^-VCE 

214 FRONT ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 

Telephone Kearny 3130 



HA.\KOW CHICAGO HONG KO.NG SAN FR.VVCISCO 

THE ASIA COMMERCIAL CO. 

SHANGHAI. CHINA 

INTERNATIONAL MERCHANTS & ENGINEERS 
722 S.\CRA-MENTO STREET. SAN FR.\NCISCO 
CL.VRENCE K. CH.\N. C. E.. American Maaafter 
Phoac China 1574: Garflcid I7S8 



E. A. CANALIZO & CO., INC. 

Importers Exporters 



40 CALIFORNIA ST. 
San Francisco 



142 PEARL ST. 
New York 



Cable .\ddress: "Shunyuen" 



Establislied 1S73 



SHUN YUEN RING & CO. 




Importers & Exporters 

849 Grant Avenue» San Francisco, California 

FOKEIGX OFFICE.^; 

anion Ilonftkong New York Mexico San Salvador 

Honduras Nicaragua Havana 



Cable Address -'O T C 
San Francisco 




t Kearny 54> 


Oriental 


Trading 


Corporation 


IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS OF RICE A.ND 1 
GENERAL FOOD PRODUCTS - RICE MILLERS | 


4.S3 


Cby Street, S.in 


Francisco 





Phoi 



519 



THE BANZAI TR.\DING COMPANY OF TOKYO 

Wholesale .Automotive Supplies and Machinery 

GENER.\I, EXPORT 

24 California Street San Francisco. California 

Main Office. TOKYO. JAP.VN 





Cabk 

510 B 


AJJress "MARUJO" San Francisco 

K. ISHIHARA CO. 

Importers - Exporters 

Anents for 

MARUJO TRADING CO., Ltd,, Yokohama, Japan 

attery Street : Trlipkmi Krarny 2447 : SAN FRANCISCO 





Telephone Sutter 270 Cable .Wdress "PACTRAD." San Franci 

Pacific Trading Company, Inc. 

IMPORT— EXPORT— RICE MILLERS 

331-343 BATTERY STREET, cor. Commercial 
San Francisco. Calif., U. S. A. 
BR.\.NCHES: Osaka, Tokyo, Japan 



YAMATE BROS. 
Canned Crab Importers 

510 B.\TTERY STREET 

San Francisco, California 



NOZAKI BROTHERS, Inc. 
IMPORTERS & EXPORTERS 

112 M.\RKET STREET, SAN FR.\NCISCO 

Phone KEARNY 1178 



IMPORTS 



444 West Grand Avenue 
Chicago, 111. 



ONO TRADING CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

"BLUE FLAG" CRABMEAT 



3? I California Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



I Hudson Street 
New York, N. Y. 



EXPORTS 



288 E. Water Street 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



SAX FRANC18CO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



IMPORTERS— EXPORTERS— Co«i/H«^(/ 

Patron. V 

Peabody. 

Pellas. S. F.. 433 California; Douslas 2504. 

Personeni. Joseph. Inc. (I). 634 Monteomorv: Douglas 4720. 

Petroleum Products Co. (Mi. 43.i California: Kearny ysu. 

Podesta Import Co. 220 Montj^'oinery; Sutter 1494 

Reed. Geo. W. & Co . 510 Battery: Garfield 864. 

Rius. Juan Aguilera, Havana. Cuba. 

Bolph Mills & Co., 149 California: Sutter HOO. 

Rossetor. John H. Co.. 354 Pine. 

Ruffner-McDowell & Burch. Inc. Q). 153 California, .Sutter 126". 

SakaiCo. (I-R) (Groceries. FLsh). 16&4 Post: West 2779. 

Sandow-Haase Co.. 24 California: Garfield 4963. 

Schimiacher Bros.. 323 Front: Kearny 2454. 

Shainiu, I. Co. (Art Goods). 268 Market. 

Sherwood Co.. 56 Beale: Sutter 67S2. 

Shields. Harper & Co.. Inc.. Mills Bldg.: Sutter 2533. 

Shing Shun & Co. (Chinese Goods), 909 Grant Aye.: China 37. 

SHOEMAEEB, J. E. CO., INC. (II-E) (Food Products), 322 Davis; 

Kearny 1640. 
Shui Tai & Co. (Chinese Goods). 852 Grant Ave.: China 48. 
SHUN YUEN HINQ & CO., 849 Grant Ave. 
Sing Fat Co.. Grant .\ve. and California: Douglas 1212. 
Slaughter. Guy T. & Co. (Manila Rope). 210 California: Sutter 5394. 
Sloane, W. & J. a-W-R). 216-228 Sutter: Garfield 2838. 
Smlllie, Chas. F. & Co.. 21 Pine: Garfield 6867. 
Solomon, Chapman. Jr., 314 Battery: Kearny 964. 
Sommer, H. L. Co.. 170 Henry: Hemlock 1727. 
Stahlbaum. Rolf. 25 California: Dnugla.-^ 9067. 
Stein-Hall & Co., 433 California: Garfield 745. 
Steinberg. G. P. & Sons, 200 Davis: Douglas S590. 
SUtt, A. W.. 259 Geary: Kearny 2391. 
Strauss & Co.. 465 CaUfomia: Garfield 394. 
Stub, I. A. & Co.. 214 Front: Kearny 2629. 
SUZUKI & CO.. 351 Calif.irnia; Kearny 430. 
Takakuwa. Y. & Co.. Ltd.. 369 Pine: Garfield 510. 
TeUer, H. E. Co. (I) (Coffeti. 5.50 Folsom, Sutter 28. 
Terstegge. A. F.. 717 Market. 
Torres, Rafael G., 510 Battery: Dotiglas 9581. 
Trans-Pacific Co.. Inc.. 150 Commercial: Sutter 2058. 
Traverso. V. Co.. 441-443 Washington: Douglas 4406. 
Treager. J., 220 Montgomer>': Douglas 3436. 
Tubbs, Tallant, 200 Bush: Kearny 1596. 
Typewritorium Co. Inc: (Rebuilt Typewriters. Adding Machines, 

Check Writers. Etc.). 457 Market: Kearny 57SS. 
United Coffee Corp.. 306-308 Sacramento: Garfield 87. 
United Commercial Co. (J-E). 234 Steuart: Davenport 2355. 
Wah King Trading Corp., 852 Grant Ave. 
Watanabe. Geo. S. Co.. 3S1 Bush: Sutter 1589. 
West Coast Trading Co., 2117 Pine. 

Wilbtu--EUis Co. (FLsb OU and Meal). 311 Cahfornia; Garfield 1704. 
Willits & Co., Inc.. 2 Pine: Sutter 2S95. 
Wilhts & Patterson. 1 Drumm: Douglas 2510. 
Wolfr-Kirchmann & Co., Inc.. 485 CaUfomia: Sutter 5643. 
World Trading Co., 3312 Clay. 
Wright. Norman S.. 41 Spear: Davenport 4497. 
Yaroashita Co. (Shipping and Commission). Inc., 310 Sansome. 



BEN. PADILLA & CO., Inc. 

Importers and Exporters 

DOMESTIC, MEXICAN, SOUTH AMERICAN 
and ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 

AGENTS W AN T E D 

Correspondence in English, Spanish, French 

Cable -Padilla". All standard codes 

332 Pine St.. Suite 407-8-9 SAN FRANCISCO 



Prentice Brothers & Co. 



310 California St. 

Cable Address: 



SAN FRANCISCO 
'Practice" 



Latin -American Trade Specialists 



Importers : 

Coffee, Sugar, Rice. Spices, Jute Bags, 

Oriental Produce 

Exporters: 

California Fruits, fresh, canned and dried; canned 

Fish; Spices; Petroleum Products; Soap Materials 

Correspondence Invited 



INDIAN MERCHANDISE 

Bloch. E. Mercantile Co. (R). 70 :Market: Douglas 1746. 



INDUSTRIAL SITES 



and 564 Market; 



INFORMATION BUREAUS 



CHAMBER OF COMMEECE, Merchants Exchange Bldg.. 451-465 
California. Kearny 112. 

Chamber of Commerce of the U. S. A., 465 California; Douglas 6894. 

Hawaii Tourist Btireau. 451 Montgomery: Sutter 5728. 

JAPANESE COMMEBCIAL MUSEUM, 549 Market; Sutter 1987. 

