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Full text of "University of Massachusets reports : Reports, 1956/1957-1977/1978"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



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1965-1966 

Report of the President 







University of Massachusetts 
Bulletin 



. , .It is to walk rapidly 

Through civilizations, 

Governments, theories. 

Through poems, pageants, shoivs. 

To form great individuals. 

— Walt Whitman 



Volume LVIII December 1966 Number VI 

Published six times a year by the University of 
Massachusetts in February, March (2), August, 
November and December. Second class mail 
privileges authorized at Amherst, Massachusetts. 



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Board of Trustees 



Organization of 1967 



Term Expires Organization of 1967 



Term Expires 



Frank L. Boyden of Deerfield 
Harry D. Brown of North Chatham 
Edmund J. Croce of Worcester 
Dennis Crowley of Boston 
Robert D. Gordon of Lincoln 
Fred C. Emerson of Springfield 
Alfred L. Frechette of Brookline, 

Commissioner of Public Health (ex officio) 
John W. Haigis, Jr. of Greenfield 
Joseph P. Healey of Arlington 
Owen B. Kiernan of Milton, 

Commissioner of Education (ex officio) 
Lorenzo D. Lambson of Southwick 
John W. Lederle of Amherst, 

President of the University (ex officio) 
Louis M. Lyons of Cambridge 
John J. Maginnis of Worcester 
Charles H. McNamara of Stoughton, 

Commissioner of Agriculture (ex officio) 



1967 
1968 
1969 
1973 
1971 
1969 



1968 
1970 



1973 



1971 
1972 



Calvin H. Plimpton of Amherst 1969 

George L. Pumphret of Dorchester 1967 

Mrs. George R. Rowland of Osterville 1972 

Harry C. Solomon of Jamaica Plain, 

Commissioner, Department of 

Mental Health (ex officio) 
Hugh Thompson of Milton 1969 

Frederick S. Troy of Boston 1970 

His Excellency John A. Volpe of Winchester, 

Governor of the Commonwealth (ex officio) 
Most Reverend Christopher J. Weldon 

of Springfield 1969 

Officers of the Board 

Frank L. Boyden of Deerfield, Chairman 
Joseph P. Healey of Arlington, Vice-Chairman 
Kenneth W. Johnson of Amherst, Treasurer 
Robert J. McCartney of Amherst, Secretary 




Members and officers of the Board of Trustees pause for a photograph during a recent meeting at Am- 
herst. From left to right are: Front row: G. L. Pumphret, L. M. Lyons, Mrs. G. R. Rowland, Pres- 
ident J. W. Lederle, Chairman F. L. Boyden, Vice-Chairman J. P. Healey, H. D. Brown D. M. Crow- 
ley. Rear row: Secretary R. J. McCartney, Treasurer K. W. Johnson, L. D. Lambson, R. D. Gordon, 
J. J. Maginnis, C. H. Plimpton, F. S. Troy, j. W. Haigis, F. C. Emerson, E. J. Croce. 



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To the 

Board of Trustees: 



It is with real pleasure that I submit to you my sixth Annual Report as 
president of the University of Massachusetts. 

The 1965-1966 year has been one of both tangible and abstract pro- 
gress, of consolidation, of self -assessment, and of increasing strength for 
the whole University entity through increased understanding among its 
ever growing number of component parts. 

It has been a year in which the satisfactions of achievement have 
outweighed the unavoidable pangs of growth and change. 

With the continued support of the citizens of the Commonwealth, the 
Governor, and the General Court, we have taken renewed sightings on 
our goal of greater educational service to all Massachusetts. We are 
confident of our course, and proud of our progress, but at the same time 
we are aware that greater challenges are always before us. 

We pledge to you and to all Massachusetts' sons and daughters our 
unflagging dedication to the increase of opportunity in public higher 
education, and to the fulfillment of our common aims. 



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December 31, 1966 



John W. Lederle 

President 



REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 



THE University of Massachusetts, in company 
with many other institutions of higher learning, has 
faced during the past year many new problems growing 
out of the necessity for institutional unity and cohesion 
on the one hand and a concurrent necessity for flexibility 
and diversity on the other. 

This is perhaps another way of saying that growth 
and change, each of which abundantly attend on a uni- 
versity aspiring to greatness, require new concepts and 
new responses. We are proud of the manner in which 
the University of Massachusetts responded during 1965- 
1966 to the exciting challenges posed for the present and 
the future. 

In essence, we are challenged to provide better educa- 
tion for more and more students. We are upgrading and 
enlarging our academic programs while coping with 
the intense demands of an unprecedented admissions 
pressure. These demands may be stated in four ways, each 
of which provides its own cumulative thrust : 1 ) The 
number of college-age youth in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts is increasing; 2) An increasingly greater 
percentage of college-age youth is seeking a higher edu- 
cation; 3) Massachusetts' superb private educational 
institutions, expanding less rapidly than public higher 
education, are nevertheless accepting a greater and 
greater percentage of their enrollments from outside the 
Commonwealth, and 4) As costs elsewhere climb, this 
University maintains its historic low-tuition policy for 
Massachusetts residents. 

In addition to this multiple demand on our resources, 
we face the reality of increased requirements per student: 
on the average, the individual is pursuing higher educa- 
tion further and longer than ever before. At the same 
time, students are requiring greater depth and variety in 
the programs and courses offered. 

It is not difficult to see that such a situation calls for 
an extraordinary effort — intellectual, physical, and finan- 
cial — if its extraordinary challenges are to be adequately 
met. 

Dr. John W. Gardner has said that post-secondary 
educational institutions should be prepared to accept as 
much as fifty per cent of the college-age population by 
1970. All indications are that public higher education in 
Massachusetts will be called upon to absorb approx- 
imately one half of that fifty per cent by that year. In 
view of this probability, some interesting conclusions may 
be drawn from other statistical estimates. 



The year 1965-1966 was our first twelve months fol- 
lowing acceptance by the Legislature of the new Massa- 
chusetts Education Plan, commonly known as the Har- 
rington-Willis Commission Report. This far-reaching and 
significant study, to which we will return later in this 
report, contains projections of enrollment for all public 
higher education facilities in the Commonwealth and of 
the coming numbers of college-age young people. 

Covering the eight-year period from 1966 to 1973, the 
projections indicate our public higher education enroll- 
ment will double (41,295 to 83,843) while the number 
of college-age youth for the same period will increase by 
twelve per cent (338,858 to 380,043). 

The implications for the University of Massachusetts 
are clear. With realization of our historic role as a land 
grant institution and of our present status as the state- 
wide University of all the Commonwealth under au- 
thority of the Board of Trustees, we must move rapidly 
and responsibly toward our changing and expanding 
goals. 

The University will continue to support a single set 
of standards and policies for all its campuses, on such 
matters as appointment of faculty, reliance upon state- 
wide academic planning to achieve sufficient diversity 
without unnecessary duplication, and allegiance to the 
principles of efficiency and economy. Within these broad 
guidelines, each campus will enjoy the greatest possible 
administrative and academic autonomy, to encourage an 
increase in responsibility and local initiative, and effect 
a decrease in delay and paperwork. 

In short, we seek to create and maintain environments 
allowing unity amid diversity, responsibility with growth, 
and balance with freedom. 



T 



HERE IS NO SUCH THING," writes Dr. Henry M. 
Wriston, "as 'mass education'. Every use of the phrase 
is a denial of a vital reality; education is a v/holly in- 
dividual process." 

The University of Massachusetts is engaged in edu- 
cating individuals, albeit in increasing numbers. Its ex- 
pansion in Amherst, Boston and Worcester is based en- 
tirely on the demonstrable needs of individual students 
wherever they may live in the Commonwealth. 

Striving to provide the greatest educational oppor- 
tunity for all qualified persons, the University continues 



4 



Report of the President 



to be guided by high academic standards and the historic 
low-tuition principle. 

University students are drawn from a broad range of 
social and economic backgrounds. We are determined 
to increase the scope of our scholarship assistance, so 
that no academically qualified student will be denied 
admission for economic reasons. 

As part of the University's responsibility to the public, 
we encourage special programs for the underprivileged. 
In this way, the talent of these potential achievers may 
be salvaged for the constructive benefit of society. 

Another facet of this University's responsibility is the 
obligation to attain the highest possible stature in teach- 
ing, research, and public service, not only for the benefit 
of those who seek understanding or service directly at 
our doors, but in an even larger sense to serve as a stand- 
ard of excellence for the Commonwealth's growing sys- 
tem of public higher education. 

And with the past year's establishment of the Board 
of Higher Education as a result of the Harrington-Willis 
Report, there is now a forum for total planning of public 
higher education. The recommendations of the Report 
became law in June, 1965. Under this enabling legisla- 
tion, which defines existing segments of Massachusetts' 
higher education system and spells out the functions of 
each, the University has embarked on an enlarged pro- 
gram of cooperation with the State Colleges, Technologi- 
cal Institutes, and Community Colleges. The University's 
official representative on the new board is Trustee Joseph 
P. Healey of Arlington. 

New avenues of approach and new forums, however, 
do not function without a tangible expression of public 
support. The Commonwealth must be allowed to advance 
from its position of fiftieth in the nation in its per capita 
support of public higher education. As existing needs are 
clarified and new needs identified, we will continue to 
rely on the far-sighted support of the Governor and the 
General Court in securing the appropriations which are 
essential if the youth of Massachusetts are to be pro- 
vided the range of educational opportunity available in 
other states. 

The University commends the vigorous development 
of the Regional Community College system, recognizing 
the desirability of bringing the initial higher educational 
opportunity within commuting range of the greatest pos- 
sible segment of its potential student body. At the same 
time, the University of Massachusetts continues to ac- 



cept all qualified Community College graduates who 
apply, thus assuring a full and continuing higher educa- 
tional program to round out the two-year Community 
College experience. University and Community College 
faculty work closely in development of curriculum and 
in preparation of teachers. 

In many other spheres as well, we place a high value 
on cooperation with sister institutions, both public and 
private. In the Connecticut Valley, we have demon- 
strated to the entire nation the virtues and rewards of 
inter-institutional cooperation through the Four-College 
Cooperation Program between the University and Am- 
herst, Mount Holyoke and Smith Colleges. Together the 
Four Colleges have now established a fifth, Hampshire 
College, at which a fresh and innovative educational pro- 
gram will put new concepts to the test, thereby adding 
an important educational resource to the Common- 
wealth. 



H 



EAVY EMPHASIS CONTINUES to be placed on recruit- 
ment of outstanding faculty, deans, and department 
heads as vacancies occur and programs expand. We seek 
to provide our faculty with the best possible support: 
office space, laboratories, modern teaching assistance, 
equipment, and resources. 

Of critical importance in securing and keeping an out- 
standing faculty is achievement of a truly competitive 
salary scale with appropriate fringe benefits. Great 
teacher-scholars continue in high demand and in short 
supply. We must rely on a purposeful program of faculty 
recruitment supported by adequate funds in order that 
our youth shall not be denied fruitful association with the 
best of mentors. 

In this regard, support for the Salary Relief Bill, since 
enacted into law, was marshalled by the University 
Trustees and by the new Board of Higher Education. 
This legislation allows salaries outside the previously 
established scale for approximately one per cent of the 
professional teaching staff" and for certain academic ad- 
ministrators. Without this law, salaries for the Uni- 
versity's most responsible positions would remain below 
their competitive market value. 

Acadenjically, our first priority is the development of 
the best possible quality in existing programs, before set- 
ting forth on new ones. We aim to provide the entire 
broad spectrum of undergraduate liberal arts and pro- 



Proposed Library Tower 
Edward Durrell Stone, Architect 



fessional curricula. As need is demonstrated, we shall 
achieve similar breadth in our graduate programs. While 
the entire instructional mode will be held to a level of 
quality comparable with that of the nation's leading 
universities, special attention will always be given to 
developing new courses and establishing new degree pro- 
grams that will meet the Commonwealth's needs for 
skilled manpower. 

While moving vigorously ahead in all areas, we have 
not forgotten our special tradition and mandates to serve 
the agricultural industry and allied resources develop- 
ment. The College of Agriculture has revised its cur- 
ricula to emphasize basic studies in science, mathematics, 
and the humanities. Teaching and research have been 
improved, and imaginative approaches devised to train 
foreign students to cope with world agricultural prob- 
lems. The number of students majoring in the College 
of Agriculture last year increased more rapidly than the 
enrollment of the University as a whole. Agriculture's 
impact will continue to grow as we recognize that the 
wisest use and conservation of all our natural resources 
is vital to our nation's living standard in a world of 
mushrooming population and rising consumer demands. 

Research at the University continues to contribute to 
the advancement of human knowledge, though subor- 
dinated to the instructional areas in which it may eventu- 
ally play a part. 

In the instructional program, the University seeks 
close interaction between student and teacher. Oppor- 
tunities are provided for every qualified student to pursue 
honors work or personal research. We are creating a 
climate favoring more independent study. 

The living-learning environment in which our students 
work and grow, including the residence halls, must be 
made to contribute to the educational process. It must 
encourage, stimulate and broaden the awareness and 
intellectual horizons of the individual student. 

As an academic community of common aims, the Uni- 
versity continues to update administrative methods. It 
seeks new means of bringing faculty, staff, and students 
into responsible involvement with all University affairs. 

Finally, the University recognizes its responsibility to 
provide the citizens of the Commonwealth with the best 
in continuing education, both on and off the campuses. 
This must occur on the collegiate and professional levels, 
and for degree and non-degree programs. Building on 
many decades of experience gained through the Coopera- 




Report of the President 



tive Extension Service, the University is moving toward 
organization of a broader support base for all its con- 
tinuing education and public service facilities. This is 
a direct contribution to the general welfare and pros- 
perity of Massachusetts' residents. 



SPECIFIC ACCOMPLISHMENTS and milestones of 1965- 
1966, as for any other year, present a kaleidoscopic 
pattern of complexity. This section of the report provides 
a capsule view of highlights of the University's year. 

The admissions picture continued to be one of pres- 
sure. The number of applications has more than doubled 
in the past four years. At the close of the fiscal year it 
vvas estimated that 3,100 freshmen would be admitted 
at Amherst in the fall of 1966, out of five times that 
number of applicants. About 1,200 freshmen were to be 
admitted at Boston, out of quadruple that number of 
applications. Also, approximately 6,500 Graduate School 
applications were on file for 1,000 openings. 

Total enrollment at Amherst increased from 10,497 
to 11,859 in September, 1965. Of this number, 2,240 
were doing graduate work, compared with only a third 
that number five years before. The Stockbridge School 



of Agriculture attained a record high enrollment for the 
fourth year in succession, growing from 484 to 516 stu- 
dents. Summer Session enrollment grew from 1,855 to 
2,464 in 1965. 

A total of 1,930 degrees were granted during the year, 
compared with 1,617 in 1964-1965. Of these, 1,463 were 
undergraduate and 467 were advanced, including 48 
doctorates. The number of higher degrees conferred has 
more than doubled in the past three years. 

Basic admission requirement of the Graduate School 
was raised from a 2.5 to a 2.75 undergraduate grade 
point average. 

Gifts and grants for new and continuing sponsored 
research totalled $7.5 million for the year. 

Seven new doctoral programs were approved: a Doc- 
tor of Education degree program as Specialist in Cur- 
riculum and Instruction, and six Doctor of Philosophy 
degree programs as follows: Business Administration, 
Industrial Engineering, Nutrition and Food, Forestry and 
Wood Technology, Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, and 
Polymer Science and Engineering. The latter is a co- 
operative program involving the Polymer Research In- 
stitute, School of Engineering, and Chemistry Depart- 
ment of the College of Arts and Sciences. 



Trustee Hugh Thompson of Milton presents certificates for successful completion of International 

Agricultural Training Program at the University. 




' till if I 



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Dr. John H. Dittfach (left) receives the 1965-66 

Distinguished Teacher of the Year Award 

from President John W. Lederle. 



Six new master's degree programs were approved: 
Anthropology, Music, Nursing Administration, Nutrition 
and Food, Polymer Science and Engineering, and Vet- 
erinary Science. In addition, the studies toward the de- 
gree of Master of Landscape Architecture were re- 
worked from a one-year to a two-year program. 

Intensive curricular revision and expansion were ac- 
complished. Highlights were the addition of Polish as the 
University's eleventh foreign language, and revision of 
the programs in Mathematics, Recreation, and Home 
Economics Education. The program for Spanish majors 
was revised. New introductory courses were approved for 
non-science majors in Chemistry, Physics, and Micro- 
biology. The Public Health curriculum was divided at 
the undergraduate level into Environmental Health and 
Community Health & Health Education. 

A blue ribbon Curriculum Study Committee, chaired 
by Dr. LeRoy F. Cook, associate professor of Physics, was 
named in the College of Arts and Sciences. Its first meet- 
ing was held with a group of deans and a consulting 
panel of twelve students. Aim of the committee is con- 
tinual curriculum improvement. 

The School of Business Administration had its first 
meeting with members of the newly-created Business 
Advisory Council. Membership is drawn from Massa- 
chusetts' business and industry. A new Center for Busi- 
ness and Economic Research was established, directed 
by Dr. George Simmons, formerly of the Columbia Uni- 
versity Graduate School of Business. 

The fine arts offerings to the general public were 
greatly expanded, with increased numbers attending ex- 
hibits of art and programs of music. 

NDEA Institutes in History and in English and NSF 
Institutes in Botany and Engineering were successful. 

Small in amount but mighty in its educational benefits, 
the Provost's Fund for Educational Experimentation and 
Course Improvement continued to exert great influence 
on curricular innovation. 

Use of the University's new CDC 3600 computer ex- 
ceeded 200 hours per month at year's end, and the ap- 
proximate total of students served by the Computer 
Science Program rose from 500 to 1,200. 




The University of Massachusetts Press published ten 
new books during the year. 

The Water Resources Research Center welcomed its 
first full-time director, Bernard Berger, formerly with the 
United States Public Health Service. 

A new publication, the Parents Report of the School 
of Engineering, received favorable comment from its 
readership among parents of freshman engineering stu- 
dents. 

An internal review of student publications was ini- 
tiated, one of many outgrowths of a continuing dialogue 
among students, faculty, administrators and trustees, 
seeking better understanding of mutual concerns and a 
broader approach to University affairs. 

Dr. John H. Dittfach, professor of Mechanical Engi- 
neering, was presented the annual award as Distinquished 
Teacher of the Year. Miss Roberta M. Bernstein, who 
achieved an A grade in each course during her four-year 
program, was presented the first Associate Alumni AWard 
for Outstanding Scholarship at the 1966 Commencement. 

Special emphasis was placed during the year on two 
projects of vital importance: the University's library 
resources and the University College concept, a com- 
pletely self-integrated living-learning unit within the 
campus-at-large. 

The Board of Trustees approved sketches by Architect 
Edward Durrell Stone of a proposed Library Tower 
which would add 320,000 square feet of space, with 
room for 1.4 million volumes. This twenty-eight-story 
structure with alternating floors of stacks and study areas, 
will seat 3,000 students. Conversion possibilities incor- 
porated in the plans would raise the total capacity to two 
million volumes. The preliminary sketches for the excit- 
ing project have brought enthusiastic comment from 
librarians and the public across the nation. 



9 




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Report of the President 



Commencement 1966 



The University added 70,000 volumes to its collections 
during the year on its way toward a minimum of one 
million volumes by 1970. A total of $750,000 was spent 
during the year on books and periodicals. A Special 
Collections Division for rare and expensive acquisitions 
was inaugurated. The University also joined in the All 
Books Current program. Under this plan, all suitable 
books published in Europe and North and South America 
are automatically shipped to the University. 

As an important sidelight, a survey during the year 
showed that 84.6 per cent of the student body use the 
University's reserve book collection. 

The concept of a University College, a stimulating out- 
growth of the Residential College programs already in 
effect, was approved in principle. This would be a refine- 
ment and extension of the living-learning environment 
in successful operation at Orchard Hill Residential Col- 
lege and initiated in the fall of 1966 at the Southwest 
Residential College. 

Present plans call for a completely separate residential 
college, with its own dean and faculty, living and dining 
areas, and facilities for faculty offices and classes. In 
essence. University College would be a 5,000-student 
institution, under the same governance as the other seg- 
ments of the University. It would allow for completely 
new curricular arrangements, and provide a unique lab- 
oratory for needed educational testing on a broader scale 
than is now possible elsewhere in the University. The 
concept has the approval of the Trustees, the Administra- 
tion, and the Committee on Faculty and Educational 
Policy. The anticipated opening date is September, 1970. 

Preparations for the fall opening of the new Southwest 
Residential College facilities placed a greatly increased 
load on the entire University, most particularly on the 
Student Personnel Services. This organization, and all 
others connected with what was historically our greatest 
single effort at sudden physical growth, deserve high 
praise. 



11 



SOUTH DEERFIELD WALTHAM 

WORCESTER / BOSTON 




AMHERST \ WAREHAM''*' 

BELCHERTOWN NANTUCKET 



A 



LTHOUGH CENTERED in the heartland of the Common- 
wealth, the University of Massachusetts reaches out in 
many, meaningful ways, across the state and around the 
world. 

The growth of the University of Massachusetts at 
Boston during its first full year was an exciting milestone 
in higher education. Designed for commuting students 
only, the University at Boston will admit successive 
classes each year until a full four-year institution is 
achieved in the fall of 1968. Progress continues toward 
determination of a permanent site. 

Work progressed on planning a totally new campus 
for the School of Medicine in Worcester. Architects for 
the facility were appointed. At year's end it appeared the 
School would rank in history as one of the most needed 
as well as the largest of the Commonwealth's construction 
projects. 

In addition to these well-known facilities, the Uni- 
versity now has units at five other locations in the state 
and six locations overseas. 

These include an archaeological site and a technical 
writing workshop on Nantucket, research acreage in 
Belchertown and South Deerfield, the Cranberry Re- 
search Station in East Wareham, and the Department 
of Environmental Sciences at Waltham. In addition to 
research work at these field stations, the College of Agri- 
culture is closely involved with Cooperative Extension 
Service work at Amherst, Waltham, East Wareham, and 
throughout the Commonwealth. It administers one of 



the overseas programs. The Extension Service reached 
more than 50,000 Massachusetts youth through 4-H, and 
approximately 100,000 homemakers through adult educa- 
tion programs during the year. 

In cooperation with the government of Malawi, Africa, 
and the U. S. Agency for International Development, 
the College of Agriculture is assisting with the develop- 
ment of a national university and a college of agriculture 
in this new nation. In addition, through the International 
Training Program of the College of Agriculture, students 
and Extension educators from emerging and established 
nations receive specialized intensive training in agricul- 
tural development on the Amherst campus. 

Plans were made for an exchange program with the 
Tororo Girls School in Uganda, another U.S. A.I.D. 
project, dedicated a year ago last June after much pre- 
liminary work by the University's School of Education. 

The University inaugurated summer academic sem- 
inars in England and Italy, enrolling almost 100 students 
in ten courses under tutelage of Oxford dons, and 65 
students in Bologna with a faculty predominantly from 
the University of Massachusetts, presenting studies in 
which the Italian location plays a significant role. 

By vote of the Trustees, an Atlantic Studies Center 
of the University of Massachusetts was established at 
Freiburg, Germany, to present undergraduate and grad- 
uate programs on a regular academic year basis. Part 
of the operating budget is derived from non-state funds. 

Especially worthy of note, the University reached out 
to 200 deserving but culturally deprived youngsters on 
its own Amherst and Boston campuses, participating in 
the Federally-sponsored Upward Bound program to assist 
promising students toward a realization of their potential. 



A, 



ln important adjunct to the expanding University, 
but never considered as an end in itself, is the continued 
improvement and enlargement of the physical plant. 
Aside from the growth across the Commonwealth and 
the world described earlier in this report, the University 
was involved dining the report year with projects totaling 
more than thirty million dollars. 

This figure includes $3.9 million for facilities accepted 
and dedicated, $17.5 million in projects virtually com- 
pleted during the report year, and $11.3 million in con- 
struction in progress at year's end. In addition, pre- 
liminary planning proceeded on ten other projects. All 



12 



Report of the President 



LONG RANGE ENROLLMENT PROJECTION 
AMHERST 
25,000 

20,000 _ 



15,000 

10,000 

5,000 



AMHERST 



OXFORD 



FREIBURG 




BOLOGNA 



UGANDA 



MALAWI 



'65 '66 '67 '68 '69 '70 '71 '72 '73 '74 '75 
n UNDERGRAD D GRADUATE D STOCKBRIDGE 



the latter are tentatively scheduled for completion by the 
end of 1970. 

Dedicated during the year were Chenoweth Labora- 
tory, for research and classroom use in food science and 
technology ($2 million), and Engineering Building East, 
including a small auditorium, a wind tunnel, and labora- 
toi"yj classroom^ and office facilities ($1.9 million). 



Completed soon after the close of the fiscal year were 
the five high-rise residence towers ($14.5 million) and 
the second dining commons ($2.2 million) in the new 
Southwest Residential College area, and three sizable 
modernization projects: renovation of Goessmann 
(chemistry) Laboratory ($600,000), air-conditioning in 
Goodell Library ($153,000), and improvement to the 
boiler plant ($103,000). 

Well under way when the year ended were seven other 
projects, listed with approximate cost and expected year 
of completion : four new low-rise buildings in the South- 
west area ($5 million, 1967) ; new administration build- 



Urban and Non-Urban 
Distribution of Massachusetts-Resident Students 



URBAN AREAS 




UNDERGRAD 


STOCKBRIDGE 


GRADUATE 


TOTAL 


BOSTON 




2,946 


135 


221 


3,302 


BROCKTON 




197 


9 


16 


222 


FALL RIVER 




116 


6 


11 


133 


LAWRENCE 




146 


10 


13 


169 


LOWELL 




119 


4 


15 


138 


NEW BEDFORD 




165 


5 


12 


182 


SPRINGFIELD — 


HOLYOKE 


1,250 


65 


408 


1,683 


WORCESTER 




387 


31 


38 


456 


TOTAL URBAN AREAS 


5,286 


265 


734 


6,285 


TOTAL NON-URBAN AREAS 


2,994 


185 


631 


3,810 


GRAND TOTAL 


— MASSACHUSETTS 


8,280 


450 


1,365 


10,095 



13 






iiSSS 




Proposed Campus Center — Marcel Breuer, Architect 



ing ($2.8 million, 1967) ; campus boulevards ($2 million, 
1968) ; expansion of utility systems ($757,000, 1966) ; 
new poultry plant ($330,000, 1967) ; farm service build- 
ing . ($317,000, 1967), and emergency residence hall 
lighting ($110,000, 1966). 

Preliminary planning was under way by the end of the 
fiscal year for ten other Amherst projects: the new 
library; the first phase of the Graduate Research Center, 
including the 16-story Chemistry Towers; Fine Arts 
Building; Campus Center; Bartlett Hall West, including 
psychology laboratory facilities; Bartlett Hall East, pro- 
viding additional classrooms and faculty offices; Mach- 
mer Hall addition, including a 10-story tower; power 
house expansion; Central Storage building; and the first 
phase of a new physical education field. 

Of all the foregoing, cost of the construction in the 
Southwest Residential Area and the Campus Center will 
be liquidated by various rents and fees. These projects 
are handled by the. University of Massachusetts Building 
Authority. 



w. 



E CLOSE THE YEAR past with Satisfaction and enter 
another year with confidence, with renewed determina- 
tion to remain both concerned and responsive. 



We are attuned to the public expectancy — that the 
knowledge refined and disseminated by their State Uni- 
versity will be knowledge for public use as well as 
knowledge for its own sake. 

We strive always and in all ways to operate the entire 
University in an economical, efficient, and prudent man- 
ner, commensurate with the best business practices. 

The fear has been expressed in some quarters that the 
University is growing so large that it is becoming im- 
personal and "no one cares about the individual any 
more." This fear is groundless. The University is con- 
cerned. It is concerned with the individual student and 
the taxpayer. It holds itself responsive to their desires 
and needs in every area of administration and operation. 

Only by responding to individual needs is our general 
public mandate fulfilled. Only through concern for the 
individual can the University sustain the vital spirit 
necessary to create a great institution of higher learning. 

The University is not a thing, nor a place; not a gov- 
ernment, nor merely an institution. It is, rather, a con- 
dition and a process. And, above all, it is people. 

Our task must be to harness its tremendous potential, 
to guide its inescapable patterns of change, and always 
to inspire its creative personalities to gi\e no less than 
their best to its nurture and support. 



14 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

Summary of Operating Funds 
Fiscal Year eriding June 30, 1966 

Where the Operating Dollar Comes From . , . 





TOTAL AMOUNT 


PERCENT OF TOTAL 


Funds from University Receipts: 






(returned to State Treasurer) 






Tuition 


$ 2,870,276.90 


5.78 


Residence Halls 


1,304,177.05 


2.63 


Sales and Services 


259,170.38 


.52 


Total University Receipts 


$ 4,433,624.33 


8.93 


Net Funds from Taxpayers of the Commonwealth 


24,808,111.86 


49.98 


Sub-Total 


$29,241,736.19 


58.91 


Federal Government 


5,091,214.22 


10.26 


Student Activities 


590,203.69 


1.19 


Student Aid Funds 


573,973.58 


1.16 


Student Loan Funds Notes Receivable 


1,218,899.52 


2.45 


Gifts and Grants 


2,257,801.00 


4.55 


Auxiliary Enterprises 


8,971,222.53 


18.08 


Endowment Income 


102,851.70 


.21 


Agency Funds 


1,582,347.25 


3.19 


Total Funds Available 


$49,630,249.68 


100.00 



How It Is Spent 



Instruction — 






State Funds 


$11,528,784.52 


27.53 


Federal Funds 


970,426.14 


2.32 


Gifts and Grants 


90,848.97 


.22 


Total Instruction 


$12,590,059.63 


30.07 


Library 


1,460,275.37 


3.49 


Research 


4,789,917.45 


11.44 


Public Services: 






Agricultural Extension 


1,293,429.68 


3.09 


State Agricultural Control Services 


451,365.20 


1.08 


Physical Plant and Residence Halls 


6,053,007.73 


14.45 


Administration 


1,658,449.49 


3.96 


Student Services 


1,490,208.05 


3.56 


Scholarships 


686,649.50 


1.64 


Student Loan Funds Notes Receivable 


1,669,150.26 


3.99 


Student Activities 


470,572.02 


1.12 


Auxiliary Enterprises 


7,744,995.19 


18.50 


Agency and Miscellaneous 


1,512,705.75 


3.61 


Total Funds Used 


$41,870,785.32 


100.00 


Balances Carried Forward (Restricted funds*) 


7,759,464.36 


Total Funds Used and Balances 


$49,630,249.68 





"Balances, restricted funds, beginning of report year, $8,457,059.68 



15 



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-r 



Principal Officers 
of A dministration 



John W. Lederle, LL.B., Ph.D. 
President 

Oswald Tippo, Ph.D. 
Provost 

John W. Ryan, Ph.D. 

Chancellor, University of Massachusetts 
at Boston 

Kenneth W. Johnson, B.S. 
Treasurer 

Robert J. McCartney, B.A. 
Secretary 

Leo F. Redfern, Ph.D. 

Dean of Administration 

William F. Field, Ph.D. 
Dean of Students 

William D. Tunis, Ph.D. 
Dean of Admissions 

Edward C. Moore, Ph.D. 

Dean, Graduate School 

Lamar Soutter, M.D. 

Dean, Medical School 

L Moyer Hunsberger, Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 

Himy B. Kirs hen, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Business Administration 

Mary A. Maker, A.M. 

Dean, School of Nursing 

E. Ernest Lindsey, D. Eng. 

Acting Dean, School of Engineering 

Warren P. McGuirk, Ed.M. 

Dean, School of Physical Education 

Marion A. Niederpruem, Ph.D. 

Dean, School of Home Economics 

Albert W. Purvis, D.Ed. 

Dean, School of Education 



Arless a. Spielman, Ph.D. 

Dean, College of Agriculture 






/Ao/z 



Q654966 



..tjj 



■Vs V 



yestden 



Qouete or /^o-fitci/cn^e 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



MASSACHUSETTS 
A^^U-iERSUMSS. 



July 20, 1966 



From: A. A. Spielman, Dean and Director 

To: Robert J. McCartney, Secretary of the University 

Subject: Annual Report, Fiscal 1966 



This report covers the areas of activity for which the Dean and 
Director is administratively responsible. These are: 

a. College of Agriculture 

- undergraduate instruction 

- graduate instruction 

b. Stockbridge School of Agriculture 

- associate degree program 

c. Massachusetts Agricultural Experiment Station 

- Amherst campus "^ 

- Waltham Field Station 

- Cranberry Station, East Wareham 

d. Cooperative Extension Service 

- Amherst, Waltham, and East Wareham campuses 

- twelve cooperating county governments 

- U. S. Department of Agriculture 

- School of Home Economics 

e. State Control Service (Statutory Responsibilities) 

- feed, seed, fertilizer composition 

- dairy laws 

- shade tree laboratories 

- poultry disease control 

- mastitis (dairy cattle) disease control 

f . Massachusetts Civil Defense Training Program 

- U. S. Department of Defense 

- Massachusetts Director of Civil Defense 

- Rural Civil Defense, Northeastern U. S. Region 



u ■ 



-f-. 



Mr. Robert J. McCartney - 2 - July 20, 1966 



g. International Agricultural Training Program 

- U. S. Department of State - Agency for International 
Development 

- University of Malawi 

h. Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit 

- U. S, Department of the Interior 

- Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources 

i. Cooperative Fisheries Research Unit 

- U. S. Department of the Interior 

- Massachusetts Department of Natural Resources 

j. Community Service and Continuing Education Program, 
Title Is Higher Education Act of 1965 

- U, S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 
Office of Education 

- Massachusetts Higher Education Act Commission 



Compiled by 

Donald P. Allan 

Assistant to Dean and Director 



AASrMRE 



~\ 



3. 



College of Agriculture 
Office of Dean and Director 

SPECIAL PUBLIC SERVICE ASSIGNMENTS 



1, Member State Committee for Conservation of Soil, Water and 
Related Resources - appointed under Chapter 6^1, General Laws, 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts . 

2, Member of Special Study Commission of the General Court re- 
garding the county extension program - designee of 
President John W. Lederle. 

3o New England Council for Economic Development representing 

Massachusetts Extension Service - by invitation of Committee 
on Expansion of Tourist Industry. 

^„ National Legislative Committee of Cooperative Extension Service 
representing the Northeast - appointed by Extension Committee 
on Organization and Policy. 

5. Board of Governors National Agricultural Hall of Fame - elected 
by Executive Committee. 

5. Committee for International Agricultural Extension, National 
Association of Land-Grant Colleges and State Universities - 
appointed by Chairman of Extension Section. 

7. State Advisory Council on Community Service and Continuing 
Education Programs under Title I of the Higher Education Act of 
1965 - appointed by the Director. 

8. Massachusetts Administrator for Mclntire-Stennis Cooperative 
Forestry Research Program - appointed by the Governor of 
Massachusetts , 

9. Technical Advisor to State Pesticide Board -> requested by the 
Board. 

10. Member Massachusetts Economic Stabilization Board - appointed 
by the Governor. 



y 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
PROGRAMS PLANNED FOR FISCAL 1967 



1. Develop interdepartmental and interdisciplinary under-- 
graduate and graduate programs in the areas of — 

a. Natural Resources and Conservation ^ 

b. Environmental Biology 
G, Agricultural Chemistry 

d. Industrial and Agricultural Microbiology 

e. Plant and Animal Genetics 

f . Regional Planning 

2. Strengthen Extension-Continuing Education and 
Experiment Station programs in — 

a. Community Resources Development 

b. Water and Air Pollution Control 

c. Agricultural Business 

d. Regional Planning 

e. Water Economics 

3. A complete conservation needs inventory of the water- 
sheds, soils and land use, including projections in land 
use changes to 1975, will be made in cooperation with 
the United States Department of Agriculture. 

If, Complete a state-wide inventory of the potentials for 
natural resources development now being made in co- 
operation with the Massachusetts Department of Natural 
Resources and the United States Soil Conservation Service, 



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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
APPROPRIATIONS 



7 



Year 
1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 



State Funds 
$3,002,24-1.00 
3,14-0,288.00 
3,252,086.00 



Federal Funds 

$1,121,096.00 

1,21+3, 524-. 00 

1,3311,71+1.00 



PERSONNEL - NUMBER IN EACH RANK 
(September 1963, September 1964, September 1965) 



^ 



Professional Personnel 

Dean and Director 

Associate Dean and Director of 

Stockbridge School 
Associate Director of Extension 
Assistant to Dean and Director 
Commonwealth Head of Department 
Head of Department "A" 
Head of Department, Academic Year 
Commonwealth Professor "A" 
Commonwealth Professor, Academic Year 



Sept. 1963 



1 
1 
1 
1 
14 

1 
1 



Professor "A" 

Professor, Academic Year 

Associate Professor "A" 

Associate Professor, Academic Year 

Assistant Professor "A" 

Assistant Professor, Academic Year 

Assistant Professor, Academic Year, % Time 

Instructor "A" 
Instructor "A", % Time 
Instructor, Academic Year 
Instructor, Academic Year, \ Time 
Visiting Lecturer 
Lecturer, % Time 
Sabbatical Leave 
Leave Without Pay 

Staff Associate 
Staff Assistant 

Contract Personnel 



53 

4 
31 

4 
46 
10 

1 

21 
4 




0** 



2 




Sept. 1964 



1 
1 
1 
1 
11 

1 
1 

43 
5 

33 
3 

45 
8 
1 

20 
4 
3 
1 
1 

6 
3 

2 




Sept. 1965 



1 
1 
1 
1 
7 
1 
1 
Sab. Lv. 



45 
7 

38 
5 

40 

16 


13 

1 
2 
2 
1 
3 
1 

2 
2 

10 



TOTALS 



204 



204 



202 



**Included in overall count of personnel. 
Figures do not include vacancies 



JUNE 1966. 



f 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
ORGANIZATION CHARTS 
1965-66 



/o 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

INSTRUCTION 
(Stockbridge , Undergraduate, Graduate) 



Dean 
Associate Dean 
Assistant to Dean 



Agricultural and Food Economics 
'Department Head 
Faculty 

Agricultural Engineering 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Entomology and Plant Pathology 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Environmental Sciences 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Food Science and Technology 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Forestry and Wildlife Management 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Landscape Architecture 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Plant and Soil Sciences 
Department Head 
Faculty 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 
Department Head 
Faculty 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



Director 
Assistant to Director 



// 



Departments 

Agricultural and Food Economics 

Agricultural Engineering 

Cranberry Station 

Entomology and Plant Pathology 

Environmental Sciences 

Food Science and Technology 

Forestry and Wildlife Management 

Landscape Architecture 

Plant and Soil Sciences 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 



Control Programs 



Feed, Fertilizer, Seed, 
and Dairy Law 

Mastitis Control 

Pullorum Control 

Shade Tree Laboratories 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
COOPERATIVE EXTENSION 



Director 
Associate Director 
Assistant to Director 



Jl. 



Department 

Agricultural and 
Food Economics 

Agricultural 
Engineering 

Cranberry 
Station 

Entomology and 
Plant Pathology 

Environmental 
Sciences 

Food Science and 
Technology 

Forestry and 
Wildlife 
Management 

M-H and Youth 
Programs 

Plant and 
Soil Sciences 

Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 



School of Home Economics 

Art and Design 

Consumer Education 

Food, Nutrition, 
Health 

Human Development, 
Human Relations 

Management 

Leadership 
Development 

Homemaking Skills 



Cooperating Counties 
Barnstable 
Berkshire 
Bristol 
Dukes 
Essex 
Franklin 
Hampden 
Hampshire 
Middlesex 
Norfolk 
Plymouth 
Worcester 



/3 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
1965-66 
STUDENTS 



Majors 

Class Enrollment 

Graduate 

Post-Doctoral Fellows 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTUPJi 

TOTAL CL.%.SS EKROLLFiEKTS 

(GSADu^TE, UNDERGRi\DII\TS, STOCIvBRIDGE) 



/y 



Depgrtngnt 



Actual Ac-oaai Actual Estimated 
1Q50-51 1953-54- 1055-56 1957-63 



Agricultural and 
Food Economics 

Agficul'tuir'al 
Eiiginecr-ing 

EntOiTiology and 
Plant Pathology 

Food Science and 
Technology 

FoL'cstry and 
Wildlife ^lanageiuent 

Landscape 

Architecture 

Plant and 
Soil Sciences 

Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 



^^85 



t^78 



t^i^Z 



1^79 



61J.8 



758 l.iflS 1,787 



603 1,729 



550 



829 



905 1,189 1,L^S7 



669 1,677 2,155 



957 1.031 



89tf 1,152 1.7iI-S 2,090 



1,232 1,233 2,095 2,442 



660 



731 



878 



955 



Totali 



5,319 6,629 10,689 12,837 



AAS:^ElS 
V1V55 



Js 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTUIIE 
STUDENT El^ROLLMENT (MAJORS) - FALL SEMESTER 
(GRADUATE, UNDERGRADUATE, STGCKBRIDGE) 



Depar'tnont 


1951 


1962 


1953 


1954 


1965 


1956* 


1957« 


Asricultur'al and 
Food Economics 


65 


61* 


67 


53 


77 


85 


90 


Agricultiij^al 
Engineering 


19 


18 


17 


20 


21 


25 


30 


Entomolosy and 
Plant Pathology 


26 


28 


25 


33 


34 


35 


40 


Food Science and 
Technology 


138 


151 


171 


195 


243 


280 


300 


Fot-estr^' and 
Wildlife Management 


175 


179 


185 


212 


250 


300 


320 


Landscape 
Architecture 


IttO 


173 


179 


216 


253 


280 


300 


Plant and 
Soil Sciences 


122 


135 


139 


167 


185 


185 


200 


Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 


li}5 


148 


l^^r 


152 


150 


170 


ISO 


Totals 


831 


905 


928 


1,048 


1,234 


1,350 


1,460 



^Estimated 



AAS:MRE 
4/14/65 



/c 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



DeparLiiient 


Graduate 

M.S. 

35 


Students 
Ph.D. 


Degrees 
M.S. 

9 


Awarded 
Ph.D. 


Post-Doctoral 
Fellows 


Agricultural and 
Food Economics 


1 


Agricultural 
Engineering 


16 




2 


2 




- 


- 


Cranberry 
Station 


1 




1 


- 




- 


3 


Entomology and 
Plant Pathology 


19 




3 


3 




1 


- 


Environmental 
Sciences 


7 




3 


2 




•■ 


3 


Food Science and ■ 
Technology 


20 




21^ 


3 




^ 


- 


Forestry and 
Wildlife 
Management 


m 


, 


«M 


12 




. 


«• 


t^-H and Youth 
Programs 


2 




- 


1 




- 


mm 


Landscape 
Architecture 


19 




- 


1 




- 


- 


Plant and 
Soil Sciences 


20 




3 


M- 




- 


- 


Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 


18 




9 


5 




1 


5 


Totals 


198 




45 


42 




6 


12 



n 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
FACULTY PUBLICATIONS 
1965-66 



n 



AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS 

Bell, Ellsworth W . 

Book Review - Borgstrom, Geor, The Hungry Planet, The Modern World 

at the Edp;e of Famine , Journal of Farm Economics, August 1966. 
Report - Fowl Marketings in New England , December 1965. 
Report - 1966 Forecast of Milk Prices , January 1956. 
Report - Business Trends , March 1966. 

Brown, Alfred A . 

Bulletin - Economics of Broiler Feed Mixing and Distribution with 

Clark R. Burbee and E. T. Bardwell, N.H.A.E.S. 4-8M-, September 

1965. 
Report - Analysis of Eastern R ilroads Mileage Rate Proposal , 

Submitted to Carriers, July 1965. 
Report - Analysis of Eastern Mileage Rates Proposal (Following 

Suspension of Rates by ICC), Submitted to I.C.C, October 1965. 
Report - Position Paper Prepared for J.C.A. of Greater Springfield, 

Inc. Opposing N.H.RR's application to discontinue Passenger 

Service, Submitted to I.C.C, January 1966. 
Report - Transportation, New England Agriculture and Grain Rates , 

Annual Meeting Boston Grain and Flour Exchange, February 1965. 

Foster, John H . 

Article - " The Economics of the Moldboard Plow and Three -tine 
Cultivator in Two Districts of Uttar Prodesh (India)" in the 
Indian Journal of Agricultural Economics, Spring 1966. 

Bulletin - (With Babeu, Rhodes, and MacConnell) Forest Owner 

Characteristics and Attitudes in Berkshire County, Massachusetts , 
Bui. 54-93 Agricultural Experiment Station, University of 
Massachusetts, 1955. 

Fuller, Earl I . 

Mimeo - Description of a Systems Analysis Approach to the Evalu - 
ation of Different Hay-Making Systems , (With Philip Cheney) 
January 1966. 

Report - Objectives of a Universal Planning Simulator , December 
1965. 

Bulletin - An Interregional Quadratic Programming Model for Varying 
Degrees of Competition (With Yoshihiro Maruyama) , August 1965. 

Report - Administrator's Gaming Manual for Farm Management (With 
Donald Ault) , August 1965. 

Report - Dairy Steers in Massachusetts (With Lawrence D. Rhoades), 
April 1966. 

Report - Feed Crops in Eastern Massachusetts - Their Production 
and Utilization (With Francis Mentzer) , March 1955. 



!? 



Fuller, Earl I . (continued) 

Report - Process Budgets for Massachusetts Forage Crops (With 

Francis G. Mentzer) , March 1955. 
Report - Cost and Labor Functions for Four Different Apple Packing 

Lines (With Peter Wilkin), July 1965. 
Article - A Review of Studies Dealing with the Effects of Bulk-Box 

Handling on Apple Quality (Journal article), December 1965. 
Bulletin - The Economics of Handling Apples in Bulk Boxes , 

December 1955. 
Report - Greenhouse Tomatoes in the Pioneer Valley (With 

Walter Melnick, N. Eugene Engel, and others), January 1956. 
Bulletin - A Feeding Guide in the Massachusetts Dairy Feed Program 

OVith Stanley N. Gaunt and Martin E. Weeks), October 1955. 

Jarvesoo, Elmar 

Article - Agriculture in Estomia, East Europe, A Monthly Review of 

East European Affairs, Vol. M-, No. 7, pp. 20-22, July 1965. 
Article - Commercial Gladiolas - Production and Our Cut Flower 

Market, The Gladiolas 1956 Yearbook of the New England Gladiolas 

Society. 
Report - Highlights of the Massachusetts Flower Grower Survey in 

196M-, Special Circular 288, Cooperative Extension Service, 

University of Massachusetts, on file 1965, 12 pp., 4- figs. 
Bulletin - IVholesale Florist Industry in Massachusetts , 

Bulletin 555, Experiment Station, University of Massachusetts, 

February 1966, 51 pp., 10 figs. 