Pacific Sight Seeing Co.. 745 Market: Douglas 478. 

Peck-Judah Co.. Inc.. 672 Market; Keaniy 2751. 

San Francisco Auto Tours. 245 Powell; Kearnv 3324. 

SAN FRANCISCO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, 451-465 CaU- 
fomia; Keamv 112. 

TVestern Information Bureau. S21 Market; Sutter 3460. 

INKS AND WRITING FLUIDS 

Arlett-Roach Co. (M), 83 Clav: Douglas 7186. 

California Ink Co. .Inc. (M). 426 Battery: Kearny 4688. 

Co^t Ink & Color Co. (M) (Printing and Lithograph). 6SI Market; 

Keamv 5S55. 
Jasmine Ink Co.. 200 Davis; Douglas 8590. 

• Duplicator Supply Co.. 604 Mission; Sutter 2391. 



Reed. Geo. Ruv^rll ' 
Secxu-ity Sales C<> ^ 
United Shoe Marhiin 
Waterman. L. E. Co. 



Baker. H. .T. .^- Rr- 
General <'lifMiir;i| 
HockwaM < ii> nil' 
Lacko spiTi;,!! > ( ■ 



nfCal :M\ 130 Fremont: Sutter 5218. 
inr M ^7.5 Brannan; Douglas 9420. 

Mil M . 4 1 6 Jackson ; Douglas 172. 
I \ W'l iiil: ^''luidi. 703 Market. 
v\ <M ! r. . iBuraisliing). 859 Mission. 
iFBi. 609 Market: Douglas 1324. 

INSECTICIDES 



ng). IS First: lie: 



M -Jl \i. ■ .1 • iirrlield 6631. 

I M M 1 I I ". I -I- lI.-mlock4144. 

.\l.\i. -'(H |-:ilil..rnm: sutler 6920. 
BOGEBS, E. R. CHEMICAL CO. iM). 527 Commercial: Kearny 150. 

INSTRUMENTS 

Braun-Knecht-Heunann Co. (TV-M). 576-584 Mission: Kearny 3493. 
Butler. Geo. E. (R). 356 CaUfomia: Kearny 914. 

Dieterich-Post Co. (Enffineering). 79 New Montgomerj-: Douglas 6H0. 
Dietzgen. Eugene Co. (Engineerini ' 
EDWAEDS. JAMES W. CO. (W 
Heiniz ,\: K'olllmons. T: 
IveufTeli: Ens.rCo. (E 
LtETZ. A. CO., Emit 
Ixiok. .\rthur E.. Inr 
Marchant Calcuki: 
Reid Bros.. Inc m 
SPENCEB LENS( i 
Spindler & .Sauiijii 
Taylor Instnuncni '- ^ 
Travers Surgical Co. 
Vandever. C. G. Co. ..._... 
Weule. Louis, Co. (M), (Nautical). 6 California: Kearny 
(Factory: 119 Steuart.) 

INSULATION MATERIALS 

Armstrong Cork Co.. l.SO New Montgomery: Douglas 6565. 
National .Maimesia .Mfs. Co, i:m i. .544 Market: Garfield 2261. 
PACIFIC PORTLAND CEMENT CO. (M) (Sound and Heat), 821 Mar- 

ki-t; i:;nli.lfl 41III) 
VAN PLEET-PREEAK CO.. .'..',7 Howard: Su 
WESTERN ASBESTOS MAGNESIA CO. 

Douglas 3b00. 

INSURANCE AGENTS AND BROKERS 

.\lthnus(.-Mr Afec c, , .Jl.i M,,Tiisomerj-: Sutter 2295. 



Bnfu,.s. t. \ C... ^il (.ihl.ii.ui; Sutter 90. 
Birdsall. W. & Co. iBi. 504 California: Sutter 3388. 
Birlem. P. W. &. Co. (B). 485 California: Garfield 1039. 
Bishop, John A., 311 California: Douglas 6767. 
Boardnian Bros. & Co. (B). 32 Montgomery: Sutter 3475. 
Boole. Fred W. & Co. (B). ir,.". r.ilifnrnia: Garfield 1846. 



(B). 



M. 
231 I; 



BBANDT, W. B. & Co.. 

Brisac. B. F. (B), 311 Calif.-n 

Brown, Carl, Inc.. 220 Montgomery: Douglas 337. 

Browne. Scott & Dinning. 201 Sansome: Douglas 41 

Buckbee. Thome & Co. (B). 151 Sutter: Douglas 47, 



(■amy 4547 
',125. 
^'nmery; Douglas S363. 



VAN FLEET- FREEAR CO. 

Agents for ARMSTRONG CORK COMPANY'S Insulating Materials 



557 Howard Street, San Francisco 



SUTTER 4073 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL U. 1920 



INSURANCE AGENTS AND BROKERS 

Continued 

Casey. M. H.. 315 Montgomery; Douglas 7i)00. 

Chapman A Naunian Co. (Oeneral Agents). 360 Pine; Sutter 4868. 

Coghlan. D. M. (B). 12S5 Market: Market T7(i2. 

CoWwell. Cornwell 4 Banker (Bl. 57 Suiter: Sutter 5420. 

Cosgrove & Co.. Inc.. 230 California: Sutler 36»4. 

Costa. Jose (B). (Fire). 100 Montgomei^-; Garfield 34. 

Creed. Wm. H. (B). 433 California: Kearny 7468. 

Crulkshank. F. R. & Co. of the Pactflc. 625 Market: Garfield 4137. 

Da\ies. Turner k Co. (Marine). 110 Catifomia: Douglas 1670. 

Daiis. J. B. F i .Son. 240 Sansome: Sutter 5890. 

de Sz>'manskl. Etlenne. 310 .Sansome. 

Detric-k. E.. 310 Sansome: Kearny 6171. 

DeVeuve. Clarence. 114 Sansome: Garfield 2430. 

Dewey, H. L.. 315 Montgomery: Sutter 1860. 

Epplnger. Josua. 225 Bush: DmiKla.- 4005 

Erlangcr * Reed. 417 Mmitt-.,m. rv -!!••, r 6227. 

Evans. E. C. i Sons. Inr :■• n i ,i,i I>..uglas 8O40. 

Field. Alexander. 311 Calii I i i ' 7r,7. 

Fisher. Godfrey, 433 Calif. I . I i i i ■._'. 

Folger. Roy S.. 201 SaIl^.,^M n u-i.. nii.% 

Foster. Geo. H i ( .i 11 

French * St. Clair 111^ 

Gale. Maurice (H '.r[i, 

Gross, Carl C. l':;ii \I.,r,i 

Guyett. R. «. A C.i II i;.'i) M:.rkel: Sutter 3352. 

Hall & Ramlx). 444 California Sutter 2451. 

Harrlgan-Weldenmuller Co. (B). 308 Montgomery': Kearny 1531. 

Harrison. A. Dalton. 351 California: Garfield 488. 

Harrison. C. B. (B). 465 California: Sutter 5S07. 

Harrison. M. C. Co.. 28 Leldesdorlf : Kearny 394. 

Hassan. E. A.. 433 California 

Healey. W. W. (Bl. 620 Market: Kearny 391. 

Heringhj, I^uis, 315 Montgomec: Sutter 18fi0. 

HlUman. John R. A Son (Bi. 201 .Sansome: Kearny 7787. 

RINCBMAN £ WENTZ, 22 LeldestlortT : Sutter 437. 

Hind Co . Inc. (Bi. 245 Montgomery: Douglas 573. 

Hohwiesner. F. M . 4.M California: Koamy 4«. 

Hopkins. C) C,. 315 Montgomery: Sutter 1860. 

Houseworth A Smith (General Agents). 155 Montgomery: Kearny 70. 

Hughes, Chas. T . 4.'i3 California: Sutter 4873. 

Hunt. George Elliott. 660 Market: Douglas 7700. 

Hyams A Mayers iB). 142 San-some: Douglas 6115. 

Hyatt. Willet B . 4.59 Montgomery: Douglas 7524. 

Insurance Brokers Exchange. 465 California: Douglas 2350. 

JOHNSON A HIOOINS OF CAL. (B) rWUlcox. Peck A Hughes), 311 



Kaliu. Malliilil.- 
Kleincrt. Alfred 
Klicgaard. C. J . 



Leonard A Holt I; i I VI t , t:i_'G. 

LEVENSALEB, J .^ n. .. ,,- j-l,'.. 

L\Tich. John C ,v < v j_'(i M ■ -,: i , . i vrs 

McCarni. Mark A. 11 . L'l; M . ' irtlrld 4.370. 

McGaw. John A Son (B> .U" t: , ii _;;.^3510. 

Madison A Burke iBi, 80 C - l 

Magee. Thomas A Sons ( II .,.-,,,, K,.irnv563, 

Marcoux. J. E. (B), 220 Moiii^..:iu i , , IJuunlas .337. 

Marsh A McLennan, 114 .lan-ome. i^arfUid 4360. 

Miller, Harry A., 315 Montgomery: Kearny 5948. 

Moroney Grant A Co.. 485 California: Garfield 624. 

Mullin Acton Co.. 315 Montgomery : Sutter 2993. 

Xeuhaus. H. A Son (B). 785 ^Iarket: Kearny 5936. 

Nichols A Fay (B) (General). 465 California: Sutter 5774. 

Nippert. Paul M. Co.. 433 CaUfornia; Douglas 6123. 

O'Brien. M. F. A Co. (B). 341 Montgomery: Kearny 5098. 

Okell. Charles A Co.. 334 Pine: Sutter 3866. 

Pacific Realty Co. (Bl. 219 Kearny: Douglas 6391. 

PABBOTT A CO. (Bl. (General Agents). 320 California: Douglas 2400. 

Peterson. Ferdinand C. . 57 California: Sutter 5416. 

Palmer. Fred E. (Bi. 57 Sutter 

Potter. Edward E. A Sons (B). 60 Sansome: Keamv 4725. 

Rankin. Laurence W. (Bl. 433 California: Sutter 4428. 

Reader. J B Co . 114 .Sansome: Douglas 7645. 

RolUns. Burdick. Hunter Co.. 369 Pine: Garfield 486. 

Rolph. James Co. (Bl. 60 CaUfornia: Douglas 3040. 

Rolph. James. Jr.-W. B. Swett A Co.. Inc . 1.50 Sansome: Garfield 6772. 

Rosenbaum. A. S. A Co.. 214 Front: Douglas 173. 

Rossier. Chas. A. Co.. 430 California: Douglas 1489. 

Ruef. A. (Bl, 916 Kearny: Davenport 1821). 

Rule A Sons. Inc.. 660 Market: Garfield 6000. 

Samuels. Louis T. (B). 43 .Sutter: Sutter 3716. 

Shaffer. Miss G. A. A Co. (Bl. 560 Sutter: Douglas 836. 

Shean A Deasy (B). (General and SiuTtv). 486 CaUfornia: Sutter 2676 

Slosson. P. M.. 351 CaUfornia. 

Smith, CUfTord A,, 58 Sutter: Sutter 9R,S. 

Smith. H. .Stevenson (B). 311 California: Kearny 628. 

Snodgrass A Myers. Inc. (Bl. (Generall. 333 Pine; Garfield 5S0O. 

Spengler A Fraser. 1 Montgomery: Sutter 1106. 

Thompson. M. A Co. (B). 311 CaUfornia: Douglas 220. 

Thornton. Arthur C. 142 Sansome; Sutter 326. 

Travelers lasurance Co. of Hartford, 155 Montgomery: Sutter 1S60. 

Trevor A Co. (B). 71 Sutter: Sutter 6483. 

I mbsen. Kemer A Stevens (B). .30 Montgomery: Douglas 40. 

Lnion Asstirance Society. Ltd.. 315 Montgomery. 

Van Bergen. H.. 2595 Washington: Fillmore 1558. 

■Webster-Mackenzie Co. iBi. 681 Market: Sutter 7300. 

Wolf A Co. (Bl. 34 .Sutter: Sutter 6195. 



INSURANCE— AUTOMOBILE 



Sutter 3010. 



ZURICH 

General Accident and Liability Insurance Company, Ltd. 

315 MONTGOMERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 



AETNA INSURANCE CO. iFBj. 219-231 Sa 

Aetna Life Insuranco ("o . 333 inne: Sutter 6073. 

A»iociated Industries Insurance Corporation. 85 Second; Douglas 8550. 

Aver>-. F. M.. 200 Bush: Garfield 651-1. 

Bankers tt Shippers Instu^nce Co.. 433 California: Kearny 3561. 

Benerd. Ira S.. Hearst BIdg.. Douglas 2571. 

Bishop. Wilson. 60 .Sansome: Keamy 1900. 

Brown, Carl. Inc.. 220 Monteomer>'; Douglas 337. 

Brown. Edward & Sons. 200 Bush; Sutter 7120. 

California .Agencies. Inc.. 226 Sansome: Keamy 2261. 

California Casualty Indemnity Exchange. 220 Montgomer>': Doug. 337. 

California Insurance Co.. 315 Montgomerj-; Douglas 7100. 

Chapman & Nauman. 35H Pine: Sutter 4868. 

Cohin. Chas. A.. 202 Sansome; Keamy 370. 

Commercial Union .\»urance Co.. Ltd.. 315 Montgomerj-; Doug. 8500. 

Conly. Clifford. 210 Sansome: Keamy 4290. 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co., 369 Pine; Keamy 1164. 

Continental Insurance Co. of New York. 60 Sansome: Keamy 1900. 



Fidelity Phenix Fire In>urance Co . GO Sansome. 

Fidelity & Casualty Co.. 351 Califomia; Keamy 2.560. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co.. 401 Califomia; Garfield 1975. 

Globe Indemnity Co., 444 California; Douglas 6460. 

Goodwin. Benj,. 60 Sansome: Sutter 5450. 

Grimth. R. H.. 354 Pine; Sutler 2517. 

Hartford .Accident & Indemnity Co.. 438 Califomia; Sutter 7680. 

Henley & Scolt. 201 Sansome; Sutter 8300. 

Henry. Carl A.. 401 Sansome; Douglas 703. 

HINCHHAN & WENTZ, 22 Leide.^orlT: Sutter 437. 

Home Fire & Marine Insiu^nce Co.. 433 Califomia; Garfield 1975. 

Home In>iirance Co. of New York. 451 California; Douglas 9080. 



Indl\idual Undensxlilng Corporation. 220 Montgomerj': Sutter 1460. 

Insurance Co. of North America. 231 Sansome: Sutter 5590. 

International Indemnity Co.. 315 Montgomerj': Douglas 8880. 

Jackson. Ward S.. 266 Busb. 

Junker. Harold. 266 Bush; .Sutter 485. 

Landis 9c Brlckell. 230 Sansome; Keamy 1020. 

Lichenstein. Joy. 430 Califomia: Sutler 76S0. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co.. Califomia and Leide«dorff. 

London Ash-urance Corporation. 369 Pine; Keamy 3637. 

London & Lancashire Insiu^nce Co.. 332 Pine; Douglas 272. 

Martizen, J. L., 735 Lakeshore Ave.. Oakland. Cal. 

Marsh & Mcl.,ennan. 114 Sam^ome; Garfield 4360. 

Marjland Casualty Co.. 22 Leidesdorff: Sutter 1841. 

Ma-fsachasetts Bonding & Insurance Co.. 433 Califomia: Douglas 1980. 

MuUin Acton Co.. 31.^ Mr,n " " 

New Anxsterdam Ca-u.jl'> ' 
New York Vnderwrii' i ■ v_ 

Newark Fire Insurai 

Niagara Fire I; 



Keamy 4566. 
Keamy 3885. 

.'o.. 244 Pine; Douglas 2151. 



North BrilLsh & MrninnU h, 

Northern Asstu^nce Ci».. 22s Pine: Keamy 3015 
Norwich Union Indemnity Co.. 222 Sansome; Sutter 2630. 
Ocean Accident & Guamatee Co.. 315 Montgomerj : Douglas 7780. 
Okell. Charles & Co., 334 Pine; Sutter 3866. 
Olds & StoUer. Inc.. 1O40 Gearj-; Prospect 7700. 