Jensen, Howard C. and Leed, Theodore W . 

Report - An Economic Analysis of Competitive Strategy and Sales 
in the Supermarket Industry , April 1965. 

Russell, Sargent 

Bulletin - Development of Milk Supplies in the Anlora, Turkey , 
Milkshed , Experiment Station, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Massachusetts, Bulletin 554-, July 1965, M-0 pp. 

Storey, David A . 

Bulletin - Louis H. Ruggles and David A. Storey, Marketing Alter- 
natives for Massachusetts Egg Producers, An Analysis of Costs 
and Returns in Different IVholesale and Jobbing Methods , 
Cooperative Extension Service and Experiment Station Publication, 
September 1965, 38 pp. 

Bulletin - John W. Denison and David A. Storey, Costs of Brown 
Egg Production in Massachusetts, An Analysis of Floor and 
Cage Plants of Different Sizes , Experiment Station Bulletin, 
JVpril 1965, 88 pp. 



^0 



storey, David A . (continued) 

Bulletin - Charles Yergatian and David A. Storey, I'/holesaler Eg^a; 
Marketinp; Costs in Massachusetts, An Analysis of the Effects 
of Volume and Procurement System , Experiment Station Bulletin, 
May 1966. 

Report - Frederick L. Gaston and David A. Storey. The Market for 
Fresh Fish that Originate from Boston Fish Pier Landings , in 
Proceedings of the Conference on New Developments and Research 
in Fishery Economics, December 1965, Federal Reserve Bank of 
Boston. 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 
Clayton, J. T . 

Shear and Flexural Characteristics of Reinforced Concrete Face - 
Expanded Polystyrene Core Structural Panels. Transactions of 
the ASAE, Vol. 8, No. i+, 1965, pp. 565-67, 571. O^ith A. G. 
Story) 

Simulation as a Technique for Investigating the Thermal Exchange 
of Chickens (abstract) . Poultry Science , M-0 (1965) . 

The Growing Paradox in Agricultural Buildings. Farm and Power 
Equipment , Vol. M-0, No. 5, pp. 1^6-48. 

Collins, W. H . 

Massachusetts Building Plan Service Contributions: MC-5602, 

MC-5610, MC-5616. 
Extension Service Leaflets and Articles: 

PS-7 "16x2 0-foot Cabin" 

PS -8 "Campground Comfort Station" 

IL-13 "Tractor and Implement Cleaning" (Emergency Preparedness) 

Featheredfax, Summer 1965. Power Failure Alarm Systems. 

Fitzgerald, G. A . 

Total Utilization in Food Distribution. Bulletin 4-28 B, 

Cooperative Extension Service, University of Massachusetts, 

July 1965, 24- pp. 
First ABC System Component — The Retail Shelf. Food Distribution , 

March 1955, pp. 10-15. 
Retailers Need the ABC System. Bulletin 128. Cooperative Extension 

Service, University of Massachusetts, June 1955, 28 pp. 

Fletcher, S. W . (l^ith N. N. Mohsenin, J. R. Cooper, J. R. Hammerle, 
and C. D. Tukey) 

Readiness for Harvest of Apples as Affected by Physical and 
Mechanical Properties of the Fruit. Experiment Station 
Bulletin 721, Pennsylvania State University, August 1955. 



€Ll 



Fletcher, S. W . (tVith N. N. Mohsenin, J. R. Hammerle, and L. D. Tukey) 

Mechanical Behavior of Selected Fruits and Vegetables Under Fast 
Rates of Loading. Transactions of the ASAE, Vol. 8, No. 3, 
pp. 32M-26. 

Lipjht, R. G . 

Design Analysis of Free Stall Housing Systems. Proceedings , 

Second Section Seminar , CIGRm Cambridge, England, September 1965. 
Massachusetts Building Plan Service Contributions: MC-3611, 

MC-3611A, MC-3622, MC-4606. 
Northeast Regional Building Plan Service Contributions: USDA-5958, 

USDA-5977, USDA-5987. 
Popular articles which appeared in the New England Homestead: 

"Milking Center Construction," October 1955. 

"Millcing Parlors with Stall Barns," November 1955. 

"Fluid Manure Storage Tanks," March 1955. 

"\Vhy Does Condensation Occur?" April 1956. 
"Construction of Free Stalls," May 1966. 

VJhitney, L. F . CVith W. P. MacConnell) 

A Family of One Man Snow Packers. Ski Area Management , Spring 1955, 
pp. 18, 19, 60. 

Zahradnik, J. W . (With J. S. Perry and T. Y. A. Fang) 

Long Term Performance Evaluation of an All-Plywood CA Storage. 
Transactions of the ASAE, Vol. 8, No. t, 1965, pp. 443-M-. 



Technical Papers 



Clayton, J. T . 



Simulation as a Technique for Investigating the Thermal Exchange 
of Chickens. 5M-th Annual Meeting, Poultry Science Association, 
Athens, Georgia, August 1955. 
Operating Characteristics of Two Aerobic— Anaerobic Dairy Manure 
Treatment Systems. National Symposium on Animal Waste Manage- 
ment, East Lansing, Michigan, May 5-7, 1966. (With D. 0. Bridgham) 
Trickling Filters: Dairy Manure Stabilization Components. 

National Symposium on Animal Waste Management, East Lansing, 
Michigan, May 5-7, 1955. O^ith N. W. Webster) 

Light, R. G . 

Regional Ventilation Recommendations for Dairy Structures. Annual 
Meeting, North Atlantic Region, ASAE, Ithaca, New York, August 
1955. (With W. W. Irish and J. A. McCurdy) 



0^4. 



Lisht, R. G . (continued) 

Climate and Environmental Control in Free Stall Dairy Housing. 
Paper No. 65-94-5, Winter Meeting, ASAE, Chicago, Illinois, 
December 1955. 

Pira, E. S. and L. F. IVhitney 

Water Distribution from Pressurized Subsurface Irrigation Systems. 
Annual Meeting, North Atlantic Region, ASAE, Ithaca, New York, 
August 1965. (With L. F. Michelson and C. M. Vaziri) 

Whitney, L. F . 

Design Parameters for Fluidized Drying of Alfalfa Leaves. Paper 
No. 65-925. Winter Meeting, ASAE, Chicago, Illinois, December 
1965. O^ith C. W. Hall) 

Zahradnik, J. W . 

Thermal Properties of the Mcintosh Apple. Paper No. 66-305, 
Annual Meeting, ASAE, Amherst, Massachusetts, June 1966. 
OVith R. J. Frechette) 
Design Parameters for Lime Scrubbers. Paper presented at New York- 
New England CA Storage Seminar, New Paltz, New York, June 1965. 
(l\fith S. V. von Rhedey) 
A Method for the Removal of Oxygen from CA Storages. Paper 

presented at New York — New England CA Storage Seminar, New Paltz, 
New York, June 1955. (With A. K. Kiratsous) 

CRANBERRY STATION 

Devlin, R., M. 

■ ■ ' ' '} *- 

Plant Physiology. 500 pages. (Book in press) 
General Biology for College. Manuscript in preparation under 
Reinhold Contract, MSS due July 1967. (With B. M. Zuckerman, 
, K. Deubert, and C. W. Miller) 

Miller, C. W . 

Persistence and Accumulation of Dichlobenil in Cranberry Soils. 

Weeds . (l^ith A. J. Charig) 1966. 
Dieldrin Persistence in Cranberry Bogs. Journal of Economic 

Entomology . 1956. 

Norton, J. S . 

A Telephone -Frost-Warning Device. Agricultural Engineering 
Journal. 1966. 



c:?^ 



Tomlinson, W. E., Jr . 

Observations Concerning Mating and Reproductive History of Black- 
Light Trapped Cranberry Fruitworm, Acrobasis Vaccinii Riley . 
Journal of Economic Entomology . 1966. 

Zuckerman, B. M . 

Observations on the Symptoms and Control of Cranberry Red-Gall 

Disease. Cranberries Magazine . 1965. 
Phenylalanine Deaminase in Plant Parasitic Nematodes. 

Phytopathology o 1965. C^ith K. Deubert) 
Parathion Studies on Bean Grown in Sterile Root Culture. Journal 

of Economic Entomology . 1965. (With C. W, Miller, R. M. Devlin, 

W. E, Tomlinson, Jr. and R. L. Norgren) 



ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 
Agrios, G. N . 

A Severe Non-Parasitic Russeting and Dimpling of Apples in 

Massachusetts Orchards. Plant Disease Reporter , Vol. 50, No. 3, 

pp. 151-153, March 1965. 
Effect of Extracts from Healthy and Virus -Infected Apple and Pear 

Tissues on the Growth of Certain Pathogenic Fungi. 

Phytopathology 56: 176-179. 
The Causes and Significance of Dying Apple Tree Branch and Crowns. 

Fruit Notes . March-April 1966. pp. 7-9. 

Becker, W. B . 

Worm-Hole -Free Lumber Salvaged from borer-damaged pine logs. 

Journal of Forestry , 614(2): 126-128. February 1965. 
Autumn Spraying of Decked Pine Sawlogs to Prevent Damage by Wood 

Boring Insects. Journal of Forestry . In press. (With 

H. G. Abbott) 
Effect of Bidrin on Twig Feeding by Scolytus Multistriatus Mar sham. 
, Proceedings of 20th Annual Massachusetts Conference on Dutch 

Elm Disease, pp. 16-20, February 1966. 
Some Facts About Sanitation and Spraying for Dutch Elm Disease 

Control. Proceedings of New England Agricultural Chemicals 

Conference, "Focus on Municipal Pest Control Problems." In 

press. 
Cooperative Studies of Elm Bark Beetles in 1956. Massachusetts 

Tree Wardens, Arborists, and Utilities Conference Proceedings. 

In press. 
Information About Shade Tree Insects. (A series of ten seasonal 

information releases issued through the Massachusetts Cooperative 

Extension Service.) 



H 



Holmes, F. W . 

Virulence in Ceratocystis ulmi . Netherlands Journal of Plant 

Pathology 71: 97-112, fig. 1. (Phytopathologisch Laboratorium 
"Willie Commelin Scholten" Mededeeling 52). September 1955. 

Bidrin — A Massachusetts Evaluation. Proceedings of the Annual 

Dutch Elm Disease Conference, Waltham, Massachusetts, 20: 12-15, 
October 1965. 

A Test Clone of ulmus Americana Uniformly Susceptible to 

Ceratocystis ulmi . Phytopatholocry 55 (•12) : 1284-. December 1965. 

Investigation of Tree Diseases in Massachusetts (Dutch Elm Disease, 
Salt Injury, Maple Decline, Phytopathological Translations). 
Assembled in Proceedings of the Northeastern Forest Pathology 
Workshop, 7: 1. (IVith M. A. McKenzie) February 1956. 

Research with Bidrin. Tree Wardens, Arborists and Utilities 
Conference Proceedings, Amherst, Massachusetts, March 1966. 

Salt Damage to Trees and Shrubs. Mass. Agr. Ext. Serv. Emergency 
Preparedness Committee Leaflet, 25: 1-2. 

Resistance of Hemiptelea davidii (ulmaceae) to Ceratocystis ulmi . 
Phytopathology . 

Effects on Street Trees of the Use of Salt as a Snow Control 
Chemical. Nev7 Jersey Federation of Shade Tree Commissions 
Annual Meeting Proceedings, 39: 38-M-5. 1965. 

Salt Injury to Trees. II. Sodium and Chloride in Roadside Sugar 
Maples in Massachusetts. Phy top athology . 1965. (I'^i'^h 
J. H. Baker) 

Culture, Diseases, Injuries and Pests of Maples in Shade and Orna- 
mental Plantings. 87 pp., M-0 figs. Typewritten text. 1966. 

Rohde, R. A . 

The Nature of Resistance in Plants to Nematodes. Phytopathology , 

55: 1159-1152. 1965. 
The Pathogenicity of Pratylenchus penetrans and Tylenchorhynchus 

claytonl t o turf grasses. Phytopathology, 56. 1966. (With 

J. Troll) 

Shaw, F. R . 

A Comparison of Sweeping and Vacuum Collecting Certain Insects 

Affecting Forage Crops. Journal of Economic Entomology , 

59:2: M-78-4-79, April 1955. O^ith F. R. Holbrook, R. A. Callahan) 
The Disappearance of Residues of Bidrin from Alfalfa. Journal of 

Economic Entomology , 59:2: 4-87, April 1955. (With R. A. Callahan, 

F. R. Holbrook) 
Preliminary Observations on the Effects of a Naled Fog on Honeybees. 

Journal of Apicultural Research , December 1965. (With 

R. L. Armstrong) 
Rates of Disappearance of Dimethoate from Ladino Clover and 

Birdsfoot Trefoil. Journal of Economic Entomology , March 1966. 

(With W. H. Ziener) 



«=?: 



ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 
Faddoul, G. P . 

A Survey on the Incidence of Salmonellae in Wild Birds - 1. 

Avian Diseases , Vol. IX, No. M-, November 1955, pp. 529-535. 

0\'ith G. W. Fellows and J. Baird) 
A Five-Year Survey on the Incidence of Saljnonellae in Avian Species. 

Avian Diseases . 1966. (With G. W. Fellows) 

Galinat. W. C . 

The Development of Glumeless Sweet Corn. 

Journal. October 1965. 
Review of Essays on Crop Plant Evolution. Sir Joseph Hutchindson, 
Ed., Cambridge University Press, New York, 1965. 204- pp. 
Domesticiation of Corn. In New Roads to Yesterday, AAAS, 
Basic Books, New York. 1956. 
Genetic Correspondence of Tripsacum Chronmosomes to Their Homeologs 
from Corn. Maize Genetics Cooperative News Letter and Allerton 
House Maize Genetics Conference, University of Illinois. 1965. 
A Planting in Florida of Perennial Relatives of Maize. Maize 
Genetics Cooperative News Letter and Allerton House Maize 
Genetics Conference, University of Illinois. 1966. 
Simple Dominance of a Day-Neutral -Like Condition in an F2 Generation 
of a Corn-Teosinte Hybrid. Maize Genetics Cooperative News 
Letter and Allerton House Genetics Conference, University of 
Illinois. 1966. ^ 
Tassel-in-the-Seed from Gaspe Flint? Maize Genetics Cooperative 
News Letter and Allerton House Maize Genetics Conference, 
University of Illinois. 1966. 
The Corn Grass and Teopod Loci Involve Phase Change. Maize Genetics 
News Letter and Allerton House Maize Genetics Conference, 
University of Illinois. 1965. 
Somatic Mosaicism in Corn Grass. Maize Genetics Cooperative News 
Letter and Allerton House Maize Genetics Conference, University 
of Illinois. 1966. 

Green, J. H . 

Physiology of Clostridium botulinum type E. Optimal Conditions 

for Carbohydrate Catabolism. Paper - American Society for 

Microbiology, Los Angeles, California. 1956. 
A New Medium and "Mimic" MPN Method for Clostridium perfringens 

Isolation and Enumeration. Journal of Food Science. 1965. 

(l»Jith Warren Litsky) 
An Anaerobic, Warburg Respirometric Procedure for Clostridium 

botulinum E Cells. Journal of Bacteriology, 1956. (With 

Paula M. Kranefuss) 



^.c 



Gunner, Ho B . 

The Distribution and Persistence of Diazinon Applied to Plant and 
Soil, and Its Influence on Rhizosphere and Soil Microflora. 
Plant and Soil. 1965. (\'l±th B. M. Zuckerman, C. W. Miller, 
and Ruth E. Longley) 

Microbial Degradation of Diazinon. Paper - American Society for 
Microbiology, Los Angeles, California. Bacteriol. Proc , 
p. 5, 1966. (With Ruth E. Longley and B. M. Zuckerman) 

Hemerick, G . 

Health Hazards in Greenhouses Using Carbon-Dioxide Generating 

Equipment. Massachusetts Flower Growers* Association Bulletin, 
No. 93, pp. 1-3. November 1965. 

Mueller, W. S . 

How to Wash and Sanitize Your Soft-Serve Freezer Without Dis- 
assembling. Journal. 1956. 

Naegele, J. A . 

Advances in Acarology II. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, 
New York. (Ed.) 1965. 

Dichlorvos Vapor Toxicity and Selection for Resistance in the Two- 
Spotted Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae p Journal of Economic 
Entomology. 1966. (With B. M. Clancy and W. D. McEnroe) 

Environmental Determinants of Light Response in the Two-Spotted 
Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae . Acarologie. 1955. (IVith 
Z. Suskil 

Spectral Sensitivity and Orientation Response of the Two-Spotted 
Spider Mite, Tetranychus urticae . Journal of Insect Physiology. 
1966. (H^^ith W. D. McEnroe and A. B. Soans) 

Tilton, Richard C, H. B. Gunner and Warren Litsky 

A Quantitative Assay for Residual Selenite in Bacteriological Media. 
Anal. Biochem. 1955. 



FEED, FERTILIZER, SEED AND DAIRY LAW 

Fertilizer Control Service Staff 

Inspection of Commercial Fertilizers and Agricultural Lime Products 
1964-1965. Control Series Bulletin, December 1965, 3 pp. 



^n 



FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Collection of gas chromatographic fractions for infra-red analysis, 
I. S. Fagerson. Anal. Chem . 37:1630. 1955. 

New cranberry varieties for processed products. 

F. B. Chandler, I. E. Demoranville , and K. M. Hayes. 
Cranberries . 13-14-. 1965. 

On-premise freezing; administrative and technical considerations- 
hospitals. 

K. M. Hayes. J, Am. Hospital Assoc. 39:128, 130, 132, 13i|, 

136-138. 1965. 

Dairy sanitation manual. 
D. A. Evans. 1965. 

Some considerations in the interpretation of direct headspace gas 
chromatographic analyses of food volatiles. 
W. W. Nawar. Food Technol . 20:115. 1966. ■ 

Cranberry anthocyanins . 

C. Zapsalis and F. J. Francis. J. Food Sci . 30:396-399. 1965. 

Watermelon color measurement with the Agtron. 

F. J, Francis. Proc. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 86:617-620. 1965. 

Optimum storage conditions for butternut squash. F. J. Francis 
and C. L. Thomson. Proc. Am. 'Soc. Hort. Sci. 86:451-4-56. 1955. 

Composition of the distillate in the alcohol test for quality of 
prepeeled potatoes. 

R. de la Mar and F. J. Francis. Proc. Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 

86:511-516. 1955. 

Detection of water core and internal breakdown in Delicious apples 
by light transmittance . 

F« J. Francis, W. J. Bramlage, and W. J. Lord. Proc. Am. Soc. 

Hort. Sci. 87:78-84-. 1965. 

New parameters for process calculation. 

C. R. Stumbo and R. E. Longley. Food Technol . 20(3) :109-113. 
1966. 

Fluid flow relationships of importance in circulation cleaning. 

D. J. Hankinson, C. E. Carver, K. P. Chong, and K. P. Gordon. 
J. Milk and Food Technol . 28:377-378. 1955. 

Pectin methyl esterase in the ripening banana. 

H. 0. Hultin and Ao S. Levine. J. Food Sci . 30:917. 1965. 



^L?' 



oc 



FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (continued) 

Association of integrated metabolic pathways with membranes. 
I. Glycolytic enzymes of the red blood corpuscle and yeast. 

D. E. Green, E. Murer, H. 0. Hultin, S. H„ Richardson, 

B. Salmon, G. P. Brierly and H. Baum. Arch. Biochem. Biophys . 
112:535. 1965. 

Operating budgets for food service establishments. 

A. L. Wrisley. Food Management Leaflet No. 12, 20 pp. 1965. 

Purchasing beef for food service establishments. 

E. M. Buck and A. L.. Wrisley. Food Management Leaflet No. 16, 
24- pp. 1966. 

Using break-even analysis in food service establishments. 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Leaflet No. 13, 
21+ pp. 1965. 

Food service management. 

C. E. Eshbach. Issued 10 times a year. Sixteen to 24- pp. per 
issue. 

Purchasing fresh fruits and vegetables for the food service 
establishment . 
C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Leaflet No. 17. 20 pp. 1966. 

Information about the County Extension Service. Cross-referenced 
index . 

C. E, Eshbach. Multilithed. 8 pp. 1966. 

Home canning. 

K. M. Hayes and W. B. Esselen. Cooperative Extension Service, 
University of Massachusetts Publication No. 14-2 (revised), 
47 pp. 1965. 

Purchasing dairy products for food service establishments. 

F. E. Potter. Food Management Leaflet No. 15, 20 pp. 1966. 

Safe storage of valuable personal and business papers in an 

emergency. 

W. M. Hunting. An Amergency Preparedness Information Handbook 
prepared for Emergency Preparedness Information Committee. 

Purchasing canned fruits and vegetables in food service establish- 
ments . 

R. F. Lukowski. Food Management Leaflet No. 16, 20 pp. 1966. 

A guide for executives of food service organizations and associa- 
tions for conducting coordinated educational programs with Co- 
operative Extension Service, 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E, Eshbach. Food Management Manual No. 7, 

26 pp. 1966. 



^f 



FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY (continued) 

A manual for State Extension Specialists for conducting educational 
programs with food service organizations and associations. 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Manual No. 8, 

20 pp. 1965. 

A manual for State Extension Specialists for conducting educational 
work with multi-unit or multi-group food service establishments. 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Manual No. 9, 

^5 pp. 1956. 

A report of the Regional Food Service Educational Program. 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Manual No. 10, 
26 pp. 1966. 

A report of procedures used in conducting educational programs with 
multi-unit or multi-group food service operations. 

R. F. Lukowski and C. E. Eshbach. Food Management Manual No. 11, 

30 pp. 1966. 

Introduction to Hotel and Restaurant Law Cases and Text . 

N. G. Cournoyer. University of Massachusetts Mimeograph Service, 
1+52 pp. 1966. 

Understanding Cooking . 

D. E. Lundberg and L. H. Kotschevar. Distributed by University 
Store, University of Massachusetts, 309 pp. 1965. 

Thermobacteriology in Food Processing . 

C. R. Stumbo. Academic Press, New York, New York, 236 pp. 1965. 

Method for producing sour cream dressing. 

C. R. Stumbo and B. Heineman. U. S. Patent No. 3,235,387. 
February 15, 1966. Producers Creamery Company, Springfield, 
Missouri. 



FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 
Abbott, H. G . 

Direct Seeding in the Northeast— 196M-. Experiment Station Bulletin. 
1955. 

Seeding l^/hite Pine Under Poor Quality Hardwood. Paper - "Direct 
Seeding in the Northeast — A Symposium," Experiment Station 
Bulletin, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1965, pp. 3M— 37. 
(With R. L. Hilton) 

Direct Seeding Red Maple. Paper - "Direct Seeding in the Northeast- 
A Symposium," Experiment Station Bulletin, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst, 1965. pp. M-7-M-9. (With W, H. Davidson) 



86 



FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT (continued) 

Abbott, H. G . 

Some Aspects of Direct Seeding Red Pine in Massachusetts. Paper - 
"Direct Seeding in the Northeast — A Symposium," Experiment 
Station Bulletin, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 1965. 
pp. 37-4-1. (With W. H. Davidson) 

Babeu, R. G . 

Forest Owner Characteristics and Attitudes in Berkshire County, 
Massachusetts. Experiment Station Bulletin. 1965. (With 
A. D. Rhodes and W. P. MacConnell) 

Bennett, Emmett 

On the Comparative Biochemistry of Conifer Seeds. Forest Sciencc o 
1966. 

Cole, C. F . 

Additional Evidence for Separation of Etheostoma olmstedi Storer 
from Etheostoma nigrum Rafinesque . Copeia , 1965, No. 1, 1966. 

Virtual Population Estimates of Largemouth Bass in Lake Fort Smith, 
Arkansas, 1957-60. Transactions of the American Fisheries 
Society, Vol. 95, No. 1, pp. 52-55. January 1966, 

Coppinger, R. P . 

Identification of Experimental Birds with the Aid of Feather Auto- 
grafts. Bird Banding . 1966. (With B.C. Wentworth) 

Gatslick, H. B . 

New University of Massachusetts Programs Provide Men to Meet 
Industry's Challenge. Wood Working Digest 67 (9): 30-32, 
September 1965. 

MacConnell, W. P . 

Thinning Young White Pine Stands with Herbicides. Proceedings 
Northeastern Weed Control Conference, Vol. 20, pp. 561-567, 
January 1966. C^ith G. P. Stoll) 

A New Family of One-Man Snow Packers. Ski Area Management , 
Spring 1955, pp. 18-20. (With L. F. Whitney) 

Westing, A. H . 

Sugar Maple Decline: An Evaluation. Journal paper. 1965. 



3/ 



FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT (continued) 

Wetherbee, D. K . 

Natal Plumage Characters in Rails. The Auk , Vol. 82, No. 3, 
pp. 500-501. (With B. Meanley) 

PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES 

Baker, J. H . 

Relationship Between Salt Concentrations in Leaves and Sap and the 
Decline of Sugar Maples Along Roadsides. Massachusetts 
Experiment Station Bulletin No. 553. 1965. 

Barker, A. V . 

Effects of Ammonium and Nitrate Nutrition on Dark Respiration of 
Excised Bean Leaves. Crop Science 5: M-39-M-M-1+. 1965. Q.'Jlth 
R. J. Volk and W. A. Jackson) 

Colby, W. G . 

Seasonal Pattern of Fructosan in Orchardgrass Stubble as Influenced 
by Nitrogen and Harvest Management. Agron. J. 57: 169-173. 
1955. O^ith M. Drake, D. L. Field, and G. Kreowski) 

Drake, M . 

Bitter Pit as Related to Leaf and Peel Calcium. Proc. Ann. Meeting 

Mass. Fruit Growers' Assn. 72: 25-29. 1965. (With W. D. Weeks, 

J. H. Baker, D. L. Field, and G. W. Olanyk) 
Factors Influencing the Fructosan Level in Orchardgrass. Sixth 

Japanese Potash Symposium, Sapporo, Japan. 1965. (With 

W. G. Colby and D. L. Field) 

Francis, F. J., W. J. Bramlage, and W. J. Lord 

Detection of Watercore and Internal Breakdown in Delicious Apples 
by Light Transmittance. Proc. Amer. Soc. Hort. Sci. 87: 79-84. 
1955. 

Havis, J. R . 

Desiccation as a Factor in Winter Injury of Rhododendron. Proc. 
Am. Soc. Hort. Sci. 86: 764-769. 1965. 

Lord, W. J. and G. E. Wilder 

Effectiveness of Herbicides Containing Amitrole Applied in Three 
Consecutive Years for Poison Ivy Control Under Blossoming 
Mcintosh Apple Trees. Proc. NEWCC. 20: 188-191. 1966. 



£> 



c5^ 



PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES (continued) 

Maynar'd, D. N . 

The Influence of Rubidium-Potassium Levels on Growth and Ion 
Accumulation in Tomato. Plant & Soil 23: 137-114-0. 1965. 
GVith J. H. Baker) 

Variation Among Tomato Lines with Respect to Ammonium Tolerance. 

Hort. Sci. 1: 17-18. 1965. O/ith A. V. Barker and W, H. Lachman) 

Porach, A. G. and J. R. Havis 

Interactions Between Granular Herbicide Combinations, Moisture, 
Incorporation Practice, and Granular Breakdown. Proco N. E. 
Weed Control Conf. 20: 220-225. 1956. 

Southwick, F. W . 

The Influence of Alar CB-995) on Red Color Development, Flesh 

Firmness g Fruit Growth Rate, Preharvest Drop, and Physiological 
Disorders of Apples. 95th Ann. Rpt. of State Hort. Soc. of 
MJ.ch., pp. 56-72. 1955. G^Iith W. J. Lord and W. D. Weeks) 

Further Studies Related to the Response of Apples to Preharvest 

Sprays of Alar (B-995) . Proc Ann. Meeting MasSo Fruit Growers* 
Assn. 72: 53-60. 1966. QiSlth W. J. Lord and W. D. Weeks) 

Vengris , Jonas 

Seasonal Occurrence of Barnyardgrass in Potato Fields in 
Massachusetts. Weeds 13 (M-) : 374-375. 1965. 

Waddington, D. V. and J. H. Baker 

Influence of Soil Aeration on the Growth and Chemical Composition 
of Three Grass Species. Agron. Jour . 57: 253-258. 1965. 

Weeks, W. D . 

Relation to Differential N and K Fertilization to Tree Performance, 
Fruit Quality and Storage Disorders of Delicious Apples. 
Mass. Expt. Sta. Bui. 552. 1965. Q.'ilth F. W. Southwick, 
M. Drake, and G. W. Olanyk) 

Zak, J. M . ■ 

Sand Dune Erosion Control at Provincetown, Massachusetts. 
Jour, of Soil and Water Conser., July-August. 1955. 

Michelson, L. F. and J. M. Zak 

Soils (Principles of Soil Management) — A Laboratory Manual. 
Newell Press, Amherst, Massachusetts. 1965. 



S3 



VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES 

Anderson, D. L . 

Pre-laying Nutritional and Environmental Factors in the Perfor- 
mance of the Adult Fowl. 1. Adaptation of Litter-reared Single 
Comb White Leghorn Females to Different Calcium and Phosphorus 
Intakes. Poultry Sci. 4-5: 67-75. 1965. 

Angstrom, C. I., H. L. Chute, M. S. Cover, and G. H. Snoeyenbos 

Report of the Committee on Nomenclature and Reporting of Diseases. 
Northeastern Conference on Avian Diseases, June 1955. 

Avian Diseases IX: 611-518. 

Armstrongs D. T. and D. L. Black 

Influences of Luteinizing Hormone on Corpus Luteum Metabolism and 
Progesterone Biosynthesis Throughout the Bovine Estrous Cycle. 
Endocrinology (In press). 1956. 

Black, D. L., Leo V. Crowley, R. T. Duby, and C. H. Spilman . 

The Effect of Oviduct Fluid on Op Uptake by Ram Spermatozoa. 
Fed Proc. 25 (2): 190 (Abstract). 1955. 

Chandir amani , N. K. , H. Van Roekel, and Olga M. Olesiuk 

Viability Studies with Mycoplasma gallisepticum under Different 
Environmental Conditions. Accepted for publication in Poultry 
Science. 1965. 

Denison, J. W. and D. A. Storey 

Costs of Bro^^m Egg Production in Massachusetts — An Analysis of Floor 
and Cage Plants of Different Sizes. Experiment Station Buletin 
(In press) . 1956. 

Dickinson, F. N., S. N. Gaunt, and D. J. Hanklnson 

Sources of Variation Affecting the Relationship of Milk Protein 
Determinations as Made by Orange G and Kjeldahl. J. Dairy Sci. 
(In press) (Abstract). 1966. 

Fenner, H. and H. D. Barnes 

Improved Method for Determining Dry Matter in Silage. J. Dairy Sci. 
1^8: 1324-1328. 1965. 



34 



VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES (continued) 

Gacula, M. C, Jr. and S. N. Gaunt 

Genetic Analysis of Protein Content of Cow's Milk. Accepted for 
publication in the Phillipine Agriculturist 4-9. 1956. 

Gacula, M. C, Jr., S. N. Gaunt, and F. N. Dickinson 

Selection Response in a Dairy Breeder *s Herd. J. Dairy Sci. M-8: 
1559 (Abstract). 

Gaunt, S. N., M. C. Gacula, Jr., and A. R. Corwin 

Variations in Milk Constituents and Milk Yield for Five Breeds of 
Dairy Cattle. Accepted for publication at XVII International 
Dairy Congress, Munich, Germany, July M— 8, 1966. 1966. 

Hahn, E. H., D. L. Black, and R. I. Dorman 

Super-pregnancy in the Swarf Pig Following Pre -fertilization 

X-irradiation. Ill International Congress of Radiation Research. 
Cartina D'Ampezzo, Italy (In press). 1966. 

Komiyama, T., W. J. Mellen, and A. J. Farrington 

Thyroxine Requirement for Normal Growth in Three Lines of Chickens. 
Poultry Sci. M-M-: 1391 (Abstract). 1965. 

Larose, R. N. and M. Sevoian 

Avian Lymphomatosis. IX. Mortality and Serological Response of 
Chickens of Various Ages to Graded Doses of T-Strain. 
Avian Diseases 9: 604-510. 1965. 

McDaniel, J. W. and D. L. Black 

Allografts and Xenografts of Oviduct to the Cheek Pouch of the 
Syrian Hamster. Nature (In press) . 1966. 

McDaniel, J. W., R. T. Duby, and D. L. Black 

The Influence of Multiple Anterior Pituitary Allografts on the 
Oestrous Cycle of the Syrian Hamster. (in press). 1955. 

Oldham, H. G. and F. N. Dickinson 

Evaluation of Nitrogen Balance of Young Women Fed Amino Acids 
Proportioned as in the FAO Provisional Pattern and as in Egg, 
Oats, Milk and Peanuts. Am. J. Clinical Nutrition 17: 360-366. 
1955. 



<9S 



VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES (continued) 
Reynolds. lona M. and R. E. Smith 

-■ I I - I 

Listeriosis of Gray Foxes in Massachusetts. Health Laboratory 
Sci. 2: 250-253. 1965. 

Renold, A. E., J. Stein]<e, J. S. Soeldner, H. W. Antoniades, and 

R. E. Smith 

Immunological Responses to the Prolonged Administration of Hetero- 
logous and Homologous Insulin in Cattle. J. of Clinical 
Investigation (In press). 1965. 

Sevoian, M . 

On the Etiology of Avian Lymphomatosis. Proc. of the Int. Conf. 

on Comparative Leukemias. Pergamon Press, Ltd., Oxford, 

England, 37-44-. 1966. 
Emerging Concepts on Avian Leukosis. Proc. 13th World's Poultry 

Congress (In press). 1965. 

Smith, C. T., F. R. Shaw, D. L. Anderson, R. A. Callahan, and 
W. H. Ziener 

Ronnel Residues in Eggs of Poultry. J. Econ. Entom. 58 (6) : 
1150-1151. 1965. 

Smith, R. E.^ lona M. Re:i^olds, and G. W. Clark 

Experimental Leptospirosis in Rams. Cornell Veterinarian 55: 

4-12-4-19. 1965. 
Experimental Leptospirosis in Pregnant Ewes. V. Middle Uterine 

Artery Inoculation. Cornell Veterinarian (In press). 1965. 
The Mechanism of Abortion in Experimental Leptospirosis of Pregnant 

Ewes. TOIO Leptospirosis Information Exchange (In press). 

(Abstract). 1965. 

Smith, R. E., E. C. Hench, and lona M. Reynolds 

Experimental Leptospirosis in Pregnant Ewes. VI. Immuno- 
fluorescence in the Diagnosis of Fetal Leptospirosis. Cornell 
Veterinarian (In press). 1966. 

Smyser, C. F., N. Adinarayanan, H. Van Roekel, and G. H. Snoeyenbos . 

Field and Laboratory Observations on Salmonella heidelberg In- 
fection in Three Chicken Breeding Flocks. 1955. 



o 



Cy 



VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES (continued) 

Smyth, J. R., Jr. and R. G. Somes, Jr . 

A Ngv\7 Gene Determining the Columbian Feather Pattern in the Fowl. 
J. Kered. 55: 151-156. 1955o 

Snoeyenbos, G. H . 

Tuberculosis in a Ruffed Grouse. Bull. Wildlife Disease Assoc. 11: 9. 
1956. 

Somes, R. G., Jr. and J. R. Smyth, Jr . 

Feather Eumelanin Distribution Variations in Buff Orpington, 
New Hampshire, and Rhode Island Red Breeds of Fowl. Poultry 
Sci. 45: 4-0-4-9. 1965. 

The Effects of Estrogen on Feather Phaeomelanin Intensity in the 
Fowl. Poultry Sci. (In press). 1955. 

Somes, R. G., Jr., T. W. Fox, and J. R. Smyth, Jr . 

Comparative Phaeomelanin Intensities in Chicken Down and Post- 
juvenile Plumage. Poultry Scio (In press) . 1955. 

Tzianabos, T. and G. H. Snoeyenbos 

Clinical, Immunological, and Serological Observations on Turkey 
Virus Hepatitis. Avian Diseases IX: 578-591. 1955. 

Van Roekel, H., C. F. Smyser, and G. H. Snoeyenbos 

For-ty-fifth Annual Report of Pullorum Disease Eradication in 

Massachusetts, 1954-1955. Control Series Bulletin 202. 1955. 

Wentworth,. B. C. and W. J. Mellen 

Anti-testis Antibodies and Fecundity in Female Japanese Quail. 
Physiol. Zool. 38: 351-359. 1955. 

Snoeyenbos, G. H . 

Contributed Chapter 14-, pages 4-27-4-50 to Diseases of Poultry , 

Blester and Schwarte, 5th edition, Iowa State University Press, 
1955. 



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Vc^ 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

OFFICES AND COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP 

HELD IN PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 



y~ 



//? 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Clayton, J. T . 

Meetings Committee (National ASAE) Vice Chairman 
Building Construction Standards Committee (National ASAE) 
Animal Shelter Ventilation Committee (National ASAE) 
Executive Committee (Connecticut Valley Chapter, ASAE) 

Collins^ W. H . 

Nuclear Radiation Protection Committee (National ASAE) 

Fletcher. S. W . 

Vice Chairman, Connecticut Valley Chapter, ASAE 
Secretary-Treasurer, Massachusetts Chapter, Phi Tau Sigma 
Food Engineering Committee (National ASAE) 

Johnson, C. A . ■ ' 

Chairman, Milk Handling Equipment Committee (National ASAE) 
Rural Waste Disposal Committee (National ASAE) 

Johnson, E. A . 

Instrumentation Committee (National ASAE) 

Light, R. G . 

Chairman, Northeast Farm Buildings Plan Exchange Committee 
Water Trea'tment and Use Committee (National ASAE) 
Northeast Agricultural Engineers Committee on Standards for 
Milk Sanitarians 

Zahradnik, J. W . 

Secretary, Food Engineering Committee (National ASAE) 
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 
Becker, W. E . 

Vice Chairman, Northeastern Forest Pest Council 

Holmes, F. W . 

Member of Committee on Regulatory Work and Foreign Plant Dis- 
eases, American Phytopathological Society 
Chairman, Northeastern Forest Pathology Workshop (International) 



yy 



Lilly, J. H . 

President, University of Massachusetts Chapter of Society of 

Sigma Xi 
Secretary, University of Massachusetts Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi 
Member, Committee on Common Names of Entomological Society of 

America 
Faculty Fellow, Eugene Field House, Orchard Hill Complex 

Wave, H. E . 

Member, Auditing Committee, Eastern Branch, Entomological Society 
of America 

Wheeler, E. H . 

Member, Insecticide Terminology Committee, Entomological Society 
of America 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

Faddoul, G. P . 

Member, Advisory Committee to Director, Massachusetts Division 

of Livestock Disease Control 
Member, Poultry Health Committee, Massachusetts Poultry Association 
Member, Program Committee, Massachusetts Veterinarians Association 
Participant, National Salmonella Surveillance Unit, Public Health 

Service 

Galinat, W. C . 

Editorial Board, Economic Botany 
Secretary, New England Botanical Club, Inc. 

Green, J. H . 

Education Committee, Society of Industrial Microbiology 

Litsky, W » 

Editorial Board, Applied Microbiology 

Editorial Board, Standard Methods for the Examination of Water 
Education Committee, Society of Industrial Microbiology 
Publication Committee, Society of Industrial Microbiology 
Applied Microbiology, American Society of Microbiology 
Microbial Contamination of Surfaces, American Public Health 
Association 

Naegele, J. A . 

Program Committee, Entomological Society of America, Eastern Branch 



vs 



Snow, J. A . 

Committee Member, Epidemiology and Meteorology, American Phyto- 
pathological Society 

FEED, SEED, FERTILIZER AND DAIRY LAWS 

Eiben, C. H . 

Member, Merion Kentucky Bluegrass Purity Committee, Association 
of Official Seed Analysts 

Gersten, Bo 

Associate Referee - to study development of methods for the 

determination of copper and sodium in fertilizers. Association 
of Official Analytical Chemists 

Kuzmeski, J. W . 

Chairman, Collaborative Check Sample Committee, and Investigator, 

Non-Protein Nitrogen Products, Association of American Feed 

Control Officials, Inc. 
Member, Guarantees and Tolerances Committee, and Investigator, 

Nitrogen Products, Association of American Fertilizer Control 

Officials, Inc. 

Rice, W. N . 

Chairman of Referee Work, Region 3; member of Noxious Weed Seed^ 
Seed Count, and Meeting Place Committees, Association of 
Official Seed Analysts 

Smith, C. T . 

President, ex officio and Chairman, Methods Committees American 
Association of Feed Microscopists 

FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Eshbach, C. E . 

Trustee, New England Economic Education Council 

Esselen, W. B . 

Member of Council and the Council Policy Committee, the World 
Food Program Committee and Chairman, Scientific Lectureship 
Committee of Institute of Food Technologists 

National Councilor, University of Massachusetts Chapter of 
Phi Tau Sigma 



^c 



Francis, F. J . 

Member, Editorial Committee, American Society of Horticultural 

Science 
Member, Babcock Horticultural Award Committee, Institute of Food 

Technologists 

Hayes, K. M . 

Treasurer, Northeast Section, Institute of Food Technologists 

Member, ASHRAE Technical Committee 

Frozen Foods Consultant, National Frozen Foods Association 

Hunting, W. M , 

Appointed by. Governor John A. Volpe to Advisory Board, Greenfield 
Community College 

Lundberg, D, E . 

Member, Board of Directors, Council on Hotel, Restaurant and 
Institutional Education 

Potter, F. E . 

Director, New England Group, National Ice Cream Retailers* 
Association 

Sawyer, F. M . 

Member, Committee on Quality Control of Food Products, Institute 
of Food Technologists 

FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Abbott, H. G . 

Secretary-Treasurer, New England Section, Society of American 
Foresters 

Bond, R. S . 

Executive Council, New England Section, Society of American Foresters 
Correspondent (News Organ) , New England Section, Society of 
American Foresters 

Brander, R. B . 

Co-authoring a chapter — Committee on Technical Manual, Northeast 
Section, Wildlife Society 



.nH 



"Vy 



Carlozzl, C. A . 

Member, Board of Directors, Caribbean Conservation Association 

Cole, C. F . 

Chairman, Audit Committee, Northeast Section, American Fisheries 
Society 

Greeley, F » 

Chairman, Committee on By-Laws Revision, Northeast Section, 
Wildlife Society 

Mader, D. L . 

Speaker, Green Mountain Chapter, New England Section, Society of 

American Foresters 
Chairman, Forest Soils Work Group, Northeast Soils Research 

Committee 
Member, Nominating Committee, Forest and Range Soils Division, 

Soil Science Society of America 

McCann, J. A . 

Committee on Student Memberships, American Fisheries Society 
Chairman, Membership Committee, Northeast Section, American 
Fisheries Society 

Noyes, J. H . 

Chairman, New England Section, Society of American Foresters 
Member, Technical Committee, American Pulpwood Association 

Reed, R» J . 

Secretary-Treasurer, Northeast Section, American Fisheries Society 
Rhodes, A» D . 

Chairman, Council of Forestry School Executives 

Scheffey, A. J. W . 

Member, Natural Resources Committee, New England Council 
Secretary, Northeastern Public Affairs Committee, Cooperative 

Extension 
Member, Advisory Committee, Higher Education Facilities Commission 
Member, Massachusetts Outdoor Recreation Council 



y? 



Sheldon, W. G . 

Executive Committee, Northeast Section, Wildlife Society 

M-H CLUB 

Metcalfe, W. W . 

Vice President, Massachusetts Division, Adult Education 
Association, United States of America 

VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES 

Foley, R. C . 

President, Massachusetts Chapter of Phi Kappa Phi 
Gaunt, S. N . 

Chairman, Eastern Region, American Dairy Science Association 
Sevoian, M. 



Member, National Committee on Avian Leucosis, American Veterinary 
Medical Association 

Snoeyeribos, G. H . 

Secretary-Treasurer, American Association of Avian Pathologists 
Business Manager, Avian Diseases (Quarterly Journal), American 
Association of Avian Pathologists 

Stern, D. N . 

Northeastern Director, American Association of Extension 
Veterinarians 



y/ 




COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FACULTY AWARDS, CITATIONS, AND 



PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION 




^d> 



DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 
George P. Faddoul 

- Bronze Plaque presented by Massachusetts Poultrymen ' s 
Association for outstanding service to the Massachusetts 
poultry industry. 

- Bronze Plaque presented by the Massachusetts Farm Bureau 
Federation in recognition of his outstanding contributions 
to the poultry industry. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Frederick J. Francis 

- Invited to serve as an Institute of Food Technologists 
National Scientific Lecturer during the coming year« 

William B. Esselen 
Irving S . Fagerson 
Charles R. Stumbo 

- Awarded travel grants by the Institute of Food Technologists 
(funded by NIH) to attend and participate in the Second 
International Congress of Food Science and Technology at 
Warsaw, Poland, August 22-27, 1956. Dr. Stumbo has also 
been invited to present a paper at the Congress. 

DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES 

John H, Baker 

- Elected a Fellow of the American Association for the 
Advancement of Science in recognition of his scientific 
accomplishments . 

- Consultant to U. S. Geological Survey on contamination of 
water with fission products produced by nuclear explositions. 

William G. Colby 

- Visiting Professor, University of Hokkaido, and University 
of Obihiro, Hokkaido, Japan, as a recipient of an award 
under the Fulbright-Hays Act. 

Mack Drake 

- Exchange Professor to Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan, 
June-August 1965. 



^/ 



DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES (continued) 
Mack Drake 

- Consulting Editor, Soil Science (Journal), 

- Consulting Editor, Agronomy Journal. 
Joseph Troll 

- Appointed a member of the United States Golf Association 
Green Section. 

- Appointed a member of the Golf Course Superintendents* 
Association of New England. 

DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES 

John W. Denis on 

- Received the "Outstanding Teacher of the Year" award by 

the Stockbridge School of Agriculture. 

Stanley N, Gaunt 

- Received a travel grant from the Research Council, 
University of Massachusetts, to present a paper at the 
International Dairy Congress, Munich, Germany. 