Pacific Coast Auto Underwriters Conference. 354 Pine; Garfield 5300. 
Pacific States Fire Insurance Co.. 11th and Alder. Portland. Ore. 
Phoenix Assurance Co.. Ltd., of London. 374 Pine: Sutter 6830. 
Phoenix Indemnity Co.. 222 Sansome: Sutter 2630. 
Preferred .Accident Insurance Co.. 220 Montgomerj": DoiJglas 9526. 
Queen Insiu^nce Co.. 201 Sansome; Keamy 3885. 
Rathbone. King & Seeley, 114 Sansome: Garfield 3900. 
Reliance In.surance Co., 200 Bush: Garfield 6514. 
Rolph. James. Jr.-W. B. Sweet & Co.. Inc.. 150 Sansome: Garfield 6772. 
Royal Indemnity Co.. 201 Sansome; Keamy 3885. 
Royal In.surance Co.. 201 Sansome: Keamj- 3885. 
Rule i Sons. Inc.. 660 Market; Garfield 6900. 

Scotti-sh Union & National Insurance Co.. 201 Sansome; Keamy 4699. 
Seeley & Co.. Inc.. 140 Sansome; Sutter 2774. 
.Selbach & Deans. 249 Pine: .Sutter 6410. 
.Slosson. F. M.. 351 CaUfornia. 
Smith. Geo. O.. 332 Pine; Douglas 272. 

Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co.. 227 Pine: Sutter 834. 
Standard Accident Insurance Co.. 315 Montgomerj*; Sutter 4940. 
Stmt. Chester C. 519 Califomia; Sutter 6400. 
Victorj- Insttrance Co., 200 Bush; Garfield 6514. 
Watson. Chas. R.. 369 Pine: Douglas 2722. 
Watson & Tajior. 433 Califomia; Sutter 252. 
Waj-man. W. O.. 2,54 Bmh; Douglas 3665. 

West American Insurance Co,. 1336 Van Ness Ave.; Prospect 406. 
Westchester Fire Insurance Co.. 369 Pine; Keamy 1164. 
Yorkshire Insurance Co.. 227 .Sansome: Sutter 5590. 

ZURICH OENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSURANCE 
CO., LTD., 315 Montgomery: Sutter 1218. 



J. A. LEVENSALER 

GENER.\L INSl'R.WCE BROKERS — ENGINEERS 

433 California Street Douglas 2815 

Dependable Protection^Prompt Service 



HINCHM.\N & WENTZ 
HINCHMAN, WENTZ & MILLER 

Fire and Casualty Insurance 

SAN FRANCISCO 



SAX FRAXClSCt) BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1920 



INSURANCE— BURGLARY AND THEFT 

Fidelity and Deposit Co. of Maryland. 433 California; Kearny 1452. 
Globe Indemnity Co.. 444 California; Douglas fi460 
Maryland Ca^Tjally Co.. 22 LoidesdortT; Sutter IMl. 

ZUBICB OENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSURANCE 
CO., LTD.. 315 Montgomery; Sutter 121S. 

INSURANCE— CASUALTY 

Aetna Life Insurance Co.. 333 Pine: Garfield 2626. 

American Miitiial LJabilitv Insurance Co.. orp3 Market 
ABMSTRONG. L. H. (TSAVELEBS INDEMNITY CO.) 315 Mont- 
gomery: Sutter I860. 

Associated Industries Insurance Corp.. So Second: Douglas S550. 

Benerd. Ira S.. Hearst Bldg.; Dotiglas 2751. 

Brown, Carl. Inc.. 220 Montgomery: Douglas 337. 

Brown. Edward & Sons. 200 Bush; Sutter 7120. 

California Agencies. Inc., 226 Sansome: Kearny 2261. 

California Casualty Indemnity Exchange. 220 Montgomery; Doug. 337. 

California Inspection Rating Bureau. 216 Pine; Sutter 3108. 

Chapman & Nauman. 358 Pine: Sutter 4868. 

Columbia Casualty Co.. 315 Montgomery-: Douglas 9215. 

Continental Casualty Co.. 681 Market: Douglas 2381. 

Federal Mutual Liability Insurance Co.. 220 Montgomery: Sutter 5898. 

FideUty and Casualty Co. of New York. 351 CaUfomia: Kearny 2562. 

Globe Indemnity Co.. 444 California: Douglas 6460. 

Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co.. 43S California: Sutter 7680. 

Henley & Scott, 201 Sansome; Sutter 8300. 

Henry, Carl A.. 401 Sansome: Douglas 703. 
HINCHMAN & WENTZ, 22 Leidesdorflf: Sutter 437. 

Insurance Co. of North America, 231 Sansome; Sutter 5590. 

International Indemnity Co.. 315 Montgomery: Douglas 8880. 

Johnson & Higgins, 311 California; Douglas 6767. 

Landis & Brickell. 230 Sansome: Kearny 1020. 

Lichtenstein. Joy. 430 California: Sutter 7680. 

Marsh & McLeiman. 114 Sansome: Garfield 4360. 

Maryland Casualty Co.. 22 I.«idesdorff: Sutter 1841. 

Massachusetts Bonding & Insurance Co.. 433 California: Douglas 1980. 

New Amsterdam Ca-^alty Co.. 105 Montgomery- : Sutler 4626. 

Nichols & Fay. 465 California; Sutter 5774. 

Nippert. Paul M. Co.. 433 California: Douglas 6123. 

Norwich Union Indemnity Co.. 222 Sansome: Sutter 2630. 

Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corp.. 315 Montgomery; Douglas 77S0. 

OKell. Chas. J.. 334 Pine: Suiter 3866. 

Phoenix Indemnity Co., 222 Sansome: Sutter 2630. 

Rolph. James. Jr.-W. B. Swett & Co.. Inc.. 150 Sansome; Garfield 6772. 

Royal Indemnity Co.. 201 Sansome; Kearny 3885. 

Rtile & Son-s. Inc.. 660 Market; Garfield 6900. 

Slosson. F. M.. 351 California. 

Smith. Geo. O.. 332 Pine: Douglas 272. 

Standard Accident Insurance Co., 315 Montgomerj-; Sutter 4940. 

ZUBICH OENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSUBANCE 
CO.. LTD.. 315 Montgomery; Sutter 1218. 

INSURANCE— COMPENSATION 

American Credit Indemnity Co., 465 California: Garfield 6920. 
Associated Industries Insurance Corporation, 85 Second; Douglas S550. 
California Casualty Indemnity E,\chaiipe. 220 Montgomery : Doug. 337. 
Globe Indemnity Co.. 444 California: Douglas 64C0. 
Maryland Casualty Co.. 22 LeidesdorfT; Sutter 1841. 
Okell. Charles. & Co.. 334 Pine: Sutter 3866. 
Standard Accident Insiu-ance Co.. 315 Montgomery; Sutter 4940. 
ZUBICH OENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSUBANCE 
CO.. LTD., 315 Montgomery: Sutter 1218. 

INSURANCE— FIDELITY AND SURETY 

Aetna IiLsurance Co.. 219 Sansome; Sutter 3010. 

Aetna Life Insurance Co. (FB), 333 Pine; Garfield 2626. 

American Surety Co. of New York. 276 Bush; Douglas 5346. 

California Agencies, Inc., 226 Sansome; Kearny 2261. 

Elbow. Gus A.. 201 Sansome; Sutter 6343. 

Fidelity and Deposit Co. of Maryland. 433 CaUfomia; Kearny 1452. 

Fidelity & Camalty Co.. 351 California: Kearny 2562. 

Globe Indemnity Co.. 444 California; Douglas 6460. 

Hartford Accident & Indemnity Co., 438 CaUfomia; Sutter 76S0. 

Henley & Scott. 201 Sansome: Sutter 8300. 

Insurance Co. of North America. 231 Sansome: Sutter 5590. 

Lichtenstein. Joy. 430 CaUfomia: Sutter 76S0. 

Maryland Casualty Co.. 22 LeidesdorfT: Su 



Okell. Charles & Co.. 334 Pine; Sutter 3866. 

Phoenix Indemnity Co., 222 Sansome: Sutter 2630. 

Preferred Accident Insurance Co.. 220 Montgomery; Douglas 9526. 

Royal Indenmity Co.. 201 Sansome; Keamy 3885. 

Smith. Geo. O.. 332 Pine; Douglas 272. 

Standard Accident Insiu-ance {^o.. 315 Montgomerj-; Sutter 4940. 

INSURANCE— FIRE AND MARINE 

Aetna Insurance Co. (FB). 219-231 Sansome: Sutter 3010. 

Aetna Life Insurance Co.. 333 Pine: Garfield 2626. 

Avery, F. M.. 200 Bush; Garfield 6514. 

Bankers & Shippers Ins. Co. of N. Y., 433 CaUfomia: Keamy 3561. 

Bishop, John A.. 311 CaUfomia; Douglas 6767. 

Bishop. Wilson. 60 Sansome; Keamv 190O. 

BOABD OF FIBE UNDEBWBITEBS OF THE PACIFIC, 465 CaU- 
fomia: Douglas 9500. 

Board of Marine Underwriters of S. F., 233 Sansome: Sutter 6514. 

BrowTi, Edward & Sons. 2C0 Bush; Sutter 7120. 

CaUfomia Agencies. Inc.. 226 Sansome; Keamy 2261. 

CaUfomia Insurance Co.. 315 Montgomery': Douglas 7100. 

CHANDLEB, L. B. (TBATELEBS FIBE INSUBANCE CO.), 
315 Montgomerr: Sutter 1S60. 

Chapman & Naxmian. 358 Pine; Sutter 4868. 

Col\-in. Chas. A., 202 Sansome: Keamy 370. 

Commercial Union Assiu-ance Co.. Ltd.. 315 Montgomery; Doug. 8500. 

Conly, CUfford. 210 Sansome; Keamy 4290. 

Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. of Hartford. Conn.. 369 Pine; Dougl 2722. 

Continental Insurance Co. of New- York, 60 Sansome; Keamy 1900. 

Davenixjrt. DixT^eU. 433 CaUfomia; Keamy 3561. 

Detroit Fire & Marine Insurance Co.. 376 Pine: Keamy 3500. 

Dinsmore, H. M. & Co.. 22 Leidesdorfl; Garfield 5420. 

FideUty and Casualty Co. of New York, 351 CaUfomia; Keamy 2562. 

FideUty Phenix Fire Insurance Co., 60 Sansome: Garfield 3506. 

Firemen's Fund Insm-ance Co.. 401 CaUfomia: Garfield 1975. 

Fonciere Insurance Co.. 339 Sansome; Douglas 4483. 

Goodwin, Benj.. 60 Sansome; Sutter 5450. 

GrifHth. R. H., 354 Pine; Sutter 2517. 

Harrison. A. Dalton. 351 California: Garfield 488. 

Harri.son. M. C. Co., 28 LeidesdorfT; Keamy 394. 

Henderson. Wm.. 333 Pine; Garfield 2626. 

Henley & Scott. 201 San-^ome: Sutter 8300. 

Henry. Carl A.. 401 Sansome; Douglas 703. 

Hewitt, Dixwell. 2525 Broadway; Sutter 7680. 

HINCHMAN & WENTZ. 22 Leidesdorfl: Sutter 437. 

Home Fire & Marine Insurance Co., 433 CaUfomia; Garfield 1975. 

Home Insurance Co. of New York. 200 Bush; Douglas 9080. 

Himter. Frank L.. 234 San.some: Sutter 4910. 

Insurance Co. of North America. 231 Sansome: Sutter 5590. 

Jackson, "Ward S.. 266 Bush; Sutter 485. 

Johnson & Higgins. 311 California; Douglas 6767. 

Jimker. Harold. 266 Bush: Sutter 485. 

Knowles, H. J., 260 CaUfomia: Douglas 5007. 

Landis & BrickeU, 230 Sansome; Keamy 1020. 

Lichtenstein. Joy, 430 CaUfomia; Sutter 76^0. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Instirance Co. . 444 CaUfomia : Sutter 2280. 

London and Lancashire Insm-ance Co., 332 Pine; Douglas 272. 

London Assurance Corporation, 369 I*ine: Keamy 3637. 

Lum, Chas. H.. 465 CaUfomia; Douglas 2170. 



National Union Fire Insuranii < i , „■ Pa.. 241 Pine; Sut. 5313 

Nevada Fire Insurance Co.. ■'■■'.{ \ >..,■ i :iti i id' Douglas 5318. 

New York Unden^iters Agem > , ,i4i ?ati>( uit- : Kfamy 4566. 

New Zealand Insurance Co.. Ltd.. 334 California: Keamy 1352. 

Newark Fire Insurance Co.. 201 Sansome: Keamy 3885. 

Newliall. H. M. & Co., 260 California: Sutter 1886. 

Niagara Fire Insiu-ance Co., of New"York, 376 Pine; Keamy 35C0. 

Nicliols & Fay. 465 Califomia: Sutter 5774. 

North British & Mercantile Insurance Co.. 244 Pine; Douglas 2151. 

Northern Assoirance Co., Ltd., of London, 228 Pine; Keamy 3015. 

Okell. Charles. & Co.. 334 Pine: Sutter 3866. 

Ord, W. E. J., 351 Califomia. 

PACIFIC MAEINE INS. AGENCY, 330 Califomia: Keamy 7529. 



Rathbone. King & Seeley, 114 Sansome: Garfield 3900. 

Rehance Insiu^nce Co. of Philadelphia, 200 Bush; Garfield 6514. 

Rodgers, H. C, 433 CaUfomia. 

Rolph, James. Jr.-W. B. Swett & Co., Inc.. 150 Sansome: Garfield 6772. 

Rosenthal. Louis. 302 Califomia: Keamy 1076. 

Royal Insurance Co., 201 Sansome: Keamy 3885. 

Scottish Union and National In.<airarceCo., 201 Sansome: Keamy 4699. 

Seeley & Co.. Inc., 140 Sansome: Sutter 2774. 

Selbach & Deans, 249 Pine; Sutter 6410. 



^ ^ " HROUGH active and constant cooperation with Municipalities, 

i ^ Architects, Contractors and Property Owners THE BOARD OF 

\^ FIRE UNDERWRITERS OF THE PACIFIC is a potent factor in 

Fire Prevention Activities — Fire Protection Development — More Adequate 

Community Safeguards — and Better Building Construction — all of which 

have a material bearing on fire hazards. 

BOARD OF FIRE UNDERWRITERS OF THE PACIFIC 

MERCHANTS EXCHANGE BUILDING SAN FRANCISCO 



SAX FRAXCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1020 



INSURANCE— FIRE AND MARINE 

Continued 



INVESTIGATORS 



Slossim, r •>! -.-,1 '• ,! 


r,.rnla. 




r : Douglas 272. 


SprliiMln . : 1 - 1. 


ricie Insuranre Co.. 225-227 Pine: Sutter 834 




.liifnrnia: .Sutter 6400. 








1 l'liil,,H,l|il,i.,. LTii Bush; Garfield 0514. 


Watson. Chas. H.. .((i'.i 


Cl'.. 1 ' .lr.'',i ', ■JL'. 


Watson & Taylor, -l.t.i 


■:i':;i •■ !i ,. -^i '. r- J.'i2. 






Westchester Fire Insura 


lift I u. ul .\i IV \ orK. 3B0 Pine; Kcamj- 1 10- 



INSURANCE— LIFE AND ACCIDENT 



.\etna Life Insuranre Co. fFI!). 333 I'i 
Beneril. Ira. S . Hearst lll.li;.; IlnuKla 
Binder. H. A.. fiM Market ; UouKia 



; Carneld 2626. 



Flniav^ 

Fleisiu 

Globe 
Oretztn 



Majisiir 
Ma.ss.-i, 
Mas«. 
Matdi. 



Sutler 1 
: Sutter ami. 
nia: DoURlat) n460. 
Ket: .Sutter B073. 
"o.. 43H California: Sutler 76S0. 



■J2 I.eidesdorfT: Suiter 1S4I. 

i.iaii.jn, S21 M.likef. Douglas 28S6. 

. Ill uMiii, I .. i:t3 California: Douglas inso. 



.Market: Sutter SS20. 



NOBTHWESTEBN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO., r,Oi Market: 



I <■ Co.. Sl.'V Montgomery: Douglas 7780. 

-h: Douglas 7!110. 

'ine: Sutter 3.s('.6. 

lee Co., 660 Market; Douglas 7700. 

inee Co . 14!> California. 



Mi.iitgomerj'; Douglas 9526. 
.1- 7(100. 