Robert M. Grover 

- Recipient of Epsilon Sigma Phi Extension Award, December 1965. 
Martin Sevoian 

- Received a travel grant from World *s Poultry Congress, 
Kiev, U.S.S.R. 

Douglas N. Stern 

- Recipient of Epsilon Sigma Phi Extension Award, December 1965. 



1 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



FACULTY PARTICIPATION IN 



£".2. 



PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS 



s-s 



AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS 

Storey, D. A . 

Presented a paper at the Conference on New Developments in 
Fisheries Economics, Boston, Massachuselts, December 1965. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Clayton, J. T . 

Presented an invited paper (Simulation as a Technique for Investi- 
gating the Thermal Exchange of Chickens) at the 5M-th Annual 
Meeting of the Poultry Science Association, University of 
Georgia, Athens, Georgia, August 1965. 

Presented two invited papers at the National Symposium on Animal 
Waste Management, Michigan State University, East Lansing, 
Michigan, May 1966. (With graduate students, N. W. Webster 
and D. 0. Bridgham) 

Presided at a half -day session (Professional Practice in Farmstead 
Engineering) of the Winter Meeting, American Society of 
Agricultural Engineers, Chicago, Illinois, December 1965. 

Fitzgerald, G. F . 

Presented an invited paper (The ABC System of Grocery Procurement) 
and demonstrated the U-Mass. developed self -dressing display 
rack at the Food Business Institutes 9th Annual Conference on 
Food Distribution, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, 
April 1966. 

Light, R. G . 

Presented a paper (Climate and Environmental Control in Free Stall 
Dairy Housing) at the Winter Meeting, American Society of 
Agricultural Engineers, Chicago, Illinois, December 1965. 

Presented a paper (Regional Ventilation Recommendations for Dairy 
Structures) at the Annual Meeting, North Atlantic Section, 
American Society of Agricultural Engineers, Cornell University, 
Ithaca, New York, August 1965. 

Authored a paper (Design Analysis of Free Stall Housing Systems) 
included in the Proceedings, Second Section Seminar, CIGR, 
Cambridge;, England, September 1965, 

Whitney, L. F. and E. S. Pira 

Presented a paper O^ater Distribution from Pressurized Subsurface 
Irrigation Systems) at the Annual Meeting, North Atlantic 
Section, American Society of Agricultural Engineers, 
Cornell University, August 1965. (With L« F. Michelson and 
CM. Vaziri) 



S-f 



Whitney, L. F . 

Presented a paper (Design Parameters for Fluidized Drying of 
Alfalfa Leaves) at the Winter Meeting, American Society of 
Agricultural Engineers, Chicago, Illinois, December 1965. 
(With C. W. Hall) 

CRANBERRY STATION 

Zuckerman, B. M . 

Served as scientific specialist. United States Department of State, 
Cultural Exchange Program, Warsaw, Poland, September 1965. 

Attended VII International Nematology Symposium, Antibes, France, 
September 1965. 

Served as External Examiner in Zoology, University of Jodhpur, 
India. Examined one Ph.D. thesis in 1965, 

ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Holmes, F. W . 

Served as host. Northeastern Forest Pathology Workshop, 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. 

Presented paper at Northeastern Division Meeting of American Phyto- 
pathological Society. 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

Butter field, N. W . 

Participant, American Society Horticulture Science, Branch Meetings 
Faddoul, G. P . 

Participant, New England Turkey Producers* Association. 

Fellows, G. W . 

Participant, Northeastern Conference on Avian Diseases, University 
of Delaware, Newark, Delaware. 

Fordham, H. C . 

Member, Governor John A. Volpe's Committee on Natural Beauty, 

Galinat, W. C « 

Participant, Maize Genetics Conference, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 



j:5 



Green, J. H . 

Participant, American Society of Microbiology, Annual Meeting. 
Gunnar, H. B . 

Invited participant. Ninth International Congress of Microbiology, 

Moscow, Russia CU.S.S.R.) 
Participant, Symposium on Soil Bacteria, University of Liverpool, 

England . 
Participant, National Meeting, American Society of Microbiology. 

Litsky, W . 

Pcirticipant, Advisory Board, Microbiology of Foods, United States 

Army Natick Laboratories, 
Participant, Research Conference, Marine Environment and Shellfish 

Sanitation Problems, Narraganset, Rhode Island. 

McEnroe, W. D . 

Participant, Entomological Society of America, Eastern Breuich 

Meetings . 

Naegele, J. A . 

Participant, Entomological Society of America, Eastern Branch 

Meetings . 
Participant, Symposium on Environmental Health, Tufts University, 

Medford, Massachusetts. 

Rosenau, W. A . 

Participant, American Society of Horticultural Science, Regional 

Meetings . 
Participant, Air Pollution Control Association Meetings, Windsor, 

Connecticut. 
Participant, Symposium on Analytical Chemistry, New York, New York, 

FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

Eshbach, C. E . 

Conference Speaker, Annual Conference, National Association of 
Product Managers, Boston, Massachusetts, 1966. 

Fagerson, I. S . 

Panel Member, Symposium in Flavor, Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts, November 1965, 



oo 



Hultin, H. . 

Presented research paper at Annual Meeting, Institute of Food 
Technologists, Portland, Oregon, May 1966. 

Sawyer, F. M . 

Presented research paper at Annual Meeting, Institute of Food 
Technologists, Portland, Oregon, May 1966. 

Stumbo, C. R . 

Presented research paper at Annual Meeting, Institute of Food 
Technologists, Portland, Oregon, May 1966. 

FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Bond, R. S . 



Presented sunmary of curriculum study at meeting of Forestiry 

Economics Educators, Society of American Foresters, 
Presented paper at New England Agricultural Economics Council « 

Carlozzi, C. A . 

Presented principal paper at Caribbean Conservation Conference 



s 



held in the Caribbean. 

Cole, C. F . 

Panel Member, American Fisheries Society, Northeast Section. 
Statement presented at Conference on Exploration of the Atlantic 

Shelf. 
Member, Advisory Committee, American Society of Ichthyologists 

and Herpitologists. 

Gatslick, H. B . 

Co-chairman, Joint Meeting, Forest Products Research Society and 
New England Kiln Dry ding Association 

Hoadlev, R. B . 

Technical Session Chairman, Forest Products Research Society and 
New England Kiln Drying Association. 

Mader, D. L . 

Paper presented at Forest Soils Workshop, Society of American 

Foresters. 
Paper presented at Municipal Watershed Management Symposium, 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts. 



^7 



McCann, J. A . 

Program Chairman, American Fisheries Society, Northeast Section. 

Scheffey, A. J. W . 

Paper, Conference on Urban Planning for Environmental Health, 
Paper, Public Policy Seminar, Northeastern Public Affairs Committee, 

New York, New York. 
Paper, Symposium on the New Conservation, Clark University, 

Worcester, Massachusetts. 
Panel Member, IVhite House Conference on International Cooperation. 
Panel Member, Conference on Environmental Resources, National 

Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
Panel Member, Symposium on Environmental Quality, Resources for 

the Future, Washington, D. C. 
Paper, Society of American Foresters, New England Section. 
Participant, Massachusetts Conference on Natural Beauty. 
Paper, New Jersey Governor's Conference on Natural Beauty. 
Keynote Speaker, Vermont -New Hampshire Workshop on Natural Beauty. 
Lectures delivered at Harvard University; School of Fine Arts, 

Dartmouth College; University of New Hampshire; Alumni College, 

University of Massachusetts. 

VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES 

Black, D. L . 

Presented paper. Federation of American Societies for Experimental 
Biology, Atlantic City, New Jersey, April 1966. 

Denis on, J. W . 

Presented an invitational paper titled, "Post High School Education 
at the Associate Degree Level," - Program on Undergraduate 
Education in Poultry Science sponsored by the Poultry Science 
Association and the Committee on Educational Policy in Agri- 
culture of the National Academy of Science, National Research 
Council, Athens, Georgia, August 1965. 

Fenner, H . 

Presented paper on "Silage Preservation", American Dairy Science 
Association, College Park, Maryland, July 1965. 

Foley, R. C . 

Presented invitational paper titled, "Education in Dairy Science 
at the Associate Degree Level," - Conference on Undergraduate 
Education in Dairy Science sponsored by the Americam Dairy 
Science Association and the Committee on Education Policy in 
Agriculture of the National Academy of Science, National 
Research Council, Lincoln, Nebraska, August 1965. 



^jr 



Gaunt, S. N . 

Presented paper on "Selection Response in Dairy Cattle," - 

American Dair^ Science Association, Eastern Section Meeting, 
College Park, Maryland, August 1965. 

Harris, W. K . 

Chairman, Committee on Laboratory Procedures, Northeastern 
Mastitis Conference, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Mellen, W. J . 

Chairman, Physiology Section, Poultiry Science Association, 

Athens, Georgia, 1965. 
Participant, Conference on Undergraduate Education in Animal 

Sciences, National Research Council, Washington, D, C, 

May 1966. 

Olesivik, Olga M . 

Presented two papers at Northeastern Conference on Avian Diseases, 
Newark, Delaware, June 1966, 

Sevoian, M . 

Presented paper titled, "On the Etiology of Avian Lymphomatosis," 
International Conference on Comparative Leukemias, 
Stockholm, Sweden, September 1965. 

Smith, R. E . 

Participant, People-to-People Travel Program to Soviet Union and 
Western Europe, United States Cultural Exchange Program, 
September 1965, 

Participant, National Leptospirosis Conference, Chicago, Illinois, 
December 1965, 

Smyser, C. F . 

Participant, Northeastern Conference on Avian Diseases, Newark, 
Delaware, June 1966, 

Snoeyenbos, G. H . 

Discussant, Symposium on Avian Pasteurellosis , United States Fish 
and Wildlife Service, Boston, Massachusetts, January 1966. 



^7 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



RESEARCH PROJECTS 



1965-66 



^D 



THE MASSACHUSETTS EXPERIMENT STATION 



The purpose of the Massachusetts Experiment Station is to conduct 
systematic scientific investigations of problems relating to the 
agricultural industry of the state in its broadest aspects. These 
investigations have as their objective - to discover the fundamental 
principles underlying the behavior of economic plants and animals, 
to determine the economic and biological factors relating to the 
constructive use of our renewable natural resources, and to develop 
better methods of utilizing the products of these resources for the 
improvement of the economy of the Commonwealth. 

The programs of the Experiment Station consist of the following areas 
of work. 

Conservation, Development and Use of Soil, Water, Forest and Related 
Resources 

Resource description and inventory. 

Resource conservation. 

Resource development and management. 

Evaluation of alternative uses and methods of use. 

Protection of Man, Plants, and Animals from Losses, Damage, or Dis- 
comfort Caused by -- 

Insects. 

Diseases, parasites, and nematodes. 

Weeds , 

Fire and other hazards. 

Efficient Production and Quality Improvement 

Biology of plants and animals. 

Improving biological efficiency of plants and animals. 

Increasing consumer acceptability of farm and forest products. 

Mechanization and improvement of physical efficiency. 

Management of labor, capital, and other inputs to maximize income. 

Product Development and Processing 

Chemical and physical properties of food products. 
Developing new and improved food products and processes. 
Chemical and physical properties of non-food products. 
Developing new and improved non-food products and processes. 

Efficient Marketing, Including Pricing and Quality 

Identification, measurement and maintenance of quality. 
Improving economic and physical efficiency in marketing, including 
analysis of market structure and functions. 



Analysis of supply, demand and price, including interregional 

competition. 
Developing domestic markets, including consumer preference and 

behavior. 
Foreign trade, market development, and competition. 

Development of Human Resources and of Economies of Communities and 
Areas 



&>t 



Description, inventory, and trends. 

Economic development and adjustment. 

Improvement of social well-being, including social services and 

facilities and adjustment to social and economic changes. 
Evaluation of public programs, policies emd services. 



0^ 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS 

E. W. Bell, Acting Head 

Department Research Prograni 

Research by the Department of Agricultural and Food Economics has 
both basic and applied aspects. The studies are related to the 
interests of a well-trained and developing staff plus the use of 
graduate assistants which has increased the mileage of this program 
under the competent direction of staff members of the department 
under whom these graduate assistants worked closely. The areas of 
emphasis include: resource economics, market structure, market 
management and efficiency studies, management economics in food 
production, land use and resource utilization, retail distribution 
economics of food handling firms, and price analyses of market 
structures in food distribution and marketing processes. 

Marketing 

Marketing of Eggs in Massachusetts 

D, A. Storey 

Three coordinated studies were completed using the economic- 
engineering research technique. Production costs of commercial egg 
production were synthesized for floor and cage plants of different 
sizes, marketing costs were synthesized for four marketing systems ^ 
and wholesale marketing costs were synthesized for three marketing 
systems. The results of these studies gave a useful basis for 
management decisions, and also gave leads to conclusions concerning 
the futiare structure of the Massachusetts commercial egg industry. 
A further study is underway on the feasibility of various types of 
marketing contracts. Data are currently being collected to identify 
the characteristics of different egg marketing systems in 
Massachusetts « 

Marketing of Marine Fish 

D» A. Storey 

A research grant from the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, U. S. 
Department of the Interior, made possible a study of the distribution 
of fish landed at the Boston Fish Pier. Marketing channels, geo- 
graphical patterns of distribution, and seasonal variations were 
identified for the major species and types. 

A second phase of this study, which will be a part of a regional re- 
search effort, will involve the study making a cross-section analysis 
of fish consumers in selected market £u?eas. 



^ 



Econometric Measurement to Sales 
Forecasting in Food Retailing Firms 

T. W. Leed 

Supermarket retailing of food today relies on short-time projection 
of store sales from day to day and week to week. This was an origi- 
nal effort to develop methodology that could be practical and 
incorporated into the food marketing firms management routine. This 
study was realized and accomplished with the aid of a graduate 
assistant and the results will be used by executives and management 
personnel in food retailing firms as a guide in their decision making. 

The Queueing Theory to Labor Utilization 
in Retail Supermarket Food Stores 

T. W. Leed 

In making this study, the Labor Relations and Research Center, as 
well as the Department of Industrial Engineering, collaborated in 
this undertaking. The results here, too, will be found useful by 
executive and memagement personnel in developing systems that will 
be efficient to store operations and understanding of their labor 
requirements. 

Transportation 

A. A. Brown 

The largest single item of expense Incurred by Massachusetts livestock 
and poultry farmers in both an absolute and a relative sense is for 
purchased feed. A substantial part of this cost has been and con- 
tinues to be the freight charges for moving the Ingredients or the 
feed to mills and farms in this area from the surplus grain producing 
areas of the Midwest. 

Research has been directed toward a more rational freight rate 
structure in this rail movement. In July of 196*+ a major innovation 
occurred with the introduction of "distance" or "mileage rate" on 
com. Although of considerable significance so far as Massachusetts 
is concerned, this change was but a first step: a first approxi- 
mation. 

Major attention continues to be given to a general revision of the 

Eastern grain freight rate structure. The availability of corn rate 

introduced an element of realism into a general analysis of rate 

alternatives with a view toward the extension of "mileage" rates to 

all feed grain ingredients generally used in the manufacturing of 

livestock feed used by farmers in this area. This will be of par- jlj 

tlcular economic benefit to dairymen as well as poultrymen, and give ! ! 

them opportunity to maintain a competitive position of economic 

production as well as the marketing of their f€U?m products. 1 



(^¥ 



Resource Productivity in Greenhouse 
Carnation Production 

E . Jarvesoo 

This was a study in the production and marketing of carnations 
produced on ranges in Massachusetts. It studied the production 
functions as related to size of business operation, capital input 
costs, labor efficiencies and management methods. The results of 
this study will be of prime interest to the firms producing and 
marketing carnations to retail florists and others, by providing 
economic analysis to develop operational efficiencies . Research In 
this area is continuing by taking up further study of the cost 
function of the economic production of carnations in Massachusetts. 

Cost of Producing Gladioli 
in Massachusetts 

E. Jarvesoo 

Based on typical performance rates of glad growers in the state, costs 
of growing is about 52 cents per dozen. Harvesting and marketing 
will add about 11 cents a dozen to a total of 63 cents per dozen. 
Certain overhead costs may increase this about to another 6-9 cents 
a dozen. The greatest weakness of the local gladiolus production 
is the low yield obtained per acre which tends to raise the cost of 
production per dozen. Small scale marketing is also much more costly 
than if it was conducted on a more extensive scale. 

Flower Grower Survey 
of Massachusetts 

E . Jarvesoo 

At the r equest of the Massachusetts Flower Association a survey by 
mail was made of the economic structure and characteristics of the 
industry. Tabulations of this survey were made and the statistical 
results were compiled and published as material for the information 
of flower growers in Massachusetts. 

The Market for Processed Fruits and 
Vegetables in Private Hospitals 

R. A. Fitzpatrick 

Hospitals are one of the large users of processed fruits and vege- 
tables in the institutional market. In order to obtain a better 
understanding of the problems of this particular demand sector, this 
study was undertaken working with suppliers and procurement personnel 
of the institution. 



'pi 



Hospitals have a high market potential for these products and one 
that is growing. Annual needs in Massachusetts are found to ap- 
proximate about $5.5 million. It was further found by the study that 
tomatoes, beans, peas, and beets ranked highest in utilization for 
the vegetables. Peaches, pears, and applesauce were the ranking 
processed fruit products. About one-half of the vegetables they used 
were frozen and the other half canned. With respect to fruit, about 
two-thirds were canned and one-fifth were frozen products. 

Analysis was made of procurement practices and inventory control as 
well as pricing procedures and quality control of the products used. 

Findings will give a basis for corrective action of problems in this 
area and lead to increased market efficiency, as well as the better- 
ment of management suad policy practices of hospitals in the procure- 
ment of their needs of processed fruits and vegetables. 

Labor and Capital Costs Relative to Competitive 
Prices of Milk in Regulated Markets 

S. Russell 

Regulation is an accepted part of milJc marketing as it affects both 
quality and the pricing of milk by marketing firms. When the price 
of the product to the consumer is regulated, it becomes difficult for 
the more efficient firms to increase volume of business by charging 
lower prices than their competitors. Studies are being made to ex- 
plore the possibilities of methodically directing and governing 
service prices, such as labor and capital, rather than retail prices. 

Farm Management and 
Production Economics 

Feed Handling on DadLry Farms 

E. I» Fuller 

Statistical methodology has been worked out for use in the 
Massachusetts dairy area. Studies that have been testing the method- 
ologies of forage handling suggest little potential economic gain to 
improving hay and grain handling. However, silage appears to hold 
more promise. For example, the "chuck-wagon" and other systems of 
feeding appear hard to testify if direct tractor scoop procedures 
are feasible. 

Dairy Supply Responses 

E. lo Fuller 

The final quasi-normative linear programming of this study is under- 
way.^ Results indicate a substantial potential increase in response 



^ 



at present or slightly higher prices. A companion totality pre- 
dictive study using Markov chains and simulation predicts 586 million 
pounds production from 50,000 cows in 1970, (A sample result 
somewhat out of context.) 

Bulk Handling of Apples 

E. I, Fvaier 

Results indicate that at equal bruising rates the break-even point 
for justifying a change-over to bulk boxes in the orchards of 
Massachusetts is less than 20,000 bushels. The bruising consider- 
ations are not totally clear. Very little additional bruising in 
handling is needed to nullify any advantages that could be realized 
from bulk boxes. 

Simulation of Farm Growth 

E. I. Fuller 

A gaming device developed by this research, when used as a simulator 
on a case farm with a mixed crop and dairy business, suggests poor 
potentials for economic growth even with good crop yields unless 
production per cow can go from the observed 10,000 pounds to 12,000 
annually . 

Simulation of Risk and Uncertainty 

E. I. Fuller 

A "universal" planning simulator has been written. It is now under 
rigid research test. Research testing has also been given a forage 
harvest sinrulator, used to test alternative systems and strategy. 
It suggests less penalty to rain damage than what farmers commonly 
do believe. If capacity to harvest is limited relative to acreage, 
it suggests practically ignoring the current weather forecasts 
either via radio, television, or daily newspaper. 

Resource Economics 

Urban Growth and Agricultural Change 
in Massachusetts and New England 

D, Lee 

Objectives of the studies in urban growth and agricultural change 
in Massachusetts and New England are: (1) to determine the quanti- 
tative changes in production of the principal agricultural 
commodities in each New England State from 18M^0-1960; (2) to determine 
any differences in the pattern of change in agricultural production 
between the^ predominantly urban and predominantly rural areas; 



c^n 



and (3) to determine the role of urban growth in the process of agri- 
cultural change in Massachusetts. The method being used is to 
compare these changes in agriculture in areas strongly influenced 
by urbanization with changes in agriculture in areas relatively 
free of urbanization but otherwise similar. The census figures are 
being used as the source of data for each principal agriciiltural 
commodity for each New England State and for all counties in Southern 
New England for the period of years 184-0-1960. This study will 
provide valuable contributions to considerations being given to the 
current rapid changes in land use and the development of suburban 
and expansion of miral communities. 

The Land Use Changes in the Connecticut Valley 
Region of Massachusetts 

J. W. Callahan 

Two towns and one city in Hampden County and three towns in 
Hajnpshire County are being studied in this project. Particular 
attention was given to changing agricultural land use, population 
growth, and non-agricultural land use changes, between the years 
19M-0 and 1965, The number of dairy animals and poultry numbers 
increased during the period, while certain crops, notably binder 
tobacco and apples, experienced acreage declines. 

Diversion of 3660 acres of cropland from agriculture to non-agricultural 
uses represented 9% of the total improved farm land available in 
194-0. 

Projection of population and dwelling house construction for the 
year 2000 A. D. indicates a possible need for over 29,000 additioneil 
houses, possibly requiring an additional 13,000 acres of land. 

Approximately 28,000 acres of open cropland are available in the 
six communities at the present time. Part of the space for non- 
agricultural needs of the future is certain to come from the present 
cropland in this area under study. 



^■1 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

J. T. Clayton, Head 

The significance of the research in the Department of Agricultural 
Engineering continues to increase. Seven of a total of 11 faculty 
members are actively engaged in formal research. Four staff members 
have primary responsibilities in reseeu'ch and the guidance of 17 
graduate students (15 M.S., 2 Ph.D.). Areas of research emphasis in- 
clude Agricultural Engineering, Biological Environment Engineering, 
and Biological Process Engineering. 

Agricultural Engineering 

Engineering Properties of Reinforced Concrete Face - 
Expanded Plastic Core Structural Panels 

J. T. Clayton 

The effect of orientation during fabrication on the inherent bond 
developed between expanded polystyrene and Portland cement concrete 
was further investigated. Previous test specimens had been fabri- 
cated by the following procedure: (1) a "lower" concrete face was 
placed in a form and vibrated; (2) a core was placed on top of this 
facing; and (3) an "upper" concrete face was placed on top of the 
core and consolidated by vibration. Experimental results reported 
in 19 64 showed that for panels fabricated in this manner failure 
always occurred at the interface between the lower face and the core 
(i.e., at the lower bond), and that the over-all strength of the 
sandwich was controlled by the shear strength of the lower bond. 
Based on this information another factorial experiment which included 
orientation as a variabld was carried out. In addition to the fabri- 
cation technique already described, test specimens were fabricated 
by the following method: (1) a layer of concrete placed over a 
horizontal core was consolidated by vibration; (2) after a curing 
period of 95 hours, to avoid revibration effects, the half -completed 
sandwich was inverted; and (3) the second facing was applied in the 
same manner as the first. This procedure gave a sandwich with two 
upper faces » 

A statistical analysis of the experimental data indicated that the 

shear strength of the specimens fabricated using the second technique 

was significantly greater (at the 99.9% confidence level) than 

specimens fabricated by the first technique. Over-all average strength 

was increased by approximately 4-4-% by using the second fabrication 

technique. Rapid yielding of the core material at loads near the 

ultimate confirmed that, for specimens fabricated by the revised :i|d 

technique, failure was due to shearing within the core and was not W. 

due to failure of the interfacial bond. 



6? 



Mass Physical Properties of Haylage 

R. W. Kleis 

Tensile strength studies completed a series of 64-8 separate tests 
covering a range of moisture contents and densities for both grasses 
and alfalfa. Moisture content had no significant bearing upon 
strength except as it affected dry matter density. Dry matter densi- 
ty had a direct and linear relationship to tensile strength. Over a 
density range of 6 to 17 pounds per cubic foot, the tensile strength 
ranged from one to three psi for grasses, and from two to five psi 
for alfalfa. Similar investigations of lateral shear strength also 
demonstrated independence of moisture content and highly significant 
linear correlation to dry matter density. Over the same density 
range, the lateral shear strengths ranged from 75 to 120 psi for 
alfalfa and 60 to 120 psi for grasses. Unstructured preliminary 
studies of compressive behavior of haylage indicated that a vacuum 
of ahout 13 psi applied to a storage unit could cause densities of 
up to M-5 Ibs./ft.^j or about three times normal storage density. 

The completion of haylage strength studies provides for more precise 
and objective design of equipment and procedures. The potential 
benefits of increased storage density in terms of efficiency and 
economy are apparent. 

Improvement of Efficiency in Harvesting Apples 

L. F. Whitney 

The objectives of the newly initiated project are: (a) to develop 
harvesting aids for positioning the worker in relation to the tree 
and for transferring the fruit from the hand picker to the transport 
container; (b) to develop mechanical harvesting equipment; and 
(c) to adapt and develop trees for more efficient harvesting. Present 
methods and equipment will be evaluated as to their application to 
the specialized problems associated with the tender fresh-market 
varieties grown in New England by inspection on-the-site at various 
locations in the country, and by procuring and field testing such 
equipment and machines as appear most promising. Improved means of 
positioning the worker and conveying fruit to collection boxes in the 
field will be developed. Emphasis will be placed on improving the 
efficiency of workers in standard-sized trees. 

Subsurface Irrigation of Turf Areas - Nozzle Design and Spacing 

L. F« Whitney 

Investigation of water movement in soil by sub-surface irrigation 
has continued in two areas. The effect of the interface of a con- 
structed soil profile comprised of a fine textured top soil and a 
coarse sub-soil has been found to be a definite deterent to the 



"^0 



downward movement of water*. The placement of the pressurized orifice, \ 

the combination of soil particle sizes and the lateral movement of 

water has been investigated. With an orifice placement 6.5 inches 

above the interface of a 10-inch layer of silt-loam over a M^-inch 

layer of coarse sand sub-soil, the greatest lateral distance of two 

feet was found. A substantial decrease in distance travelled as the 

particle size in the top layer increased was observed. 

Nozzle design and spacing studies have been initiated with preliminary 
results indicating that porous media do not appear to possess long- 
range, trouble-free characteristics. A labyrinth nozzle appears to 
be most promising in providing a clog-free, root-resistant design. 
Portable experimental apparatus is being constructed for tests under 
controlled conditions in the laboratory or the field which will perroit 
detailed study of the effects of nozzle spacing. 

These results will contribute to the over-all design of an irrigation 
system which should provide increased water usage efficiency for turf 
areas. Also, a continuous irrigation procedure, free from surface 
equipment, would permit continuous usage of the area while irrigation 
is in progress. 

Biological Environment Engineering 

Environmental Requirements of Chickens 

Jo T. Clayton 

An automatic differential temperature control system has been developed 
for use with the simulated chicken previously developed. The control 
system is based on previously determined relationships between internal 
temperature and environmental temperature (within the range M-5-95°F.). 
Due to physiological stimuli (presumably) the plot of internal temper- 
ature versus environmental temperature has several inflection points. 
It is possible, however, to eliminate all but one inflection point by 
using temperature difference as the control reference sequence. 
Control is accomplished by putting the signal from an environmental 
temperature sensor into an electronic balancing unit which drives a 
properly formed cam. The cam, through a follower, positions a linear 
potentiometer in an electric circuit which controls the heat input 
to the simulated chicken. 

A facility for studying convection effects on the surface temperature 

distributions of both live and simulated chickens and the thermal 

exchange rates of simulated chickens has been designed and built. A 

recirculating type of wind tunnel provides an essentially uniform 

velocity across a three-foot square test section. Test velocities 

can be varied from zero to approximately 20 miles per hour in nine 

discrete steps. Environmental temperature can be controlled at any ^ 

level greater than 40°F, 



^7/ 



Chemical and Non-Chemical Measures for the Protection 
of Perishable Food Commodities in Marketing Channels 

E. A. Johnson 

Studies were made of the physical response of Periplaneta Americana, 
obtained from the Wisconsin Alumni, to electro-magnetic radiation 
from a number of commercial lamps. Preliminary tests of ten differ- 
ent 15-watt florescent and and incandescent lamps were run. Four of 
these lamps were selected for more comprehensive studies. The ones 
selected were Germicidal, Coll Green, and Pink (General Electric 
names) florescent, and inside frosted incandescent. The Germicidal 
lamp was found the most effective in repelling the insects. None of 
the lamps was attractive to them. The tests indicate a definite 
difference in response to different radiations, and it seems possible 
that a relatively simple radiation source may be found which can be 
used to repel Periplaneta Americana from food storage areas. 

Closed Systems for Animal Sewage Treatment 

J. T. Clayton 

Two biological treatment systems (aerobic - anaerobic digestion) have 
been developed. The purpose of each was to reduce the pollution 
potential of the system effluent to a level which would permit its 
reuse as a flushing agent or discharge into a watercourse. Pilot 
test systems were sized for processing the waste (manure, urine, 
bedding) of a 1,000 pound cow unit over a six-month operating period. 
Preliminary bench tests (1/100 pilot system capacity) were conducted 
to help determine dosage rates and operating procedures. Standard 
analysis methods were used to evaluate the performance of the two 
systems. Determinations included: total solids, volatile solids, 
BOD, volatile acid, pH, and settleability. 

After the bench tests, pilot systems were operated for five months. 
At the end of this period one of the systems was operating satis- 
factorily. The other had practically ceased to function as tilie 
dissolved oxygen content of the primary aeration tank had dropped to 
less than one ppm, the suspended solids content was very high (1.7%), 
and the settleable solids at 30 minutes were 90% of the total volume. 

Trickling Filters - Daiiry Manure 
Stabilization Components 

J. T. Clayton 

The performances of three idential trickling filters have been studied 
under laboratory conditions to determine the effects of temperature 
and loading rate on the BOD removal from liquefied dairy manure. The 
trickling filters, with post sedimentation tanks, were studied for 
eight -week periods at 65°F, and 55°Fj. The three trickling filters 



7CU 



respectively received nearly constant daily loadings of 26, IM^, and 
7.5 pounds of five-day BOD per 1,000 cubic feet of trickling filter 
medium. 

The following results, for decreasing rates of loading, were obtained 
at an operating temperature of 65°F: BOD removals of 64, 80, and 92%; 
solids removals of 53, 66 and 75%. The dissolved oxygen content of 
the respective trickling filter effluents was 1.0, M-.5, and 6.0 ppm. 

Without draining the post-sedimentation tanks the operating temper- 
ature was changed to 55°F. During this phase of the test the fo]J.ow- 
results, for decreasing rates of loading, were obtained: BOD removals 
of 54-, 79, and 89%; solids removals of 35, t^8, and 60%. The dissolved 
oxygen content of the respective trickling filter effluents was 0.6, 
6.0, and 8.2 ppm. 

These data clearly show that the rate of loading and temperature 
interact with respect to BOD removal and dissolved oxygen content of 
the effluent. It has not been determined whether the decrease in 
solids removal was due to the temperature decrease or the length of 
the experiment. Perhaps an evaluation of the sludge in the post- 
sedimentation tanks will help to answer this question. 

Biological Process Engineering 

Heat and Mass Transfer Studies in Food Engineering 

J. W. Zahradnik 

Two general areas of activity have been pursued. Applied research 
dealing with mass transfer and related control problems in controlled 
atmosphere apple storage has yielded two significant developments e 
Design parameters for lime absorbers have not been developed, and dry 
lime scrubber performance in the field has been undependable . Now, 
with the engineering parameters established, the method can be used 
with greater confidence and the savings in cost over caustic soda of 
two-thirds achieved. In Massachusetts with approximately 800,000 
boxes capacity CA, the annual savings potential is to cut a caustic 
soda bill of $24-, 000 down to $8,000 annually. 

The other area of research activity under this project has to do with 
the fundamental aspects of the thermal inactiviation of bacterial 
cells and spores . In these studies , certain engineering approaches 
through the use of models and the principles of similitude have made 
possible heretofore very difficult evaluations. A chemical model 
has been successfully used to establish the absence of any extrinsic 
effect of apparatus on the nonlinearity of thermal survival dats for 
Salmonella. Through the use of a continuous flow system the inacti- 
vation kinetics of Salmonella have been compared with a batch-type 
system. It has been shown that rate data obtained from a static 
batch-type system cannot, without qualification, be applied to a 
dynamic continuous flow system. By means of a tracer fluid the 



"^3 



residence time distribution for a complex thermal process has been 
established. These findings contribute to a better understanding 
of the death of bacteria and to increased safety in the estimation 
of thermal processes for foods. 

High Temperature - Short Time Fluidized 
Drying Process for Forage 

L. F. Whitney 

The drying rates of alfalfa leaves at temperatures ranging from 
300-m-00°F. have been established for various degrees of stomata 
opening. Theory was substantiated: drying rates for leaves with 
stomata open to any degree were the same and significantly higher 
than for closed stomata. The drying constant was found to be related 
to the drying temperature by a classical Arrhenius expression. 
Results for orchard grass were found to be substantially the same 
with similar significant results, but with relatively slower drying 
rates as determined from the steeper slope of the Arrhenius relation- 
ship. 

These results will provide basic parameters of drying rates and damage 
points for forage in the design of high temperature - short time 
drying processes. The effect of stomata opening on the drying rates 
is considered to be of relatively small magnitude and does not appear 
to substantially improve drying efficiencies. 

Food Products Packaging and Handling Systems 

G. A. Fitzgerald 
S. W. Fletcher 

Several new methods of handling cans were tested by standard pro- 
cedures and found to be satisfactory, and have been proved to be 
practical from the standpoint of physical resistance to damage and 
economic improvement in the over-all handling procedure. These re- 
sults will be published and the work continued in soft good containers. 
Research will be initiated in the area of using a scientific 
approach to the development of package evaluation methods rather than 
the experdLmental simulation methods that were used to develop the 
existing methods. 



In addition to these formal projects with leadership in this 
department, faculty members have cooperated in the following area 
with other departments. 

(a) Snow Management Equipment (L. F. Whitney with W. P. MacConell of ^ 

the Forestry and Wildlife Management Department) 



^^ 



(b) Tree Hole Borer Development (L. F. l\/hitney with H. G. Abbott of 
the Forestry and Wildlife Management Department) 

(c) Direct Seeder for Conifers (L, F. Whitney with H. G. Abbott of 
the Forestry and Wildlife Management Department) 

(d) Laboratory Pellet Mill Feed Conditioner (L. F. Whitney with 
G.H. Snoeyenbos of the Veterinary and Animal Sciences Depatment) 

(e) Ornamental Plant Storage Environments (J. T. Clayton with 
J, R. Havis of the Plant and Soil Sciences Department) 



CRANBERRY STATION 

C. E. Cross, Head 

Cranberry Breeding 

I. E. Demoranville 

Hybrid crosses made in 1958 and planted on the State Bog in 1960 
will be subjected to preliminary selection this fall. A half -acre 
section of the State Bog was rebuilt this spring and planted to the 
Franklin variety, named in 1951. Grower interest in establishing 
new plantings is at the highest peeik since 194-7, and many new nursery 
plantings of new named and unnamed hybrids were set out this spring. 

Data from the Ocean Spray variety project indicates the variety 
Franklin is superior to others in color development and for most 
processed products. 

Weed Control in Cranberries 

I. E, Demoranville 

Casoron continues to exhibit excellent weed control capabilities; 
about 40% (or 4-, 500 acres) of the state's cranberry bogs was treated 
this year. Casoron is applied by ground machines and helicopters, 
in spring or in the fall, on "early-water" or "pre-late-water" bogs. 

Diquat and Paraquat for aquatic and ditch weed control, 2,4— D for 
selective control of three-square grass and some woody weeds by 
concentrate wiping treatments, and the potassium salt of maleic 
hydrazide for the selective control of about 12-weed species and 
registrations with appropriate residue tolerances are being peti- 
tioned from the United States Department of Agriculture and the Food 
and Drug Administration. 



7^ 



Rearing Cranberry Frultworm in the Labocatory 

W. E. Tomlinson 

Attempts to brealv diapause of cranberry fruitworm larvae without a 
period of cold exposure in the laboratoiry using various exposures to 
light and darkness were unsuccessful. The optimum cold storage 
temperature and length of storage was not determined, but at M-QOp. 
the optimum storage was close to 100 days. A cold exposure longer 
than 100 days did not increase the percentage of moth emergence, but 
did shorten the time to emergence after removal from the cold. Very 
few moths emerged from larvae held in cold storage for one year. 

Cranberry Fruitworm Mating Studies 

W. E. Tomlinson 

Black-light records show that the female cranberry fruitworm is 
normally multiple mating. Close to two-thirds of the field popu- 
lation mates more than once. Though this would not rule out sterile 
male control techniques, it would ma]<e control by this method more 
difficult and slower to accomplish than with a single mating species. 
Successful use of sterilization techniques with any insect species 
is dependent on a means of rearing large populations in the labora- 
tory. Attempts to rear cranberry fruitworm in the laboratory has 
been hampered by low mating success of captive moths. However, 
tests in late winter with limited numbers of moths indicated that 
mating in confinement increased when moths were exposed to black- 
light peaking at 3654- angstroms. 

Insecticide Testing on Cranberries 

W. E. Tomlinson 

SD 9129 (dimethyl phosphate of 3-hydroxy-N-methyl-ciscrotonamide) 
and GS 13005 (0,0-dijnethyl-S-/^-methoxy-l,3,tt-thiodiozol-2 (3H)-on- 
3-yl-methyl7 - dithiophosphate) were as effective as parathion at 
comparable dosages against cranberry tipworm and cranberry fruitworm. 
Their excellent performance and favorable mammalian toxicity level 
make them attractive when compared to parathion. Further testing 
and residue breakdown studies will be conducted. 

Analytical Chemistry 

B. M. Zuckerman 

Parathion Translocation and Distribution . Parathion was detected 
in bean leaflets two hours following application to soil of plants 
grown in sterile root culture. Analysis for degradation products 
indicated the parent molecule intact for more than 24- hours. 
Parathion was shown to be transported selectively by certain leaf 



/ 76 



veins resulting in uneven distribution within the plant. Low levels 
of parathion or associated metabolites were detected in leaf-feeding 
insects 24- hours following soil application. 

Diazinon v^as rapidly translocated through plants and appeared in root 
exudates within two days following foliar applications to plants 
gro^\m in sterile root systems . In the absence of microbial contami- 
nants the parent molecule did not break down during a seven day test 
period, whereas selected bacteria utilized at least the ethyl acetate 
portion of the molecule within 2M- hours. 

Nematology 

B. M. Zuckerman 

Enzyme Studies . The presence of the enzyme phenylalanine deaminase 
was demonstrated in plant parasitic nematodes for the first time. A 
rapid method for the detection and identification of this enzyme was 
found and described. 

Several other enzyme systems in nematodes have been detected and a 
method developed which may possibly assist in localizing site of 
enzyme activity within the body of a small nematode. The method 
involves intricate handling techniques during the process of section- 
ing with a freezing microtome. 

Culturing . Panagrellus redivivus has been grown through one genera- 
tion on a chemically defined medium. Since this finding, if it can 
be consistently repeated, represents a break-through in the field of 
parasitology, this study is being pursued intensively. 

Tetylenchus jocturs , a plant parasitic nematode which previously has 
not been cultured axenically, has been raised through several 
generations on balsam root culture. 

Nematophagous Fungi and Nematode Predators . Nine species of predators 
and five of nematophagous fungi were described as occurring in 
cranberry soils. 

Food Technology 

B. M. Zuckerman 

The comparative characteristics of fifteen cranberry varieties were 
studied. Characters investigated included: relative pigmentation 
and pectin content of fresh fruit, juice, and processed sauce; juice 
yield of each variety; and taste of products manufactured from each 
variety. • 



77 



Persistence, Accumulation and Fate of Pesticides 

C. W. Miller 

The persistence of dieldrin following application to cranberry bog 
soils has been established. Translocation of the chemical in the 
soil in a vertical or horizontal direction does not appear to occur 
as a result of water management practices involved in cranberry 
cultivation. 

Retention of dieldrin and the herbicide dichlobenile in the bog is 
related to the organic content of the soil. Soil analyses for 
dichlobenile show relatively high retention, while bio-assay tests 
fail to indicate the presence of the herbicide. It is thought the 
chemical is bound to the organic matter, and that it is held ineffec- 
tive. Lateral movement of the herbicide off the bog into surrounding 
waters does not occur. 

Water Resources 

C. W. Miller 

Diazinon and parathion have been shown in the laboratory to be 
transported off a small model bog in draining flood waters 24- hours 
after application. The quantity removed ranged from M-.6 to 5.5% of 
the total applied. Fish and mussels exposed to these contaminated 
waters accumulated the chemicals to levels 10-100 times the concen- 
tration in the water. No degradation products of diazinon were 
foiind, but three metabolites of parathion were isolated, one of which 
has been identified. 

Mechanization of Cultural and Harvest Operations 

J. S. Norton 

Bulk Storage of Cranberries . Perforated tubes were inserted in 
eight -barrel boxes and tested with and without forced air circulation. 
After three months of storage, the quality of cranberries receiving 
forced ventilation was equal to that of berries in conventional 
one-third barrel wooden boxes. Fruit in bulk boxes without forced 
air was unusable with 65% of berries decayed after three months. 

Bulk Handling Equipment . A truck-mounted loader (1500 lb. capacity) was 
designed and built to hoist palletized field boxes onto and off the 
truck. It will be commercially tested next fall and cost comparisons 
made against manual loading of M-O-lb. field boxes. 

Bulk Harvesting Equipment . A trailer carrying a three-barrel capacity 
box was constructed and attached to a picking machine. Feasibility 
of picking with this unit was demonstrated and a 50% increase in 
harvest rate achieved. 



'/? 



Water Harvesting of Cranberries . A loader and cleaner has been 
designed and is under construction for the removal of floating berries 
from a flooded bog into bulk containers on the bog shore. This is 
one phase of an operation designed to eliminate the 25% loss of 
berries in conventioneil dry harvest operations. 

Water Resources Research . Plans and. designs have been dravm and co- 
operators enlisted for the installation of low-cost contour dikes to 
conserve water needed to flood cranberry vines on out-of -level bogs. 
First installations are on schedule for the fall of 1965. 

Harvest Machinery . A new harvesting machine for cranberries is well 
along in design. It is planned to function in both flood and dry 
conditions, and it is hoped will be flexible enough to follow closely 
the soil surface contours and pick cleaner than existing machines. A 
one-quarter scale model is under construction. 



DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

J. A. Naegele, Head 

Research in the department continues to accelerate with emphasis upon 
the fundamental and applied aspects of environmental contamination 
of the soil, water, and air. Increased participation in the graduate 
programs of other departments and the increased receipt of research 
grants continues. 

Studies on Regulated and Non-Regulated Growth 

Air Pollution Effects on Floriculture Crops 

N. W. Butterfield 

To indicate the presence of pollutants, particularly O3, we have 
initiated in cooperation with the Public Health Service and the 
United States Department of Agriculture a program of O3 monitoring 
throughout the Boston area using sensitive tobacco strains. We desire 
to determine when and for how long O3 fumigations occur in the area. 

As early as May two specific varieties of tobacco received slight 
fiomigations of ozone and certain varieties of petunias were fumigated, 
apparently with one of the aldehydes. Thus, we now have a program 
of pollution early warning (PEW) established with the growers and 
county agents to report to us any floret drop or other damage that 
can be correlated with pollutants. It is expected that with new 
techniques now employed we will be able to understand the problems 
arising from polluted environments. 



If 



Bio-Assay for the Detection of Photochemical Smog Potential 

G. Hemerick 

There is no instrument available that will detect photochemical smog 
potential. The objective of this study is to determine the feasi- 
bility of using cultures of algae to detect photochemical smog. Two 
types of bio-assay instruments have been designed; one is based on 
the continuous replacement of medium for rapidly-dividing algae; the 
other is based on positive photoaxis of algal flagellates. Algal 
cultures in the instruments are aerated. Phytoxic air pollution is 
indicated by decline in algal growth rate or decrease in number of 
flagellates swarming in an illuminated zone. Both effects can be 
measured photometrically as increase in light transmitted through the 
culture . 

For this study approximately 73 species of algae, including flagellates 
and types which grow very rapidly, have been cultured. An inexpensive 
photosynthetic , continuous culture apparatus has been fabricated. 
Preliminary observations on phototaxis have been made. 

The Influence of Broad Spectrum Supplemental Light on 
Growth and Flowering Characteristics of Selected Plants 

G. Hemerick 
R. E. Young 
N. W. Butterfield 

The rate of growth and flowering of greenhouse plants varies through- 
out the year, principally because of the variation in day length. It 
is desirable to determine a maximum rate of greenhouse plant pro- 
duction and to maintain this rate of production economically. 

A series of greenhouse crops are, therefore, being grown with and 
without supplemental illumination at night. Two types of fluorescent 
lamps are being compared - cool-white, and a lamp having an emission 
spectrum similar to the action spectrum for photosynthesis in 
flowering plants. 

In the first series of experiments, petunis, snapdragons, and 
carnations received supplemental illumination of approximately 
30 lamp-watts or 6 watts of absolute visible radiation per square 
foot from midnight to morning. Plant weight and number of flowers 
were recorded. This work indicates specific timing and production 
benefits from the supplemental lighting. 

Investigations of Fatty Acids from Neutral Lipid 
and Phosphatide Fractions of Atypical Mycobacteria 

Unsaturated Acids . Permanganate-periodate oxidation of the unsatu- 
rated fatty acid§ from the triglyceride fractions of seven atypical 



^0 



mycobacterial strains has shown the 18 carbon monoenoic acid to con- 
sist principally of oleic (ci£ 9, lO-octadecenoic acid with 10-20% 
other isomers (7,8-8, 9-10, ll-octadecenoic acids). The 16 carbon 
monoenoic acid consists principally of cis 10, 11-hexadecenoic acid 
with up to 40?^ other isomers, depending on the strain. The other 
isomers are 7, 8-8, 9, and 9-10 hexadecenoic acids. The presence of 
trans isomers has been observed by infrared spectrometry. Their 
presence may be artif actual. 

Saturated Acids . The fatty acid spectrum of all strains studied are 
similar to those reported for the human and bovine strains. From 
chain lengths of 12 to 20 carbons odd and even acids are present, the 
even predominating. In addition, there are also branched-chain 
isomers of most of the even-carbon acids. The predominant branched- 
chain acids are a branched 19 carbon acid, shown by chromic acid 
degradation and GLC of the resulting ketones to be 10-methyl-stearic 
acid. Mass spectrometry of several branched-chain acids of a Runyon 
group I organism showed that these acids were mixtures, the methyl 
branching occurring at several places along the carbon chain. 
Preliminary GLC data of acids from a Runyon group III organism also 
show that the branched acids are mixtures of isomers . 

Action Spectra and Mass Cultures of Variously- 
Pigmented Algae and Photosynthetic Bacteria 

G. Hemerick 

Kilogram quantities of fresh, pure algae (Tolypothrix tenuis) were 
produced under controlled conditions to promote biosynthesis of 
predominantly phycoerythrin. Mass culture facilities were expanded 
to 200-liter capacity, six separately-lighted compartments, and a 
greenhouse culture facility. Growth rate of T. tenuis under various 
conditions of medium, water, light and amount of initial inoculum 
was determined by weighing the algae which were grown in polyethylene 
bags. Viability of refrigerated algae was tested. Absorption spectra 
and fluorescence of algal pigment solutions were compared with respect 
to mass culture conditions. 

Cultures of the photosynthetic bacteria, Rhodopseudomonas spheroides , 
Rhodospirillum rubrum , and Chromatium were requested, and delivery 
is anticipated. 

Investigations Undertaken or Planned . Our immediate objective is 
large-scale production of aerobic and anaerobic cultures of 
R. spheroides while maintaining active growth of R. rub rum and 
Chromatium , and limited production (100 liters) of T. tenuis . VJe 
hope to establish a chemostat with continuous dilution and continuous 
refrigerated harvest of the photosynthetic bacteria. 

One objective during the reporting period was to promote the production 
of phycoerythrin by T. tenuis^ Comparative absorption spectra of 



V 



crude water extracts of algal pigments were obtained by measuring 
their optical density in fifteen regions of the visible spectrum 
with a Klett-Summerson colorimeter. Pigment from T. tenuis grown 
in green fluorescent light had nearly the same absorption spectrum 
as an extract from Porphyridium cruentum , in the region from M-70 to 
690 millimicrons, with maxima near 550. All extracts from T. tenuis 
had small absorption maxima near 420 millimicrons, which were 
absent in P^. cruentum. 

Extracts from T. tenuis grown in red light had a maximum near 500 
miULimicrons , while pigments produced in blue light were intermediate 
in absorption distribution, suggesting a blend of blue and red 
pigments. The pigment extracts also differed in color of fluorescence 
in ultra-violet radiation; T. tenuis from green light fluoresced 
pink, from red light, a purplish wine color, and from blue light, 
the fluorescence was yellowish orange, similar to that from jP. cruentum . 
These data are preliminary; additional algae samples will be 
similarly analyzed as time permits. 

Isolation of Algae and Fungi for Protein Production 

G. Hemerick 

Over 100 species of algae, including species eaten by man, were 
collected or isolated, purified and cultured. Methods of mass culture 
were developed for production of kilogram quantities of pure algae. 
Economical methods of harvest were found for different types of algae, 
and successive crops of algae were grown in the effluent nutrient 
solution. Fungi which utilize algae as the sole nutrient source were 
isolated. A flock of Japanese quail was successfully propagated for 
feeding trials. 

Value of Results ; Portable apparatus for promoting growth and for 
harvesting algae, developed for this project, may have application in 
purification of water supplies as well as production of algae as 
livestock feed. New methods for isolation and identification of 
algae, as well as methods of mass culture, harvest and storage of 
algae are useful to other scientists who require certain amounts of 
specific algal products of known origin and purity. 

Magnesium and Carbon Dioxide 
Studies on Greenhouse Tomatoes 

R. E. Young 

The results of the spring crop of greenhouse tomatoes show that even 
the application of large amounts of potash to soils, already extra 
high in potash, did not produce the severe type of magnesium de- 
ficiency. The application of fertilizer was so high that it reduced 
the crop to only 65% of last year. It must be concluded, from the 
results to date, that a high level of potash alone is not the cause 



'^x 



of the severe form of magnesium deficiency. All plots showed the 
mild form of the deficiency and applications of three tons of 
magnesium sulphate per acre failed to prevent the formation of this 
deficiency. Spraying the plants with magnesium sulphate corrected 
the mild deficiency but did not result in increased yield. This 
brings up the question of whether the mild form of the deficiency 
results in sufficient loss of chlorophyl to effect growth. 

The addition of 1200 ppm of carbon dioxide to the greenhouse atmos- 
phere did not result in an increase in total crop. It did increase 
early yield. Growing the crop at higher temperatures did not change 
the results. These results are in agreement with the past results, 
except for one year when the addition of CO2 resulted in an increase 
of total yield. 

Studies in Pollution Ecology 

Epidemeology of Avian Necrosis 

G. P. Faddoul 
G. W. Fellows 

Epizootiological studies were expanded to ascertain the significance 
of wild birds as a reservoir of Pasteurella multocida to the domestic 
poultry population. Epizootics in wild birds have not received 
adequate attention in the past, and may account for the lack of 
knowledge as to the natural distribution of common pathogens o This 
report describes 11 natural cases of Pasteurella infection identi- 
fied in wild avian species in Massachusetts during a two-year survey 
(March 9, 195i|— April 21, 1966). 

A total of 412 specimens were submitted in 212 wild bird consignments 
to the diagnostic laboratory for necropsy and a bacteriological 
examination. Fifty different avian species v\/ere represented in the 
study. Pasteurella multocida was isolated from four out of 35 cases 
of robins, three out of 13 cases of starlings, one out of 22 cases 
of grackles, one out of four cases of grosbeaks, one out of three 
cases of pheasants, and one out of one case of oriole. 

A septicemic Pasteurella infection was identified in 11 out of 212 
wild bird consignments submitted during a two-year survey. These 
findings indicate a need for a system to monitor the incidence of 
Pasteurella multocida and perhaps other pathogens in the free-flying 
wild bird population. 

Sub-Lethal Effects of Pesticides on Embryonic 
Development in VJhite Leghorn Chickens 

G. W. Fellows 
W. D. McEnroe 

The significance of pesticides on populations of wild birds is not 



^3 



kno\wi, although reproductive failures have been reported, and at- 
tributed to DDT, Forced feeding studies of DDT in chicks has 
demonstrated transovarial effects. 

Current work is concerned with the relationship between the effect 
of transovarian deposition of DDT and the yolk injection of DDT. 
Similar ranges of DDT are being injected into the yolk to compare 
the results with DDT deposited in eggs by females on 100 ppm DDT 
diets . 

To date the preliminary work on solvent selection has been completed. 
The solvent of choice is corn oil which shows no significant effect 
on embryo development at 0.1 ml yolk sac injection per egg. 

Transformations of Insecticides by Plants 

H. B. Gunner 
B. M. Zuckerman 

A bacterium arising as the predominant soil microfloral form in re- 
sponse to the application of the organophosphate insecticide, 
Diazinon, was isolated and the nutritional and biochemical pathway 
of its attack on the Diazinon molecule studied. The presence of 
C--^^-Diazinon in microbial cells incubated with labelled pesticide 
established unequivocally that these cells were in fact permeable 
to this compound and functional in its degradation. Nutritional 
studies showed that the microbial cells utilized Diazinon as a re- 
spective source of sulfur, phosphorus, carbon and nitrogen in that 
order of preference. The biodegradability of Diazinon proved to be 
conditioned by its solubilization in a suitable carrier such as 
ethyl alcohol and, equally, by the presence of an additional carbon 
source. 

Studies in the metabolism of Diazinon suggest that two principal 
products result after initial microbial attack: 2-isopropyl-M- 
methyl-6-hydj?oxypyrimidine and ethyl acid phosphate following cleavage 
at the -0-P bond. Suitable gas chromatographic and thin layer 
chromatographic methods have been developed for the identification 
of these products as well as their extraction and clean-up from 
culture media. 

A Study of Anaerobic Pathogens in 
Low Temperature Environments 

J. H. Green 
W. Litsky 

The emphasis of current research is to explore the physiology of 
Clostridium botulinum type E, and related botulinum organisms, in 
order to understand these dangerous pathogens which are a potential 
hazard in_the food industry. The first phase of this project. 



^v 



carbohydrate metabolism, is nearing completion. (1) Optima con- 
ditions for carbohydjcate metabolism are being explored. An unusucil 
condition (requirement) has been observed. C. botulinum type E 
vegetative cells require the presence of casein hydrolysates in order 
to carry on carbohydrate metabolism. Preliminary experimentation 
indicates that the peptides of casein hydrolysate, probably in 
combination with free amino acids, are responsible for this phenomenon. 
(2) Radiorespirometry studies involving specifically C-^^ labelled 
carbohydrates are in process. Initial results indicate that the 
Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway is the main route of carbo- 
hydrate catabolism. Either the hexose monophosphate (IIMP) or the 
Enter-Doudoroff (ED) pathways are probably not operative, although 
a reinvestigation, with refined techniques, is being performed to 
verify this. (3) Cultural studies have been simultaneously performed 
to test the rate of growth and carbohydrate consumption in various 
concentrations of peptides. 

It is hoped that by exploring the physiology of these botulinum 
organisms a better understanding of their capacity to develop and to 
grow might be gained, and better methods of their control might be 
achieved. 

Biological and Chemical Studies 
of Mite Resistance to Chemicals 

J. A. Naegele 
W. D. McEnroe 

Three areas of concentration have shown progress: (a) circadian 
organization; (b) light response selection; (c) population fitness 
and selection. 

Circadian Organization . The presence of biological rhythms has been 
demonstrated by measurement of oviposition patterns, recovery rate 
from narcosis, and mortality to indifferent narcotics. Both daily 
rhythms which use light as an entrainraent factor and lunar rhythms, 
using some geophysical event associated with the lunar day, have been 
demonstrated . 

Light Response . Selection for behavioral response, using 325 u and 
525 u in selection agents, have demonstrated the presence of two 
distinct behavioral responses, two receptor systems, and the ability 
to select for increased response and decreased response to U.V. (325 u) 

Population Fitness . Selection studies with inbred and resistant 
strains have demonstrated that well-known concepts of population 
dynamics such as genetic homeostasis, introgression with the destruc- 
tion of the model phenotype, loss of fitness, sex ratio disturbances, 
occur during the selection process. These facts emphasize that 
resistance factors cannot exist independent of the genetic matrix. 



r-:^ 



studies on the Iron Bacteria; Nutrition . 
Isolation and Methods of Elimination 

W. S. Mueller 

This project received final approval in January 1955. A study has 
been made to determine the bactericidal effectiveness of various 
chemicals on Sphaerotilus natans in paper mill process water. The 
chemicals tested are given in the following order of decreasing ef- 
fectiveness. Chlorine, 2-Bromo-M— hydroxy-acetophenone. Chlorine 
dioxide, Bis-l-M— Bromoacetoxy-2-butene, l-Bromoacetoxy-2-proponol + 
Bromoacetic acid and Silver fluoride (irradiated) . Lowering the 
temperature from SOOp. to 50°F. decreased the effectiveness of 
chlorine against S^.. natans. S£_. natans was completely destroyed 
after two hours contact with mill process water which had been ad- 
justed to a pH of 10.9 by the addition of lime water. A pure culture 
of S£. natans would not grow in C.G.Y. broth nor in paper mill 
process water in the absence of oxygen. Tests also showed that 
Sp . natans can be filtered out of mill process water by the use of 
filter aid filters. Results obtained indicate that a combination 
of chemical treatment and filtering may have some advantages. 

Any information obtained from this study should aid the many indus- 
tries that are dependent upon a good water supply. Also, the American 
people are entitled to a good water supply for domestic use which 
is becoming one of the major problems due to the expansion of our 
population. Furthermore, information from this study should aid in 
the general understanding of the biological process of these organisms. 

The Cytogenetics, Morpholog!:v and 
Evolution of Corn and Its Relatives 

W. C. Galinat 

A unique method of cytogenetic analysis is being used to determine 
the gene content of Tripsacum chromosomes in terms of the already 
well-known gene content of corn chromosomes. The chromosomes of 
Tripsacum are transferred to various genetic stocks of com and then 
identified by the recessive genes which they are able to cover up. 
The results have indicated that Tripsacum is an amphidiploid genus 
with a genome of the now extinct wild corn as one of its parents. 
Thus, Tripsacum is important as part of a larger gene pool to better 
meet all com breeding requirements of the future. A comparison of 
the gene content has revealed two cases where genes on one arm of a 
corn chromosome correspond to a different Tripsacum chromosome than 
those on the other arm. These results reveal genetic pathways to 
improve com. 

The practical use of the vestigial glume gene (Vg) in sweet corn 
breeding has become possible by the discovery of two major modifying 
genes, as well as other lesser ones, which permit the production of 
the essential pollen in this genetic type. Thus, the ear of corn 
may now reach a higher level of utility by acquiring a glumeless cob. 



Ot^ 



Vegetable Breeding for Improvement 
of Quality and Adaptability 

R. E. Young 

In a breeding project to develop a small dark green record, second 
early cabbage, suitable for culture on beds, considerable progress 
was made in both a spring and a fall crop in eliminating those 
selections that did not have hard heads. Three slightly differing 
lines have been selected. These are uniform for horticultural 
characteristics but are still segregating for hardness of head and 
to stresses of extreme weather. 

Waltham 24- Broccoli, a clubroot and mildew tolerant variety, has 
continued to increase in usefulness, particularly in those areas 
where clubroot is severe. 

Lack of seed, for testing by growers, continues to slow the final 
testing and evaluating three strains of iceberg type lettuce de- 
veloped for adaptation in this area. Strain 15 cut 97% of the crop 
in three harvests over a period of eight days. The percentage of 
cut was much higher than for the commercial variety. 

Greenhouse Tomatoes . A breeding program to incorporate resistance 
to mildew, mosaic, verticillium, fusarium, and nematodes was carried 
through the third back-cross generation. All of these resistancies 
are single gene dominate and will be used in hybrids. A new variety 
for the greenhouse was released showing resistance to mildew, 
fusarium, and nematodes. 

Trellis Tomatoes . Duplicated trials of nine hybrids for tellis use 
were conducted. The results have shown that the most desirable 
characteristics of earliness, large size, and freedom from cracks 
vary considerably. Weather changes from year to year make it diffi- 
cult to determine just which hybrid will best serve the largest 
number of growers. 

Butternut Sc^ash . Taste testing and storage experiments, conducted 
during the year, helped greatly in eliminating those lines showing 
undesirable characteristics. Difficulty has been encountered in 
obtaining proper type in regard to neck thickness. The best lines 
are ready for grower testing. 

Carnation Breeding for Commercial 
Varieties for New England 

F. J. Campbell 

Selected clonal evaluations on a broader scale prior to commercial 
trialing received emphasis. The value of clones determined by labo- 
ratory Jkeeping tests and analyses of production and grading records 



^61 



resulted in good evaluation guides. The 1963 progeny from greenhouse 
varieties crossed with garden Chaboud varieties indicated that garden 
varieties carry the dominant factor for grassiness, small flowers, 
and cropping; garden varieties carry factors of a potentially desira- 
ble broad color spectrum but is overshadowed by undesirable charac- 
teristics. Branching and height characteristics were considered in 
selecting progeny from other 1963 crosses for uses as 'miniature' 
type carnations and pot plant carnations, respectively, along with 
standard types. Four-thousand clones were card indexed, grouped 
according to parental background and anticipated characteristics. 
Additional named commercial varieties were grown for comparative ob- 
servations and breeding purposes. Replicated clones were plemted in 
soils amended with three different sources of calcined clay, horti- 
cultural perlite and peat moss to determine the value of these 
amendments and clonal reactions. An outstanding seedling - The 
"Boston Marathones" - is being test marketed, 

DEPARTMENT OF FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 

W. B. Esselen, Head 

W. M. Hunting 

Research is being done toward the development of chemical and physi- 
cal methods for detection and determination of dextrose from various 
sources in the presence of other carbohydrates. 

R. E. Levin 

The first use of the chelating agent tetra-sodium ethylene-diamine- 
tetraacetic (EDTA) as a bacteriostatic food preservative is being 
investigated. Work to date has shown that fish which remained 
"fresh" for only four days at 3°C. without treatment remained "fresh" 
for ten days after being dipped in a 1% solution prior to being 
stored at 3oC. 

I. S. Fagerson 

A combined gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer system has been placed 
in operation. It is the only system of its type among the New England 
State Universities. Primary application has been for the isolation 
and identification of flavor components from foods. It has also been 
used in support of research in other departments of the University. 
These studies on the origins of one type of flavor component, delta- 
lactones in heated milk fat, support the view that these arise from 
thermal hydrolysis of a glyceride containing the appropriate hydroxy 
acid. Studies on the thermal degradation of glucose indicate that 
the degradation pathway at low temperatures appears to proceed via 
an initial dehydration to yield 5 -hydroxy methyl-furfural and then 
furfural. It had previously been thought that furfural was not formed 
in appreciable amounts from such compound. 



n 



W. W. Nawar 

Continued research is being done on the effect of heat on the decom- 
position of fats and on the realtionships between objective and 
subjective methods of flavor measurement. 

F. J. Francis 

Major effort has been devoted to the development of good food 
colorimetry and plant pigment biochemistry research facilities, A 
strong research and graduate training program is being carried on in 
this area, with particular emphasis on isolation and identification 
of pigments and color stability in processed apple and cranberry 
products, £ind the chlorophyJJ. of green vegetables. 

D. J. Hankinson 

Research on fluid dynamics of circulation cleaning, with the support 
of a U. S. Public Health Service Grant is in its third and final 
year. It promises to yield new information on the factors which 
cause milk to deposit on heated surface, as well as an evaluation of 
the physical forces which can effect removal of these soils. 

H. 0. Hultin 

An active and productive research program is being carried on in 
connection with the distribution of glycolytic enzymes in skeletal 
muscle. 

C. R, Stumbo 

An extensive research program is being conducted on the kinetics and 
mode of vapor-phase sterilization. Results obtained with a non- 
explosive mixture of ethylene oxide (12%) and dichlorodifluoro- 
methane (88%) are indeed encouraging. They indicate that surface 
sterilization may be accomplished in as little as 90 seconds at lOOoC, 
This is considered to be the most significant finding coming out of 
the program in five years. The finding paves the way to the com- 
mercial application of this sterilant in many areas. High speed 
sterilization of glass containers to be used in the aseptic canning 
process, for the first time, appears commercially feasible. The 
finding should be similarly valuable in other applications, such as 
sterilization of hospital space and equipment, pharmaceutical 
supplies too sensitive to be sterilized by heat, clean rooms for 
spacecraft assembly, and spacecraft. 

Of considerable public health significance are studies elucidating 
the influence of various factors on the death kinetics of Clostridium 
botulinum subjected to heat and/or ethylene oxide. This organism is 
the cause of botulism and is the only organism, in foods to be 
canned, that has major public health significance. 



?-? 



After considerable delays we are optimistic that funding may be 
provided during the coming year to implement a research and continuing 
education program in the area of maine food science and technology 
to be supported on a matching fund basis (State 25% and Federal 75% 
under P.L. 88-309). Our proposal has been approved at the state and 
federal level and all that remains is the availability of state 
funding. 

DEPARTMENT OF FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

A. D. Rhodes, Head 

Principal Research Activities 

Departmental research is carried on by most staff members working 
individually and with the assistance of graduate students. In ad- 
dition to University personnel research is also performed by the 
Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit and the Cooperative 
Fishery Unit, both of which are based on the department and manned 
by federal scientists who carry adjunct faculty appointments. Funds 
for research are mainly derived from the Agricultural Experiment 
Station, the Massachusetts Divisions of Maine Fisheries, and Fisheries, 
and Game, the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Research Center. Smaller grants have been received 
from other sources of which the U. S. Forest Service has been a 
frequent cooperator. Including salaries our research budget for this 
year has been about $300,000. 

Wood and Plant Chemistry 

E. Bennett 

The Comparative Biochemistry of the Seeds of Certain Conifers with 
Special Reference to the Essential Oils . The chemistry and bio- 
chemistry of the seeds of four species of conifers are being investi- 
gated on the basis of chemical composition and subsequent use. 
Principal emphasis is being placed on the hemicelluloses and the 
essential oils. The composition, molar ratios and length of chain 
will be determined. The essential oils will be fractioned and 
partially identified by gas chromatographic procedures. This part 
of the project is aimed at discovering compounds which might serve 
as general rodent repellents. 

The Chemistry of Wood - the Organic Acids in Leaves, Twigs and 
Seasoned Lumber from Certain Forest Trees as Affected by Age, Dorman- 
cy, and Disease . The chemistry of wood, as a biological unit, is 
being investigated with major emphasis on chemical transformations 
and equilibria. Currently considerations are being given the metabolism t" 
of organic acids . A detailed study will be made of the identity and 
seasonal and other effects on their participation in the Krebs cycle. 



90 



The investigation is designed to yield information on the inter- 
relationships of certain chemical compounds in the tree and their 
behavior under normal and eibnormal conditions. 

Wood Technology 

R. B. Hoadley 
H. B. Gatslick 

The Perpendicular-to-Grain Rheological Behavior of Wood Restrained 
from Normal Swelling Due to Moisture Increase , ^^/hen dry wood speci- 
mens are fitted snugly into steel fixtures, and then wetted, the 
attempt of the wood to swell across the grain develops compression • 
stress. If the proportional limit in compression is exceeded, and 
the specimen is redried to its original moisture content, it will 
shrink to a size smaller than its original dimensions. Tests con- 
ducted with four species (basswood, sugar maple, hickory, massaranduba) 
showed generally the same behavior among these species, with the 
amount of set developed being proportional to the total moisture 
content increase while under restraint. Set development is greatest 
in the d,irection parallel to the growth rings, reflecting the greater 
tangential than radial swelling of wood. The relationship between 
total moisture change and set suggests that strain does not develop 
uniformly throughout the cross-section but that stress concentrations 
are involved. The effect of total time under restraint has not been 
clearly established. 

Technical Properties of Wood from Certain Forest Tree Species in the 
Northeast. Part I - Physical and Mechanical Properties and Drying 
Characteristics of Plemtation-Grown Red Pine CPinus resinosa . Ait.). 
Although plantations of red pine in the Northeast represent sub- 
stantial volumes of timber, it has been rumored that wood from plan- 
tation grown trees of this species is of comparatively low quality. 
Material from sixteen 4-0-year-old trees taken from four locations in 
Massachusetts was evaluated by standard ASTM procedures for both 
physical and mechanical properties. Results indicate that average 
strength properties were lower (up to 50% less) than generally ac- 
cepted values previously published for this species, with consider- 
able brashness noted in both static and impact bending. It was noted, 
however, that outer layers of wood had greatest strength, suggesting 
that older trees managed for longer cutting rotations, on better 
sites, under optimum growth conditions, might yield stronger material. 
Increment borings at breast height appear to be a reliable means of 
evaluating specific gravity, rate of growth, and per cent summeirwood 
for the tree stem. 



-irr 



?/ 



Forestry and Resource Development 

H. G. Abbott D. L. Mader 

R. S. Bond A. D. Rhodes 

W. P. MacConnell A. J. W. S chef fey 

Establishment of Forests by Direct Seeding . These studies have 
investigated factors affecting the establishment of forests by direct 
seeding and have evaluated the influence of birds and mammals on 
natural regeneration and on direct seeded areas . Research, conducted 
over the past ten years, has demonstrated the feasibility of direct- 
seeding certain conifers. 

Consumer Analysis of Forest-Oriented Recreation Activities in the 
Northeast . This study is part of a regional project involving 
several Northeastern States. Massachusetts is attempting to determine, 
by mail questionnaire and interview, what it is that hunters and 
fishermen desire from their hunting and fishing. Comparisons will 
be made on the basis of geography and certain socio-economic 
characteristics of the sprtsmen. 

Thinning Young \Vhlte Pine Stands with Herbicides . After cull hard- 
woods have been removed from plantations and natural coniferous 
stands the next necessary operation is the removal of surplus trees 
to concentrate potential wood production on a limited number of 
selected trees. Herbicide treatments similar to those used against 
cull hardwoods are appropriate for pre -commercial thinning of white 
pine. Picloram and dicamba at 1 to 1 and 5 to 1 in water and the 
amine salt of 2,M-,5-T at 1 to 1 in water all successfully controlled 
whie pine trees In thinning operations when applied at the base in 
connected hacks by tree injector. 

Recreational Resources of the Connecticut River as Determined from 
Aerial Photographs . National statistics indicate the need for new 
outdoor recreation facilities to satisfy the demand for current and 
future use of our wild land resource. Most in demand are sites ad- 
jacent to water, and in urban New England most of the good sites 
have already been developed. The Connecticut River has not been 
exploited for recreation because of its polluted state. Pollution 
abatement has moved ahead at a steady pace, however, so that more 
of its waters are suitable for recreation. In the near future this 
great river, relatively free of pollution, will face explosive 
recreational growth. Towns, cities and the four states through which 
it flows need Icnowledge about potential recreation sites on the 
river so they may make wise land acquisitions and formulate proper 
zoning regulations for recreation. 

The land on both sides of the river in both Massachusetts and 
Connecticut has been separated by a rather complex system into a 
use classification evolved for the study. Maps prepared in this 
study will locate possible recreation sites on the river from its 
headwaters to the sea. 



9li. 



The objective of this research is to develop and test the use of 
aerial photogrammetric techniques as a tool for identifying and 
classifying river-based recreation sites. The classification system 
has seven categories: 

1. Agricultural or open lands - 9 types. 

2. Forest lands - 105 types. 

3. Wet lands - 5 types. 

4-. Mining, exposed rock, or waste disposal areas - 6 types. 

5. Urban areas - 11 types. 

6. Outdoor recreation areas - 11 types. 

7. River bank and edge of river bed - M-0 types. 

As a first step all the land within 1000 feet of the river *s edge is 
to be classified on the basis of its current use . The river bank 
and edge of the river bed will be identified on aerial photographs 
and mapped for use by the recreational planner. A catalogue of 
suitable sites for recreational use and reconmendations concerning 
their development will be prepared. 

Influence of Soil and Site Conditions on the Growth of Forest Trees . 
This project is a regional study in which Maine, New Hampshire, 
Massachusetts, and the U. S. Forest Service are cooperating. Red 
pine and eastern white pine are being studied. Growth and yield of 
trees and stands are being correlated with site characteristics, 
but especially with the physical and chemical properties of the soil. 

Etiology of Maple Decline . Sugar maples in many sections of 
Massachusetts have exhibited typical decline symptoms for a number of 
years: sparse, yellowish foliage, thin crowns, twig and even branch 
die-back. Decline is especially evident along highways and city 
streets but is present to a lesser degree in maple-sugar orchards and 
forests. This department is cooperating with others on campus to 
investigate this problem. Our contribution concerns: (a) a study in 
detail of decline occurrence as it relates to geography, highway, 
sugarbush and forest, and certain gross characteristics of site, and 
(b) micro-site studies in the forest involving soil properties and 
nutrient relationships „ Artificial fertilization has effected marked 
improvement in the foliage color and apparent vigor of declining 
trees . 

Factors Affecting Evapo-Transpiration, Run-off, Storage and Drainage 
Characteristics of Water from Soil in Massachusetts . The purpose of 
this research is to determine the combined effects of different 
soils and associated forest vegetation under different types of forest 
management on interception of precipitation, infiltration, surface 
movement, percolation, evapo-transpiration, soil water storage, and 
sub-surface drainage. Little work of this nature has been performed 
in the Northeast x^here until recently there appeared to be no 
problems of water shortage. Now, however, there is abundant evi- 
dence to the contrary, and information from studies of this nature 
is much needed. 



93 



Yields of Managed Forest Stands . Test plots have been established 
in even-aged, pole-sized stands of red pine, eastern white pine, 
Norway spruce, eastern hemlock and sugar maple, and in uneven-aged 
eastern white pine and mixed hemlock and hardwoods . These plots have 
been placed under intensive management involving pruning as appro- 
priate, thinnings at tliree and five (mostly) year intervals, and 
selection cuttings on a ten-year cutting cycle. Records are kept of 
mortality, tree and stand development. 

The Conservation Commission Movement in the Northeast . Massachusetts 
enacted legislation in the late 1950 *s which authorized the establish- 
ment by a municipality of a Conservation Commission with power to 
acquire conservation lands. The movement, which originated in this 
state, has spread rapidly so that today there are commissions in 
about two-thirds of the state's towns, and similar legislation has 
been adopted in several other states. The objective of this study 
is to document the development of the Conservation Commissions, 
their history and how they function. 

Fisheries Biology 

Quabbin Reservoir Investigations 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit: 

J. A. McCann 
R. J. Reed 

Quabbin Reservoir affords the anglers of Massachusetts a diversified 
fish population found nowhere else in the state. The Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries and Game has been conducting creel census 
programs and research on the Quabbin for a number of years. However, 
little work has been done on life histories of any of the fishes. 
The rock bass, which usually is an incidental species in the waters 
of Massachusetts, is extremely abundant in the Quabbin. Creel census 
studies indicate an exploding population and a potential management 
problem. The white perch is abundant in the reservoir and has ranked 
either second or third in the creel census during the past seven 
years. The life histories of these and other species of fish in the 
Quabbin are under study. Unit personnel are also studying the popu- 
lation dynamics of the brov>m and rainbow trout in the Quabbin since 
only limited interest has been previously shown towards these species 
and they contribute significantly to the sport fishery. 

Connecticut River Investigations 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit: 

J. A. McCann 
R. J. Reed 

The steady improvement in the water quality through pollution abate- 
ment of the large rivers of this country such as the Connecticut River 



/// 



will promote increased use of these waters for recreational purposes. 
Recently much state and federal interest has been turned towards 
evaluating the recreational potential of the Connecticut River. The 
Unit Leader is assisting in a project of the Department of Forestry 
and Wildlife Management to study the feasibility of the use of aerial 
photographs to map the shoreline of the Connecticut River and evalu- 
ating the present and potential land uses for recreational develop- 
ment. Unit personnel will investigate the possibilities of classifying 
the river into general aquatic habitats, depending upon the water 
current, depth of water, water quality, shoreline type, and bottom 
type. The fish population of the river in Massachusetts is also being 
studied. 

Weweantic Estuarine Investigations 

C. R. Cole 

Salt marshes and their meandering estuarine streams too often have 
been considered a biological wasteland and public apathy has allowed 
these areas to become targets of developers of waterfront properties. 
Although no fishery ecologist doubts the importance of these estuarine 
areas as breeding grounds for commercial and sport fisheries, little 
hard data are available to support these beliefs. This program will 
attempt to obtain detailed data on the ecology of the estuarine areas 
of the Weweantic River on the northwestern shore of Buzzards Bay and 
the effects of these environmental parameters in determining 
survival of several dominant fish species within the estuary. 

Ecological factors control the stock contributions and mortality rates 
of larval and juvenile fishes in the estuary. Recent studies indicate 
excessive mortality in late larval stages of the winter flounder; 
current research discloses heavy pre-spawning ovarian concentrations 
of DDT and its degradation products, possibly resulting from mosquito 
control in the estuary. Current management practices in cranberry 
production utilizing parathion are also being investigated. The 
seasonal occurrence and frequency of abundance of eggs and larval 
stages of other species of fishes along with basic environmental 
parameters are continuing to be monitored within the system. 

Marine Sport Fishery Statistics 
(Buzzards Bay) 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit: 

J. A. McCann 
R. J. Reed 

Federal and state governments have just recently begun to realize 
the importance of reliable catch statistics of the marine sport 
fisheries. Several studies by Atlantic coast state personnel have 
been completed that indicate some of the problems in marine sport 
fishery data collection. This project will evaluate survey methods 



95 



which have already been developed and apply them to a pilot study 
area along the Massachusetts coast. The total program will obtain 
the information necessary to develop an efficient and sound method 
to estimate the statistics of the Atlantic coast marine sport 
fisheries . 

Survey and Evaluation of Small Artificial 
Recreational Ponds in Central Massachusetts 

Massachusetts Cooperative Fishery Unit: 

J. A. McCann 
R. J. Reed 

Construction and utilization of small artificial ponds in 
Massachusetts has increased rapidly during the postwar period. 
Fishery management policies of these ponds have been based on data 
obtained from studies outside the general New England area. This 
study is designed to increase our present knowledge of the importance 
of small artificial ponds as a source of recreation in Massachusetts 
and to develop fish management policies for these ponds. The project 
will be divided into three phases: 

Phase I. To locate, enumerate and classify by type artificial 

ponds in Central Massachusetts. 
Phase II. To select representative ponds and conduct detailed 

seasonal limnological studies. 
Phase III. To establish experimental ponds and evaluate 

various management policies formulated through the 

findings of the first two phases. 

Wildlife Biology 

Influence of Nutrition on the Eye-lens 
Growth Curve in Relation to Age 

F. Greeley 

The growth of the eye lens has been used as a means of determining 
the age structure of several populations of wild mammals. In this 
study the proposal that nutrition influences the age-growth curve 
of the lens was examined in the Wistar strain of laboratory rats. 
Reductions to one-half of normal intake of total feed, protein and 
energy content did not influence lens growth although body growth 
rate was severely reduced. 

Control of Bird Damage to Small Fruits 

F. Greeley 

A regional project to study the damage to small fruits caused by birds 
and to control the depredation. Current activities are directed to 



9C> 



an investigation of the behavior of robins which are among the most 
destructive birds. Fledgling and adult robins are being tagged, 
and their movements, eating and resting habits are observed. 

Food and Shelter Requirements of the 
Ruffed Grouse in Relation to Energy 
Regimes 

R. B. Brander 

The ruffed grouse will be studied in the field and laboratory to 
determine its energy requirements and relationships in this respect 
to habitat. 

Wild Turkey Project 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W. G. Sheldon 
B. C. Wentworth 
D. K. Wetherbee 

Twenty-two wild turkeys were introduced in Central Massachusetts in 
1950 and 1961. For several years this project was experimental but 
in 1965 and 1966 a stable and expanding population has been 
established. 

Woodcock Project 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W, G. Sheldon 
B. C. Wentworth 
D. K. Wetherbee 

A book gathering together the results of 15 years of research on 
this game bird at the Unit and also work done on it in other regions 
will be published by the University of Massachusetts Press in the 
fall of 1966. 

Cadwell Forest Project 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W. G. Sheldon 
B. C. Wentworth 
D. K. Wetherbee 

A preliminary plan on creating a game management area of the 
University-owned Cadwell Forest has been completed. 



f^ 



Pulmonary Edema Syndrome 
of Game Farm Pheasants 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W. G. Sheldon 
B. C. VJentworth 
D, K. Wetherbee 

This investigation was begion in the fall of 1965 in an endeavor to 
discover the causes of heavy die-off of Ring-necked Pheasants in 
the state game farms. 

Radio Telemetry Project 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W. G. Sheldon 
B. C. Wentworth 
D. K. Wetherbee 

As the first phase of this project, radio transmitters were placed 
on pheasants released by the state to discover survival, mortality 
and movements of these birds. 

Ecology and Physiology of Avian Sterility 

Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit: 

W. G. Sheldon 
B. C. Wentworth 
D. K. Wetherbee 

Responsive to the acute need for the humane control of populations 
of sea gulls, starlings and other problem species of birds, we have 
developed and field-tested the embryocide Sudan Black which is 
selective to birds and is non- toxic. Chemosterilants that are 
effective against the production of sperms and eggs of birds are 
continually being developed and tested. Methods of field appli- 
cation and appraisal have been developed in this pioneer area of 
applied ecology. 





^? 


DEPARTMENT OF PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES 




F. W. Southwick, Head 





Department Research Program 

Research by the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences has both funda- 
mental and applied aspects, but in recent years more emphasis has 
been placed on basic studies. Such studies are related to recent 
appointment of well-trained staff plus a marked increase in graduate 
students since 1953-6M-. At present, 15 faculty members have major 
research responsibilities. The areas of emphasis include plant 
physiology and biochemistry, nutrition, ecology, genetics and plant 
breeding, soil chemisti^y and soil stabilization. 

Plant Nutrition 

Effect of Calcium Salts on Potassium 
Accumulation by Plant Roots 

J. H. Baker 
T, Tadano 

The roots of many plants accumulate more potassium from solutions 
containing both KCl and CaCl2 than from pure KCl solutions. In order 
to obtain a better understanding of this effect, K accumulation by 
plant roots from KCl solutions is being compared with K accumulation 
from KCl solutions containing CaCl2 or CaSO^.. Evidence has been 
obtained which indicates that increased K accumulation by barley 
roots from KCl solutions containing Ca salts as compared to pure 
KCl solutions is the result of increased anion accumulation rather 
than to a direct effect of Ca as has often been suggested. 

Relationship Between "Maple Decline" and 
Inorganic Chemical Composition of Sugar 
Maple Leaves 

J. H. Baker 

During the recent drought in Massachusetts leaves of many roadside 
sugar maples have developed a severe marginal necrosis, a "leaf 
scorch," early in the summer. A study has been underway to determine 
if the development of these symptoms could be related to the mineral 
composition of the leaves. The results of this study indicate that 
the chemical composition of leaves from injured trees is little 
different from that of healthy trees except that more chloride is 
present in leaves from injured than from healthy trees, and the 
chloride concentration in leaves from injured trees is as large as 
that reported to cause similar injury to other kinds of trees. 



c/ri 



The Relationship of Nutrition to 
Plant Physiological Disorders 

D. N. Maynard. 

Continued research on spinach leaf chlorosis has shown that it is 
caused primarily by a deficiency of magnesium. Other contributing 
factors are excess potassium and the loss of magnesium from the 
spinach leaf by leaching. 

The magnesium requirements of corn inbreds Fjl, Fp, and backcross 
populations are being investigated in order to determine the genetic 
basis for this characteristic. 

Ammonium toxicity in tomato has been described. Its appearance may 
be prevented by suitable potassium concentrations. The role of 
potassium in ammonium metabolism is being evaluated. 

Plant and Nutritional Variables Associated 
with Ammonium Assimilation 

A. V. Barker 

The nutritional aspects of ammonium toxicity were studies with special 
reference to the tomato plant. Ammonium nutrition in soil culture 
produced a unique stem lesion on tomato plants . To date these lesions 
have not been observed on other plants under similar conditions, 
but it is not yet known whether this injury is confined to tomato. 
Different tomato cultivars show different susceptibilities to 
Eimmonium injury varying from nearly complete resistance to extreme 
sensitivity. Sand culture experiments in connection with soils 
experiments have shown further that potassium deficiency is induced 
by fixation of potassium within the clay lattice when ammonium is 
supplied. The induced potassium deficiency is necessary for lesion 
development. 

Ammonium toxicity is very pH sensitive . Toxicity is lessened at neutral 
or alkaline pH in the root media. All herbaceous plants tested 
(includes onion, pumpkin;, tomato, peas, corn, beans) will grow on 
ammonium if the acidity is neutralized. Onion, however, is the most 
resistant of the plants tested. The ericaceous plants, blueberry 
and rhododendron, are resistant to ammonium nutrition and appear to 
grow better on ammonium nutrition than on nitrate nutrition. 

Calcium Exchange Between Barley Roots and Clay 

M. Drake 
J. H. Baker 

Relative Ca gains by excised barley roots reacted with Ca-H bentonite 
depended upon degree of Ca saturation direct contact versus 



J 60 



semipermeable membrane and pretreatment. Rinsing roots in .05 N HCl 
increased Ca uptake from given Ca saturations and resulted in Ca 
uptake from lower Ca saturations as compared to untreated roots. 

Relationships of Mineral Nutrition to 
Physiological Disorders of Apples 

J W. D. Weeks 

Foliar sprays of Ca 0^03)2 applied to Baldwin apple trees increased 
leaf and fruit Ca and reduced the incidence of bitter pit. Leaf N 
was not increased by the Ca sprays. The incidence of bitter pit was 
associated with the level of Ca in both the foliage and the peel of 
the fruit. There was a highly significant negative correlation be- 
tween peel Ca and the incidence of bitter pit. 

Plant Physiology and Biochemistry 

Fruit Carbohydrases 

H. V. Marsh 

In order to gain some insight into the factors controlling the sudden 
shift during fruit development in the form of the carbohydrate 
reserve from starch into soluble sugars, an investigation of the- 
carbohydrases of apple fruit was initiated. Evidence has been 
obtained indicating at least three starch hydrolyzing enzymes in 
mature fruit. One of the enzymes was identified as a typical 
amylase. Work is being continued on the characterization and 
properties of these enzymes and their activities during fruit 
development. 

Physiology of Low-Temperature 
Injury on Ornamental Plants 

J. R. Ha vis 

Autumnal bark splitting, rapid temperature changes in leaves, low 
temperature root injury, and foliar desiccation have been identified 
as specific causes of winter injury to broad-leaved evergreens in 
northern regions. Various species and varieties have been found to 
differ in susceptibility to each factor. Environmental and physi- 
ological factors contributing to susceptibility and resistance are 
being studied with the aim of discovering methods for reducing winter 
damage. This project is partially supported by the Massachusetts 
Nurserymen* s Association. 



JOf 



The Ultrastcucture of Chloroplasts De- 
sradlns from Metabolic and Physiological 
Disorders Induced by Ammonium Nutrition 

A. V. Barker 

Ammonium induced changes in fine structure of tomato leaf chloro- 
plasts are being studied. Functional alterations of the chloroplasts 
are being related to fine structure. 

Post-Harvest Physiology of Apples 

W. J. Bramlage 

Spectrophotometric techniques for detecting watercore and internal 
breakdown have been developed. Using these techniques, a definite 
relationship between these disorders has been found and the bio- 
chemistry and physiology of this relationship are being studied. 
Gamma irradiation produced a rapid loss of watercore and reduced the 
siobsequent development of scald, but increased the incidence of 
internal breakdown. 

Physiological Effects of Growth 
Regulating Chemicals on Apples 

F. W. Southwick 

The growth retardant N-dimethyl amino succinamic applied to bearing 
apple trees following young fruit abscission inhibits fruit growth 
rate, markedly reduces preharvest fruit abscission, delays the rate 
of fruit softening, may improve anthocyanin development, may delay 
watercore development emd reduces storage scald of some cultivars. 
Possibilities of using this compound to extend the harvest season 
of Mcintosh and thereby alleviate the harvest labor problem for 
commercial orchardists, as well as providing the consumer with 
apples having superior keeping quality, make continued study of this 
chemical desirable. This project is supported in part from funds 
of the Horticultural Research Center and the U.S. Rubber Company. 

Temperature Effects on Fructosan 

in Orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata) 

M, Drake 
W. G. Colby 

Dormant clones of orchardgrass transplanted in March from the field 
into 6-inch plots, were placed in growth chambers at eO^F, 70OF. 
and 80OF. with a 16-hour day. During the initial 10 days, SQOF. 
produced most vigorous growth, but then vigor declined. After 15 
days, growth became vigorous at 60°F. and was superior after 30 
days. Fructosan in basal tissue after 30 days was 11, 25 and 30% 



/-^a 



for 80, 70 and 60°F., respectively, confirming field observations 
that Ccirbohydrate reserves in orchardgrass (as indicated by fructosan) 
remain low at air temperatures above 70°?. 

Plant Genetics and Breeding 

Genetic Interrelations of Six 
Yellow-Green Mutants of Tomato 

W. H. Lachman 
I . delaRoche 

The inheritance of yg^, yg2, yg3, ygq., yg5, and ygg chlorophyll- 
deficient mutants was found to be genetically controlled and were 
non-allelic. F2 repulsion data from double intercrosses of all 
these mutants indicated that they assorted independently, except 
possibly yg2 and ygij.. In all cases, the double recombinant mutants 
appeared to be more chlorophyll deficient than either of their 
parents . 

Heat Treating Seed of T-Cytosterile C13 
Sweet Corn 

W. H. Lachman 

Heat treatment of dry seed at 82.5-90°C. for one to four days was 
lethal. Seed held at 72-8G°C. for one to ten days gave rise to 
plants with a high incidence (75-100%) of Japonica stripping. Neither 
treated nor control plants shed pollen. 

Chemical Evaluation of Tobacco Types 
and Fermentation Patterns 

R. A. Southwick 

In an attenpt to better understand tobacco fermentation patterns, 
plants were grown at high populations. Quality of primed leaves 
indicated a fine quality of leaf at moderately high populations, but 
became tender in very high populations. Mechanically harvested and 
dehydrated leaf fragments are now being fermented to determine the 
effect of plant populations and fermentation patterns. Sponsored by 
Consolidated Cigar Corporation. 

Weed Ecology 

Ecology of Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) BEAUV . 

J. Vengris 

The response of barnyard grass to atrazine treatments was investigated. 
The effect of atrazine on the plant was found to be variable and 



fOb 



dependent on the stage of plant development. Cytological studies 
have been initiated to follow the anatomical changes of barnyard 
grass treated with atrazine. Electron microscope procedures in 
studying cliloroplast grana changes were worked out and used. The 
majority of the granal compartments and interconnecting fret system 
are affected. This effect has been observed at concentrations as 
low as 5 ppm within eight hours after treatments. At this time the 
plants have no morphological symptoms of atrazine injury. 

An analyticEil procedure for the qualitative and quantitative detection 
of atrazine with gas chromatography and isotopes will be used. 

Soil Stabilization 

Roadside Slope and Sand Dune Stabilization 

J. M. Zak 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Roadside Development Program was to 
seek and evaluate methods of slope stabilization on roadsides. Seed 
mixtures, rate of seeding and roadside turf maintenance have been 
evaluated for Massachusetts soil and climatic conditions. A special 
problem related to dune stabilization on Cape Cod has resulted in 
new techniques for planting and establishing beachgrass for the 
control of drifting sand. Various other grasses have been success- 
fully established from seed for controlling moving sand. Supported 
by funds available from the Massachusetts Department of Public Works 
and the Bureau of Public Roads. 

Soil Chemistry 

Adsorption of Pesticides by Soils 

J. H. Baker 
Young-Oh Shin 

The extent of adsorption of pesticides on Massachusetts soils and 
the rate these compounds can be expected to leach from the soil and 
conteuninate ground water are being studied. Preliminary results 
indicate that the herbicide, atrazine (2-chloro-M— ethylamino-6- 
isopropyl-2-triazine) is adsorbed mainly by the soil organic matter. 
Water Resources Research Center (WR-8) . 



j(y/ 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY AND ANIMM, SCIENCES 

T. W. Fox, Head 

Department Research Pro-am 

Research activity in the animal sciences has continued to be one of 
the major areas of departmental emphasis and effort. The year 
igSM^-GS has been a highly productive one with 35 publications pre- 
pared and published since July 1, 1965. 