Mi.ntpomery; Sutter 4940. 

uiiy 82. 



okell. c I i :• ■ ' ;:i 

Paeilir ^ ■ I .: .: I .'• ' i-ui 
Page, .1-; ■ I. -iM^ ■ 1,11 

Pioni-i-r I ;!.' ;'. I .' I .■' ,1 
Pivferreii .\erldent Iii-iir 
Shields. A. M.. 31.'. M.'i 
Standard Accident Insiu 
Stcphen.son, R. L.. I M' 
Stolp. F. .•\.. 544 Mark.l. n.,ut;,t~ l., u. 
Thomas, E. J.. .564 Market. Kearny lis.';. 

Von Danim. Bertram. 1012 Palm Ave.. San -Mateo. Cal.; San Mat. 803. 
Webster Mackenzie Co.. 681 Market; Sutter 7300. 
West Coast Life Insurance Co., 605 Market: Kearny 6760. 
Western Stales Life Insllranee Co.. 905 Market: Sutter 545. 
Wickett, F, A.. 14 Montgomery, 

ZUEICH GENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSUBANCE 
CO., LTD., 31.^ Montgomery; Sutter !2I,S. 

INSURANCE— PLATE GLASS 

Globe Indemnity Co . 444 California; Douglas 6460. 
Mar\'latid Casualty Co.. 22 Leidesdorlf; Slitter 1S4I. 
ZUBICH OENEBAL ACCIDENT & LIABILITY INSUBANCE 
CO.. LTD.. 31.'') Montgomery; Sutter 1218. 

INSURANCE— TITLE 

California Paeifle Title In-uranee Co.. 14S Montgomery: Sutler 3500. 

City Title Insurance Co.. 216 Montgomery; sutler 3755. 

Clark. Walter C. 250 :Montgomery; Garfield 2170. 

Northern Countie.s Title Insurance Co.. 374 Bush. 

Title Insurance & Guaranty Co.. 250 Montgomery: Garfield 2170. 

Western Title Insurance Co.. 176 Sutter: Garfield 5810. 



Costcllo Bureau of Invi^tigaii 
Field. W. H. Detective Bun-aii 
General Service Corp.. 995 Ma 
Gtgnac Secret Service Bureau 
Jerome Detective Service ( , 
Morso Detective it Patrol s. , 
Paeifle Kiweareh Buivau isi... 
Pinkerton National Deteeti\t 



ket ; Kearny 7699. 
: Sutter 2238. 
I 13.i9. 

Douglas 5469. 
'"UKlas 9199. 

iiiia: Sutter 1900. 
Market; Kearny .5330. 



INVESTMENTS AND SECURITIES 



.<: Co , 31.-, Mo 



Frank. Alvin H, ,'t 
Grlffln. Andrew ( ; , 
Gundelflnger. E. K 
Hamilton. H, G. .^; 
Heelit Invi'-tmrnt c 
Hell.r-llnir. ,\ < ,, 



Kiniliall. C. E.. 2.'ii I 
Koshland. Max I, i; " 

l^ndlleld. P. E.. r.^:: 

Ijcvi. H. & Co . Ill \ I 

Lenis. A. N.. 703 .M 
Lewis, Ge4>rge W, .v ' 
Lewis & Co.. 58 Sun. I -u 
Lilienthal Co. (Bi. 3.J1 i ,ilil 
Ix)wenberg. A. .1.. Hearst HI 



_•;. 1 1-1.1 ,1.1.,, lii;, I ,,,1 Meld 4074. 

il ,v llnM>in Inc. -i:n) ( alifornia; Douglas 142. 

s'j California; Kearny GaOO. 

105 Sansome; Sutter 1856. 

Market: Doutd&s 8949. 

4S0 California; Garfield 4450. 

IS,-, 1 i.lifornia: Garfield 4766. 

■ :iiiii Montgomery; Kearny 7900. 

Is,-. 1 ilifiirnia: Dav 



-utter 4064. 

iiitgomery: Douglas 7641. 
la. Davenport 1541. 
> Dougla.s 2244. 
amy 2706. 
, ry; Douglas 188. 
liter 5710. 
.ilifomia. 
Ilia; Douglas 8391. 



: Garfield 3982. 



irfield 2290. 
iilil 1202. 
3690. 



.Shaiuioii, Samuel. _';.! 
Snowden, J. Arthur . 
Sutro* Co. (B). 4111 
Swift. Henry F.. 2 1' 
Wagnon. Wm. B,. 31 
Wat.son. Dougla-s s,, 
AViiLship. Emory : ;i," i 
Wriglit. Alexander 



Douglas 500. 
I > Kearny 5764. 
Montgomery: Douglas 7327, 
\ Douglas 2130. 



.-., .Market; Garfield 4690. 



Zadig & Co. (B), 370 Bush; Kearny 1725. 

IRON— PIG 

COLUMBIA STEEL COEP,. 21,5 Market; Douglas 8; 

IRON AND STEEL 



1819 


1926 


"More Than a Century of Ser-vice" 




iCTNA INSURANCE 


CO. 


HARTFORD, CONN. 




First Agency Appointed at San Francisco Dec. 8, 1858 


Pacific Coast Department 

ESTABLISHED DEC., ISbO 




Ralph B. Ives 
President 





BADT-FALK & CO. 171 \, 
Baker. Hamilton & Pacilir < ,, \ 
Bourne-FuUer Co.. 681 M.-u I, I 
California Iron Yards Co. , \\ 
California Steel Co. (M). 5^- ' 
Castle, A. M. & Co. (Wi, nil 
Colorado Fuel & Iron Co Ih 
COLUMBIA STEEL CORP J 
Continental Steel 4: , sill, i.|\ ' i 
E.VTe. Edw. L. & Co. , l-K , , H ' 
Foucar. Eay & Simon. Inc., ,. Ij I 
Guim. Carle & Co. (MA). -144 M; 
Jessop. Wm. & Sons, Inc. IFIJ J 
Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp, i , , 
Judge & Dow (M.\), 74 New M,,i 
Judson Mfg. Co. (M), S19 Folson 



1 , Market 1062. 
a~ 1490. 
Hemlock 3800. 
Douglas 2469. 
i,iuglas 8760. 
-;t3 Harrison ; Doug. 1562. 
, amy 2.S9. 



Douglas 1776. 



Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Co. 

of Milwaukee. Wis. 

E. J. THOMAS 

GENERAL AGENT 

564 Market Street San Francisco 



SAX FRANCISCO BUSINESS, AI'RIL 14, 1926 



IRON AND STEEL— Continued 



Kej. Tohn L Inc (Ii i 
Metal & Theimit Coipci 
Midvale-Philadelplua f - 
Montague Pipe A. stetl < 



IRRIGATION SUPPLIES 

iM). West Berkeley, Cal.l Ber. 5420. 

jidrv Co. (FB).6S1 Market; Gar. 5140, 

Weissbatun. G. & Co.. Pipe Works (M). 133 Eleventh: Market 272. 
1 Pipe & St«ei Co. (M), 444 Market; Kearny 4110. 

JAIL WORK 



Holph Mills & Cci 



Scovel Iron stop 
Soule, Edis L f 
Sugarman Ii 



JS21 



Hemlock 1190. 
M I II, ^ota. Mission 7800. 

I 'I --utter 3005. 

_ _ .. _ Douclas 7133 

XTnited States steel Products Co (KB), Rialto Bldg Sutter 2500. 
Western Pipe& steel Co <M) 444 Market. Keamj 4110 
Wetenhall. W S Co (Dj. Nineteenth and Wtsconsm. Hemlock 14S0. 



Truscon Steel Co . 709 ilf 



IRON WORK 



California .irtlstic M.tal .^ W in < 

California SJteel f^' i irnaiiM mil 

Central Iron Wnrk- M _'n:.n l:i\ nn . Mission on. 

Day, Thomas r,. .M , 7j:, M i-imi I i.niflas 1573. 

GolVlen <:ale Irnn \\ ..ilv.- M IMi ]fii\va!Ti; Market 5445. 

Gnlfieri statr \ .Mimi-- Imii Wml,- M -'49 First: Sutter 3508. 

HENDY, JOSHUA, IRON WORKS Ml. 75 Fremont; Kearny 3430. 