The research program has benefitted from the growth in the graduate 
program by providing bright young scholars to assist in the conduct 
of research and to contribute creative ideas to many of the basic 
problems involved in these studies. The post-doctoral scholars have 
also made a significant contribution to research and have assisted 
the graduate faculty in launching the beginning graduate students on 
their thesis research. 

The research program of the department is continuing to concentrate 
on the basic discipline areas of the animal sciences. 

Animal Diseases 

Infectious Diseases Affecting Reproduction in Cattle 
with Emphasis on Leptospirosis and Viral Diseases 

R. E. Smith 
lona M. Reynolds 

Studies on experimentally produced leptospiral infection in ruminants 
and the subsequent effect on abortion. A fluorescent antibody 
technique for the identification of leptospiral infection has been 
developed for use in experimental studies and in diagnosis. Supported 
by Regional Research Funds, U.S.D.A. and the National Institutes of 
Health. 

Salmonellosis of Poultry 

G. H. Snoeyenbos 
H. Van Roekel 
C. F. Smyser 

Methods of detecting Salmonella in poultry and poultry products. 
Determination of the time and temperature necessary to kill 
Salmonella in feeds. Studies of the virulence and dynamics of in- 
fection of Salmonella in chicken flocks. Supported by Hatch funds j 
National Institutes of Health, and industrial grants. 



10. 



Avian Lymphomatosis 

M. Sevoian 
R, Larose 

Determination of the pathogenesis and epizootiology of neurolympho- 
matosis including the study of the etiologic agent through growth 
in chicken embryos, young chicks and in tissue culture. The isolation 
of the JM virus responsible for an acute form of lymphomatosis in 
chickens represents a significant contribution of this project. 
Characterization of the virus and the feasibility of developing a 
vaccine is being continued. Supported by Hatch funds and industrial 
grants. 

Respiratory Diseases of Poultry 

H. Van Roekel 
Olga M. Olesiuk 
R. Bowen 
D. Roberts 

Studies on the modes of transmission of Mycoplasma gallisepticum 
with emphasis on egg transmission and direct or indirect contact 
under different environments. Investigations on the response of 
Mycoplasma gallisepticum to medication and the feasibility of eradi- 
cation of the disease from poultry breeding flocks. Egg transmission 
has been shown to occur, the latency or carrier state of the organism 
following infection has been determined and eradication has been 
shown to be a feasible method of control of the disease. Supported 
by federal funds, the Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture, 
and industrial grants. 

Animal Genetics 

The Genetic and Environmental Aspects of Total 
Solids, Solids-Not-Fat and Its Components in Milk 

S. N. Gaunt 

F. N. Dickinson 

Studies to determine the repeatability and heritability of milk 
constituents and the genetic and phenotypic correlations between milk 
constituents and milk yield in dairy cattle. A detailed study of 
the environmental factors affecting milk composition and the labora- 
tory methods for the determination of milk composition. Reliable 
estimates of heritability for these traits have been established and 
laboratory methods for the determination of milk composition have 
been developed. Supported by Hatch funds and industrial grants* 



/oc^ 



The Performance of Populations of the 
Domestic Fowl as Influenced by Heritable 
Physiological Traits and by Genes with 
Known Pleiotropic Effects 

J. R. Smyth, Jr. 
T. W. Fox 

A study of the pleiotropic effects of certain genes influencing 
melanization and morphological traits in the domestic fowl. The gene 
for rosecomb has been shown to drastically reduce the viability of 
gametes produced by homozygotes. Recessive white reduces growth rate 
and a series of alleles concerned with melanization affect viability. 
These studies are being extended using the JM virus to determine if 
the differential mortality observed is associated with genetic 
resistance to leucosis. Supported by Hatch funds and industrial grants, 

Genetic and Physiological Components 
of Reproductive Ability in Turkeys 

J. R. Smyth, Jr. 

A study of the effects of sexual maturity on egg production, broodi- 
ness, fertility, hatchability and poult size. This investigation is 
also studying the possibility that genes carried by individual male 
gametes influence their subsequent survival and fertilizing capacity 
in the female reproductive tract. Supported by Hatch funds. 

Animal Physiology 

Pituitary and Ovarian Function 
in Relation to Fertility 

D. L. Black 
W. McDaniels 
G. Currie 

An investigation of the role of the pituitary gland and hypothalamus 
in ovulation and corpus luteum formation and function. Histological 
and Histochemical studies of the corpus luteum have been completed 
through the entire bovine estrus cycle. In addition, the physiology 
of the uterus and oviduct in the fertilization process and embryo 
survival is actively being investigated. Supra-ovulation in swine 
has been observed as a response to X-irr adiation . Supported by 
Regional Research funds (Hatch) , National Institutes of Health, 
Population Council, and the Atomic Energy Commission. 



/c/r 



Thyroid Physiology in Chickens and Turkeys 

W. J. Mellen 
T. Komiyama 

131 
A study of the value of plasma PBl level as a criterion of thyroid 

state in chickens cind turkeys. An endocrine physiology survey of 

two lines selected for early rapid and slow rate of growth has been 

completed during the year. Supported by federal funds (Hatch). 

Animal Nutrition 

Endocrine Physiology Associated with 
Nutritional-Environmental Interactions 
in Chickens, Turkeys and Japanese Quail 

D. L. Anderson 

A study of the value of Se-75 uptake by parathyroid tissue as an 
assay of calcium metabolism in avian species. This research in- 
cludes the effects of modified environments on calcium metabolism 
and on parathyroid and adrenal function. Supported by federal 
funds (Hatch) . 

Ruminant Digestion and Fatty Acid 
Transport Through the Rumen Wall 

S. J. Lyford 
H . Fenner 
D. L. Black 

Determination of the effect of increased nitrogen fertilization of 
forage on rumen fermentation. A study of pectin digestibility, the 
sites of pectin digestion and pectinase enzymes. An isolated rumen 
pouch technique has been developed that will allow the perfusing of 
the rumen pouch to measure fatty acid absorption through the rumen 
wall. Supported by federal funds (Hatch). 



/^7 



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

M. A. McKenzie, Acting Head 

Plant Virology 

Effects of Virus Infections on 
Susceptibility of Plants to Fungi 

G. N. Agrios 

Significantly greater numbers of fungus infections on virus -infected 
than on virus-free apple trees observed in the field suggested a 
positive correlation between infections' by the two types of pathogens. 
Experiments involving combination of three pathogenic fungi and four 
viruses indicated that some fungi grow considerably better on tissue 
extracts from virus -infected than from virus-free tissues. The dif- 
ferential growth is, in some cases, striking enough to allow diagnosis 
of the virus infection by observation of the type of fungus growth, 
suggesting the possibility of using certain fungi as indicators for 
virus infections of plants . Greenhouse experiments are presently 
underway to determine whether such virus-fungus interrelationships 
exist on the plants as well as on plant tissue extracts. 

Relationship of Viruses to Maple Decline 

G. N. Agrios 

Transmission experiments are being carried out in the field and in 
the greenhouse to determine the presence and importance of viruses 
in the development of the so-called "decline" condition of sugar 
maples found in woodlands. Appropriate plant parts obtained from 
sugar maple trees exhibiting typical decline symptoms are being tested 
on some known and several potential virus indicators, including tree 
varieties, tree seedlings and herbaceous plants, for virus symptom 
expression. Further studies on the viruses and their effects on sugar 
maples will follow once the viruses have been obtained. 

Fruit Russet Ring and Leaf 
Flecking Virus of Apple 

G. N. Agrios 

This extremely destructive virus was found for the first time in the 
United States in two orchards of this state. It was found on 
Mcintosh, which is the most popular apple variety in New England, 
and on which it causes reduction of fruit size and unsightly blemishes 
on almost 100% of the fruit of infected trees. The virus seems to be 
transmitted only through vegetative propagation or through contact of 
vegetative parts. Histopathological studies indicate that the virus 
affects the size, shape, orientation and contents of certain cells of 



joq 



the apple fruit. In the leaf the virus affects chlorophyll formation 
in spots, results in loss of intercellular spaces and appearance of 
large and. misshapen plastids in the cells. It also reduces the 
number and size of palisade parenchyma cells which become roiond rather 
than elongated and lose their stratification. 

Apple and Pear Disorders with Virus ~Like 
Symptoms but as Yet of Unknown Cause 

G. N. Agrios 

Several distinct types of abnormal symptoms that could be caused by 
viruses have been observed on various numbers of apple or pear trees 
in the state. They include: 

1. Misshapen trees and fruit and abnormally rough bark of 
Delicious apple trees, 

2. Malformed and abnormal-sized fruit and tree growth of 
Cortland apple trees. 

3. Reduced size and malformation of fruit of Mcintosh apple 
trees. 

M-. Surface cracking and size reduction of fruit of certain 
pear varieties. 

The possibility of these conditions being caused by viruses is studied 
through transmission experiments in the field and in the greenhouse. 

Etiology of White Pine Blight 

W. M. Banfield 

The relationship of three agencies to the development of white pine 
blight was studied in the past year 

An undescribed species of Hypoderma has been found correlated with a 
characteristic chocolate -brown blight and needle-cast phase of this 
disease complex. Spore fruits of this fungus were collected in 1964- 
from diseased trees in Massachusetts, Virginia, West Virginia, and 
North Carolina. Similar collections were obtained in 1965 from 
Pennsylvania 5 New York, and Ontario, Canada. Profuse typical blight 
of new foliage was induced on some 50 potted whiE pine seedlings ex- 
posed under diseased trees in June and July. Spore fruits of this 
fungus developed subsequently on the blighted needles of these 
infected trees. No blight developed on several hundred control trees 
not so exposed to the fungus. 

The profuse yellow spotting, needle casting, and dwarfing of eastern 
whie pine were associated further with Lophodermium pinastri in the 
past year. Foliage of susceptible experimental trees exposed only 
on rainy days developed disease symptoms and subsequently spore fruits 
of this fungus developed on ;fehese diseased needles. New needles of 



these trees that were exposed only on clear days did not develop 
these symptoms and subsequently have not produced spore fruits of 
this fungus. 

Exposure of foliage of susceptible potted eastern white pine to 
concentrations of ozone normal to the atmosphere of this environment 
did not develop any symptoms of disease. 

Ecological Studies of Maple Decline 

W. M. Banfield 

Decline of sugar maples is manifest by progressive reduction of leaf 
area due to marginal scorch, and premature loss of leaves. This 
leads to early dormany, to die-back of branches, stagheading and 
death of the trees. The disease occurs in drought years, primarily 
in the floristic area transitional between the oak, chestnut, and 
the northern hardwood forest area in which sugar maple is a dominant 
species. The disease occurs primarily on roadside trees, on trees 
from which leaf litter and ground cover have been removed and the 
ground compacted by traffic, on trees growing in shallow soils, trees 
suddenly exposed by the felling of surrounding trees, and on trees 
with extensive root injury. Comparable decline occurs also in this 
area on ash, beech, oaks, elms, and hemlock, and in each case is 
closely correlated with adverse environment. Sugar maple decline 
appears to result from adverse environment in which increasing stress 
for soil moisture is the dominant etiological factor. 

Research in progress is designed to: (a) correlate a variety of 
ecological parameters with the water economy of declining trees; 

(b) to correlate these with changes in the internal economy of 
declining trees; and (c) to study the relationship between degenera- 
tion of the root system and the decline syndrome. 

Forest and Shade Tree Entomology 

Relationship of Insects to Current 
Decline of Maples in Massachusetts 

W. B. Becker 

The current maple decline in Massachusetts, not, along highways, seems 
most closely associated with drought and harmful conditions brought 
about by man. To date, no primary insect has been involved. However, 
in artificial defoliation tests, started two years ago^ to simulate 
the harmful effects of insect defoliation, more deaths or loss of the 
tree's vitality resulted from removing leaves: (a) in the spring 
than in midsummer; (b) in shaded rather than in sunny locations; and 

(c) twice a year rather than once. Complete defoliation of an indi- 
vidual branch on a large tree seemed to result in more damage or 
mortality to the denuded branch thaix resulted from the conplete 



m 



defoliation of small saplings. Observations on the effects of repeated 
defoliation by the saddled prominent are incomplete. Research is 
supported by Federal Mclntire-Stennis funds. 

Effect of a Systemic Insecticide on Twig Feeding 
by Insect Vectors of Dutch Elm Disease Fungus 

W. B. Becker 

Injections of Bidrin into the sapstream of American elm trees has given 
relatively slight, short-term reduction in the number and extent of 
feeding punctures chewed into twigs by the smaller European elm bark 
beetle, the chief insect vector of the Dutch elm disease in the 
United States . In nature , fungus infections may result from such 
feeding over a longer period of time than protection was obtained. 
The study has been done under an Extension Service project. Recently 
the Shell Chemical Company cillotted funds for work. 

Phenological Studies 

W, B. Becker 

Relationships between the seasonal development of certain shade trees 
and their insect pests have been studied for several years in attempts 
to determine if a relationship exists between them which might be used 
to predict, more accurately than a calendar date, the proper time to 
apply various control measures. To date, a few such relationships 
have seemed fairly constant, not only between an insect and its host 
but also between an insect and certain other plants . This study is 
being conducted on an Extension Service project by our own personnel 
and also by cooperators in the Massachusetts Department of Natural 
Resources. 

Shade Tree Laboratories 

Pathology of Tree Wilt Diseases . 



F. 


W. 


Holmes 


M. 


A. 


McKenzie 


J. 


S. 


Demaradzki 



Resistance by the host plant to the Dutch elm disease fungus is being 
studied. About 3% of the seedlings grown from elm seed irradiated 
with thermal neutrons at Brookhaven have survived their first 
inoculation with Ceratocystis ulmi . A few of these "trees had no twig 
die-back; they lost many leaves from the shock of infection. Crosses 
were made between elms at Cornell that had survived past infections; 
the seedlings are growing at Amherst. Both irradiation and crossings 
are being continued; a clone garden of resistant trees has been 
started. Our standard, disease-susceptible clone of Ulmus americana 
was offered to other researchers for control evaluations; requests 



//s 



for it have been received from several laboratories in the 
United States and Canada. 

Maple Decline 

F. W. Holmes 

R. F. Farrington 

Mr. Farrington (graduate student) has isolated many microorganisms 
from diseased maple tissues, including frequent bacteria. He has 
taken special courses which are helping him identify the bacteria. 
, He has started efforts to induce artificial drought around roots of 
some of the maples he will inoculate with these microbes. A bulletin 
of 87 typed pages and M-0 figures on culture, diseases, injuries, and 
pests of maples in shade and ornamental plantings was written and 
submitted on request. Measurements were made on survivors of U-0 
maples planted too deep in 1961. Artificial girdling roots (steel) 
were installed on 20 maples and 20 check trees were assigned. 

Study of Fungus and Insect Pests 
of Trees in Massachusetts 

M. A. McKenzie 
F. W. Holmes 

Evaluation of Shell's "Bidrin" (cooperation of state and town agencies) 
indicated it did not control Dutch elm disease under Massachusetts 
conditions. This agrees with research of Chater (Massachusetts), 
Becker (Massachusetts), Neely (Illinois), and Lincoln (USDA, Ohio) 
but not of Thompson (Kansas) or Norris (IVisconsin) . A 12-page 
analysis was submitted on 8,57M- diagnoses of tree troubles (excluding 
Dutch elm disease) including 1,004- performed in 1965. Biopsy and 
diagnosis continue. Foliar chloride was found to be a better 
indicator of salt injury in maple trees than foliar sodium or sap 
constituents. Salting of plots continues. 

Ecological Investigations 

Environment Manipulation and 
Mosquito Populations 

T. M. Peters 

This study of the ecology of floodwater mosquito larvae has evolved 
into two aspects: (1) the investigation of basic ecological factors 
and their effects on larval mosquito populations under laboratory 
conditions; and (2) a study of sampling techniques applicable to 
naturally-occurring larval populations. 

Basic Ecological Factors . In the first aspect we are currently 
investigating the space, food, and intra-, and interspecific 



//3 



requirements and limitations of mosquito larvae. In comparing two 
important species, Culex pipiens and Aedes aep;vpti , we have found 
them to have similar space and food requirements, but markedly dif- 
ferent light requirements, which has an important effect on the 
second aspect of the study. 

Sampling and Sampling Techniques . An investigation into a new use 
of vital stains as a method of tagging mosquito larvae for analysis 
of population and sampling techniques is under investigation. As 
reported at the Northeastern Branch of the Entomological Society of 
America, the technique is useful both as a basis for analyzing 
mosquito populations (including dispersal and total numbers) and as 
a tool to investigate biological control agents. 

The effects of vital stains on tagged larvae is being studied on 
various levels including the histochemical, histological, physi- 
ological, and ecological aspects in order to evaluate the accuracy 
and limits of the tool as a sampling technique. 

Plant Hematology 

R. A. Rohde C. DiSanzo 

J. R. Acedo W. Knox 

B. D. Bhatt Chia-ling Pi 

Respiratory Behavior in Tylenchidae 

A Cartesian Diver ultramicro-respirometer has been constructed and 
permits respiration measurements on nematodes which weigh less than 
0.1 ug (10-' g) . Variations in osmotic pressure, carbon dioxide 
concentration, moisture, and temperature have been found to influ- 
ence respiration markedly. Of particular interest have been studies 
on those nematodes which exhibit anabiosis and will live in 
"suspended animation" for several years, since they are able to 
respire well at M-0 atmospheres of osmotic pressure. 

Resistance in Tomato Varieties to 
Root-Knot and Lesion Nematodes 

R. A. Rohde C. DiSanzo 

J. R. Acedo W. Knox 

B. D. Bhatt Chia-ling Pi 

Tomato varieties resistant to root-knot nematodes accumulate large 
quantities of chlorogenic acid (CA) in the area of nematode feeding. 
Subsequent oxidation of CA and polymerization to melanins result in 
a necrotic lesion and the nematode dies. This does not occur in 
susceptible varieties. Leson nematodes readily penetrate the 
endodermis of susceptible roots, but are confined to the cortex in 
resistant roots. The influence of CA on nematode behavior and 
development is being studied further. _ 



Phenolic Compounds Associated 
with Lesion Nc^matode Injury 

R. A. Rohde C. DiSanzo 

J. R. Acedo W. Knox 

B. D. Bhatt Chia-ling Pi 

Carrot, cabbage and tobacco seedlings have been inoculated asepti- 
cally and the phenolic compounds which accumulate in lesions are 
being studied by chromatography and spectrophotometry. Several new 
compounds, which di not occur in healthy plants, have been partially 
identified. In resistant tobacco varieties, those few progeny which 
reach maturity have been found to exhibit morphologic changes. For 
example, lesion nematodes normally have one ovary, but those which 
develop in tobacco often have two ovaries. Attempts are being made 
to isolate those compounds responsible for these changes. 

Nematodes Associated with Maple Decline 

R. A. Rohde C. DiSanzo 

J. R. Acedo W. Knox 

B. D. Bhatt Chia-ling Pi 

A survey of healthy and declining maples throughout the state has 
shown that certain nematodes are m ore commonly found around 
declining maples. Populations have been isolated and used to 
inoculate various-sized maples in greenhouse and growth chamber 
studies. The possibility that these nematodes may vector a virus 
is being explored. 

Entomology 

Pesticide Residues in or on Raw 
Agricultural Commodities 

F. R. Shaw 

We have in process or have determined the rates of disappearance of 
seven pesticides currently being investigated for the control of 
the alfalfa weevil. Residues of Ronnel and Vapona in the flesh of 
poultry and in eggs have been determined. 

Forage Crop Insects in Massachusetts with 
Particular Emphasis on the Alfalfa Weevil 

F. R. Shaw 

Investigations of the role of parasites of the alfalfa weevil have 
shown that two of the five species of introduced parasites are well 
established in parts of the state. Both Bathyplectes and Tetrastichus 
attack larval alfalfa weevils. The relatively high percentage of 



/jV 



paratism by Tetrastichus indicates the possibility that this para- 
site may be better synchronized in Massachusetts than in Maryland 
or New Jersey. 

Investiyrations of Losses of Honeybees from 
Applications of Pesticides and from Bee Dis- 
eases, and Methods of Reducing Such Losses 

F. R. Shaw 

In some areas of the United States 2-hydroxy-n-octyl sulfide has 
been recommended as a material to repel bees from crops treated with 
pesticides. Under our conditions this material had no value as a 
repellent to solitary bees and little value as a repellent to 
honeybees. 

Some beekeepers have claimed bee losses resulting from insecticidal 
fogs applied for mosquito control. A Naled fog applied at a temper- 
ature of 50°F. had no measurable effects on nucleii or colonies of 
bees. 

Comparative Analytical Methods for the 
> Detection of Ronnel or Releated Toxic 

Residues in Chicken Eggs 

R. A. Callahan 

Three methods of analysis for ronnel (0-0-dimethyl-O 2,4-, 5 
trichlorophenyl phosphorothiate) were used to determine the presence 
and disappearance of ronnel in yolks of chicken eggs. Tests for 
toxic metabolites of ronnel were also tested. The techniques of 
analysis involved colorimetric, gas chromatographic and bio-assay 
using the brine shrimp , Artemia salina (Leach) , The comparative 
value of each of the methods is presented. 

A Study of Certain Factors Influencing 
Oviposition by the Alfalfa Weevil , 
Hypera Postica Gyllenhal 

M. C. Miller 

The study of stem size and age in relation to oviposition preference 
by the alfalfa weevil indicates that fresh growing stems of up to 
3.3 millimeters in diameter are preferred. 

Oviposition preference tests on four varieties of alfalfa and a control 
variety indicated a marked resistance by two varieties to oviposition. 
It was determined that fall oviposition played little role in the 
spring alfalfa weevil infestations and that alfalfa weevil eggs did 
not overwinter in Western Massachusetts. The spring infestation is, 
therefore, due to oviposition by overwintering adult weevils « 



// 



^ 



Host Preferences of Mosquitoes 

R. G. Means 

Host preferences of mosquitoes were determined in Suffolk County, 
New York, by exposing test animals in a new type of mosquito trap. 
The data obtained were analyzed using the "t" test. It was demon- 
strated that some species had significant host preferences whereas 
others fed readily on a wide range of hosts. 

The Ecology and Biology of the 
Blackflies of Western Massachusetts 

F. G. Holbrook 

Intensive collections of blackflies have been made in the four 
western counties of Massachusetts. At least twenty -two species of 
these insects have been caught. Observations on the distribution 
and ecology of blackflies have been recorded. In one locality a 
pure culture of Simulium vittatum Zett has been f ound and a year-long 
study of the population dynamics of this insect has been made. 

Mosquito Taxonomy 

Marion E, Smith 

Studies on the comparative morphology of early instars of the larvae 
of one of the common snow-pool mosquitoes, carried on as a master's 
degree problem by Duncan MacKenzie, show that certain characters 
appear to be indicative of the instar to which they belong. Most 
mosquito identification in the past has been based upon last instar 
larvae alone, hence any aid in positive identification of younger 
larvae is a valuable contribution in this economically important 
group of insects. Continuation of this research will include similar 
studies with other species to determine the universality and 
reliability of these characters. Other aspects of mosquito taxonomy, 
both adult and larval, are also in progress. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
PUBLIC SERVICE 
' PROGRAMS 

1965-66 



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COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK 



Cooperative Extension work is a voluntary out-of-school system of 
education for adults and young people. 

Its objectives are — 

to lessen the lag between discovery of knowledge and 
its useful application; 

to spur the development of the individual, the family, 
the farm, the firm, the group and the community. 

Its method is to plan programs with its participants, basing 
these programs on current problems and needs and developing 
their substance from the relevant disciplines of the University. 

In Massachusetts Cooperative Extension work is an arrangement entered 
into by the federal government through the United States Department 
of Agriculture; by the State through the University of Massachusetts; 
and by the counties through the Trustees for County Aid to Agriculture 
in the Counties of Barnstable, Berkshire, Dukes, Franklin, Hampden, 
Hampshire, Middlesex, Plymouth and Worcester, and through the Trustees 
of the County Agricultural Schools in Bristol, Essex and Norfolk 
Counties. 



PROGRAMS IN COOPERATIVE EXTENSION WORK 

Development of Human Resources 

Educational programs are conducted with families and members of 
families designed to improve social well-being and adjustment to social, 
and economic changes. Opportunities for human development and improved 
human relationships within the family and within the community are 
emphasized. 

Educational programs designed to foster beneficial physical, mental 
and emotional development of youth are conducted through a voluntary 
youth leader system. These programs offer a variety of learning and 
training situations providing youngsters opportunity for leadership 
development, career exploration, understanding the natural world of 
plants, animals, land, water, air and the opportunity to accfuire 
knowledge and skills in agriculture and home economics. 

Improvement of Human Nutrition and Consumer Satisfaction 

Educational programs are conducted with families and with people as 
individual workers, as consumers, and as members of society on 



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nutritional needs; on the selection, preservation, preparation and 
use of foods; on design, selection, construction, and care of 
clothing; on housing for the family; on equipment and furnishings 
for the household; and on the efficient and satisfying use and 
management of family resources. 

Conservation, Development, and Use of Soil, Water, Forest and Related 
Resources, and the Development of Economies of Communities and Areas 

Educational programs of resource description, inventory, conservation, 
development, management and evaluation of alternative uses and 
methods of use are conducted with farmers, land owners, conservation 
commissions, development commissions and many other regional and 
inter-community groups. 

Local factual information including description, inventory and trends 
is compiled and disseminated to aid in community, county and area 
economic development and adjustment. 

The Protection of Man, Plants and Animals from Loss, Damage or Dis- 
comfort Caused by Insects, Diseases, Parasites, Weeds, Fire, and Other 
Hazards 

Educational programs related to the protection of people; to the 
preservation and protection of man-made resources, crops and crop 
products, animals and animal products, and forest and related re- 
sources are conducted with producers and consumers of these products 
and resources. 

Efficient Production and Quality Improvement of Food and Other Agri- 
cultural Products 

Educational programs concerned with the biology of plants and animals, 
improvement of the biological efficiency of plants and animals, in- 
creased consumer acceptability of farm and forest products, the 
mechanization and improvement of physical efficiency and the management 
of labor, capital, and other inputs to maximize income are conducted 
with producers, agricultural supply firms, related federal and state 
agencies, and agricultural organizations „ 

New and Improved Development and Processing of Food and Other Agri- 
cultural Products 

Educational programs pertaining to the chemical and physical properties 
of food and other agricultural products and programs concerned with 
developing new and improved food and non-food products and processes 
are conducted with processing firms, manufacturers and processing 
supply firms, institutional consumers of food and non-food agricultural 
products, and related federal and state agencies. 



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Efficient Marketing, Including Pricing and Quality of Food and Other 
Agricultural Products 

Educational programs are conducted with distributors of food and 
other agricultural products, food service operators, the related 
supply firms, federal and state regulatory agencies on subjects 
concerned with identification, measurement and maintenance of quality; 
improvement of economic and physical efficiency; analysis of supply, 
demand and price, including interregional competition; and the 
development of markets, including consumer preference and behavior. 



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DEPARTMENT OF 
AGRICULTURAL AND FOOD ECONOMICS 



Farm Business Management Schools 

A series of four 5 -hour classes (20 hours) for owner managers of 
dairy farms held, in Hardwick, Massachusetts, daytimes, followed by 
on-farm-laboratory exercises requiring another 10 hours of student 
time and 8 days of instruction time; 10 attending. Dr. Fuller, 
Mr. Rhoades, and Mr. Mentzer. November - December 1965 

A series of six 5 -hour classes (30 hours) for owner managers of 
vegetable cash crop farms held at West Springfield, Massachusetts, 
daytimes; 17 attending. Dr. Fuller, Mr. Rhoades, and Mr. Melnick. 
January 1966 

A series of four 5-hour classes (20 hours) followed by 10 hours of 
on-farm-laboratory classes for dairy farm owner managers held at 
Spencer, Massachusetts; 15 attending. Dr. Fuller, Mr. Rhoades, and 
Mr. Mentzer. February 1966 

A one day Tax Management and Income Tax Record School for forest 

owners, Christmas tree owners and foresters held in cooperation 

with the Extension Forester; 30 attending. Mr. Noyes and Mr. Rhoades, 

Dairy Nutrition Schools 

A two day, 8 -hour course on the principles of dairy cattle nutrition, 
included principles of rumen physiology, biochemistry, and economic 
level and substitution. Dr. Fuller, Dr. Gaunt, and Dr. Lyfordo 

a. Held in Northampton, November 1965; 30 participating. 

b. Held in Pittsfield, December 1965; IM- participating. 

c. Held at Bristol County Agricultural High School, 
Segreganset, Massachusetts, January 1965. 

Food Distribution Management Seminar 

A two day training course for those with management responsibilities 
in food wholesaling, retailing, and related firms. The course dealt 
with the application of quantitative techniques, including computer 
simulation, to the scheduling and supervision of labor and other 
inputs utilized in retail food firms. Held on the campus, October 11 
and 12, 1965; 50 attending. Dr. Leed and Mr. Marion 

Produce Management Seminars 



Two 2-day seminars conducted in cooperation with the New England 
Grocers Supply Company of Worcester for retail food store owners 



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and managers . Included technical and management information and 
practices concerning the handling and merchandising of fresh produce 
in retail food stores. Held in VJorcester, Massachusetts, 
January 17-18, 214—25, 1965; M-0 attending. Dr. Leed and Mr. Hayes 

Supervisory Management Training Program 

A three day, 21-hour institute on planning and policy formulation 
conducted for department managers, supervisors, and other personnel 
with management responsibility in agriculturally-oriented firms. 
Held twice during year - once on the Amherst campus v^/ith enrollment 
of 20, and once at Waltham Field Station with enrollment of 17. 
Dr. Bragg and Mr. Stokes from Nelson, Nicol and Stokes 

Financial and Expense Control Workshops 

A five day, 30-hour workshop conducted for owners and accountants 
of dairies in the Northeast. Held twice during year, once in 
Syracuse, New York with 19 enrolled, and once in Albany, New York, 
with 23 enrolled. Dr. Bragg taught tv-JO of the five-day sessions. 
Dr. Aplin, Dr. Carpentier from Cornell University, and Dr. Johnston 
from The Pennsylvania State University taught the other three days. 

Management Workshops 

A continuing series of one day, 5-hour workshops for owners and 
managers of dairies. The two groups have met a total of nine times 
since last July 1, with a total of 24- regular participants. 
Dr. Bragg 

Milk Plant Operators^ Seminar 

A nex-i series of one day, 5-hour meetings for owners, plant managers 
and laboratory technicians of dairy plants. The first meeting was 
attended by 18. Dr. Bragg and Mr. Evans 

Costs and Returns of Fruit Enterprises 

A clarification of (1) fixed costs, which continue even if production 
ceases, (2) direct cash costs arising with production, and (3) de- 
sired returns or non-cash costs. Explanation of typical cost of 
production analysis. 1955 series open to Central Massachusetts fruit 
growers; 20-25 participating in three, 2 1/2 hour sessions every 
other week. Dr. Crossmon and Mr. Fultz 

Business Management Clinics 

Background study of the industry and case studies of individual firms 
provided teaching materials for classroom discussion, examination, 
and take home study and reference. 



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a. Northeast Florists' Association School, Boston, Massachusetts, 
October 31 - November 1, 1955; two parts: 

(1) Management clinic, 3 hours; 50 attending. 

(2) Special follow-up growers' session; 2'4- attending two, 
5 hour periods. Topics included choice of productive 
combinations, relative resources and demand, clari- 
fication of costs and profits, other management goals, 
pricing alternatives, and relation of individual firms 
to total industry. 

b. Maine Florists' Association, Lewiston, Maine; January 19, 1966; 
50 attending. 

c. Maine Arborists' Association, Augusta, Maine; March 5, 1955; 
85 attending. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 



Eighth Annual Agricultural Structures Seminar 

A one-day program of lectures and discussions held at Amherst. 
Attended by 50 builders, materials suppliers, farmstead equipment 
suppliers, and others engaged in or advisers to those who are engaged 
in the design and construction of agricultural buildings. Mr. Light, 
Mr. Collins, and Dr. Clayton 

Seventh Annual Power Equipment Seminar 

A one-day program of lectures and discussions sponsored jointly by 
the Extension Service and the New England Association of Power 
Equipment Retailers. This November meeting was attended by more than 
70 retail dealers and manufacturers' representatives from all parts 
of New England. Dr. l\Oiitney and Mr. Light 

Improved Operation of Milking Machines 

A series of two, 2-hour classes for dairymen and other milking machine 
operators. This series was held in March in Worcester, Massachusetts, 
with a total attendance of M-4-. Dr. Stern (Veterinary and Animal 
Sciences), Mr. Evans (Food Science and Technology), and Mr. Johnson 
(Agricultural Engineering) 

Field and Farmstead Forage Handling 

A one-day program of lectures relating to improved methods and equipment 
for handling forage. The meeting was held at Middleboro, Massachusetts, 
in March and was attended by 25 dairymen and equipment retailers. 
Mr. Light. 



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In addition, Mr. Light actively participated in the Dairy Farmers 
Seminar (Veterinary and Animal Sciences) and the In-Service Training 
Course on Milk Technolocry for Milk Sanitarians (Food Science and 
Technology). Dr. Wliitney cooperated with Dr. Lord (Plant and Soil 
Sciences) in the presentation of a two-meeting series on harvesting 
aids and harvesting systems for apple growers. Details of these 
programs have been given by the other departments concerned. 



CRANBERRY STATION 

Summer Cultural Practices for Cranberries 

An afternoon clinic for cranberry growers held at East Wareham, 
Massachusetts, on July 1. Lectures on the veirious cultural practices 
necessary for growing cranberries during the summer months. Attended 
by 120 growers. Dr. Cross, Mr. Tomlinson, and Mr. Demor anville . 

Cranberry Growers * Field Day 

One all-day meeting at East Wareham, Massachusetts, with lectures, 
demonstrations and field trips on August 24, 1965. Attended by 
approximately 300 growers and held in cooperation with the 
Cape Cod Cranberry Growers Association. Dr. Cross and the entire 
Cranberry Station staff 

Mechanical Harvesting IVorkshop 

Instruction in the use of mechanical harvesting machinery for 
cranberries held at East Wareham, Massachusetts, on August 31, 1965. 
T\\;o, 1 1/2 hour classes. Attended by 8M- growers. Mr. Demoranville 
and technical representatives 

Cranberry Club Meetings 

A series of two, 2 1/2 hour evening meetings, one in Kingston, 
Massachusetts, one in Barnstable, Massachusetts, and a three-hour 
afternoon meeting in Rochester, Massachusetts. Held during February. 
Lectures on bulk storage, fungicides, new varieties and weather 
conditions in regard to cultural practices and crop potential. Total 
attendance 175. Dr. Cross, Dr. Zuckerman, Dr. Deubert, Dr. Pracer, 
and Mr. Demoranville 

Cranberry Club Meetings 

Held at same places as above during March. Lectures on insect control, 
low gallonage sprinklers, weed control, fertilizer practices, 
pesticide residues in soils and growth hormones. Total attendance 165. 
Dr. Devlin, Dr. Miller, Mr. Norton, Mr. Tomlinson, and Mr. Demoranville 



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Spring and Early Summor Cultural Practices for CraribGrries 

A series of three clinics for cranberry growers held at Hanson, 
East Wareham, and North Harwich on May 2^■ and 25. Lectures on the 
various cultural practices necessary for growing cranberries during 
the spring and early siommer months. Attended by approximately 150 
growers. Dr. Cross, Mr. Tomlinson, Mr. Norton, and Mr. Demoranville 

DEPARTMENT OF 
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES 

Gas Chromatography Pesticide Workshop 

A three day training program for analytical chemists, biologists, and 
other professionals concerned with pesticide analysis. Attended by 
52 professionals from eight states. Dr. Naegele, Dr. McEnroe, 
Dr. Lisk (Cornell University), and technical representatives from the 
F & M Scientific Company 

Pesticides, a Contemporary Component of Environment 

A one-day symposium reviewing the current progress and posture of 
pesticide research in Massachusetts. Attended by 25 research and 
Extension personnel. Dr. Naegele, Dr. McEnroe, and staff 

Culture of the Greenhouse Tomato 

a. Three one day educational meetings for tomato growers ex- 
plaining the latest methods of culture. Each meeting 
attended by 25 growers. Mr. Young 

b. One all-day meeting at Waltham with formal lectures on the 
growth and culture of the greenhouse tomato. Attended by 
1+0 growers and held in cooperation with the Massachusetts 
Greenhouse Tomato Growers Council. Mr. Young 

Florist Field Day 

A one-day program of lectures and demonstrations held at Waltham. 
Professional growers were instructed in new culturing concepts. 
Approximately 200 attended this meeting. Dr. Butterfield and regional 

agents 

Introduction to Turf Management 

A one-day (6-M-O minutes) lecture course designed to introduce concepts 
of turf management to professional managers of turf in industry, 
parks, playgrounds, cemeteries, and schools. Attended by 89 managers. 
Held at Waltham « Mr. Fordham 



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An Introduction to Plant Physloloj^ 

A series of six 2 1/2 hour classes for professional flower growers, 
A course to give an understanding of basic principles and to prepare 
for advanced investigation. Held at Waltham; M-0 attending. 
Dr. Butterfield 

Arborists ' Refresher Course 

A series of seven 2 1/2 hour lectures for commercial arborists, 
nurserymen, tree wardens, and state forestry personnel. Lectures 
covered a variety of subjects to give a broad understanding of the 
latest materials and methods available. Held at Waltham; 160 at- 
tending. Mr. Chater 

An Introduction to Plant Nutrition 

A series of six 2 1/2 hour classes for professional flower growers, 
Basic metabolic principles were discussed leading to study of indi- 
vidual chemical elements important in plant nutrition. Held at 
Waltham; 18 attending. Dr. Rosenau 

Environmental Factors Affecting Public & Private Health 

"Pollution in the Suburbs" - a course consisting of eight 2 hour 
lectures and two field trips. A 'Commonwealth *99' offering for 
health officers, planning board and conservation commission members 
as well as civic-minded citizens. Designed to give a sound bio- 
logical foundation to a better understanding of pollutants and their 
implications. Held at Wellesley in cooperation with the Wellesley 
Adult Education Program and Vi/ellesley Conservation Council, Inc.; 
157 attending from 25 communities and 4-5 organizations. Dr. Naegele 
and Mr. Putnam 

A Citizens ' Forum on Air Pollution 

A series of seven 2- hour lectures for those in the Greater Boston area 
who are concerned with improving their environment. Another 
'Commonwealth '99' information-action program to explain the latest 
research information and action opportunities available. Cooperating 
organizations: Back Bay Association, Beacon Hill Civic Association, 
Boston Tuberculosis Association, Massachusetts Horticultural Society, 
Neighborhood Association of the Back Bay. Held at Horticultural Hall, 
Boston; 70 attending. Dr. Naegele and Mr. Putnam 

Poultrymen's Refresher Course 

A one-day program of five one-hour lectures for the professional 
poultrymen and allied industry representatives. Latest information 
on poultry health and economics was presented. Held at Waltham; 
60 attending. Dr^ Faddoul, and Mr. Fellows 



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DEPARTMENT OF 
ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

New England Aerial Applicator Conference 

An, April 1965, afternoon-evening conference covering laws and regu- 
lations in New England States, hazards of aerial pesticide appli- 
cations, reviev\7 of information obtained at Regional Conference in 
Ithaca, New York. Participants included 17 pilots, owners and 
growers. Dr. I'Jheeler and leaders in Pesticide Education from other 
New England States 

Northeastern Mosquito Suppression and Wildlife Management Conference 

A three-day program in April 1966, designed to stimulate interest in 
greater efforts to coordinate activities carried out in mosquito 
control and wildlife management operations for greatest benefit for 
all. Sponsored by National Coordination Committee, the College of 
Agriculture, several private organizations and federal and state 
agencies. Attended by 119 professional and nonprofessional from 
15 states and Washington, D. C. Dr. l\Jheeler worked closely with the 
National Committee in developing the program and chaired the local 
organization committee. 

DEPARTMENT OF 
FOOD SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 



During the past year several very successful seminars and training 
sessions were held. Experience to date indicates that these should 
be continued as very effective department Extension activities. 

Psycholog\/ of Personnel Management 

A series of five 1 1/2 hour classes for Massachusetts school lunch 
supervisors, at the request of the Massachusetts Department of 
Education, June 28 - July 2, 1965, Amherst; lOM- attending. 
Dr. Lundberg 

Personnel Management 

A series of six 2- hour classes for ov\mers , managers, supervisors, 
and other personnel with supervisory and management responsibilities 
in Massachusetts hotels, restaurants, hospitals, and other food 
service firms, Monday evenings during October and November 1965. 
Held simultaneously at University of Massachusetts— Boston, and at 
West Springfield, utilizing a telephone circuit; 123 attending. 
Dr. Lundberg, Mr. Eshbach, and Mr. Lukowski 



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Purchasing; Food for Food Service Establishments 

A series of eight 2-hour classes for managers, owners and others with 
responsibilities for food purchasing in a wide variety of food 
service establishments, Monday evenings during November and December 
1965. Held simultaneously at University of Massachusetts— Boston, 
and at West Springfield, using a telephone circuit; 92 attending. 
Dr. Lundberg, Mr. Eshbach, Mr. Lukowski, Mr. Wrisley, Mr. Buck, 
Mr. Hayes, Dr. Potter, plus outside lecturers 

13th Annual Food Service Seminar 

Cosponsored by Massachusetts Food Service Educational Council and 
University of Massachusetts held at University, January 26-28, 1966. 
Program focused on changes that will determine the food service 
operator's future and included features on convenience foods, 
equipment, merchandising, legislative developments, and economic as- 
pects. Attendance 190. Mr. Eshbach, member of planning committee, 
and Dr. Francis, speaker, from University 

Ice Cream Forum 

January 27-28, 1966 - annual tv\;o-day conference for the ice cream 
industry held at University. Attendance 80. Dr. Potter, 
Dr. Hankinson, and outside speakers 

In-Service Training Course for Milk Sanitarians 

A one-week course held at University, November 15-19, 1965, designed 
to update sanitarians' technical knowledge of milk quality and to 
introduce the sanitarian to the requirements of the new 1965 U. S. 
PoH.S. Grade A Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. A loose-leaf reference 
titled "Dairy Sanitation Manual" was prepared by Mr. Evans. Supported 
by a $5,925 short term training grant from U. S. Public Health Service. 
The total attendance of 82, representing all six New England States, 
consisted of 70 regulatory persons and 12 persons from industry. 
Dr. Hankinson, Mr. Evans, Dr. Potter, Dr. Stern, plus outside speakers 

Food Science Research Seminar 

Held at University, January 14-, 1966, for and at request of research 
directors and administrators of General Foods Corporation, Tarrytovvn, 
New York, for purpose of reviewing research programs of Department 
of Food Science and Technology. Attendance 12. Dr. Esselen, 
Dr. Hultin, Dr. Fagerson, Dr. Francis, Dr. Stumbo, Dr. Levin, and 
Dr. Nawar 

Seminar on Wax Packaging in the Food Industry 

Cosponsored by Department of Food Science and Technology and American 
Petroleum Institute. Held at University, March 22-23, 1965. 



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Purpose of seminar xvas to bring executives with research, technical 
service and sales backgrounds from primary wax producers, and the 
packaging and food industries up-to-date on applications and uses 
of wax in food packaging. The 70 people in attendance came from all 
over the country, including the IVest Coast, Middle West, and South. 
Mr. Hayes, Dr. Levine, Dr. Francis, Dr. Potter, Dr. Esselen, and 
outside speakers 

Understanding Cooking 

A series of eight 2-hour classes for food service industry personnel, 
including owners and managers , Monday evenings during March and 
April 1966, at West Springfield. The principles of physics and 
chemistry behind many of the food service industry's practices and 
procedures in cooking were emphasized. Used in the seminar was a 
book on "Understanding Cooking" by Dr. Donald E. Lundberg, the first 
programmed textbook on this industry's subject matter; 80 attending. 
Dr. Lundberg, Mr. Lukowski, Mr. Eshbach, and outside speakers 

Color Measurement in Foods 

At University, June 22-24-, 1956. An intensive course designed to 
present the theory and practice of food colorimetry, including visual 
and instrumental measurement of color and color tolerances of 
foodstuffs; 4-0 attending from food research orgemizations . 
Dr. Francis, Mr. Hayes, Mr. Clydesdale, Mr, Buck, and outside speakers 



DEPARTMENT OF 
FORESTRY AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT 

Municipal Watershed Management Symposium 

A trt\7o-day symposium to point out to municipal watershed administrators 
responsible for land management policy ways in which forestry may 
enhance quality and quantity of water yields, and the role of 
forestry in a total land management program. This symposium, 
conducted at the University, was reported to be the first of its kind 
in the United States. One hundred and twenty people enrolled - 
v/atershed administrators, professional foresters and University staff 
from throughout the Northeast. Mr. Noyes, General Chairman; 
Mr. Bond, Dr. Mader, Mr. Noyes, Program Committee; Dr. Mader and 
Mr. Noyes, Editors of Proceedings; Dr. Mader, Mr. MacConnell, 
Mr. Berger, Instructors from University; eight others. November 9-10, 
1965. 

State-Wide Massachusetts Forestry Field Day 

A one-day program of lectures, demonstrations and educational exhibits 



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designed to show Massachusetts forest lando^vners the multiple-use 
potentials of their' forest properties — for commercial timber pro- 
duction, recreation, Xi7ildlife management, and watershed purposes. 
Approximately 1,100 people from Massachusetts and neighboring states 
attended. This event at the Hawley State Forest was organized by 
Mr. Noyes, General Chairman, assisted by Regional Agent Donald T. 
Thayer, and foresters of the Massachusetts Department of Natural 
Resources. July 10, 1955. 

Forest Property and the Federal Income Tax 

A one day training course at the University for landov-mers, public 
and private foresters and county agents concerned v/ith current re- 
quirements for forest products tax reporting. Third successive 
annual course. Eighty-five attendees from the Northeast. Mr. Rhoades 
and Mr. Noyes. March 21, 1956. 

Retail Lumber Merchandising 

A one-week course at the University to develop competency in retail 
lumbermen in sales, engineering, business methods, etc. Thirty 
attendees from retail lumber firms in New England. Dr. Gatslick, 
April 1966. 