Michel & Pfeffer Ir. .11 » 1 ,1 I . \ 1 
Monarch Iron AVorl.- M J- - -'i 
Ocean Shore Iron Wmk-, .',",ii l.i^l 
Old Mission Kopper Kraft. Im- > 
Pacific RoUing MiU Co. iM J. 1 lUO 
Peerless Ornamental Iron & Broiiz 
Pennington. Geo. W. ."^ons. Inc iM 
Ralston Iron \Vraks iMi. T 
Roberts M IL-- Cii M^ i nm 
Schrador li-n W-ik-, Im- 
Seipel& ,li,iiri-<,ii .\l ]n,-ii 



ementina; Kearny 4481. 



I ii luglas 6575. 






, ,.\i,, i^;i FuLs< 



star Ornamental Ire .. _ 

West Coast Wire & Iron WoiKs (Mj. S61 Howard: Douglas 4397, 
Western Iron Worlds (M), 141 Beale: Davenport 2575. 



JANITOR SERVICE 

Pacific Coast Contracting Janitor Co., 521 Brannan; Sutter 930, 

JANITORS' SUPPLIES 

Building SuppUes Co., 623 Sacramento; Kearny 5787. 
Easteiday Supply Co.. 938 Howard: Douglas 424. 
Lacko Specialty Co. Inc. (J), 824 Montgomery; Garfield 0631. 
Sterling Hardware Co. (R). 535 Montgomerj-; Davenport 2179. 

JEWELERS' SUPPLIES 

Nordman & Aurich, 150 Post; Cai field 357. 



JEWELRY 



17 Market; Douglas 2553. 



Ahlers, H. C. Co. 

Andrews Diamond P.ii i 

Auger, Constant J. 1 1 : ; , - 

Barkan. Fritz (W) il'n i n i ^ 

Barth. Rudolph (R). 7., ( i h 

Brilliant. B. T. (R), 703 Ma 

Burnett Bros. (R), 938 Mai 

California Jewelry Co. (I-W 

Carrau & Green Inc. (W), 1 

Chew Chong Tai & Co. M 

Daridson, Wm. (I-W i, 701 

deBor, Mendel B, iWi. _iim 

DeFerrari & Peters i H , L'',. 

Dreyfus, Henry & Daunlin 

Eisenberg. A. & Co. \\ 

Freer. Burr W. Co. iW -M \ ' "' i niiy: 

Friend, Samuel H, I I-W rm I I' ':t>o'i 

Gensler-Lee Jewelr\ t 1 1 K . -i~ ,ii,., i.iarnj 

GUdden, W. B. Co., HU Ul;u.\ , i).,u^l.i.- 117y. 

GUndemann, Wm. M. & Son (K), 7ls Market; Dc 

Goldstein, S. H. (M). 830 Market; Douglas 6099. 



704 Market ; Kny. 2300. 
Mer 1633. 
1 liina 95. 



JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS 

SAN FR/VNCISCO (established in i856) CALIFORNIA 

EISaiNEERS AND IWACmiNERY MANUFACTURERS 

SPECIALIZING IN 

Industrial, Construction and Mine Machinery 




WORKS— SUN'XYVALE 



SANTA CLARA CO., CAL. 



FOR MINING INCLUDE: Hoists— eleetric. 



OUR iVIAIVUF'ACTURES— 

...... '^.,^ M.,^^^^ , n. gas. air or water driven; Head Frames; Cages; Crossheads; Dumping Irons; Landing Chairs; 

"Buckets; Baiiersrsidps'; oVVCars; Turn Tables; Switches; Track; Saw Mills; Timber Framers. 
FOR MILLING AND ORE REDUCTION: Stamp. Roller. Ball. Rod, Tube and Gravel Mills; Rolls; Grinding and Clean-up Pans; Bateas; Amalgam 

Plates- Barrels- Safes; Retorts; Sand Pumps; Tailings Samplers; Jigs; Classifiers; Thickeners; Kilns; Ore Drj-ers; Concentrate Dryers; Ore and 

Rock Feeders; Crushers; Ore Concentrators; Ore Samplers and Screens; Shoes and Dies; Bullion Retorts and Molds, etc; Qmcksilver Furnaces; 

Water Wheels, 
FOR HYDRAULIC MINING: Giants; Elevators; Water Wheels; Derricks; Winches; Riveted Steel Pipe; Riffles; Sluices: Water Gates and Valves. 
FOR WATER POWER, IRRIGATION AND WATER STORAGE: Needle Nozzle Valves; Gate Valves; Slmce Gates; Riveted Steel Pipe; Water 

Wheels. 
FOR ELEV.VTING AND CONVEYING: Cranes; Winches; Windlasses; Derricks; Belt i 
BOILERS AND STE.\M ENGINES of various kinds; also a Une suitable for a ' 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 1926 



JEWELRY— Continued 



KODAK SUPPLIES 



Ciraves. Wn 
HaU. A. 
Heslhal, Wm. . 
Htrsclinian & ( 
Houston. C;lliii< 
Jecldis. Alphoii: 
Johnson & Wu. 
Keams. K. P. ( 
King. Jcsso W, 
Knox & Kaye i 
Lee fc Kierski i 
Levy, M. L. & 



Onuda (■,,iiiinn.iii> l.(d 
Oil. AuKu<rt 1,. i.\l). :;:i.i 
R.idke & Co. iK). 20H ]'. 
KlWtsky. Mrs. K. (No\. 
Rotlischllrt .Ii'wclry C"... 
.Samuels. Alhrri sen (I; 
Shrcvc-, Tlmi .\ r.i't. I 



:i'l,,i _-utter28S8. 

aiiiv .M:il. 
i\ l>tjuglus 406. 
Aiai-ny 538. 
. r 0407. 
><>U)i:la8 92S. 
r • . 150 Post ; Sutter 3050. 

i'lO. 

K.amy 4538. 
Sutter 6127. 
Ml lieary.33 Kearny; Doug.S383 
sutler 1012. 
\vo :Garfleld 2600. 
It: Kearny 3228. 



Tin Kook «i Co. i.M). 727 .Iaiks..n; China 70. 
Tuckey. H. W. & Co (M). 140 Goai^'; Kearny 5749. 
Welnshenk. Chas. & Son (W). 704 \Iarkot: Sutter 4497. 
Wurkhelm. S. & Bro. (W). 717 Market: Douglas 975 

JUNK AND WASTE MATERIALS 

Harlov. Chm. Co. i\V). tttiO Seventli; Miirkcl 1.^5. 

Learner & Kosftillial (W). lOO .lacksfm. Oakland. Cal.: Oakland 1078. 

Le\'in. M. & Sons (W). 2i;31 Third; Park US. 

Sugarman iron & Metal Co. (W), sixt<fnth and Missouri: Hemlock 1190. 



KEROSENE 



1 Oil Co. of Cal . 2.' 



KITCHEN EQUIPMENT 



: Carfleld 2070. 



s.;7-S31 .Mission: Kearny 3155. 
_ _ „ „ . iM). 376 .SLilh; Market4845. 

NELSON, JAS. a., Inc iMl. i;t75 Howard: Heniiock 140. 
Topper. T. J. Co. (M). 10K9 .Mls.slon: Market 7501. 
Western Range Co. iM). »49 Mission: Garfield 6962. 



KNIT GOODS 



Market 263. 



^ ItlOO. 



Abrams, N. (W). .520 Mis>i..ii Iii.u 

Alcone Knitting Mills i.\l ' l'it::i M 

Baby Shop Inc. (M). ^r, Fii»i. Hi.ii 

Baude. Frank W. iMAl. 4:!.-> .Mi>-m. 

Bauer Bros. 4 Co. i\\ i, s:i lMi..ii I 

Cluett Peabodv .'fc Cn iWi. lod I". 

Crocker. A. & Co. <M i. :12 Had. i ^ 

Davis. Simon E, .'t Cn .Wi. :,\ 1 -. 

Dinkelspiel. L. c>> Iii< \\ iJ'i H 

ElkusCo. (M-W' 7J'. 7:::: Mi-.i.m 

Feisel.E. J. (W ■ :;:i 1 Mi^-mm i.,,r 

Fisher. Chas. (-\1 \ im,,,,, K,-a 

Gantner & Matt' III ( o M h.l > 

Greenebaum, AViil \ M 

Gruhn Bros., l-'i) I:, in, 

Israel & Nussbatim i <i 

Jacobs, F. P. & Hn. M 

Karsky & Abrahm (\\ I, 

Kaufman-Goldman Co. i\\ .^'i Hiiii i\ Douglas il3l. 