Hardwood Lumber Grading and Measurement Workshop 

A one-v/eek course at the University designed to instruct lumber indus- 
try representatives with the basic techniques of hardwood lumber 
grading and measurement. Thirty-five attendees from the Northeast, 
National Hardwood Lumber Association Inspector, G. Bullard, joined 
our staff of Dr. Hoadley, Dr. Gatslick, and Mr. Noyes in teaching. 
May 23-27, 1955. 



DEPARTMENT OF 
PLANT AND SOIL SCIENCES 



The following are all instruction courses given as Extension activity 
of this department during the past fiscal year. 

Turf Conference 

A one and one-half day conference for golf course superintendents; 
park, cemetery and athletic field superintendents; government workers; 
county agricultural and regional specialists* equipment dealers; 
pesticide and fertilizer representatives; students; University person- 
nel, and other Extension people from other New England States and the 
Northeast interest in fine turf. In eluded a series of lectures given 



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prominent turf specialists from various universities throughout the 
country, United States Golf Association Green Section representa- 
tives, state government and. radio personalities involved in weather 
forecasting. Held at University in the Student Union and at the 
Hotel Northampton, March B-"-!-, 1966; 535 attending. Dr. Troll 

Grass Identification Workshop 

A one-day school for regional and turf specialists involved in turf 
work. Included grass identification and turf disease identification. 
Held January 25; 7 attending. Held at University. Dr. Troll 

La\\m Establishment Workshop 

A one-evening session held in Pittsfield before the Men's Garden Club, 
Included a lawn establishment demonstration and a question and answer 
period. Held May 13; 75 attending. Dr. Troll 

Corn Production and Management Symposia 

Five, two-to-three hour, formal sessions composed of lectures and 
demonstrations for farmers, technical representatives from industry, 
government workers, vocational agricultural teachers and University 
personnel held February 8, 9, and 10 in Bristol, Hampshire, FranlcLin, 
and Worcester Counties on latest findings in corn production research; 
250 attending (many several sessions). Dr. V/eeks, Dr. E. E. Gamble 
(Guelph, Canada), and Regional Specialists Harrington, Hill, and 
Corwin. 

Liquid and Bulk Blend Fertilizer Workshops and Training Sessions 

Nine, t\\70-hour, formal sessions usually of three lectures at the 
University/ or in county headquarters and one workshop at a fertilizer 
plant in Rochdale for University personnel, county and regional 
specialists, farmers, fertilizer representatives and government workers 
were held in late February and early March; approximately 150 attend- 
ing (many several times). Dr. Weeks, Mr. Harrington, Mr. Mentzer, 
and Mr. Hill 

Culture of Ma.jor Vegetable Crops 

A series of three one-half day, educational meetings dealing with all 
phases of the culture of three vegetable crops of major importance. 
Held at Waltham with average a-ttendance of 65 growers and commercial 
representatives. Instructors v/ere Mr. Thomson, Mr. Young, other staff 
members, and regional vegetable specialists. 

Recent Developments in Fertilizer Technolog\/ 

A one-day course at Amherst for agents and specialists dealing with 
crops. Fifteen agents and specialists attended. Instructors were 
Mr. Rhoades, Dr. VJeeks, Dr. Drake ,• and Mr. Thomson. 



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Modern Extension Methods 

A series of four one-day programs outlining newer concepts in Extension 
programs for vegetable growers. Held at Worcester for the regional 
agents working with vegetable growers. All attended all sessions. 
Instructor was Mr. Thomson. 

New York-Nexv? England CA Seminar 

One all-day meeting to discuss the latest research findings on CA 
storage of apples. Meeting held at New Paltz, Nev/ York, University 
of Massachusetts and Cornell University cooperating. Attended by 
125 people involved in the apple industry as well as professionals 
from the United States Department of Agriculture, Canada, Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, as well as New York and New England. Research data 
were presented by Dr. Zahradnik, Dr. Bramlage, Dr. Lord, Dr. Southwick, 
Dr. Smock (Cornell University), Dr. Blanpied (Cornell University), 
Dr. Dewey (Michigan State University), and Dr. Eaves (Nova Scotia). 

New England Fruit Meeting 



A tv\70-day series of meetings for tree fruit growers in New England at 
which nutritional, post-harvest physiological, rootstock, growth 
regulator, pesticidal, mechanical harvesting, marketing, and labor 
problems were discussed by professionals from New England, Michigan, 
Pennsylvania, Illinois, Idaho, and the Office of the United States 
Secretary of Labor. These meetings were held at Suffolk Downs, 
Boston, January 5-6, 1966, with over 500 in attendance. Dr. Lord, 
Dr. Southwick, and Mr. Goss (Worcester County Extension Service) were 
involved in program arrangements. 

Winter Fruit Meetings 

Six meetings of one-half or one-day duration were held during the 
winter months. Meetings held at several locations in the state with 
lectures Eind demonstrations related to weed control, pruning, 
varieties, post-harvest disorders of tree fruits, etc. Attendemce 
ranged from 30-100 persons per meeting. Dr. Lord and Regional Agents 

Twilight Fruit Meetings 

Evening meetings were held at commercial orchards throughout the state 
from May through August. About 15 such meetings were held at which 
such topics as insect and disease control, nutrition, weed control, 
chemical thinning, etc., were discussed. Attendance ranged from 20- 
90 persons per meeting » Dr. Lord, Dr. Wave, Dr. Gilgut, and Regional 
Fruit Agents were primarily involved in these meetings. 



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DEPARTMENT OF 
VETERINARY AND ANIMAL SCIENCES 



All phases of the continuing education programs with the animal indus- 
tries of the state have demonstrated a high level of professional 
accomplishment under the able leadership of our Extension coordinators: 
Dr. Gaunt, Dairy; Dr. Stern, Animal Diseases; Mr. Grover, Poultry, 
and Mr. Colby, Livestock. An important element in the success of the 
program has been in the concept of regionalization of the county staff 
and the specialized competencies of this field staff. Another 
highlight of the program has been the initiation of well-designed 
Extension field studies on problems germane to the animal industries 
of the area. Many successful courses of instruction were conducted 
during the year and a list of these is as follows: 

Dairy Program 

New England Forage Forum 

Two days in August 1965 at the University of Massachusetts. Designed 
to provide advanced dairymen with the latest research and technologi- 
cal developments related to feed production, feed handling and feeding 
economically. Ten speakers; 290 attended. Dr. Gaunt, Program 
Coordinator 

Dairy Nutrition Schools 

Three two-day schools were held, one in Northampton in November, a 
second in Pittsfield in November, and a third in Segreganset in 
December at the Bristol County Agricultural School. These schools 
were designed to provide specific essential information on dairy cattle 
nutrition and the application in feeding systems economically. 
Attendance 12, 10, and 20. Dr. Gaunt and Dr. Lyford 

New England Dairy Feed Conference 

One day session in April in Boston. Requested by feed manufacturers. 
Designed to present the latest in dairy nutrition and feed processing. 
Emphasis on complete feeds and feed processing. One hundred attended; 
instructors were six staff members of the New England Colleges. 
Dr. Gaunt, Chairman of Conference, and an instructor 

Dairy Cattle Type Evaluation School 



' » 



Two days in July 1965. Held at four farms in Western Massachusetts, 
Eastern New York, and Southern Vermont. Designed to improve the 
quality of judging at shows and fairs to reflect more accurately the 
better cattle and to provide a reservoir of judges (relieving Extension 
of this task) . Enrollment 4-5 , Dr . Gaunt 



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Northeast Dairy Sire Conference 

Sponsored jointly by the New England Colleses and Cornell University, 
Ithaca, New York, January 1966. Two days of instruction designed to 
develop a better understanding of the fundamentals of genetics and 
their application to dairy cattle on the part of Sire Selection 
Committee members in the Artificial Breeding Associations (ABA*s). 
Enrollment 200. Dr. Gaunt, Massachusetts Extension representative 
and instructor. Six other instructors from cooperating colleges. 

1- H Genetic Course 

Six evening sessions held at Concord in winter of 1965-56. Purpose - 
to provide educational information on genetics of value to M—H members 
with animal projects. Attendance 30-70. Mr. S. Alden Helliker, 
Leader, Middlesex County M—H Agent. Dr. Gaunt assisted with program 
and as an instructor. Four other instructors. 

A Dairy Cattle Breeding Course 

Two days held a week apart; eight hours of instruction in February 
1956. For dairymen in Southeastern Massachusetts at Bristol County 
Agricultural High School. Designed to improve the educational 
background of dairymen in the principles of genetics, physiology of 
reproduction and their application to dairy cattle. Attendance 22. 
Dr. Gaunt, Dr. Dickinson, and Dr. Stern 

School of Managed Milking and Mastitis Control 

A course with four one-day sessions held over a two-week period. 
Two were held in a hall for illustrated lectures and two in barns 
to demonstrate techniques, equipment, and procedures. This school 
was designed to reduce the losses due to mastitis by providing basic 
information on the anatomy and physiology of the udder, the maintenance 
and operation of milking machines, sanitation, and management 
techniques. Enrollment limited to 25. Almost 100% attendance at 
every session. Dr. Stern, Dr. Gaunt, Mr. Johnson, and Mr. Evans 

Mastitis Control Instruction Meeting 

Three one-half -day sessions held in Southeastern Massachusetts in 
January 1965. Purpose the same as the school cited above; time 
limited so emphasis given to most important points in illustrated 
lectures. Attendance 14-, 13, and M-7. Dr. Stern and Dr. Gaunt 

Dairy Farmers* Seminar 

Two-day session held at the University of Massachusetts in January 
1966. Purpose - to improve the educational background of dairymen 
to overcome the compiex production and processing problems. 
Attendance 255. Dr. Gaunt, Chairman; 14- speakers, specialists in 
their areas, from universities and business. 






- IS - 

Massachusetts D»H«I.A. Supervisors^ Conference 

May 10, 1966, all day and evening conference attended by approximate- 
ly 4-5 supervisors, their wives and Extension personnel. Three 
sessions were held. These sessions were devoted to a discussion of 
the nexv? D.H.I. A. information that will be put out by the Cornell 
Central Processing Laboratory starting August 1, 1965 and its import 
for Massachusetts D.H.I. A. programs. Dr. Dickinson, Mr. Carter and 
Mr. Loomis, Cornell University 

Animal Disease 

Bovine Breeding School 

A series of t\\70 6-hour sessions for dairy farmers. Held at Bristol 
County Agricultural High School. Demonstrations and lectures on 
sterility problems in cattle and genetics. Dr. Stern and Dr. Gaunt 

Ruminant Nutrition Seminar 

A series of two 6-hour sessions for veterinary practitioners and 
Regional Agricultural Agents. Held at the Universi-ty of Massachusetts, 
Subject matters included ruminant physiology, feed additives, 
minerals, haylage, residues, and ketosis - limited to 30. Dr. Stern; 
Dr. Moore, U.S.D.A.; Dr. Reid, Cornell University; Dr. Broim, 
University of Connecticut; Dr. Lyford, and Dr. Gaunt, University of 
Massachusetts 

Mastitis-In-Service Training Course 

A series of two 5-hour sessions held one day a week for two weeks. 
For milk collectors, laboratory personnel, and Regional Agricultural 
Agents. Held at the University of Massachusetts. Subject matters 
included lectures and demonstrations on bacteriology, sanitation, 
milking machine function, and sample collection technique. Dr. Stern, 
Mr. Johnson, Mr Evans, Miss Mitchell, and Miss McConnell 

Mastitis Management 

A series of four 4— hour sessions held tvv'o days a week for two weeks 
for dairy farmers and milking machine servicemen - limited to 25. 
All aspects of mastitis management and control covered. Pioneer 
Valley Region - Sunderland and nearby dairy farms. Dr. Stern and 
mastitis team - Mr. Harrington 

Mastitis Management 

A series of two 8 -hour sessions for dairy farmers in Worcester County 
- limited to 25. All aspects of mastitis management covered. 
Dr. Stern and mastitis team - Mr. Hurld 






- 16 - 



Veterinary Radiolo.'arv 



Eight M— hour sessions in 2 1/2 days for veterinary practitioners and 
X-ray technicians at the University of Massachusetts. All phases of 
large and small animal X-ray and fluoroscopy. Both diagnostic and 
therapeutic aspects explored. Included demonstration in use of varied 
equipment - permanent and portable - limited to 30 registrants. 
Dr. Stern and Dr. Barrett, Alabama Veterinary College 

Meat Hygiene and Abbatoir Sanitation 

Two 2-hour sessions for Peace Corps students going to Bolivia. Basic 
information on diseases and sanitation of physical plant and 
personnel. Approximately M-0 students - Brandeis University. Dr. Stern 

Audio-Visual Aids in Extension Veterinary Medicine 

One 2-hour presentation with demonstrations and touring veterinary 
facilities at University of Massachusetts. Sixteen Madagascar 
students. Simultaneous interpretation from English into French. 
Dr. Stern 

Poultry Program 

Poultry Day 

One day held October 20, 1965 at the University of Massachusetts. 
Purpose - to present the latest information on the production and 
marketing of table eggs. Attendance 50. Mr. Grover, chairman. 
Papers by Dr. Fox, Dr. Anderson, Mr. Denison, Mr. Ruggles, 
Mr. Yergatian, and others 

Fitchburg Management Series 

Five sessions held monthly, October to March, in Fitchburg. Designed 
to present information and stimulate discussion among table egg 
producers and marketers relative to production management, poultry 
housing, and marketing of product. Average attendance 60. Mr. Grover, 
Mr, Denison, and others 

Southeast Region Business Management Series 

Four sessions held September to December 1965 in Plymouth and Bristol 
Counties. Purpose - to develop business management techniques 
QDudgeting, contract evaluation, etc.). Utilized the workshop 
approach to problem solving. Average attendance 20. Organized by 
Mr, Spear. Instructors, Mr. Grover and others 



1^0 



- Yl - 

Northeastern Turkey Producers Conference 

T\\70 and one-half days held January 17, 18, and 19, at the University 
of Massachusetts. Purpose - to provide turkey industrymen in the 
Northeast with the most recent research findings related to breeding, 
production management, processing and merchandising. Attendance 100 
from New England, New York, Pennsylvania, and. New Jersey. Organized 
by Mr. Grover, Dr. Smyth, and Mr. Denison. Instructors, Mr. Grover, 
Dr. Fox, Dr. Smyth, Mr. Denison, and others 

Massachusetts School Lunch Supervisors^ Short Course 

Three days, held first week in July 1965, at the University of 
Massachusetts. Purpose - to instruct school lunch supervisors in 
the procurement, care and preparation of foods. Attendance 150. 
Mr. Grover instructed session concerned with poultry and poultry 
products . 

Institutional Food Service Managers' VJorkshop 

Weekly sessions held in December 1955. Designed to assist insti- 
tutional food service operators in the purchase and care of foods. 
Sessions held concurrently in West Springfield and Boston by 
telephone Attendance 100. Mr. Grover instructed session on the 
purchase and care of poultry and poultry products. 



/3^/ 



- 18 - 
l-^-H CLUB AND YOUTPI WORK 

State I- H Conference for i-i— K Club Members 

A one-week conference conducted at the University of Massachusetts 
for 350 teen-age 4— H Club members. The conference consisted of 
lectures, seminars, and discussions relating to career exploration 
and preparation for employment. Dr. Howes, Mr. Boss, and staff 

Senior M— H Forum 

A t^\7o-day conference held in Boston for 250 teen-age 4— H Club members. 
Emphasis was on career exploration through visits to places of 
employment, institutions of higher learning. Dr. Howes, Miss Howell, 
and staff 

State M-H Clothing Seminar 

A three-day conference with 1-I-5 teen-age l-H girls relating to se- 
lection, care, and construction of clothing for girls. Emphasis v;as 
placed on economics and materials, both man-made and natural fibers. 
Seminar was held at the University of Massachusetts. Miss Hox\7ell 

4- H Horse Leaders Field Day 

A one-day program designed to give leaders of 4— H horse clubs train- 
ing ^^7hich would improve their local 4— H Club programs. Program 
content included emphasis on (1) developing and organizing a club 
program, and (2) new developments in horse husbandry. One hundred 
adults and teen-agers participated in this program held at the 
University of Massachusetts. Mr. Boss and faculty from Department 
of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Massachusetts M— H Dairy Show 

This three-day program was held in West Springfield for 120 4— H dairy 
members and emphasized (1) selection of high quality dairy animals, 
(2) preparation of animals for the show ring, and (3) evaluation of 
personal accomplishments on the part of each member. Methods included 
demonstrations, workshops, and personal evaluation. Mr. Boss 

4— H Lamb Marketing Program 

This program was held in West Springfield, and Hartford, Connecticut, 
for 50 4— H members and emphasized instruction in (1) market grades 
and qiaality of live lambs, (2) market grades and quality of lamb 
carcasses, (3) consumer demands for meat, and (4-) marketing of farm 
products through modern supermarkets. One-half day session was held 
in West Springfield, and one-half day in East Hartford, Connecticut. 
Mr. Boss and Mr. Colby 



/z% 



- 19 - 

Seminar - Western Massachusetts M— H Staff 

Six. one-day seminars were conducted for nine Western Massachusetts 
County 4— H Extension Agents. These were held at Northampton. 
Subject matter included (1) work with low-income youth, (2) organizing 
Community Action Committees, (3) television as a teaching method, 
and C-l-) efficient use of regional staff. Mr. Boss 

AID Training Programs for Foreign Extension Agents 

a. Rural Youth Leadership - University of Massachusetts. 
A six-week program carried out for six Kenyan and. one 
Grenadan Extension officers. Program included recruitment 
of staff, development of course outline, and carrying out 
teaching responsibility for this program. Course content 
included (1) administration of youth programs, (2) use of 
volunteer leadership (including recruitment, selection, 
and training), (3) teaching methods, and (M-) application 
of theory through development of a youth program for own 
situation. Mr. Boss and M—H staff, and School of Home 
Economics 

b. Developing Youth Programs - University of Massachusetts. 
A ten-day program for four Malawi Extension agents. This 
course emphasized the planning and evaluation of a youth 
program to be carried out in Malawi by each of the par- 
ticipants. Mr. Boss 

G. Youth Leadership and Effecting Cultural Change - University 
of Massachusetts. This eight-day program was conducted for 
three Malawi Extension agents. Program emphasized 
(1) recruitment, selection, training and use of volunteer 
leadership, (2) characteristics of peasant cultures, 
(3) principles of effecting cultural change, and (■+) appli- 
cation of (3) to local situation. Mr. Boss 

Massachusetts M— H Agricultural Science Field Day 

A day-long conference at the University of Massachusetts attended by 
250 high school age young people and adults vjhich demonstrated new 
scientific developments resulting from recent agricultural research 
and acquainted participants with the educational opportunities avail- 
able through the College of Agriculture. Dr. Metcalfe, Mr. Boss, 
and 25 faculty members from Departments of Agricultural Engineering, 
Forestry and Wildlife Management, Plant and Soil Sciences, and 
Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Youth Development Seminars 

Six day-long instructional seminars emphasizing techniques and 
processes in the development of Informal Educational Programs for 
Youth with ten Extension youth agents from the five southeastern 



/3c/ 



- 20 - 

counties of Massachusetts. Instruction provided in Brockton, 
Walpole, Segreganset, Lakeville, and Barnstable. Dr. Metcalfe and 
staff, and faculty of the College of Agriculture and the School of 
Home Economics 

Informal Educational Television Institutes 

Six day-long conferences with state and county Extension youth 
workers throughout New England on the effective use of informal edu- 
cational television as a means of reaching an increased audience of 
young people, largely unreached by previous M— H programs. 
Dr. Metcalfe and staff 

Homemakers Education Institutes 

Three day-long institutes for homemakers in Williamsburg, Lee and 
Northampton concerning the need and the opportunity for the continuing 
life-long education of individual and groups. Dr. Metcalfe 

Seminar on Development of Out-of-School Educational Programs 

Two one-day seminars were conducted in Worcester with 11 professional 
County 4— H Club Agents attending. Emphasis was placed on identifying 
needs of youth and effective use of volunteer adults in providing 
educational experiences which will meet these needs. Miss Howell 

M— H Educational Program Via TV 

A special 4— H TV Science Program was conducted in Southeastern 
Massachusetts. This program, which consisted of 16 one-half hour 
telecasts over Station WTEV, New Bedford, demonstrated certain 
principles of science. Examples of the science fields covered in- 
clude plants and animals, archeology, physics, microbiology, and 
chemistry. 

Each of the 15,000 Massachusetts young people who enrolled received 
a manual which they could use as an aid in following the concepts 
presented on television. A sampling of the audience indicated 
two-thirds or 20 of the experiments in the manual were completed by 
the participants. 

The program was conducted in cooperation with 81 school systems and 
Old Colony Superintendents* Association; Superintendent of Schools, 
Diocese of Fall River; Massachusetts Junior High School Principals* 
Association; Massachusetts Elementary School Principals' Association; 
Massachusetts Teachers' Association, and Senior Supervisor of Science, 
Massachusetts Department of Education, WTEV donated time and 
technical support. 



'^ 



- 21 - 

Urban ^l-H Program Development - Sprin,qfleld 

A 4-H program was initiated last fall in the Riverview Housing 
Project. This program is conducted in cooperation with the Hampden 
County Extension Service and the Commonwealth Service Corps. The 
Extension staff is responsible for the immediate supervision of the 
project and the Commonwealth Service Corps is providing volunteers 
for local leadership. 

Approximately 50 young people are enrolled in a foods and nutrition 
program, and ten volunteer adults and one paid leader support the 
program in the project. 

Urban ^1— H Program Development - Boston 

A program to train volunteer adults for M— H leadership in Roxbury is 
in progress. The work is being carried out in cooperation with the 
Roxbury-Dorchester Community Beautification Committee and the 
Massachusetts Horticulture Society. 

At the present time 17 adult leaders and 17 teen-agers are being 
trained to transform 17 vacant lots in Roxbury to flower and/or 
vegetable gardens. These leaders are being trained during the summer 
of 1966 on one of the vacant lots. Each of the 17 leaders is ex- 
pected to beautify a lot during 1967. 

Work With Community Action Committees 

Guidance was offered five different communities in developing 
Community Action Committees. Each of these committees is now in- 
corporated and has received a grant for expanding Office of Economic 
Opportunity work. The communities concerned are in Hampshire County, 
Franklin County, Barnstable County, and two in Hampden County. 

Specific youth components were developed for Lynn and Maiden Community 
Action Committees. 



/Vl 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
SPECIAL PROGRAMS 
1965-66 



Community Development Program 
International Agricultural Training Program 
Civil Defense Training Program 
Diagnostic Laboratories 



mms 



/y^ 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 
HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF 1965 - $60,000.00 

Problems of Regional Planning 

The inadequacy of traditional isolated socio-political problem- 
solving procedures by Communities in Urban, Suburban and 
Metropolitan areas. This program will institute the application 
of regional and inter-community problem solving by educational 
programs centering on the technical regional and inter-community 
aspect of air and water pollution. The educational plan consists 
of four related programs : 

A continuing education curriculum directed at three 
definable- clienteles: the professional civic servant; 
the semi-professional civic worker; the non-professional 
citizen with an as yet undefined civic awareness. 

A summer workshop program directed to qualified educators 
to develop technical competence in air and water pollution 
at the community level in order to develop community based 
adult education programs. 

A consultation service for civic leaders and organizations. 

A reference library on community developments for civic 
leaders and organizations. 



/^i 



INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

July, 1966 



Introduction 

"Agricultural development is needed in almost every country of the 
world today. The race between increasing population and mankind's 
food supply is real and grim. Agriculture is the only way we now 
know to produce the food on which our very lives depend. To feed 
the additional millions of people being added to the world's popu- 
lation each year, and to improve somewhat the present inadequate 
amount of food per person, will require faster agriculturcil develop- 
ment in the next two decades than almost any country has ever 
achieved in the past," 

Authorities agree that this goal can be attained only through 
education and research. 

International Training 

The international training program in the College of Agriculture is 
conducted in cooperation with the U. S. Agency for International 
Development (State Department) and the U. S, Department of Agri- 
culture . 

Purpose 

Its purpose is three-fold: 

1, To educate a selected number of promising students from emerging 
and established nations in the agricultural sciences. These 
students are presently enrolled in the two-year Stockbridge School, 
the four-year curriculum, and the graduate school. 

2« To train, on a short-term basis (from one week to six months), 
international participants who occupy supervisory or executive 
positions in the ministries of agricultures education and 
commerce of their respective countries. 



1 



Getting Agriculture Moving ^ Essentials for Development and 
Modernization , Arthur T. Mosher, Agricultural Development Council, 
N. Y» Frederick A. Praeger, Publishers, New Yorkj 1966« 



/y^i 



3. To assist, under a special contract, the Ministry of Agriculture 
and the Ministry of Education in Malawi (formed British Nyasaland) 
in expanding and improving the Agricultural Extension Service; in 
training native Malawians for teaching and research assignments in 
agricultural schools; and in providing consultants and lecturers 
in the agricultural sciences for the newly-established University 
of Malawi e 

Presently on assignment in Malawi are: H. Sidney Vaughan, 
Extension Organization; Kenneth E. Boyden, Farm Credit; 
Clarence H. Parsons, Dairy and Animal Science; and 
Dr. Constantine J. Gilgut, consultant to the Vice-Chancellor 
of the University of Malawi on curricular requirements for 
the new College of Agriculture.. 

Leaving in August for teaching assignments in the University of 
Malawi's College of Agriculture are Dr. Emmett Bennett and 
Mr. Evangel J. Bredakis. Two additional lecturers will be 
furnished in 1957. 

Charles W. Turner, who returned to campus in 1965 after two years 
in Malawi as consultant on Extension, is coordinator of the 
Malawi project and Director of the College of Agriculture's 
International Training Program. 

Gilbert E. Mottla, Office of the Dean, has been given an additional 
assignment as Associate Director. 



/y;j 



Attachment 1 

The College of Agriculture's part in providing qualified nationals 
for key roles in agricultural development in their native countries 
is shown in the table below. 

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS STUDYING 
FOR CREDIT IN COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
1965-1966 (Total 75) 

Academic Participants 

1. Stockbridge Hall 



2 
2 
1 

1 



Nigeria 
Canada 
Ecuador 
Liberia 



6 - Total 



B.S. Degree 



Poultry Science 

Plant Science 

Animal Science 

Fruit and Vegetcible Crops 



1 
5 
1 
1 
1 
1 



Kenya 

Malawi 

Ghana 

Cuba 

Nigeria 

Israel 



10 - Total 



Food Technology 

Animal and Plant Science 

Agronomy 

Agricultural Engineering 

Agronomy 

Agricultural Economics 



3. Graduate School 



India 


- 8 


Korea - 3 


Israel 


- 1 


Japan - 3 


Uganda 


- 1 


Mexico - 1 


Peru 


- 1 


Hungary - 1 


Phillip ines 


- 5 


West Indies - 1 


China 


- 16 


Great Britain - 2 


Cambodia 


- 1 


Uruguay - 1 


France 


- 1 


Malaysia - 1 


Australia 


- 1 


Italy - 1 


Canada 


« 10 


59 



- Total 



Attachment 2 



PARTICIPANTS IN INTERNATIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM 
(Short-Term Basis) 



/■/(, 



Number 



Country 



^ 


Malawi 


2 


Nigeria 


1 (Grenada) 


West Indies 


M- 


Malagasy 


6 


Kenya 


1 


Australia 


1 


Cameroon 


1 


Malawi 


3 


Malawi 


2 


Ghana 


1 


Guyana 


1 


Nigeria 


7 


Kenya 


M- 


Malawi 


3 


Zambia 


1 


England 


1 


England 


3 


Thailand 


i| 


Malawi 


1 


Guyana 


1 


Brazil 


4 


Uganda 



Training 

Extension Supervision 
Vocational Agriculture 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Supervision 
Rural Youth Work 
Administration of 

Stockbridge School 
Research and Extension 
Agricultural Information 

Techniques 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Specialists 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Supervision 
Vegetable Crops 
Food Technology 
Animal Science (Horses) 
Extension Supervision 
Extension Youth Work 
Extension Youth Work 
Extension Youth Work 



56 Participants 



Attachment 3 



MEMBERS OF THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE FACULTY/STAFF WHO 
ASSIST IN THE TRAINING OF INTERNATIONAL PARTICIPANTS 



//r 



Donald P. Allan 
Marvin W. Boss 
John H. Bragg 
John W. Denis on 



Fiscal and Budgetary Procedures 
Youth Organization and Program Planning 
Management and Supervision 
Animal Science 



Miss Winifred Eastwood Extension Home Economics Training 



Merle L. Howes 
Curtis A, Johnson 



Youth Organization and Program Planning 
Agricultural Skills (Engineering) 



Horace M« Jones (emeritus) History of U, S. Agricultural 

Development 



Gilbert E. Mottla 

Wassef W. Nawar 
Richard A. Southwick 
Cecil L, Thomson 
Charles W, Tuimer 



Communication and Problem-Solving 
Techniques 

Food Preservation and Storage 

Plant Science (Tobacco) 

Vegetable Crops 

Extension Organization and Supervision 



Note s Some of the participants are also assigned for varying 

periods to County Extension Offices throughout the state 
for training in Extension Work at the County level« 



/y? 



CIVIL DEFENSE TRAINING PROGRAM 
July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 

ANNUAL REPORT 



APPROPRIATIONS 



Fiscal Year 1963-64 — — $70,000 

Fiscal Year 1964-65 $70,655 

Fiscal Year 1965-66 $69,942 



PERSONNEL 



Harold W. Perkins 
Sidney D. Pierson 
Virginia Wesoloski 
Current Vacancy 



Coordinator, UECDTP 
SMI-CDM Instructor, UECDTP 
Sr. Clerk-Steno. 
RMI-RDO Instructor, UECDTP 



STUDENTS OR CLIENTELE SERVED 

Students participating in this Civil Defense Training Program were 
representatives £rom industry, business, state and federal agencies , commun- 
ity school systems and community leaders., 



/Vf 



CIVIL DEFENSE TRAINING PROGRAM 
July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 

ANNUAL REPORT 

MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Over 2,000 people in the State of Massachusetts were trained and/or 
became knowledgeable as to the needs of Civil Defense as a result of the fiscal 
year 1966 University Extension Civil Defense Training Program. Training and in- 
formation regarding Civil Defense needs were imparted byj 

CONDUCTING CIVIL DEFENSE TRAINING COURSES IN SHELTER MANAGEMENT. CIVIL DEFENSE 
M ANAGEMENT, RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE , 

SHELTER MANAGEMENT INSTRUCTOR . Four SMI courses were conducted 
during FY 1966. The most noteworthy area of interest in this particular course 
is the change of attitude of the students from the time they enroll to the com- 
pletion of the course. An attitude of indifference, a negative attitude, or 
just plain ignorance, almost without exception changes to a positive attitude 
and a desire to learn. 

Recruiting for this course continues to be a problem, but once students 
are enrolled, we have experienced a negligible dropout rate. 

It is anticipated that continued progress in providing organization 
capability in community Civil Defense will serve to create more need and greater 
acceptance for SMI training. 

SMI Courses completed during FY 1966 ; 

Location Attendance Certified 

Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfield 
Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfield 
Cape & Vineyard Power Co., Hyannis 
Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfield 

CIVIL DEFENSE MANAGEMENT . This course was probably the most success^ 
ful of all courses taught during FY 1966. The large majority of students were 



16 


15 


12 


12 


18 


16 


12 


12 



/56 



Civil Defense Directors with varying degrees of experience; from completely 
inexperienced to 10 to 12 years on the job. The feed-back indicated that for 
the first time the information had been compiled into one "package" for the 
experienced and gave a broad over-view for the inexperienced. Many of the 
students immediately applied their newly acquired knowledge to up-date their 
offices and programs, orient their elected officials, discard antiquated letters, 
sop's, etc., initiate action for continuity of government, and compile an up-to- 
date Civil Defense Guide . 

This appears to be such a worthwhile course that in time to come, 
perhaps consideration will be given to a refresher course containing all the , 
latest policies and procedures and would be offered annually to Local Civil 
Defense Directors. 

CDM Courses conducted during FY 1966 ; 

Location Attendance Certified 

Ludlow Hospital, Ludlow 

Greenfield Community College, Greenfield 

Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfleld 

Sector IC Hdqrs., Bedford 

Sector 2C Hdqrs., So. Dennis 

RADIOLOGICAL MONITOR INSTRUCTOR & RADIOLOGICAL DEFENSE OFFICER . The 
RMI program did not attract the number of students desired and special attention 
is being given this area of training to insure that during FY 1967 attendance 
and certification goals will be reached. 

Action is being initiated in cooperation with the State Radef Officer 
and four Area Radef Officers, each possessing doctorate degrees in Physics, to 
form a Massachusetts Radef Association. A one-day Conference will be planned 
for all RMI and RDO graduates (approximately 300) and in addition to the Con- 
ference agenda, election of officers is contemplated for the proposed association. 
Not only should this action lend credence to the professional capabilities of 



16 


11 


15 


13 


22 


22 


30 


26 


18 


17 



/5/ 



current graduates and stimulate continuing interest and activity, but it should 

also serve to attract qualified personnel in future training programs. 

RMI Courses conducted during FY 1966 ; 

Location Attendance Certified 

North Junior High, Pittsfield 5 5 

Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfield 11 7 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst A ^ \ 

National Guard Armory, Boston 10 10 

DPW District 3, Worcester 28 16 (Refresher) 

RDO Courses conducted during FY 1966 ; 

Location Attendance Certified 

Mass. CD Training Center, Topsfield 7 5 

Area 2 Hdqrs., Bridgewatar 9 7 

National Guard Armory, Boston 8 5 ! 

CONDUCTING CONFERENCES FOR SELECTED COMMUNITY LEADERS AND ELECTED OFFICIALS . 

Seven formal conferences were conducted during FY 1966. Locations 

and attendance are as noted below: 

Natick Lab., Natick, Mass. 500 

Natick Lab., Natick, Mass. 453' . 

Natick Lab., Natick, Mass. 390 

Wakefield Motor Inn, Wakefield, Mass. 74 

Holiday Inn, Waltham, Mass. 82 

Holiday Inn, Waltham, Mass. 50 

Lewis Lodge, Taunton, Mass. 556 

Each year since the University Extension Program began, more interest 
in Civil Defense has been manifested at the conferences. Of course, entire 
communities are not "converted" overnight. Nevertheless, definite inroads are 
made which have resulted in more support for the Civil Defense Director, such 
as increased appropriations, more interest in Office of Civil Defense courses 
and requests for the University staff to appear in other communities, usually 
in an informal manner rather than a formal conference. 

The addition of business and industry conferences in FY 1967 should 
prove very successful for the overall Civil Defense Training Program. 



7^^ 



PARTICIPATING AS GUEST SPEAKERS IN REGULARLY SCHEDULED MEETINGS OF ORGANIZATIONS 
AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS . 

Participation as guest speakers for meetings not directly related to 
the scope of the University contract resulted in wide dissemination of infor- 
mation regarding Civil Defense. These endeavors were necessary to insure 
continuity and greater acceptance of Civil Defense. 

Primarily, personal calls, group meetings and correspondence with 
various organizations were conducted as part of recruiting efforts; however, 
many times information and education concerning Civil Defense was presented 
and subsequently led to positive community actions as rewarding as those ob- 
tained in performance of official contract obligations. 

During FY 1966, over 400 people were contacted in this type endeavor 
and of particular significance is the fact that these people were 1007o action 
leaders of industry, school systems and communities. 

FUTURE PLANS 

Continual growth and expansion of services provided by the Univer- 
sity is dependent upon widespread acceptance and understanding of need. From 
observation and by conversation with people throughout the State of Massa- 
chusetts, it appears that significant progress has been made in this respect 
and future programming actions should be successful. 

The University contract for FY 1967 will provide the following ; 

5 Conferences ' - , 

3 Shelter Management Instructor (SMI) 

3 Civil Defense Management (CDM) . 

3 Radiological Monitor Instructor (RMI) 

2 Radiological Defense Officer (RDO) 

1 Emergency Operation Simulation Training (EOST) 

We look forward to the new EOST phase of training as one that will 

stimulate interest by community leaders, prove community operational capability 



/ O V 



and more fully utilize personnel trained in University programs. 

We anticipate expansion of this phase of training either by modifi- 
cation of current or future contracts . 



t6i 



ANNUAL REPORT 
of the 
DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORIES 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 
Amherst, Massachusetts 

Department of Environmental Sciences 
Waltham, Massachusetts 

of the 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

19 6 5 



/5S 



This ropozt is prGsemted by the Departoeat of Veteriaary avA Aaiaal Scicacas, 
Ataherst, I-'IacsachissetCis, and the Departeaat of Eavirocaeatol Sciences, Waltham, 
Massachuset:£:s, o£ the College of Agriculture, University of Kasaachusetts, Aoh^rst, 
Kass&chusetts. 



SUM-5MY 



I. Dia,<*pos£ie Laborasories 

Durios the calGadas year Jsauary 1, 1965, throu^^ December 31, 1965 a total 
of 7665 cviaa cad BacaaliaQ specisEeos in 1314 coasisacisQts was sufcaittcd for 
laboratory c::caisuitioa* Specitseas submitted ucre &s follows: 

Walthaa 

3859 

4@3 

18 

25 

96 



II. 



AVIAH 


An&ers 


t 


Chickea 


1330 




Turkey 


102 




PheasQQt 


40 




Duck 


29 




MiscellaQSOus (17 species) 


743 




HAlE-mLIAN 






Cattle 


533 




Sheep 


20 




Goats 


7 




SwisiQ 


45 




Horses 


79 




Miscollc&eous (16 species) 


74 




CoaCirol Services 




Samples Tested 


Pullorum Disease Testiog 




559j006 


Mastitis Coatrol Service 




49,042 



20 



The Collece of Agsiculture provides veterioary diagnostic services at Walthan 
through the Departdesit of EnvirotaaeaCal Sciences and at Asherst through the 
Department of Veterissary and Aiaitaal Scieaces. Most of the poultry diagnostic 
work is perforaad hy the DepartEeat of Enviroaszental Sciences at Waltham. 
Poultry and large snical diagnostic cervices $> as well as control programs 
are conducted by the DepartciaEt of Veterinary asid Anicaal Sciences at Amherst. 



This report preseata individually the diagnostic activities o^ 
partments as veil as summaries of the control programs. 

- I - 



both de- 



DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMEOTAL SCIENCES 
Waltham, Massachusetts 



REPORT OF DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORY 



1:^0 



Chicken Diagnoses (3;89^9 Specimens) 



Number of 
Diagnoses 



0-4 

weeks 



4-20 

weeks 



20+ 

weeks 



Acariasis 6 

Ascariasis 5 

Aspergillosis 2 

Avian encephalomyelitis (Epidemic tremor) 13 

Blepharocojunctivitis 1 



Cannibalism 

Capiilariasis (C. obsignate) 

Chronic respiratory disease 

Cloacitis 

Coccidiosis 

Colibacillosis 

Enteritis 

Enteritis, ulcerative (Quail disease) 

Enterohepatitis 

Fatty liver 
Faulty husbandry 
Formaldehyde toxicity 
Fowl cholera 
Fowl typhoid 

Gout, visceral 

Gumboro disease (nephrosis syndrome) 

Heat prostration 
Hemangioma 

Inanition 

Infectious, bronchitis 
Infectious laryngotracheitis 
Infectious synovitis 

Keratoconjunctivitis 



Lymphomatosis, neural 
Lymphomatosis, ocular 
Lymphomatosis, visceral 



2 
2 



6 
3 



2 






2 


28 




4 


24 


42 


■S3- 


23 


19 


1 






1 


78 


6 


33 


39 


36 


11 


15 


10 


11 






11 


1 


I 






1 




I 




2 






2 


3 




1 


2 


1 


I 






5 






5 


1 






I 


4 


1 




3 


1 




I 




1 




I 




1 






I 


2 


2 






8 


1 


7 




3 






3 


22 




10 


12 


7 




3 


4 


56 




39 


17 


1 






1 


148 




57 


91 



2 - 



/^7 



Chic!!:Ga Dia.";ROses (continiaed) 



Eluaber of 0-4 4-20 20+ 

Diagnoses weeks weeks waeka 



Kolitj physiologic 

Kepbrosis 
No diagaoses 
Korea 1 

Osteoaalacia 

Paralysis a undate rained 
Paratypiioid (11 seroQ^p^s) 

Pediculosis 

Perosis 

Prolapsus 

Respiratory infectioa 
Ruptured gastrocnemius £eadcn 

Salpingitis 
Suffocatioa 
Sulfaquinoxaliae toxicity 

Taeaiesis 

Tendinitis » gastrocnecoius 

TrausiatiSQ 

Vitaain B deficiency 
2 

Water deprivation 

Turkey Disgao nss (483 Speciciens) 

Ascariasis 
Aspergillosis 

Coccidiosis 

Colibacillofis 

EnteritiSj h-icxorrhagic 

Enter-.-hepaur'.tis 

Erysipelas 

Foul cholera 

Hepatitis, viral 
Hepato-gra-'.i'-omatosis 
Histostat toxicity 
Hock disease 



6 



2 




1 


1 


22 


7 


2 


13 


9 


3 


5 


1 


2 






2 


1 






1 


15 


4 


8 


3 


10 






10 


2 


1 


1 




1 






1 


4 




3 


1 


3 




2 


1 


2 






2 


2 






2 


S 


^ 


4 


4 


3 




1 


2 


3 




1 


2 


3 






3 



1 




1 




I 


1 






2 


2 






1 


1 






3 


1 


2 




2 


1 


1 




2 




1 


I 


2 




1 


1 


3 


1 


2 




1 




1 




1 




1 




I 




I 





-3- 



JS^ 



Turkey Diajimoses (continu odjj 

Infectious sinusitis 

LyephOEiatosiSj visceral 

No diagnosis 

Paratyphoid (7 serotypes) 

Peritoaitis 

Piroteus infectioa 

Staphylococcosis 

Toxeaia 

Tr<snsu3issiblc enteritis 



Vitaaiu D deficiency 

Water deprivation 

Pigeon Biagaoees (28 Specitsseas) 

Ascariasis 

Neoplasm; liudetersained 

Ko diagTT'.csis 

Paratypl.oid 

Pediculosis 

P^espiratrzy infectioa 

Toxeaia 

Trauaati^in,, interaal 

Trichomoui ^ois 

Duck Dia p^ ;o-';es (25 Specicaens) 

Goutj visceral 
No d-f.:is-.-virds 

Per-:,-:oiiii-.l3 

Rabbit ?j.a.gTi.oses (20 Specitaens) 

Coccidiosis 
Mucoid eateritis 
Paralysis 
Fregaancy toxenia 
Spirochetosis 
Suffocation 



Ktiaber of 
Diagnoses 


0-4 

i7eeka 


4-20 

V7eek3 


20f 


3 
3 




3 

1 


1 




I 


1 






1 






4 




2 


1 




1 


14 




12 
1 


2 




1 








I 






12 




6 


1 
5 




1 


U disease) 1 






1 












1 












1 







1 
1 

3 
6 
L 
2 
2 
1 
1 



1 
3 
1 



2 

4 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
I 



2 
3 
1 



1 
1 
3 
4. 
I 
I 
2 
1 



1 
2 
1 



2 
1 
1 



Pheasant Diajgnoses (18 Speeimeas) 



Number of 0-4 4-20 2(M- 
Diaj^noses weeks weeks weeks 



Coccidiosis 1 

Colibacillosis 1 

Fulmtoary ; edasaa 1 

Syngamus trachea infaction 1 

Traumatism; head 1 

Sparrow Diagaoses (20 Spaciaeas) 

Coccidiosis 1 

Enteritis 5 hemorrhagic 3 

No diagnosis 4 

Paratyphoid 2 

Traumatisais head 2 

Covj'oird Diagnoses (18 Specimeas) 

Ho diagnosis 3 

Paratyphoid 5 

Coturaia Quail Diagnoses (II Specimens) 

Faulty husbandry I 

LymphocytotTia 1 

Toxemia 1 

Traumatism 1 

Chuckar Parf-ri^ge Diagnosas (6 Specimens) 

Coccidiosis 2 

Goose Diagno ses (5 Specimens) 



Coccidiori:; 
No diagT'.osis 
Trichomociasis 

Swaa Diagnoses (4 Specimens) 

Fowl cholera 
Goutg visceral 
Nephrosis 
No diagnosis 



1 
I 
1 



1 
I 
1 
2 



1 
1 



1 
1 



1 
1 



1 
2 



1 
2 
2 
2 
1 



2 
2 



1 
1 
1 
I 



1 
1 
1 



Quail Diagnoses (4 Specimens) 

Quail disease (ulcerative enteritis) I 



-5- 



((. 







DSPMII-IEI3T 0? VETERINARY Al© MII-IAL SCIEIICSS 
Amhersc, Massachusects 



REPORT OF DMGNOSTIC LAB02AT0RISS 



Chicken Diagaoses (1330 SpeeiGcns) 



Kuaber of 0-4 4-20 ICW- 
Diagnoses ^eeks uaaks uaeks 



Airsacuuiitis 

Ascariasis 

Autolysis 

Sluacoab complex 
Bumblefoot 

Cannibalism 

Cspillariasis 

Cholera, fowl 

Chroaic respiratory diseasa 

Cioaoitis 

Coccidiosis 

Colibacillosls 

Culls 

Dermatitis J gangreaous 

Encephalomyelitis J aviaa 
E:iteritis, uaidantifled 

Faulty m&cagement 
Foot necrosis 

Gumboro di.'^ease 

Hepatitis J avian vibrioaic 
Hepatitis... unideatified 
Eistocio-jrlasis 

Impactiot?., gisr.ard 

Impactior., int'-.tstinal 

lapactiCiij oviduct 

laanitica 

lafectious laryngotrachaltis 

lafactious synovitis 

KeratoccnJTiactivitis 



2 
7 
1 

4 
1 

5 

6 

3 

30 

1 

18 

17 

1 



3 
7 
3 

2 

1 



9 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
11 



1 


1 






1 


6 




1 






1 


3 
1 

5 

3 




10 


% 


1 






1 


8 


9 




8 


9 
1 




1 


1 


1 




2 


I 




6 
3 




1 


1 
1 




1 


9 
2 




1 


1 




1 


1 




1 


2 




S 


6 



-6- 



/6/ 



Chicken Diagnoses (CoQtinuad) 



Number of 0-4 4-20 20+ 

DiaRnoaes weeks wec':3 weeks 



Leukosis, neural 
Leukosis, visceral 


21 
55 


1 
1 


11 
18 


9 
36 


Nephrosis 
Newcastle disease 
Newcastle disease, immune 
No diagnosis 
Normal 


1 

1 

1 

11 

6 


1 
1 


1 
1 
2 


1 

10 

3 


Omphalitis 
Overheating 


1 

1 


1 
1 






Paratyphoid 

Pediculosis 

Perosis 

PullorutQ disease 

Pullorum disease called in: 

positive 

negative 


8 
2 
1 

1 

18 
32 


1 


1 
2 


8 
2 

16 
32 


Respiratory infection 


1 






1 


Salpingitis 
Staphylococcosis 

Starvation 


1 
1 
3 


3 




1 
1 


Teniasis 
Toxicity, sulfa 
Tuberculosis, negative 


3 
1 

1 






3 
1 

1 


Turkey Diagnoses (102 Specimens) 










Airsacuulitls 
Ascaridiasis 


4 
1 


2 


1 
1 


I 


Cannibalism 
Capillariasis 
Cholera, fowl 
Coccidiosis 
Colibaciliosis 


1 
1 
1 
2 
3 


1 


2 
3 


1 
1 
1 



Dehydration 



Enteritis, unidentified 

Enterohepatitis 

Erysipelas 

Infectious synovitis 
Influenza A 



1 
1 
1 

1 
1 



1 

1 



-7- 



/^^ 



Turkey Diagnoses (continuad) 



EJusaber of 0-4 4-20 20<- 

Diar^noses weeks weeks weeks 



Mycoplasma infection 
Ho diagnosis 
Ompliaiitis 
Paratyphoid 

Staphylococcosis 

Starvation 

Unfit for examination 
Water deprivation 
Canary (3 Specieeas) 

Ko diagnosis 



3 

2 

I 

2 

2 
I 

I 

X 



1 
1 



1 

Total 
3 



I 
2 



1 
2 



CCT'7birds (337 Speciiaeas) 

negative for salEOssalla 
Paratyphoid 



1 
4 



I>ucks (2 SpecicEiens) J 

Hew duck syndrome 

Duck, Japanese stuffed (1 Specimen) 
Negative for salc&onella 

Ducks i, White Pekin (17 Speciaiens) 
Paratyphoid 

Ducks „ Wood (9 Specimens) 
Exposure 

Goose (1 Speciasen) 



No diagnosis 



Gracklos (30 Specimeas) Total 

Kegative for salaoaella 1 

Poraeyphoid 1 

Pox 1 

Para!:eet (1 Specimen) 

Lipoisa 1 

Pheasaa£ (40 Specimeas) 

CdEEJibalisQ 1 

Capillariasis I 

Coccidiosis 1 

EGpscitis I 

Paratyphoid (pullorua disease called in) 1 

Red Grouse (1 Specieiea) 

j:o diasBOsia I 

lsd-'t?ir»'^ed Slaekbird (43 SpecicaeaJ 

I'lega^lvc for saltaoaelia I 

g£c~lipf;3 (117 SpeciQsas) 

Paratyphoid-pooitive 1 

Paratyphoid-ttegativa 3 

HlGcellaaeous 

Chicken esbryos (150 Speciceaa) - no diagnosis 1 
Eggs (4 doaea) - icauae to eviaa 

encephalos^/'elitis 1 
Feed sasples (12 Spcciiaeos) - nesative for 

paratyphoid 1 



-9- 



/(j>Z 



Summary of Salmonella Isolates Obtained frog Specimens Subaitted 

to Diagnostic Laboratories at Aiaherst and Waltliaca aad Those Isolated 

from Tested Flocks During the Calendar Year 1965 



SalQonella 


Chickens 


Turkeys 


Pheasants 


Pif!;eon 


Ducks 


Misc. 


Pi^s 


Total 


ana turn 


1 


2 


* 


'« 


1 


* 


* 




blockley 


1 


* 


•A 


* 


* 


* 


* 




bredeaey 


■is 


1 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




cubana 


'iZ 


1 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




derby 


•li 


* 


& 


'* 


1 


* 


* 




enteritidis 


1 


^ 


* 


* 


* 


* 


« 




gallinarusa 


1 




* 


* 


* 


* 


* 




give 


•;.- 


I 


•k 


* 


* 


* 


* 




heidelberg 


5 


* 


* 


* 


* 


1 


* 


6 


infantis 


5 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


•k 


5 


montevideo 


1 


1 


* 


* 


* 


* 


«: 


2 


newport 


1 


1 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


2 


panama 


^w 


1 


* 


•k 


* 


* 


* 


1 


puilorum 


12 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


* 


12 


saint-paul 


1 


2 


* 


«r 


tt 


* 


•& 


3 


schwarsengrund 


1 


1 


it 


* 


*: 


* 


* 


2 


thompson 


2 


* 


■it 


« 


* 


* 


* 


2 


typhicuuriuca 


5 


"k 


I 


* 


* 


8 


I 


15 


typhimurium var. 


3 


1 


* 


7 


* 


* 


* 


11 


Copenhagen 


















Totals: 


40 


12 


\ 


7 


2 


9 


i 


72 



All isolates are reported oa a farm basis. ^cowbirdSj starlings^ sparrows 

Nine of t'.-.e. poultry salaonella isolations were froa out-of-state 
flocks » S. ha.:.dp-. lberg was recovered ia chickens toi^ice from New York 
and once from K<iine, S^^ iafantis was recovered froE chickens once each 
frca New York ai^d New Hampshire, One isolate of S, typhisurlua v ar. 
Copenhagen was recovered froa chickens iia Connecticut. Cae isolate of S_. 
pullorum was from a small chicken flock in Venaont, From one turkey flock 
in New Hampshire both S._ anatua and S,, cubana were recovered. 

£. anatuT. was recovered three tisas from two different turkey f areas; ' 
Sa saint-pauI was recovered twice froa one turkey fare; and S,, typhJEurium 
var. Copen hagen was recovered three times froa another turkey -faro. Both 
S. montev5 .deo a>.id S_, schwarsea?;rund were recovered froa a turkey flock, 
and ia another turkey flock both S_. ana turn and S. bredeaey were recovered. 
From one group of ducks both S„ ana turn and _S. derby were recovered, la 
one chicken flock (K.Y.) both S, heidelber,':? and S» infasstis were recovered, 

§.' puiloruQ was isolated froia brooding chicks oa a ccsmercial e^g 
farm; it was also recovered frcca one of the layins birds ©a a different 
premise, S. D/phlcEu giugi var. ccpeahagea was recovered froa the layins 
birdSo The reiaainiag 10 isolations of S, pullorus were recovered froD 
tested fancier flocks as a result of the regulation that sil birds' eust 
be tested before being e:chibited. 

Saldonella (paratyphoid) isolations were eade froa 4 chicken breedios 
flocks which reacted to the pullorua antioen, 'There were 2 icolatiojia of 
£. typhlmurium and one each of S_. enteritidis and S, feeldelber|», S* 
typhitauriura was recovered froa a pheaeasit. breeding f locli. 



CATTLE 



(159 accessioas; 533 speciaens) 



/<^ V 



Abortion, alpha screptococcus 

AborC-jLoap Aspergi Jlus ^ f EainaSus 

Abortion, beta sCreptococcias 

Abortioa, Lar^aoopiga spp» (F.Ao tecbaique) 

Abortioa, Listeria Eoaocytogeaes 

Abortioaj, So3~Epacii:ic ' ' 

Abortioag twias 

Abortloaa ussssatisfactory specisaa 



Dlaaooses 
3 
1 
1 
4 
1 

23 
2 
I 



ArthritiSa acu£Q beaorrhagies, al£>Ias sarep&ococxiio ■ spp. 1 

Calf sei>£ic£saia (colibacilXosis; ealf -scours) ' ■ 6 

CliroEic indigestioa 1 

Eateritis, aoa cpecific 3 

Grass tetaay I 

SeEatologyp ansmis wi'di eosiaophllia 1 

Eeaatologya lesscopsaia 1 

Hema'cologyj, aeatrophilia 2 

Eeaatologyj, aosEial 2 

HeaaSoIogyp lyaphocytosis 1 

HetBa£olo2ys uasaelsfsccosy opeciaaa 1 

Heasturia 1 

Hepatic cirrhosis 1 

Mucosal disease- '■ I 

Ho diagnosis 4 

Parasitology - negative 2 

Pasteuxellosis 1 

Peritoaitis 1 

FoeiuEonia, puruleat, Cogyaebactegii;a pyogenes 2 

Poisonings lead 5 

Poisoaingj limestone 1 

Poisoning J nicarbasin 1 

Poisoaiagj aigbtsbade 1 

*11- 



/6jp' 



Cattle (continued) Diagnoses 

Rectal swabj culture - coliform asid proteus I 

Serology Pos , Susp . ^eg. Diagnoses 

Leptospirosis blood agglutination 8 ■__ 400,, 403 

Vibriosis mucus agglutination 4 ' 4 

IBR serua neutralisation 5 47 52 

BVD serum neutralisation 7 30 37 

Shipping fever 1 

Stillborn 4 

Toxicology - negative 6 

Tracheobronchitis, beta streptococcus 1 

Tuaor 

Granuloma ^ 

Unsatisfactory 2 

.Urine culture - hemolytic coliforai I 

SHEE? 

(15 accessions; 20 specimens) 

Dystocia, ruj;tured uterus 1 

Enterotoxem:'.a 1 

Listeriosis 1 

Ko diagnosis 2 

Pneuconia 1 

Pneumoniaj irhf.jation I 

Pnexinonia. purulent, Corynebaeterium pyogenes 1 

Poisoning J copper - 1 

Poisoningj diasinon (presumptive) I 

Starvation 1 

Unsatisfactory 2 



■12- 



/(j>(, 



GOATS 
(7 accessions; 8 specimens) 

Eye suaby culture negative 2 

Eeaonchosis and ear mites 1 

Hepatic necrosis and hemorrhage I 

Metritis s colifora 1 

Tosicology negative I 

SWIi>IE 

(24 Qcc<3ssioas; 45 specimens) 

Anemia^ nutritional 2 

Cleft palate 1 

Dermatitis J infectious, -etiology unknown I 

Enteritis J necrotic and associated anemia 1 

Kemorrhagej hepatic 1 

No diasnosis 2 

Otitis - eiology unknown I' 

-Otitis media, Pseudoaonas aeruginosa 1 

Overlaid 2 

Parasitology - negative for ©ites 2 

Pneumoenteritis I 

Pneumonia, chronic 1 

Pneumonia, purulent, Pastuarella aultocida 2 

Salmonellosis g S. t^^phimuriua 1 

Serology Pos . Susp . Keg « 

Leptospirosis blood agglutination 3 11 14 

Spondylitis 1. 

Starvation ^ I 

Ulcer, gastric 1 

Unsatisfactory I 



/6n 



KORSES 

(41 accessions; 79 specimens) 

Abortion, non specific 1 

Abortion, Streptococcus zooepidemicus 1 

Abortiouj, twins I 

Ascariasis 1 

Ascariasis and stroagylidosis I 

Cystitis a Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1 

Hematology J noraal 3 

latestinal tympany 1 

Joint ill, Klebsiella spp . 1 

Metritis > Streptococcus equiruulis 1 

Mycology - negative 4 

Pleuropneumonia J Streptococcus zooepidemicus I 

Pregnancy test - positive 3j negative 10 13 

Ringworm "1 

Sesaea culture - negative for streptococci I 

Serology gos . Susp . Neg , 

Leptospirosis blood agglutination 3 3 

Shigellosis . ■. 1 

Stillborn I 

Toxicology - negative 1 

Unsatisfactory I 

BAT 

(6 accessions; 6 specimens) 

Rabies - POSITIVE (Mass. Dept. Pub. Health) 2 

Rabies - negative (Mass, Dept. Pub, Health) 2 
Rabies - Specimen unsatisfactory (Mass. Dept, Pub. Health) 2 



-U- 



Hr.% 



CAT 

(2 accessions; 2 specimens) 

No diagnosis ' 1 

Toxocariasis 1 

DEER 

(3 accessions; 4 specimens) 

FracCured neck I 

Ko diagnosis 1 

Serology Pos. Susp . Na£. 

Leptospirosis blood agglutination . ., . • '2 . 2 

IBR, serum neutralization 2 2 

DOG 

(19 accessions; 20 epecltoens) 

Ancylostomiasis . . • ■ ■ j^ 

Anomaly, anal 1 

Hematology, neutrophilia 1 

Infarction, hemorrhagic I 

Kycology, negative for ringworm 2 

No diagnosis 2 

Parasitology, negative 1 

Pneumonia 1 

Toxocariasis 1 
Tumor: 

Adenoma ' 1 

Adenocarcinoma 2 

Duct carcirioma 1 

Hemangiotca 1 

Lymphosarcoma I 

Myxosarcoma 1 

Squamous cell carcinoma 1 

FCK 

(3 accessions; 3 specimens) 

Culture negative for Listeria monocytogenes 2 

Fractured skull 1 

Ruptured liver 1 



-15- 



/C>Y 



GUINEA PIG 
(I accession; 5 specimens) 
Lymphadenitis 1 

LLAMA 
(1 accession; 1 speclaien) 
poisoning, lead 1 

MINK 
(1 accession; 2 specimens) 
Viral enteritis and inanition I 

MONKEY 

(2 accessions; 4 specimens) 

Malnutrition 1 

Parasitism and dehydration 3 

OCELOT 
(1 accession; 1 specimen) 
Infectious feline enteritis 1 

RABBIT 
(I accession; 1 specimen) 
Mononucleosis 1 

RACOON 

(4 accessions; 4 Specimens) 

Normal I 

Rabies, negative (Mass, Dept. Pub. Health) 1 

Rabies, specimen unsatisfactory (Mass. Dept, Pub. Health) 1 

Serology - negative for leptosplrosls 1 



-16- 



i70 



SUMMARY OF PULLORUM DISEASE ERADICATION 

In the 1964- I96S testing season, 163 chicken, turkey and 
pheasant flocks were tested, representing 559,006 samples. No pul- 
lorum nor fowl typhoid infection was found among the commercial 
breeding flocks tested. Pullorum Infection was detected in two 
flocks of show stock that were tested. A severe outbreak of the 
disease occurred also in chicks that were being raised as replacements 
for a commercial egg-producing flock. In three flocks, the Infection 
Is either in the process of being eradicated or has been eliminated. 

Paratyphoid infection was detected in five chicken flocks and 
one pheasant flock. In four chicken breeding flocks, S, heldelberg 
was IsolatGda S. typhlmurium was Isolated from one flock of show 
birds which also was infected with ^, pullorum.^ The pheasant flock 
was infectod with S_. typhlmurium. 



-17- 



/7. 



SUMMARY OF MASTITIS TESTING 
1965 - Annual Report 

During Che calendar year of 1965, 49,042 milk samples were 
tested for mastitis. Of this number, 45,023 were from 201 private 
herds, 2,167 were from 4 State and County herds, and 1,852 were 
tested on an experimental basis. Twenty of 29 herds on initial test 
were found positive for Streptococcus agalactiae with 37 percent of 
the cows infected. Fourteen herds were freed from the infection 
during the year. 

A nine-year summary of initial tests (1957-65) indicates the 

incidence of Str. agalactiae Infection in herds enrolled in the state 

program. 

Herds Total Cows Cows Infected 
Herds jositlve 253 (66%) 8698 3059 (38%) 
Herds r.ft£a-ive 133 (34%) 3580 

A total of 122 semiannual and 3 annual tests was made on 88 
herds that h&d been Str . agalactiae -free. Eight herds were found to 
have become infected, 5 of them by the addition of purchased re- 
placements. In two others, home raised heifers reintroduced this 
Infection upon freshening. In one instance, the source could not be 
determined. 

Nocardia mastitis was found in four more herds in the state, 
which brings the total of such infected premises to twenty-sevea 
Since 1953. 



■18- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
SCHOOL OF NURSING 



ANNUAL REPORT 



July 1, 1965 ~ June 30, 1966 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
School of Nursing 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Memorandum of Submittal 



Page 



General Information 

Appropriation — — 1 

Personnel 

Rank and Number •= — ■- I 

Personnel Action 1965-66 —..»-»— 2 

Organizational Charts 

Functional Organization _..-_--„ .- 3a 

Faculty Organization 3b 

Students and Clientele Served __»»»_-- 3 

Publications and Grants _„-_-_ _- 3 

Major Accomplishments 

Graduate Program — — k 

Undergraduate Program — 5 

Special Projects 11 

Future Plans and Needs _„..-_- — . 13 

Appendices 

Appendix A - List of Faculty 18 

Appendix B - Professional Activities of Faculty -- 21 

Appendix C - Faculty Attendance at Professional 

Meetings -- — — 32 






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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
School of Nursing 



July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 



From: Mary A. Maher, Dean, School of Nursing 

To: Dr. John Vi. Lederle, President, University of Massachusetts 

Subject: Annual Report of the School of Nursing - July 1, 1965 - 

June 30, 1966 



Dear President Lederle: 

It is my pleasure to submit herein the report of the School of 
Nursing for the fiscal year I966; prepared according to the format 
received from the Office of R, J, McCartney, Secretary of the 
Uni versi ty. 

May I tatce this opportunity to express my appreciation and that 
of the faculty for your continued administrative support and under- 
standing. 

Most sincerely, 

Mary A. Maher, Dean 
School of Nursing 

MAM:mmr 

- i - 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
School of Nursing 

ANNUAL REPORT 
July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 



Appropriation ; 



FISCAL YEAR 


APPROPRIATIOM 


1963-196i> 


$19,950,00 


1964-1965 


$24,700.00 


1965-1966 


$20,600.00 



2. Personnel: 



Rank 


Number of Personnel 
Sept. 1963 Feb. 1964 Sept. 1964 Sept. 1965 


Dean 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Associate Dean 


- 


1 


1 


1 


Professor 


2 


1 


2 


2 


Associate Professor 


1 


1 


1 


2 


Assistant Professor* 


4 


4 


5 


5 


InstructorVf* 


4 


i;. 


5 


12 


Total 


12 


12 


15 


23 



* 1 Assistant Professor paid from Mental Health Grant. 
Vc* 1 Instructor paid from Mental Health Grant. 



- 1 - 



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2a. Appointments, Promotions, Resignations - Fiscal, 1965-66 : 



New Appointments (N) or Replacements (R ) 



Date 


Name 


Rank 


Clinical Area 


N 


R 


Undergri 


aduate Program: 


Instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


X 




9/65 


Rita Kisting 




II 


Benita Martocchio 


instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


X 




II 


Alice Norman 


Instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


X 




II 


Elizabetli Petti 


Instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


X 




II 


Ciiarlene Phelps 


Instructor 


Medical £• Surgical 


X 




II 


Hi Idegard Salenius 


Associate 
Professor 


Psychiatric- 
Mental Health 


X 




II 


Mary Schank 


Instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


X 




II 


E. Ann Sheridan 


Instructor 


Maternal & Child 




X 


2/66 


Bettye Frederic 


Instructor 


Public Health 




X 


Graduat< 


2 Prociram: 


Associate 


Nursing 


X 




9/65 


Ida MacDonald 








Professor 


Adm'nistration 








( 


Total 


8 


2 



Promotions 



Date Name 


From 


To 


CI inical Area 


1/31/66 


Rachel Smith 


Assistant 
Professor 


Associate 
Professor 


Psychiatric- 
Mental Health 



Resignations 



Name 


Rank 


Area 


Date 


Length of 
Service 


Elizabeth Petti 


Instructor 


Medical & Surgical 


1/66 


1 semester 


Rosamond Shepard 


Instructor 


Maternal & Infant 


6/66 


2 years 


Hi Idegard Salenius 


Associate 
Professor 


Psychiatric- 
Mental Health 


6/66 


1 year 


Janet Simmons 


Instructor 


Psychiatric- 
Mental Health 


6/66 


li years 


Rachel Smith 


Associate 
Professor 


Psychiatric- 
Mental Health 


6/66 


2 years 



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Organization Chart - School of Nursing 

Chart I - Functional Organization - page 3a. 
Chart 11 - Faculty Organization - page 3b, 

Students and Clientele served: 



Classification 


Sept. 1963 


Sept. 1964 


Sept. 1965 


Baccalaureate Program: 
Nursing Majors 


]kS 


178 


206 


Graduate Registered Nurses 
in Practice* 


Summer, 1963 
25 


Summer, 1964 Summer, 1965 

Enrollment too 25 
limited to 
warrant offer- 
ing worl< 
conferences. 


Graduate Registered Nurses 
in Practice** 


1963-64 
96 


1964-65 
72 


1965-66 
92 


Total Graduate Nurses 


121 


72 


117 



5. 



* Summer job-related work conferences designed for Graduate Professional 
Nurses (R.N.'s) in Practice offered by the School of Nursing. 

** Work conferences for practicing supervisors and head nurses in hospitals 
and public health nursing agencies. The University of Massachusetts 
School of Nursing was one of six (6) Universities in New England parti- 
cipating in the program. The program is sponsored by the New England 
Board of Higher Education in Nursing and is funded by the United States 
Public Health Service Division of Nursing. These work conferences are 
focused on improving the quality of nursing care through the improvement 
of management, supervisory and teaching skills of professional nurses 
responsible for directing nursing service personnel. 

Publications, Research Grants. Research Projects and Other Professional 
Activi ties : 

a, Publ ications - 

- Mary E. Macdonald, Associate Dean 

"Utilization of Nursing Personnel", Proceedings of Work Conference 
on Improvement of Nursing Practice , Massachusetts Nurses 
Association, August, 1965. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
School of Nursirig 

Functional Chart of Organl7ation 



Doard of Trustees or 
Ooard of Directors 
Cooperating Agencies* 










Administrators of 
Cooperating Agencies 










Director of Nursing Service 
of Cooperating Agencies 


Nursing Service Personnel 
of Cooperating Agencies 



Doard of Trustees 
of the 
University of Mass. 



Director of U.M. 
Health Services 



Secretarial 
Staff 




Advisory CouncI 1 
to the Dean 



College of 
Arts and Science 



School of 
Home Economics 



School of 
Physical Education 



Administrative Coordinators 



Student Health 
Program 



Springfield 
Clinical Division 



CLINICAL NURSING 



Sophomore Year 
Curriculum Coordinator 



Junior Year 
Curriculum Coordinator 



Course Coordinator 



Senior Year 
Curriculum Coordinator 



Course Coordinator 



Instructional Team 



Course Coordinator 



Instructional Team 



Instructional Team 



-I- 



STUDENTS OF NURSING 



Legend: 



Direct Responsibility 



- - Collaborative Relationship 
. . Advisory Relationship 
* Seven Cooperating Agencies 



- 3a - 









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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
School of Nursing 

Faculty Organization df School of Nursing 
1 964- 1965 



Interagency 
Committees (7) 

Northampton State 

Hospi tal 
Springfield Day Care 

Center - Mass. 

Dept. of Mental 

Health 
Springfield Hospital 
Springfield Health 

Departmsnt 
Visi ting Murse 

Association of 

Springfield 
V/esson Maternity 

Hospital 
V/esson Memorial 

Hospital 



Standing 
Comml ttees 



I 



Curriculum 
Commi ttee 



FACULTY 
ORGANIZATION 

(All full-tfme 
instructional 
staff) 



Clinical Associates 

of the 

Facul ty of the 

School of Nursing 



Special 
Commi ttees 



j Faculty 
Development 



School 
Functions 



I'romotions 



Records 



.1. 



Library 



Legend: 



Direct Responsibility 
Advisory Relationship 



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- k - 

b. Grants - 

- National Institute of Mental Health - Integration of Psychiatric 
Nursing in the Baccalaureate Nursing Program. 

A grant of $25,^:32.02 was made to the School of Nursing for the 
tenth consecutive year. The continuity of the grant has made 
it possible to: 

- designate a psychiatric nurse faculty member to function 
directly with non-psychiatric clinical nursing faculty 
for the sophomore, junior and senior years; 

- award undergraduate stipends, tuition and fees, to 
students in the last two years of their program. (One 
senior and one junior student received such awards 
during 1965-66.) 

- purchase psychiatric services from the University Health 
Services for a faculty development program; 

- add to the audio-visual equipment; 

- utilize the professional services of two qualified 
psychiatric nurse faculty members during the summer 
in the project related to the Neighborhood Health 
Center in Springfield. 

Of the total amount of the grant, $2284 was designated as Overhead; 
$5^+00 for undergraduate stipends; and, $1260 for undergraduate 
tuition and fees. 

Our 1966 graduate has been accepted for advanced psychiatric 
study at New York University for the fall of I966. 

c. Professional Activities of the Faculty : 

(See Appendix B and C.) 

6. Major Accomplishments of School of Nursing - 1965-66 : 
I . Graduate Program ; 

1. Development of the first graduate program to be offered by the 
School of Nursing In September, I966 - Master of Nursing 
Administration. Approved by the Graduate School and the University 
Board of Trustees - 6/30/66. 

2. Development of a preliminary proposal for a graduate program - 
Master of Psychiatric Nursing. Consultation was provided by 
Dr. Gertrude Isaac, Nursing Consultant, National Institute of 
Mental Health, V/ashington, D. C. 



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1 1 . Un».'ergracluate Program : 

A, Cu.riculum Development - 

During the past year, the Faculty of the School of Nursing 
has directed its efforts toward continuing refinement of the 
nursing curriculum. Cognizant of the fact that the needs of 
people dictate the design of nursing, and thus, the pattern of 
its educational programs, the Faculty, in 196^, recommended a 
curriculum design which: 

- emphasized a broad problem-solving approach to the 
nursing care of individuals of all age groups in a 
variety of settings; 

- permitted the development of core units in all upper 
division nursing courses, which required the particip- 
ation of a faculty team representative of the various 
clinical specialties in nursing; 

- provided for increased opportunity for continuity, 
progression and sequence in learning. The revised 
design was considered experimental in nature and 
continuous evaluation and refinement was recognized 
as a constant imperative. The results of two years 
of experience with the revised plan would appear to 
support not only its general wisdom, but also the 
need for continued development in the three areas 
mentioned above. 

The major curriculum refinements accomplished in I965-66 
have emanated from an individual and collective consciousness 
of the need to: 

- maintain integrity through the control of size of the 
school . 

- insure against undue specialization and fragmentation 
of the educational experience. 

- enrich instruction. 

- experiment with the variants of independent study. 

- collaborate with members of the University faculty as 
regards course offerings in general education and 
supporting courses. 

- create the feeling of an intellectual community. 



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Specific accomplishments include: 

1. The creation of a functional faculty organizational 
structure which will permit increased involvement of 
all faculty In the conduct of school business in ways 
consonant with their individual rank and responsibilities. 

2. The establishment of intra-dlscipl inary teaching teams 
at each instructional year level to the end that maximum 
utilization of the specialized prepa:-ation, sl<ills and 
intera?ts of each faculty member wHl be effected con- 
comitantly with increased opportunity for collaborative 
and coordinative functioning as a member of a teaching 
team. 

3. The extension and improvement of the broad core units 
offered in the upper division nursing courses, with 
increased opportunity for intra- and inter-disciplinary 
participation. Continued development in this area has 
resulted in a progressive movement away from the tradit- 
ional, segmented, compartmentalized approach in the 
teaching of clinical nursing content. 

k. The experimentation with "programed" learning in 

selected areas of instruction, with the utilization of 
"programed" Instruction in the course units on Asepsis; 
Measurement and Dosage; and Biostatistics. 

5. A markedly revised approach in the teaching of Operating 
Room Nursing in which increased emphasis will be placed 
on continuity of care of the surgical patient, and less 
emphasis on operating room techniques. This plan will 
be implemented on an experimental basis in I966-67. 

S. The exploration of and experimentation with selected 
variants of Independent Study. 

a. A Subcommittee of Curriculum assumed the responsibility 
for investigating the much-discussed area of Independ- 
ent Study in the Basic Collegiate Nursing Program, 
Their activities included an exploration of the 
literature and existing programs of independent study 
in other nursing programs and colleges and an 
opinionnaire survey of University of Massachusetts 
nursing majors and a group of non-nursing sophomore 
women. The progress report of this Subcommittee 
emphasized the need for further investigation of the 
subject through controlled research and, in the 
interim, for further utilization of teaching methods 
which provide for the active participation of 
students in an informal climate with the faculty 
serving as resource personnel. The faculty is 
committed to further investigation of this topic 
in 1966-67. 



- 7 - 

b. Since its initiation, the Special Problems Seminar 
offered in the Junior Year has been oriented to the 
development of increased understanding of research 
methodology and beginning skill In its application. 
In 1965-66, the objectives were extended to include 
the opportunity to initiate a design for a descriptive 
type of investigation appropriate for undergraduate 
students of nursing. 

Six faculty members and nine junior students parti- 
cipated in this seminar. Despite the heavy demand 
which this seminar placed on both student and faculty 
time. Its role in allowing the student to take an 
active part In the learning process, to utilize an 
indirect method of faculty guidance and to develop 
increased skill in critical thinking was emphasized 
by both students and faculty. The problems selected 
by the students were as follows: 

- Use of the Kardex as a means of communicating 
Information to improve continuity of patient care. 

- Identification of factors predisposing to form- 
ation of decubitus areas. 

- Identification of fears common to adult pre- 
operative patients. 

- Investigation of the Influence of knowledge con- 
cerning a diagnosis of carcinoma on selected 
areas of interpersonal behavior in hospitalized 
adults. 

- Investigation of toy selection for preschool 
hospitalized children. 

- Investigation of interpretation of commonly used 
terms by nursing personnel and patients. 

- Investigation of a method of preoperative pre- 
paration for four and five year old children 
anticipating a tonsillectomy. 

- Investigation of the relationship of attitudes 

of nurses about charting to the quality of nurses 
notes. 

Five of the students plan to complete their investigation 
during the senior year. 

The Special Problems Seminar at the senior level provided 
an opportunity for three senior students to participate 
in Individual and group experiences with psychiatric 
patients for the purpose of Increasing both practitioner 
and research skills. Each student spent one hour each 
week in the clinical setting in actual participation with 
patients; kept a diary of each session; received one hour 



- 8 - 

of faculty supervision for each hour spent with patients; 
and prepared a clinical paper. One student elected to 
work in a continuing therapeutic nurse-patient relation- 
ship with an acutely disturbed schizophrenic young male; 
the other students elected a group experience. The two 
faculty preceptors identified this teaching experience as 
the most meaningful one in which they had participated in 
at the University and indicated that the learning outcomes 
far exceeded their expectations of undergraduate students 
of nursing. The students commented on the extraordinary 
meaning of the experience in their personal and profession- 
al growth and on the imperative need for similar experiences 
in other areas. 

7. The participation of the clinical nutrition faculty member in 
the planning and implementation of the foundation course in 
normal nutrition offered by the School of Home Economics. 
Inasmuch as nutrition is an integral part of health, it is 
viewed, in all its aspects, as an essential part of the nursing 
curriculum. The responsibility for the development of the 
teaching content, including its practical application, is 
shared by nursing and nutrition faculty. During the past year, 
emphasis was placed on the extension and improvement of the 
content offered in this area. 

8. The establishment of a University Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, 
national nursing honor society. Directly related to the need 
to establish the feeling of an intellectual community Is the 
progress made during the past year to initiate a chapter of the 
national nursing honor society at the University of Massachusetts 
School of Nursing. On June 9, notification was received from 
Dr. El kins. Director of Honors and Chairman of the Honors 
Council, that the petition to establish a University Chapter of 
Sigma Theta Tau had been approved by the Senate Committee on 
Academic Affairs. The organization will function as a local 
honor society until a charter Is received from the national 
organization. 

B. Clinical Resources : 

The procurement of suitable clinical and other related labor- 
atories for the implementation of the required practlcum in a 
collegiate nursing program Is a task which faces the faculty of 
many schools of nursing, which does not have a University hospital 
and related clinical facilities. This problem is one which the 
Faculty has faced since the Inauguration of the program twelve 
years ago, but which has been compounded in recent years by such 
factors as: 

- increased student enrollment In our program. 

- increasing demands on cooperating agencies by other nursing 
education programs in the area. Including associate degree 
and practical nursing programs. 

- interest on the part of the facultyto inaugurate selected 
experiences with patients and families during the Freshman 
Year. 



These pressures have increased the imperativeness of securing the 
needed clinical and other related laboratories, within feasible 
geographic distance from campus, which will meet the quantitative 
and qualitative criteria of an accredited collegiate program. 

During the past year, extended use has been made by the 
faculty of the clinical resources of the second general hospital 
cooperating in this program — Wesson Memorial Hospital. Clinical 
rotations for 1966-67 have been planned within the limits of the 
existing structure (6 cooperating agencies). By 1967-68, additional 
clinical resources must be located to provide the needed learning 
experiences for the nursing majors currently enrolled. 

C. Program Priorities - 1966-67 : 

1 , Present and Future Role and Function of the University of 
Massachusetts School of Nursing - 

The fact that every profession is Influenced by Its 
heritage, its Immediate problems, emerging societal trends, 
the nature of Its practice, and the extent to which It can 
realistically enact changes which will permit progress has 
been well documented. And the profession of nursing has not 
escaped the influence of social change. Particularly 
significant In its recent development are the Impact of the 
current explosion of knowledge affecting health practices, 
the Increasing level of education In the United States, and 
the public demand for more health care. Major changes and 
trends in and around nursing have made it imperative to 
examine the nature and scope of nursing practice and the type 
and quality of education needed by nursing practitioners. 

In December, 1965, the American Nurse's Association In 
Its first position paper on education for nursing took the 
position that: 

a. Education for those who work In nursing should take 
place in institutions of learning within the general 
system of education. 

b. Minimum preparation for beginning professional nursing 
practice should be baccalaureate degree education in 
nursing. 

c. Minimum preparation for beginning technical nursing 
practice at the present time should be associate 
degree education in nursing. 

It is obvious that this movement holds particular Implications 
for collegiate nursing education in general and for this 
public supported University School of Nursing In particular. 
Among these are: 

a. The responsibility of colleges and universities not 
now offering programs in nursing, but having the 
resources to do so, to provide education for practit- 
ioners of nursing. 



- 10 - 

b. The responsibility of colleges and universities now 
offering programs in nursing to expand facilities and 
faculties to accommodate the expected increased number 
of appl icants, 

c. The responsibility of universities now offering programs 
in nursing to utilize their resources for the prepar- 
ation of increased numbers of master clinical nursing 
specialists and faculty members qualified to assume 
teaching positions. 

d. The responsibility of colleges and universities to 
determine the distinctions between education which 
prepares for professional nursing practice and that 
which prepares for technical practice. 

Cognizant of their leadership role and responsibility in 
assisting with the development of a coordinated system of 
nursing education within the public-supported institutions of 
higher education in the Commonwealth, the Faculty of the 
School of Nursing have addressed their individual and collect- 
ive efforts to these issues during the past year. More 
specifically, their on and off campus activities have included: 

a. The establishment of a subcommittee to study the 
contemporary issues in nursing as they relate to the 
education of professional nursing practitioners, and 
to make recommendations as to the objectives and 
learning experiences appropriate for the undergraduate 
baccalaureate program in nursing. 

b. The establishment of a subcommittee to study the 
contemporary trends in higher education and, more 
specifically, anticipated direction of higher education 
on this campus, and to develop a projected blueprint 
for our undergraduate program in nursing within the 
framework of these movements. 

c. individual faculty participation at the local, state 
and regional level in professional and community group 
activities related to this issue. 

The faculty is committed to further study of these issues 
and problems in I966-67. A two-day off-campus faculty confer- 
ence has been scheduled in September as the kick-off point for 
the continued deliberation on this subject. 

2. Curriculum Implementation - 

As indicated earlier in this report, priority will be 
given in 1 966-67 to: 

a. The enrichment of the course offerings at the senior 
level through the extension and improvement of intra- 
and inter-disciplinary core units and the expansion 
of opportunities for the independent pursuit of 
selected problems. 



- n - 

b. An experimentaJ approach to the teaching of operating 
room nursing at the junior level. 

c. Continued exploration of the philosophy and method of 
Independent study as it relates to the basic collegiate 
nursing program and continued experimentation with 
selected variants of this method. 

d. Continued refinement of the lower division nursing 
courses toward the achievement of increased coordin- 
ation with other nursing and supporting courses and 
increased participation of the student in the learning 
process. 

e. Cooperative effort with interagency personnel In im- 
proving the quality of the nurse care offered to 
patients and families to the end that the quality of 
the nursing education offered to our students will be 
improved, as well as the concomitant service to 
patients and families. 

f. Continued exploration of additional clinical and other 
related laboratories within feasible geographic 
distance from campus to provide the resources needed 
for Implementation of program for the students 
currently enrol led. 

g. Continued work on special projects described under #7 
of this report. 

7. Special projects or programs of the School of Nursing - 1965-66 ; 

P ROJECT 1 : Promoting the Establishment of a Neighborhood Health Center 

During the past year, a special committee of the faculty has been 
engaged in exploring the health needs of the families of low socioeconomic 
status residing In a somewhat Isolated area of Springfield. The rate of 
social and health problems Is especially high. The goal of this committee 
is to initiate plans for the establishment of a Neighborhood Health Center 
in Census Tract 7, Brightwood Area of Springfield to the end that: 

1. A community health resource will be created through which multiple 
health services will be made conveniently accessible to a segment 
of the population who present a multiplicity of health-related 
problems, and In which new patterns of family health care, based 
on the latest advances In the health and allied sciences, can be 
developed and demonstrated. 

2. A community health laboratory will be available In which the represent- 
atives of the helping professions can collaborate In delineating and 
defining the specific health needs of the people living In this area 

of the community, and in developing and demonstrating improved 
approaches to their solution. 



- 12 - 
To date, the Committee's activities liave included: 

1. Establishing lines of communication with government and community 
leaders and/or agencies. 

2. Investigating the methodology employed in the planning and establish- 
ment of selected existing neighborhood health centers and the organ- 
izational patterns effected. 

3. Establishing lines of communication with residents of the Riverview 
Apartments (a federally-aided low income housing project in this 
census tract), including the administration of a health survey 
questionnai re. 

k. Review of the literature relating to neighborhood health services, 
programs, studies and demonstration projects, including the reports 
of two recent extensive surveys of community problems and programs 
of community service in the Springfield area. 

5. The preparation and submittal of a project proposal for Financial 
Assistance for the Planning and Establishment of this Community 
Service Program under Title I of the Higher Education Act of 1965. 
This request was for funds to support a mul tidlscipl inary University 
team which would be responsible for the preliminary planning and 
development of the proposed Neighborhood Health Center, and for the 
development of continuing project grants from other sources, such 
as the Economic Opportunity Act and the Nurse Training Act, ]36k. 

Although this project was not one of those funded in Fiscal I966 under 
Title I of the Higher Education Act of I965, a modest budgetary allotment from 
the Provost will permit continued exploration and development of the project 
during the summer, I966, by a faculty team. Also, the members of the special 
committee have committed themselves to continued woric on this project in 
1966-67 on the basis that: 

- It represents an educational research program. In which the resources 
of the University of Massachusetts can be employed in identifying and 
developing new, expanded or improved approaches to the solution of 
community health problems. 

- the proposed facility will provide a much-needed community health 
laboratory for utilization by the School of Nursing and other 
University programs in the Implementation of their respective programs 
of study. 

PROJECT II ; Curriculum Project: Independent Pursuit of Learning Experiences 
with Selected Families 

Another group of faculty addressed themselves to the development of an 
experimental program whereby the senior course offerings might be enriched 
through the extension of student experiences with selected families. A 
preliminary statement of a project proposal was developed, which Is based 
on the premise that enrichment of learning experiences for selected students 
can be accomplished through independent study which has as Its focus the care 
of families, and that this study of selected families can be pursued In lieu 
of the structured courses offered In the senior year. 



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- 13 - 

The faculty has committed Itself to a Fall, 196? target date for the 
initiation of this curriculum project. A special subcommittee has been 
appointed to continue exploration of the proposal during Summer, 1966. It 
is anticipated that a request for funding will be submitted in I966-67 to 
the Division of Nursing, U. S, Public Health Service, where monies are avail- 
able through the Nurse Training Act of 196^ and other appropriate grant sources. 



PROJECT Ml ; Faculty Development Project 



During the past two years, a number of the faculty have been Interested 
in learning more about the group process and more about themselves as a group 
participant and group leader. This Interest was stimulated by a recognition 
of the need for increased sl<i 11 In working collaboratively and productively 
with students, peers and other Inter- and Intra-dlsclpl Inary groups. In 
I96U-65, four faculty seminars were held for the purpose of discussing 
attitudes and relationships of the teacher and student in the teaching and 
learning process. Dr. Julian Janowitz, Director of the University Mental 
Health Service, served as seminar leader. The helpfulness of these sessions 
resulted In an expanded project in 1965-66. Seventeen (17) faculty members 
participated in the program In I965-66. Two faculty groups were formed -- 
each of which met weekly with Or. Janowftz throughout the year. The content 
of the group discussions was initiated by the group. Along with the discussion 
and sharing of Important concerns, there was an opportunity to investigate and 
learn the process through which a group — and in particular, this group -- 
functions. The general consensus of the faculty is that this experience 
contributed much to the improvement of work effectiveness, group morale, and 
self-understanding. 

The participants recommended that the project be continued In I966-67. 
Funding has been established for the fall semester, 1 966. A faculty committee 
has assumed the responsibility of finding ways and means for continuing support 
of this project. 

8. Future Plans and Needs ; 

The School of Nursing, now In Its twelfth year of operation, is 
conscious of Its responsibilities for: 

- Improving the curriculum of the baccalaureate program. 

- increasing the number of educational opportunities for baccalaureate 
nursing education within the University and the Commonwealth. 

- Initiating such advanced programs In nursing education as will increase 
the quality and quantity of nurse clinicians and teachers of nursing. 

- Collaborating with schools of nursing offering advanced programs In 
clinical nursing by providing a practicum In teaching. 

- Continuing education for professional nurses In practice. 

- Providing consultation service. 

CURRICUtUM IMPROVEMENT - 

Improvement of the curriculum Is of perpetual concern to a faculty 
dedicated to the preparation of a qualified professional nurse practitioner, 
and of a graduate who will meet the requirements for admission to graduate 
schools. The work already initiated will be continued, and during the coming 



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year consultation will be sought. 

INCREASING THE EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FOR BACCALAUREATE NURSING EDUCATION 
IN MASSACHUSETTS - 



It Is generally agreed that until the number of students enrolled in 
baccalaureate nursing programs can be at least doubled, throughout the 
country, the advanced nursing programs preparing such graduates for positions 
in teaching, administration, supervision, consultation, and research cannot 
assume their professional role and responsibility. As a result the prepar- 
ation of a larger number of baccalaureate nursing students cannot go forward 
at a rate essential to meet the nursing care needs of our society. 

The University of Massachusetts School of Nursing can help to meet this 
problem by: 

- increasing the admission of qualified high school graduates to 100 
in 1967 (1966 admission - 80); 

- encouraging the transfer of students from accredited senior and/or 
junior colleges who meet the requirements of the University and the 
School of Nursing; 

- admitting graduates of diploma and associate degree programs In 
nursing, who meet the requirements of the University and the School 
of Nursing, for a 3-5 year period commencing In September, 19^7; 

- providing leadership in the planning for the Initiation of additional 
baccalaureate nursing programs In the State Colleges of the Common- 
wealth (presently, there is one such program - The State College at 
Fi tchburg) .* 



The target date for the completion of the University Hospital In 
Worcester is 1971. The Advisory Council to the Dean believes an autonomous 
School of Nursing should be established in Worcester at such time as the 
facilities of a College of Arts and Sciences are available. 

Utilization of the desirable clinical resources of the University 
Hospital for baccalaureate study by the students enrolled at the University 
of Massachusetts School of Nursing/Amherst would necessitate travel to 
V/orcester two or three days a week. 

ADVANCED PROGRAMS IN NURSING EDUCATION - 

The School of Nursing ii" obligated to provide graduate education in the 
areas of greatest need in the Commonwealth. Its first such program - Nursing 
Administration - will be Initiated In September, 1966. It Is anticipated that 
enrollment In this program will materially Increase each year. 



* Recent statistics reveal that the number of students seeking admission to 
diploma programs in Massachusetts is decreasing. Nationally the number of 
graduates from such programs decreased by 1^33 In 196i}-65. 






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- 15 - 

Nurse-Cl inician : 

The graduate program in Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, origin- 
ally planned for I967 or I968 will, of necessity, have to be postponed 
until a later date. Basically, the problem lies in the inadequacy of 
clinical resources in this area of the State, and the dearth of quali- 
fied psychiatric personnel. Both are essential if the practicum for 
the graduate students is to be significant and meaningful. 

The future holds promise. It is anticipated that the bill (S.889) 
currently before the General Court which provides for the decentraliz- 
ation of the Massachusetts Department of Mental Health and for the 
construction of multipurpose Mental Health Centers in regional areas 
will receive favorable action. If such is the case, construction of 
the long-anticipated Mental Health Center in Springfield will go forward. 
The establishment of a Department of Psychiatry at the University of 
Massachusetts School of Medicine undoubtedly will employ psychiatrists 
and other essential professional psychiatric personnel. Such resources 
will be of unestimable service to a psychiatric nurse faculty member 
planning a graduate program. 

Teachers of Nursing: 

II I ■ I ■— l^i— — ■ ■ ■■■!■■ I ■! Ihl 

The preparation of additional professional nurses is dependent 
primarily upon the availability of qualified nursing faculty. The 
responsibility and role of the University of Massachusetts School of 
Nursing in the preparation of teachers of nursing will be defined and 
clarified during the coming year. 

INTER-UNIVERSITY COLLABORATION - 

Increasingly, graduate programs preparing teachers of nursing are seeking 
a practicum for their students. An initial exploratory meeting has been held 
with one such program in Massachusetts. V/hlle the faculty feels that 
collaborative action is essential, the time and effort required in developing 
a sound practicum by faculty members who would qualify as preceptors will be 
considerable. Inter-university planning will, however, go forward during the 
next year. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR GRADUATE NURSES IN PRACTICE - 

The University of Massachusetts School of Nursing plans to continue its 
collaboration with the Mew England Board of Higher Education in providing 
work conferences for graduate nurses in practice. 

The unprecedented explosion of knowledge which has resulted in radical 
changes in medical and nursing practice demands that a continuing education 
program be provided for the graduate nurses providing direct care to patients 
and/or directing the services of nursing personnel. (These educational 
services are funded through the Short-Term Tralneeships of the U. S. Public 
Health Service.) 