Maltzer& Kiefer (M-Jl. ln^li n.iajlas ^29. 

Mission Knitting Works i.M lis i jisi, Douglas 6119. 

Moore. Walton N. Dry Gn.ds c, i w : Mission and Fremont; Day. 841. 

Princeton Knitting Mills (Ml, 502 Mission: Douglas 5397. 

Rosenthal. Maurice (W). 49 Battery; Kearny 7213. 

Snyder Bros. Knitting Mills (M). 201 Eighth: Park 8058. 

Western Fancy Goods Co. (W), 544-546 Mission: Douglas 2086. 



I Held 42154. 
arn\ lOOH. 

Mission: Kearny 8900. 
I. 740 Mission: Keamy 4548. 
S3631. 
I Sutter; Douglas 850. 



Eastman Kcdak Co. iFBi. 241 Bati 
Eastman Kodak Stori« Inc .W-Ki 
Hirseh at Kaye (M). 2:19 (ii 



1 inoglas 0346. 



LABELS 



Diiinis.>o Mfk- <■.. il-H s:j:j .Market Kearny 3789. 

Ea.sliiKin n.,«aul<'.. M , 4 14 Hi:.iiiiaii Ki-amy 5102. 

<i.i]li.«a\ l.iihi.L.rai.liiiifc.' ( o .M l'aMr">15Fo!som; Douglas 3056. 

Ileuiiis, ji .\ (. ( ,, MA JII2 I)..MS S,ilter2207. 

OLSEN LITHOOBAPB CO. M;. .>17 s.ins ime: Keamy 1282. 

l';j.ill. I.:.l«l c... 'M.. ll.ill Folsom. Hemlock 10S6. 

SCHMIDT LITHOOBAFH CO. (Ml. 461-499 .Second: Douglas 200. 



I,alx-1 J; Litlionraph Co. 



i.M). 902 Battery: Douglas 680. 



LABORATORIES— BIOLOGICAL 



LACQUER FINISHING 



LADIES' FURNISHINGS 

Alcone Knitting Mills (M), (Jersey Cloth Sport Coats and Suits). 1633 

Mission: Market 2(13. 
Anthony Bros. (M), 510 Mission; Sul 



Barry-Ncwberg & C' 
Bauer Bros. & Co. ■ ' 
Benedict. C. Mfg ( 
Blume. Harry (M ■. 
Cityof Paris Dryli. 



Flelschman. M. R 
Goldman. Morris i.N 
Gruman & Kaufnuii 
Hale Bros,, Inc. (It, 
Hamburger .Api'ni'l 
Handelsnian I. M 



Sutter: Sutter 5310. 

I)..uglas731. 
j-Mi r.'s). 1058 Mission: Market 2482. 

li..UKlas4298. 
( .eary, Stockton and O'Farrell; Dotlg- 



I.cvy. Max « i:iii 
Llebes, II. .^ < .i U 
Livingst(tn Hi ^'^ , Im 
Loewy, Edmund & < 



7sL- .Market: Sutter 8744. 
iiller: Douglas 3»^31. 
■: Keamy 167" 



Magnin, 



nd Grant Ave.: Garfield 6240. 

irant Ave. and Geary; Douglas 3060. 

Sutter: Keamy 1936. 

, .. J Ave. and Geary: Douglas 2100. 

Magnin. Joseph Co.. Inc. (R). Stockton and O'Farrell: Sutter 123. 
Malson Adelaide (R). 287 Geary; Douglas 6f39. 

" Ri. 2S0 Post: Garfield 4390. 

■1,(1 I)..ut,'la.s3400. 
i-iiNin \V I. Mission and Fremont. 
\ 7(1 I'liie Sutter 690. 
:i:i(i -\lis.~iijn; Keamy 2891. 
K . llH-129 Post: Garfield 6000. 
\\ I HI New Montgomery. 



. MnfTat 



\s 



S79 Market : Douglas 4709. 
Van Vliet, George IMAl. 1.54 Sutter; Garfield 2152. 
Waller Cloak & Suit .Mfg. Co. (M ). 228 Grant Ave. : Garfield 1658. 



Olsen Lithograph Co. 

Manufacturers of Labels 
547 Sansome Street - San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 1282 



MANGRUM & OTTER, Inc. 

827-831 MISSION STREET 

We carry a complete line of STOVES, RANGES, REFRIGERATORS, HOUSEHOLD 

and RESTAURANT UTENSILS, KITCHEN and BAKERY EQUIPMENT for HOTELS, 

HOSPITALS, CAFES and OTHER PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS 

TILING FOR WALLS, FLOORS and MANTELS 

FIREPLACE ACCESSORIES of all kinds 



ESTIMATES FURNISHED 



Telephone Kearny 3155 



SAN FRANCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL 14, 192C 



Bunker Hill Smelter 



PRODUCERS OF 



"BUNKER HILL" 

PIG AND CALKING LEAD 



99.99% Pure 




NORTHWEST LEAD CO. 

Manufacturers of 

"Everything in Lead" 

From "BUNKER HILL" Pig Lead 



Seattle 



Sales Offices and Warehouses 

San Francisco Los Angeles Salt Lake City 

Spokane Oakland Sacramento 



California Sales Agent 

F. A. HAMMERSMITH 

CROCKER BUILDING Phone Sutter 414 SAN FRANCISCO 



SAX FRAXCISCO BUSINESS, APRIL H, 1926 



LAMPS 



Braun-Knecht-Hcimann Cn. \\ -M i, .-,7ti-.",s.l Mission; Kearny 3493. 
Bullard. E. D. Co. (D-M.Vj s.f,.iv .\Iinei. 565 Howard: Doug. 0320. 
CaUiotl. Henry J. B. (M.\) iFloiir . IMI New MontRomery; Doug. 7552. 
Day. Thomas Co. (M) (Floor). 725 Mi.s.slon; Douglas 1573. 



LAND OPERATORS 



. _ ... . . rv: Krariiy /Vll. 

Kern CoiUlty Land Co.. 4*^5 (".ilifurnia: Kearny 4021. 

Liberty Farnw Co.. 8.s3 Markft: Kearny 27«»8. 

Parsons. E. A.. Sacramento. Cal. 

Patterson. P. H.. Newark. Cal. 

Kivor Farms Co. of California. 220 Montgomerj-; Garfield 1219. 

Reeding. Geo. C. Co.. 485 California: Kearny 5083. 

Rosenberg, Jos.. San Ardo. Cal. 

Sonoma Land Co.. 170 Townsend; Sutler 350. 

Voorman Co., 593 Market : Kearny 449. 



LARD 



Mcljilvrr- I'.-i.kiiiL- C. Ml. II!) .Sacramento: .Suiter 950. 
EATHJENS. P F. & SONS l.Ml. 1331-1.T15 I'aclBc: Graystone 2027. 
illiSa))l'))iiii)Mi.l'aeKiiig& I>ro\lvlon Co. (M). .107-413 Front 



LAUNDRIES 



Atla.s Laundry Co. CM). I3v Krie: I'ail, l.-.ni. 
Blrslnger. A. P. i Co.. 1'.).'.7 sun. r « .-.i -isrei. 
CavanauKh. Joseph T. Ii)r i M .n)i ) ]r hMarket 143. 
Cerciat French I.aundry <'<■., ))il . \1<- \jii,(,.r: Fillmore 6544. 
Domestic l.auTiilr\ Cn -M .'iiiii: i]..u;iiil I'arli 4657. 
Galland .\I. M .,i,iH. I .iii„l.% \1 i :tiil sti,, Marliet 2514. 
Goldenic.L. - . [ , lr> \l LM IL' l..itnliard: West 420. 
Home l.;i"i .1 . I ;!:iNi7rli .Murki-l 130. 

LaGrau.l. I .... \l I'lii ]^'i hMarket 916. 

Lamay.scju. 1;. ' .. j'-.i -w" i w '-r ti.h 

Leighton CMopiTaiivc l..iuii..i . ;''.,. I:n .dc Market 3551. 

Loustau. Laurent Co.. 3t'-.'.i -' III ' (I • w --^t 6517. 

Metropolitan Laundry Cc M iii- Mi n-un: Market 2170. 

New Process Laundry Co Nt ..-, mii Market 9.52. 

New San Franclco Laundi> M ... i ) i .miuvi