Three work conferences, sponsored by the School of Nursing, are planned 
for the Summer of 1967. These educational opportunities are planned on the 
basis of theexpressed need of practicing graduate registered nurses. 



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- 16 - 

CONSULTATION SERVICE - 

The School of Nursing anticipates continuation of its consultative 
services through Its faculty to: 

- State colleges interested in initiating a baccalaureate degree 
program in nursing. 

- Public community colleges interested in initiating and/or in 
improving an associate degree program in nursing. 

- Diploma programs desiring help in the area of general curriculum 
development and/or in the improvement In the teaching of clinical 
nursing, such as Nursing of Children; Nursing of the Adult; 
Maternal and Infant Nursing; Public Health Nursing and/or in the 
transition from a diploma to an associate degree program. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING FACILITY - 

The present and projected services of the School of Nursing cannot be 
realized without a School of Nursing facility. An adequate and functionally 
designed School of Nursing Building is absolutely essential. 

Unfortunately, the School of Nursing's request for Capital Outlay 
(1963, 196^, 1965) is not high on the priority list. While several public 
and private schools of nursing throughout the country have received up to 
66 2/3 percent of the total construction costs through the Nurse Training 
Act''^, we cannot apply for federal funds and our School continues to be 
housed in less than adequate quarters (Western Massachusetts Public Health 
Center and Morrill IV). 

A Planning Committee for the School of Nursing Building has been 
appointed by the President. It is anticipated that the Committee will 
initiate its task in the fall, 

FACULTY - 

While adequate resources and facilities for clinical nursing laborator- 
ies are essential for the improvement and extension of the baccalaureate 
nursing program, and the initiation of graduate programs, the quality, 
creativity and commitment of the faculty continues to be the most important 
single asset of any school of Nursing. 

The utilization of the faculty through the use of Team Teaching has 
continued for the second year. There appears to be increasing evidence that 
the several problems inherent in this method of teaching are viewed as 
challenges by the members of the teaching teams. Considerable responsibility 
must be assumed by all members of the team but more particularly by those 
responsible for providing leadership to the team. 



(0 



Requests for construction grants (k year period 1965-69) have exceeded the 
^^3 million dollar ceiling. Efforts are being made by the American Nurses 
Association and other interested groups to extend the ceiling. 



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- 17 - 

The sophomore, junior and senior year coordinators function not unlike 
a department head. Her role and responsibility Is indeed similar, and are 
compounded when new and inexperienced faculty members join the team. Every 
effort must be made to attract faculty qualified, by preparation and teaching 
experience, for appointment at the rank of Assistant, Associate, or full 
Professor. The present disproportionate of Instructors (55%) places a far 
too heavy responsibility upon those faculty members assuming an administrative, 
teaching, and leadership role at the operational level. 

Recruitment of qualified faculty continues to be a difficult task, due 
to the enchantment of many with the large city, but primarily because too 
few faculty are graduates from advanced programs each year. 

SUMMARY - 

The unfinished tasks confronting the School of Nursing require that a 
Blueprint with priorities be established. The energy and capabilities of 
the faculty must be expended in such a manner as will bring credit to the 
University, the School of Nursing, and a sense of accomplishment and pro- 
fessional pride to the School's faculty. 



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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

School of Nursing Appendix A 

FACULTY 

1965-66 

Ful 1-Time 

Administration : 

Miss Mary A, Maher, R.N. (Rhode Island Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Columbia University) 
M.A, (Columbia University) 

Dean, School of Nursing 

Miss Mary E. Macdonald, A.B. (Emmanuel College) 

R.N. (Mass. General Hospital School of Nursing) 
M.A, (Columbia University) 

Associate Dean and Professor of Nursing Education 

Maternal and Child Nursing ; 

Miss Gellestrina T. DiMaggio, A.B. (Connecticut College for V/omen) 

M.N. (Yale University School of Nursing) 
M.A. (Columbia University) 

Professor, Maternal and Child Nursing 

Miss Rosamond R. Shepard, B.S. (Simmons College School of Nursing) 

M.S. (University of Colorado School of Nursing) 

Instructor, Maternal and Infant Nursing 

Miss E. Ann Sheridan, R.N, (Catherine Laboure School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Boston College) 
M.S. (University of Pennsylvania) 

Instructor, Maternal and Child Nursing 

Miss Edith G. Walker, R.N. (Episcopal Hospital of Philadelphia) 

B.S.N.E. (University of Pennsylvania) 
M.A. (Columbia University) 

Assistant Professor, Maternal and Infant Nursing 

Nursing of the Adult : 

Miss Elizabeth A, Clarke, A.B. (Mt.Holyoke College) 

M.S. (Columbia University) 
M.N. (Yale University School of Nursing) 

Assistant Professor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Mary F. Condron, R.N, (St. Francis Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S.N.E, (The Catholic University of America) 
M.S.N, (The Catholic University of America) 

Assistant Professor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

- 18 - 



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Miss Mary E. Gilmore, R.N. (Mass. General Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Simmons College) 
M.S.N. (The Catholic University of America) 

Professor of Nursing 

Miss Rita Kisting, B.S.N. (University of Wisconsin School of Nursing) 

M.S. (University of Colorado) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Benita Martocchio, B.S. (Hartford College) 

R.N. (Hartford Hospital School of Nursing) 
M.S. (Western Reserve University) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Helen C. Mather, B.S, (Boston College School of Nursing) 

M.S. (Boston College School of Nursing) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Jane E. Nicholson, R.N. (Mt. Auburn Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (University of Utah School of Nursing) 
M.S, (Boston University School of Nursing) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Alice Norman, R.N. (Westchester School of Nursing) 

B.S. (V/estern Reserve University) 
M.S, (Western Reserve University) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Elizabeth Petti, R.N, (Holyoke Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Boston University School of Nursing) 
M.S, (Boston University School of Nursing) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 
(Resigned from position - January, I96S) 

Miss Charlene Phelps, B,S, (University of Connecticut School of Nursing) 

M,S, (Western Reserve University) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Mary Jane Schank, B.S.N. (University of V/isconsin School of Nursing) 

M.S. (University of Colorado) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 

Miss Dorothy L. Sexton, R.N. (St. Raphael School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Boston College School of Nursing) 
M.S. (Boston University School of Nursing) 

Instructor, Medical and Surgical Nursing 






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- 20 - 

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing : 

Miss Greta Salenius, R.N, (St. Luke's Medical and Children's Center, 

Denver, Colorado) 
B.S.N. E. (University of Denver) 
D.N.Sc. (Boston University) 

Associate Professor, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 

Mrs. Janet Simmons, R.N. (Worcester Memorial Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (Boston University) 
M.S. (Boston University) 

Instructor, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 

Miss Rachel Smith, R.N, (Sioux Valley Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S. (South Dakota State College School of Nursing) 
M.Ed. (University of Minnesota School of Nursing) 
C.A.G.S. (Boston University School of Nursing) 

Associate Professor, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 

Public Health Nursing : 

Mrs. Bettye Frederic, B.S.(0il1ard University School of Nursing) 

M.S. (Boston University) 

Instructor, Public Health Nursing 

(Appointed to position: February, 1966) 

Miss Constance A. Kurkul, R.N. (Children's Hospital School of Nursing) 

B.S.N, (Boston University School of Nursing) 
M.A. (Columbia University) 

Assistant Professor, Public Health Nursing 

Graduate Program : 

*Miss Ida M. MacDonald, B.A. (University of Montana) 

R.N. (Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing) 
M.A. (University of Minnesota 

Associate Professor of Nursing 

*Joint appointment - University of Massachusetts School of Nursing 
and Franklin County Public Hospital. 

Part-Time 

Mrs. Kathryn B. Nickolls, B.S. (University of Oklahoma) 

A.O.A. (University Hospital, University of Michigan) 

Lecturer, Clinical Nutrition 



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Appendix B 

FACULTY ACTIVITIES 

July 1, 1965 - June 30, 1966 

In addition to their regular administrative, teaching and counseling 
activities, the Faculty of the School of Nursing has participated individually 
and collectively as follows: 

A. Participation in the planning and Implementation of educational and 
other services within the University: 

1 . All- University Committee Membership and Other Services : 

Miss Maher 

Member: Faculty Senate 
Dean's Counci 1 
Master Planning Council 

Miss M. Macdonald 

Member: Faculty Senate Committee on Summer Session 
President's Committee - Planning Northwest 

Residential Complex 
President's Advisory Committee - Department 

of Public Health 
Advisory Curriculum Committee - Department 

of Public Health 
Exploratory Committee - Organization of 

Research-Training Institute in 

Environmental Health 



Miss Clari<e 



Member: 



Committee on Scholarship, Financial Aid, 
Placement and Study Abroad 



Non-resident faculty fellow: 

Southwest Residential College - Emerson House 
(First semester) 



liss DiMaggio 
Member: 



Committee on Academic Matters 
Subcommittee on Honors 



Non-resident faculty fellow: 

Orchard Hill Residential College - Eugene Field 
House 



Miss Gi Imore 
Member: 



Committee on Tenure and Grievance 
Committee on Admissions and Records 



Non-resident faculty fellow: 

Southwest Residential College - Thoreau House 
- 21 - 



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- 22 - 
Miss Kurkul 

Member: University health Council 
Miss Mather 

Chairman: Committee on Recognized Student Organizations 

Member: Faculty Senate 

Committee on Committees 
Committee on Student Affairs 

Miss Nicholson 

Member: Library Committee 
Miss Schank 

Faculty Advisor: Scrolls 

Miss Smith 

Member: Faculty Senate 

Committee on University Affairs 
Committee on Evaluation - Orchard Hill 
Residential College 

Non-resident faculty fellow: 

Southwest Residential College - Melville House 

Miss Walker 

Member: Committee on Faculty Affairs 

Distinguished Teacher of the Year Committee 

2. School of Nursing Committee Membership : 

Miss Maher 

Chairman: Faculty Organization 

Interagency Administrative Committee - Public 
Health Nursing 

Member: Curriculum Comml ttee 
Promotions Committee 
Committee on Graduate Program 
Interagency Administrative Committee - V/esson 
Memorial Hospital 



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Miss M. Macdonald 

Chairman: Curriculum Commi ttee 
Promotions Committee 
Records Committee 

Student-Faculty Evenings Planning Committee 
Interagency Administrative Committees: 

Springfield Hospital 

Wesson Memorial Hospital 

Wesson Maternity Hospital 

Faculty Advisory Personnel Committee 

Secretary: Faculty Organization 

Advisory Council to Dean 

Member: Library Committee 
By-Laws Committee 
Committee on Graduate Program 
Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (k) 

Miss Clarke 

Chairman: Ad Hoc Committee to Study Communication Problems 
Subcommitte of Faculty - (1) 

Secretary: Promotions Committee 
By-Laws Committee 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 
Interagency Administrative Committee - Wesson 

Memorial Hospital 
Faculty Advisory Personnel Committee 
Advisory Council to Dean 

Miss Condron 

Chairman: By-Laws Committee 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (2) 
Interagency Administrative Committee - Wesson 
Memorial Hospital 

Miss DiMaggio 

Secretary: Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 
Promotions Committee 
Library Committee 
Records Committee 
Subcommittee of Curriculum - (1) 
Interagency Administrative Committees: 

Wesson Memorial Hospital 
Wesson Maternity Hospital 



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Faculty Advisory Personnel Committee 
Advisory Council to Dean 
Committee on Graduate Program 



Faculty Organization 
Subcommittee of Faculty - (I) 
Interagency Administrative Committees: 

Springfield Health Department and 
Visiting Murse Association of Springfield 



Miss Gilmore 



Secretary: Records Committee 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Curriculum Committee 

Faculty Development Committee 

Library Committee 

Promotions Committee 

Advisory Council to Dean 

Faculty Advisory Personnel Committee 

Committee on Graduate Program 

Interagency Administrative Committees: 
Springfield Hospital 
Wesson Maternity Hospital 
Springfield Health Department and 
Visiting Nurse Association of Springfield 

Miss Ki sting 

Secretary: Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 



Member: 



Miss Kurkul 



Faculty Organization 

School Affairs Committee 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (3) 

Student-Faculty Evenings Planning Committee 



Chairman: Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 

Secretary: Interagency Administrative Committee - 

Springfield Health Department and 
Visiting Nurse Association of Springfield 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 
Promotions Committee 
Library Committee 
Records Committee 
Interagency Administrative Committee - Wesson 

Maternity Hospital 
Advisory Council to Dean 



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Secretary: Committee on Graduate Program 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Faculty Development Committee 
Social Committee 

Facul ty Advisory Personnel Committee 
Advisory Council to Dean 

Miss Maftocdhio 

Chairman: Subcommittee of Curriculum - (1) 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Subcommittees of Faculty - (2) 
Student-Faculty Evenings Planning Committee 

Faculty Advisor: Preliminary Planning Committee - Sigma 

Theta Tau Chapter 

Miss Mather 



Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 
Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 
Interagency Administrative Committee - 
Springfield Hospital 

Faculty Advisor: Nursing Club 

Miss Nicholson 

Chairman: Library Committee 

Secretary: Interagency Administrative Committee - 

Wesson Memorial Hospital 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Corrani ttee 

Student-Faculty Evenings Planning Committee 
Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - {k) 
Facul ty Advisory Personnel Committee 
Preliminary Planning Committee - Sigma Theta Tau 
Chapter 



Miss Norman 
Member; 

Miss Phelps 
Member: 



Faculty Organization 

By-Laws Committee 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (3) 



Faculty Organization 
School Affairs Committee 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (3) 
Preliminary Planning Committee - Sigma Theta Tau 
Chapter 






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- 26 - 

Miss Schank 

Chairman: Subcommittee of Curriculum - (l) 

Membei': Faculty Organization 

School Affairs Committee 
Subcommittee of Faculty - (2) 
Student-Faculty Evenings Planning Committee 

Hiss Shepard 

Chairman: School Affairs Committee 

Secretary: Interagency Administrative Committee - 

Wesson Maternity Hospital 
Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (2) 

Miss Sexton 

Secretary: Curriculum Committee 

Faculty Development Committee 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 

Preliminary Planning Committee - Sigma Theta Tau 
Chapter 

Faculty Advisor: Nursing Club 
Miss Sheridan 

Secretary: Subcommittee of Curriculum - (1) 

Member: Faculty Organization 

Subcommittees of Faculty - (2) 

By-Laws Committee 

Preliminary Planning Committee - Sigma Theta Tau 

Chapter 
By-Laws Committee - Sigma Theta Tau 

Miss Salenius 

Chairman: Subcommittee - Independent Study 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Promotions Committee 
Committee on Graduate Program 
Advisory Council to Dean 
Faculty Personnel Committee 

Miss Smith 

Chairman: Faculty Development Committee 



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- 27 - 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 
Records Committee 
Subcommittee of Faculty - (1) 
Interagency Administrative Committee - 

Northampton State Hospital 
Advisory Council to Dean 
Committee on Graduate Program 

Miss Walker 

Secretary: Library Committee 

Member: Faculty Organization 
Curriculum Committee 

Subcommittees of Faculty and Curriculum - (3) 
Interagency Administrative Committees: 

Wesson Maternity Hospital 
Springfield Health Department and 
Visiting Nurse Association of Springfield 

Participation in the planning and implementation of programs related 
to improvement of patient care and nursing education: 

' • Oi'ga"' zational Activities : 

Miss Maher 

Chairman: Standing Committee on Continuing Education, New 

England Council on Higher Education in Nursing 
Program Committee - Deans' Meeting, National 

League for Nursing Council of Member Agencies 
Dept. of Baccalaureate and Higher Degree 
Programs, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Vice-chairman: Hampshire County Public Health Association 
Director: Third Inter-Unlverslty Faculty Work Conference 

Member: Massachusetts Board of Registration in Nursing 

Executive Council, New England Council on Higher 

Education in Nursing 
Review Panel on Nursing Projects, Division of 

Nursing, U. S. Public Health Service (Site 

Visit to Emory University School of Nursing - 

July 25-26) 
Planning Committee - Regional Nursing Work Conference, 

University of Massachusetts, N.E.B.H.E.N. , 

Fal I and V/inter 
Faculty, Regional Nursing Work Conference, N.E.B.H.E.N, 

Fall and Winter 



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28 



Miss M. Macdonald 



Chairman: Massacliusetts Nurses Association - Committee on 

Professional Counseling and Placement Service 



Member: 



Miss Clarke 



Massacliusetts League for Nut-sing - Steering Committee 
Study of Nursing Needs and Goals in Commonwealth 
New England Council of Higher Education in Nursing 
Massachusetts General Hospital School of Nursing 

Advisory Council 
Holyoke Hospital School of Nursing Advisory Council 
Advisory Council - Training Center for Comprehensive 
Care - Lemuel Shattuck Hospital 



First Vice-President: District One - Massachusetts Nurses 

Association 



Member: 
liss Condron 



Massachusetts Nurses Association - EACT Section, 
Program Committee 



Member; 



Miss DiMagglo 



Massachusetts Nurses Association - Committee on 
By-Laws 



Secretary: Massachusetts Nurses Association - Conference 

Planning Committee 

Co-Chalrman: Committee on Awards and Recognition - 

Massachusetts Nurses Association - 
District One 



Member: 



Miss Gilmore 



Member: 



Greenfield Community College School of Nursing 
Advisory Committee 



Board of Directors - Massachusetts Nurses 

Association, District One 
Board of Directors, Massachusetts Nurses 

Association 
Massachusetts League for Nursing - Scholarship 

Comml ttee 
M.L.N. - M.N. A. Disaster Committee 
New England Council on Higher Education in Nursing - 

Planning Committee 
Annual Forum 



Miss Kurkul 



Chairman: Conference on Cardiac Nursing, Western Mass, Heart 
Association 



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- 29 - 

Member: Board of Directors, Western Mass. Heart Association 
Springfield Cancer Society 

Miss I. MacDonald 

Director: Regional Work Conference, University of 

Massachusetts, N.E.B.H.E.N. , Fall and Winter 

Member: Council on Graduate Education, New England Council 
on Higher Education in Nursing 

Miss Mather 

Second V ice-Chairman: Massachusetts Nurses Association - 

District One, EACT Section 

Miss Shepard 

Secretary: Massacnusetts Nurses Association, EACT Section 

Miss Sexton 



Member: 

Miss Walker 
Member: 

2. Other Activities : 
Miss Maher 



Mass, League for Nursing - Committee on Public 
Relations and Communication 



Planning Committee, Massachusetts Nurses 

Association - Maternal and Child Health 
Conference 



Chairman: Scholarship Committee - Hampshire County 
Business and Professional Women 

Member: Hampshire County Public Health Association - Board 
of Directors and Executive Council 
Massachusetts Tuberculosis and Health League 
Massachusetts Department of Mental Health Advisory 
Committee 



Miss M. Macdonald 

Consultant on Nursing Education - 

Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital, Gardner 
Somerville Hospital School of Nursing 

Editorial Consultant - Nursing Education 

C. V. Mosby Co., Publishers, St. Louis, Missouri 

Speaker - 

Fall Conference, Maine Student Nurses Association, 
Portland, Maine - Oct. 6, 1965 



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- 30 - 

N.E.B.H.E. I^urslng Conference, Amherst, Oct. 27, 1965 
Westfield Nurses Association Meeting, Westfield, Mass. 

Nov* 3, 1965 
IMursing Conference, Western Mass, Department of Public 

Health, Amherst, Nov. 16, I965 
M.L.N. Department of Diplima and Associate Degree 

Programs Meeting, Providence Hospital, Dec. 14, I965 
M.L.N, - Central Massachusetts Meeting, Worcester, 

Jan. 19, 1966 
M.L.N. District One and M.N. A. Western Massachusetts 

Meeting - Agawam, Feb. 28, I966 
Seminar, Holyoke Hospital Nursing Service, Holyoke, 

April 6 and June 16, I966 
Henry Heywood Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 

Gardner, Capping Address, April 28, I966 
M.L.N, Department of Nursing Service and Nursing 

Education Meeting, Boston University, April 30, 1966 
Greenfield Community College School of Nursing, 

Greenfield, May 2k, 1966 
Mass. Department of Mental Health, School of Practical 

Nursing, Pioneer Valley Division, Graduation 

Address, June 15, 1966 
Regional Conference for Public Health Nursing Supervisors, 

Boston University, June 21, I966 

Miss DIMaggio 

Panel Moderator: "Nursing Responsibilities - Brain Injured 

Infants and Children" - Mass. Department 
of Public Health, Springfield 

Speaker: Belchertown High School Career Day 

Mrs. Frederic 

Co-Instructor: Parent Education, Springfield Visiting Nurse 

Association, Springfield 

Miss Gilmore 

Member: Board of Governors, Alumni Association, The Catholic 
University of America 

Speaker: Nursing Institute, M.N. A., Head Nurse Section, 

Oedham, Mass., Feb. I8, I966 
N.E.B.H.E. Nursing Conference, Amherst, Apr. 28,1966 
Conference on Respiratory Problems, Worcester County 

Public Health Association, Worcester, 

May 13, 1966 

Miss i. MacDonald 

Consultant: Nursing Education, School of Practical Nursing, 

Northampton 
Nursing Service Administration and Staff Develop- 
ment, Franklin County Public Hospital 



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- 31 - 

Speaker: Nursing Institute, M.N.A. - Head Nurse Section, 
Dedham, Mass. 
aN.E.B.H.E. Nursing Conference, St. Anselm's College, 
Manchester, New Hampshire 
Nursing Club, University of Massachusetts School of 
Nursing 

Miss Martocchio 

Speal<er: N.E.B.H.E. Nursing Conference, Amherst, Oct. 1965 
Miss Mather 

Speaker: N.E.B.H.E, Nursing Conference, Amherst, Oct, I965 

Reserve Officer: Captain - Air Force 

Miss Nicholson 

Reserve Officer: Assistant Chief Nurse - New Hampshire Air 

National Guard - 133rd Aeromedical 
Evacuation Fl ight 

Miss Phelps 

Consultant on Nursing: Western Massachusetts Heart Association 

Miss Sheridan 

Consultant: Maternal and Child Nursing, Greenfield Community 
College School of Nursing 

Miss Walker 

Member: Planning Committee and Group Leader, Community Program, 
"How to be a Successful Teenager" - Northampton 
Council of Churches 

Group Leader: M.N.A. Maternal and Child Health Conference 

Co-Instructor: Parent Education Course, Visiting Nurse 

Association of Springfield 

Speaker: Health Careers Day, Holyoke, Massachusetts, Mar. 1966 
Hopkins Academy, Had ley, Mass. 



Appendix C 



FACULTY ATTEi\IDANCE AT PROFESSIONAL MEETINGS 









Faculty MembfefS' 


Date 


Meeting 


Place 


Attending 


10/7/65 


M.N, A. - District 1 - Annual 


Agawam, Mass. 


Miss 


Condron 




Meeting 




Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


DiMaggio 

Gi Imore 

Kurkul 

Maher 

Mather 

Schank 

Shepard 


10/ IV 65 


N. E.G. H.E.N. - Fall Meeting 


Cambridge, Mass 


. Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


DiMaggio 
Macdonald 
Maher 
MacDonald 


10/18/65 - 


Institute for Instructors of 


Framingham, 


Miss 


Mather 


10/22/65 


Disaster Nursing 


Mass, 


Miss 


Nicholson 


10/27/65 - 


M.N. A. - Annual Meeting 


Chicopee, Mass. 


Miss 


Clarke 


10/29/65 






Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Condron 

DiMaggio 

Gi Imore 

Kisting 

Kurkul 

Mather 


11/3/65 - 


A.N, A. Conference on Improve- 


vyashlngton. 


Miss 


Sexton 


n/5/65 


ment of Patient Care 


0,C. 






11/9/65 - 


Conference on Obstetrical, 


Hanover, 


Miss 


Shepard 


11/10/65 


Gynecological and Neonatal 
Nursing 


New Hampshire 






11/10/65 - 


N.L.N. - D.B.H.D.P. - Council 


Phi ladelphia, 


Miss 


Clarke 


11/12/65 


of Member Agencies - Fall 


Pennsylvania 


Miss 


DiMaggio 




Meeting 




Miss 


Sheridan 


11/16/65 


M.N.A, - District 1 - EACT 


Holyoke, Mass. 


Miss 


DiMaggio 




Section Program Meeting 




Miss 


Kurkul 


11/18/65 


Annual Meeting - Visiting Nurse 
Association of Springfield 


Springfield, 
Mass. 


Miss 


Kurkul 


11/30/65 


M.L.N. - Annual Meeting 


Boston, Mass. 


Miss 


DiMaggio 


1/18/66 


M.N.A. - District 1 - EACT 


Northampton, 


Miss 


Kurkul 




Section Program Meeting 


Mass. 


Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Mather 

Shepard 

Sexton 


1/26/66 


M.P.H.A. - Conference on 


Boston, Mass. 


Miss 


Kurkul 




Legislation 




Miss 


Walker 


2/12/66 


Conference on Mental 


Amherst, Mass. 


Miss 


Kisting 




Retardation 




Miss 


Sheridan 



32 



,S.-A , j 



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■-1-— 



- 33 



Date 


„ ,.. 

Meeting 


Place 


Faculty Members 
Attending 


2/lQ/(>(> 


M.N, A. - District 1 - Program 
Meeting 


Agawam, Mass. 


Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Kisting 
Nicholson 
Shepard 
Sexton 


3/1/66 - 
3/3/66 


Conference on Educational 
Television - D.H.E.W. 


Cambridge, Mass. 


Miss 


Nicholson 


:/7/66 


Child Study Association - 
kl Annual Conference 


New Yorl< Ci ty 


Miss 


Shepard 


3/12/66 


Third Intercollegiate Student 
Nurses Conference 


Storrs, Conn. 


Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Kisting 
Schank 
Sheridan 
Shepard 


3/1V66 - 
3/17/66 


American College of Surgeons 
and Nurses Convention 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Miss 
Miss 


Martocchio 
Phelps 


3/16/66 


Annual Meeting - United Fund 


Springfield, 
Mass. 


Miss 


Kurkul 


V 11/66 


Conference on Birth Defects - 
M.D.P.H. 


Amherst, Mass, 


Miss 
Miss 


DiMaggio 
Shepard 


V 11/66 


Conference on Mental 
Retardation 


Boston, Mass. 


Miss 


Sheridan 


VI 8/66 - 
V21/66 


Conference on Aerospace 
Nursing - U.S.A.F. 


San Antonio, 
Texas 


Miss 


Macdonald 


V25/66 


M.N. A. - District 1 - EACT 
Program Meeting 


Pittsfield, Mass 


. Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Kisting 

Mather 

Schank 

Shepard 

Sheridan 


5/V66 


N. E. Health Educators 
Association 


Northampton, 
Mass. 


Mrs. 
Miss 


Frederic 
Kurkul 


5/10/66 


M.N. A. - District 1 - EACT 
Section Program Meeting 


Springfield, 
Mass. 


Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


Kisting 
Shepard 
Sexton 
Sheridan 


5/11/66 


N.E.C. H.E.N. Annual Forum 


Boston, Mass. 


Miss 
Miss 
Miss 
Miss 


DiMaggio 
Gi Imore 
M. Macdonald 
1, MacDonald 


5/19/66 - 
5/20/66 


Educational Conference 


Wentworth 

By-the-Sea 
Newcastle, Mass. 


Miss 


Maher 


6/13/66 - 
6/17/66 


A.N. A. - Bienniel Convention 


San Francisco, 
Cal ifornia 


Miss 


Kurkul 



3k - 









Faculty Members 


Date 


Meeting 


Place 


Attending 


6/20/66 - 


Third Inter-University Faculty 


Chatham Bars Inn 


Miss Clarke 


e/ik/ee 


Work Conference - N.E.C. H.E.N. 


Chatham, Mass. 


Miss Condron 
Miss DiMaggio 
Miss Gi Imore 
Miss Kisting 
Miss Kurkul 
Miss Martocchio 
Miss Maher 
Miss Mather 
Miss Nicholson 
Miss Norman 
Miss Phelps 
Miss Salenius 
Miss Schank 
Miss Sexton 
Miss Walker 
Miss 1. MacDonald 


6/28/66 


Governor Volpe's Conference 


Boston, Mass. 


Miss Maher 




on Hospital Planning 




Miss 1. MacDonald 



AimUAL aSPOET 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EBUGATJJ 

June 1966 



Appropria£ions 
Account/Year 1963-1964 



03 


27,825 


06 


14,000 


07 


6,000 


09 


2,140 


10 


2,700 


11 


„o- 


12 


2,500 


13 


16,850 


14 

14| 

15'' 

16 


1,500 
5,400 

6,775 

350 


Persoaael^ 





Dean 

Assis&ant Sean 

SepartradQt Head 

Professor 

Associste Professosr 

Assistant Profisissor 

Instructor 

Fart Time lasfcructos- 

Assistant: Ashl^tle ISlr. 

Mead Coach 

Intraaural Bis-eetor 

Asst. Fooeb4ill Coach 

Athletic Coach 

ABst. Athle&ic Coaeh 

Fia^social Manager of 

Athletics^ 
Sports Information Sisr.^ 
Asst. Sports Information 

Director^ 



1964-1965 


1965-1966 


36,259 


31,300 


6,900 


7,400 


7,000 


7,000 


3,000 


3,000 


3,940 


5,100 


200 


200 


3,398 


4,600 


IS, 850 


28,100 


2,330 


3,500 


6,000 


6,000 


3,400 


4,000 



200 



1963-1964 1964-1965 i965«1566 



1 

2 
3 



10 
2 
1 
2 

2 
4 
2 

1 
X 



1 
1 
2 

3 
6 

5 

li 

2 

1 

2 

1 
'J 

4 



1 
1 
2 
3 
6 
7 
.2 



1 
2 
4 
3 



©rganisstioa Chart for 1966-1967 - 



Students or clientei© served 

Kuaaber of Graduate Students 
Number of Undergradaafce Majors 
SJuaaber of Students Taysght 
Athletie team. Metabership 



1 1 

See Qttsahad chart 

£ci96_3 §ent._l96± Se|?j;,136_5 

2 72 

452 2 
829 



oot recorded 



Xn£ra®urai Fartieipatioc 

*See Appendix for Departsneatal brsskdo?sa 
^Paid from Athletic TrBs£ F«ads 



16' 

3 33 

5672 

788 

3165 



380 

6.520 

SOS 



f*"*'^ 




aan;'»5w 



© 
® 

© 



FaculKy Fublicaelotts 

a- Bischoff, David C, "Designed fox- Participatioa, " 
i" J,£il^^ > Fhysleal Education, RecgeaSloa, 37;29s 
March, 1966". " ^'"™ 

Campneys Harry K. „ and Wehr. Richard W. "An InterpreSa- 
£i©n of the Strerogfeh Differences Associsted with Vary- 
ing Angles of Full," ,M££££££. £H££S,££iZ» 36:403-4125 
Deeemberj 1965. 

Gampney, Harry K. aad Vincent:, Karllyn F. "Effects of 
CelisCheaics on Selected Conapoaenfes of Physical Fitaess , ■'' 
Eesesreh Quagfceg ly, 36:393-402, Deceraberj 1965. 

Coffey, Margayes A., "Girls in Sports; 1900~1965s" 
K . G . A . A , Bullefcint Vol. 4, Bo. 3, pp, 16-20. 

Goffey, Margaret A., "Sotse Unorthodos Thoughts About 
Showers," £. Bealth, ghyeical EducaKionj, Recggation, 
37:29, May, 1.966. 

Stcei, B., "OKygea uptake aad blood lactats relatioaships 
in subjects of diametric somafeotype , " Srgonoiaicg (supple- 
meet), p. 87, Sctober, 1965. 

Ricci , B., et al, ''Eaer§y cost aad effieieacy of Harvard 
Step Test perfogns^nce, " Arbeitaphysiologie , 22:125^ 19S6. 

Veadiens Lynn, "Syyvey of Physieal Edueation ia Asia 
aad the Pacific Islaads," £, of Eealth, ghysiesl 
Education and SeerestloBj "37:293 March, i9&6. 



Research Gras^t 

Riggs, Msida, Travel allowance to present a paper at 
the Xnternstional Congress oa Girls and Women's Sportsj 
Cologne, SeriHanyj summer 1965. Paper, "Treads ia 
Grouping. " 

Papers presented: 

James, E., Gollege Physical Sdu«s£i®n Association 
meeting, Philsdelphia j Beeessbarj 1963 

Jaoies, R.J Massachusetts Associatleia for Heslth^ Physical 
Education, sad Recxeatton^ Boston, March, 1966, 

Ricci, B., "Oxygen debt and blood lactate Bieasur®E3eR£ , " 
Annual Meeting, American College ©f Sports Mediciae, 
Madisonj, Wiscoasin, March, 1966. 



d. Current: Research 

Ricci, B - s legative energy balance (Faculty Research 
Grant) 

Rlcci, B., Oxygen debt incurred in ehe six minute mile 

Riccl, B., Inefficiency of sveis lime carbon dioxide 
absorbei:. 

Eicci, B.; sind James, R. , Assessment of Knee StrengClt 
Rogation. 

Ricci, B.; and Snook, 0., Subtslor iu3&abiliey 

e. Professional Activities 5 School Faculfiy represented the 
University at the fQllo%i>'lng conferences during the year: 

Interna Clonal Congress on Girls and Woraens Spor&s 

American College of Sports Medicine 

Kdtional College Physical Education Association for Men 

National Collegiste Athletic Association Meetings 

Association of Interpretive naturalists 

National Recreation Congress 

Kev England Recreation Conference 

Eastern Association for Physical Education of College 

Women 
American Assoc, for Health, Fhysical Education & Recreation 
Massachusetts Assoc, for Health, Physical Education & 

Recreation 
Eastern District Assoc, for Health, Physical Education & 

Recreation 
International Academy of Aquatic Art 
National Assoc, for Student Teaching 

6. Major accomplishments 

a. Department of Athletics 

(1) Intrsfsursls 

The main objective in this yearns intramural program 
was to promote additional interest, with an ultimate 
aim of attaining a higher percentage of participation 
in the various individual sports. The participation 
in this phase increased hy 114X over the past year, 
and It is felt that the goal isas achieved. 

Team sport entries continued to rise and showed a 
28% Increase over last year. This high percentage 
can be attributed to the individual sports, such as 
wrestling, swimoiing, and cross country, in which 
teams were also represented and a team champion 
deterEiined. 

Individual participation showed an Increase of 16% 
and the total participations amounted to 17,466 cr 

an increase of 10% over last year. 



(2) Intercollegiate Athletics 

The Frank W» Keaaey Trophy, awarded asinuaHy to t;he 
Yankee Coiifereisce University afceaining the most points 
ia confereace chamjpionship coiapeKition, was returned 
to the Univeirsifcy ia Jvme 1965. Conference chaaipton- 
ships ehis academic year in soccer and isdoor $:rack 
enhance the University's prospects of retaining this 
trophy for another year. 

She University's football team coiapleted a syceessful 
season by finishing with sis coaseewCivs vi.cJ;ories, 
Five taeabers of that team were tlrafted by professional 
footbsll teaajs. One of these, Milt Morln, the first 
draft choice of the Cleveland Browns and a meesber of 
the AlX»Yankee Conference Academic Team, became the 
first student-athlete to represent the University ia 
a niejor post season football game by participas;lng 
as a member of the Morth teais in the Annual Senior 
Bo^sl Gasae ia Mobile, Alabaaia on January 8, 1966. 

9n fcbe wiafcer sposrts seeae, the varsity ski team under 
the able direction of Coach William i^scConnsll, ex<» 
perlenced its bsst season in history, solacing second 
in the Osborn Division of the elevsn-'team Nev England 
Intercollegiate Ski Conference. The appointtaeng of 
John Leaman as Varsity Cosch of Basketball ^ replacing 
Coach John Orr uho resigne<^, insures continued progreei 
in the years to come iE fielding strong and successful 
basketball tesmso 



As in the past, the future intercollegiate athletic 
schedule of the University will continue to be built 
around Yankee Conference competition, supplemented 
by contests v^ith representative independent te^ms 
frota the New England and Northeast Region. Radio 
Station HTXf again ^ill sponsor the Eedmen For/t» 
ball Hetwork throughout the Coaisaonxsealth during the 
coming yaar, and hopefully plans will asaterlaliise 
to extsud coverage to the basketball stepson as 'Ee'eli,, 
Plans for the future also inel«<iie introducing 
& Junior Varsity j>rogrs® ia basketball, baseball, 
lacrosse and football in oxdez to accommodate the 
gsrowlng nusaba? of students srho isish to participate 
in these sports a'c that level of cosapetition. 
Finaliyj participation by -^^he \"-arslCy baskefball 
team ia tourasments in Bcstoa and OklahoKia City neKfc 
veer during the Christmas holiday recess, and the 
selection of the University as the site of the snnusl 
Korth-South All-Star Lacrosse Gatae in June 1967, 
provide further evidence of the contiaued developmeafc 
and growing stature of the Unlversity*s athletic 
program. 



The academic achievemeiit of out scholair-fithieKss is always 
a coacern of the Council and the athleitic coaches. As 
was the case a j/eair ago, it is gratifyiag to note that- 
again ao scholarship athlete in th® freshman class v;as 
dismissed fox academic reasons. 

(3) One of the many highlights of the Issf: year at the 

University was the dedication aad availability of fcha 
newly erected Aluiaai Sfcadiuia. The dedicatioa cereajcny 
of this facility on the dsl:e of the Homeeoming Day foo£- 
ball game againsE the University of Shode Island ^A^as 
a mecEorable ©cession, with Governor Joha A. Folpe, 
membsrs of the Board of Trustees and the University 
Building Aughorlfcy, and a large crowd la attendance^ 
fhis contest, and one that followedj were ealevised 
state-wide for the benefit of ail citiseas of the 
Commonwealth . 

Department of Physical Education for Men 

(1) U»dergradus^e Professions! Frepi^ratloa Prograca 

Revision of the undergraduate saajor curriculum yader 

study for the j^ast yesr has been completed. An spprosch 
toward consolidating cocmon professional courses curr©a6ly 
offered in both the Men^s and Bomea*8 Bepartaaesits is 
presently under study. 

Recruitment 

The success of the School "Career Bay," for the 
purpose of recruitment of prospective essjors through- 
out the stste, juoKifies eoESiauaace of the program. 




Student Teas hi ng_ 

During the past year twenty-five aajors have bean 
placed and supervised in sixeeea cooparatlsg cjchools,, 
ArrangemenKs have been coopleted for the addition oS 
four new schools for next year» 

Seainar meetings for Interning studesst teachers, whes-s 
critical issuas persainisjg to their particular assign- 
ments are digcusssd with the Department faculCy^ have 
continued, fhe effectiveness of this approach towarcs 
teaching preparetioa has been highly endorsed fay bofch 
students and faculty « 



Juniors who are planiaiag on practice teaching in the 
fail are assigned to the school in which they will 
teach pirior to fchei? dapaztutBa fojf the summer vacafcion. 
This procedure provides the time for the student to 
make any special adjustments required to meet the 
sreaponsibili ties of his aasigament prior to his 
return in the fall. 

(2) General Frograa 

The caliber of the General Prograia continues to be 
reflected in fehs genuine interest displayed by students 
enrolled in the program. This interest results from 
the high level of instruction, the broad selection of 
activities offered, the iastruction environiiaent , 
equipment and supporting services. 

Outcoffles to th€s students are evidenced by their 
voluntary participation in a variety of activities 
during perio«!s of "free play" in which facilities and 
equipment are avsilsble during the late afternoons, 
evenings and weekends. The stigme of compulsion 
attached to Che "required" aspect of the program Is 
no longer in evidence. Physical Education is vle^red 
by the s<::udent as an educational, rather than a perspirs- 
tive eKperience-»sn attitude vhlch is not readily 
attained and one i^hich should be fostered. 

The Univtsrslty Health Service referred 250 male 
students to the Adapted Physical Education unit of 

the General Program. 

The Therapeutic Exercise Unit ^as conducted from 

3:30 to 5:30 Monday through Friday. This unit averaged 

28 students per six weeks period for four periods. 

An average of 100 treatcaants per week were administer®^. 

The types of ncodalities and testing used are progressive 

resistive exercise^, passive exercise, active exercise, 

muscle re»education, manual muscle testing, range of 

motion testing, gait analysis, electrical testing 

and general conditioning. 

Adapted sports and follow-<-up therapy have been offered 
to students beyond the resjuired program if medically 

indicated^ 

Bepartment of Physical Education for Women 

During the academic year the professional stature 
of the department has grot?n. This is evidenced by 
the number of prospective high school seniors that 

have applied for admission to physical education, 

the increasing applications and Inquiries regarding 
transferring to the department from students at other 
institutions known for preparation in physical education^ 
the increase in inquiries and applications concerning 



7. 

graduate assiistantships , ah® Improved cutRulafcive 
average o£ the major st^udeuts, the notices \irhlch the 
department receives from Shroughont the country of 
college positions available, and the number o£ inquiries 
the department has had r«=«garding the program, the 
facilities and faculty opinion. 

Our graduate assistants will be holding positions at 
the University of California at Berkeley, Washington 
State University» Skldjaore College and the University 
of Massachusetts. In addition, they have been offered 
positions at the University of Hslne, Bates College, 
University of Connecticut, Michigan State University, 
Iowa State University, and Springfield College. 

Mary O'Tooie *66 was enrolled in the Honors Program 

and was elected to Phi ISiappa Phi. Four st^idents from 
the class of ®67 have chosen to do Honors work n®s.t yesr, 

(1) Dance Education 

The first venture in bringing a New York artist to 
the campus ^^as most successful.. Erik Hawkins presented 
a lecture demonstration which was the department's 
attempt to use an srtist for educational design^ 
The part dance can play In developing a fine arts 
prograiB is a goal yet to he realised. 

(2) Elementary School Physical ISducation 

The developsient of a preparation course in physical 
education for elementary school majors has becotae 
a reality. This program needs strong leadership and 
must be pursued ss the responsibility of this depart" 
aent. The status of physical education in elecaesttary 
schools of th® Coiamonwealth is a discredit to i^s 
children. 

(3) Professional Preparation Program 

A departiaentai commlttse has ev^sluated the total 
curriculum in light of the changing needs. It i& 
planned to allow emphasis in program areas in order 
that stronger fceachiag competencies will rasuXt. 
The future curriculum plans will be ub5-<|us for the 
training of women in physical educatioa. With essiphasis 
in skill areasj, greater f lessibility is allowed for 
electives ±n liberal arts. 

d. Bepertment of Recreation 

The most important accomplishment of the year has been 

the revision of the undergraduate major curriculum, which 
has resulted in approval of what we believe is the ojost 
forward-looking one ia the u&tion« 



8 o 

Iri conjuactioa with this revision iafcenslve ccnsideratioa 
has been given to long-range planning for £'he growth of 
the department, in teriss of trends and needs in the field, 
cotapatencies to be developed in students, future depart- 
mental directions and programs, staffing needs, and interde~ 
partmental cooperative relations. 

Consistent with our new perspective «:rhich emphasises 
undergraduate preparation for professional positions at 
the supervisory levels every encouragement and form of 

assistance has heett given to Greenfield Community College 
in the inauguration sad operation of a two-year curriculum 
designated to train recreation leaders and facility 
managers . 

e. School Graduate Program 

Continued g^^o^^^ best describes fefe© Graduate Program in 
Physical Education during the subject porlod. The number 
o£ graduate students rose to nearly t'^enty^'f ive and two 
new faculty members were addsd to tb.e graduate faculty 
within the School of ^hysicsii Edu'^ation. One of the new 
faculty members was appointed to direct the 6r$.duste Program 
in Physical Education. Several new courses i$ere approved 
which will strengthen the Master's program. 

7. Special Programs 

a. Movement Education i^orkshops 

Or. Joan Tillotson of the Women^s Physical Education l$epart<» 
ment traveled to twenty-eight colleges, universities snd 

public school systems this past yesr presenting ^ovk&hopB 
in movement education. Her efforts proiaotsd movement e4viCStion 
for elementary school children, and enhanced the departsssent 
professionally. ^he enthusiassa with which she was received 
at other institutions was evidenced by letters of appreciation 
and verbal comments received by the department head at exhe 
national convention. 

b. Suismer Workshop 

The first summer workshop for woBsen will be offered this 
summer in gymnastics, Xt will be one of the School "s effosras 
to upgrade teaching, to provida fos- seatinuing sdult educa- 
tion, and to reach a new potential public for tfee graduate 
program of the School. 

8. Future Plsns and Heeds 

a. Department of Athletics 

Respite the addition of. Alumni stadium we £^ce a crisis 
situation with respect to fehe facilitiss svailsble for our 
total physical education and sports prograia. She constructloE 



9, 

of a aew Adiaiaist;jrs£ion Building oa tlna former Aluiimi 'Field 
has left fche University "sJitbouft saf;iEf actory varsity bageball 
snd cuSdoor track sad field facilities, asriously hendlcappiag 
our sbility to coa^-see successfully ia these two InCercollegiate 
sports. Also urgej^tly needed are additional multi-use a£hle£lc 
fields to the wese; of fche Boydaa Building for the gei»,eral 
physical sdueattloiij xsisracaural , aad varsity sports programs , 
spprosinsafcsly forfcy ae^7 tennis co«r£s, an^ a combination 
icdoor artificial ice area®~4ressiucg facility. It is hoped 
that the coastrwetios of al'l of ebese facilities will recsive 
high ps'ioyifcy in the aear fueus® la the IJKiveraifcy 's Capital 
Budget . 

S?eparta€nt of Ffeysieai EdtsiaaeioR for Ken 

[I) Faellitles 

the urgeise rsssG for high prisrity Capital Oufciay coa- 
sideraSic-B fcsr ehs developieaat ©£ outdoes: iasSrucfcioE 
areas has beea developed la detail ia previous Asaual SeporSs. 

Eecogaifeion of preseaS iaadequaeyj budgetary support aad 
early developmeKE: of fehese facilities is imperative to meet 
She demands of laereased eneollissffit and progsraa developfasaS. 

^2) PersoQEel 

file auialsar of full-tisae st®ff s-aqulred £o mees: fufcusre 
iaseruefcioaal aesds ?'?111 be proportionate to earollffieirae 
inersases aad p^ograa expssxsioa plassasd charowgh fehe eurrest 
provision of lac^eira in^oox facilities and the future develop- 
aient of outdoor ittstructioBal areas. 

The exEene to which gra^uaee assisesats may be used to 
supplemeat full-fiiss staff ia <lep<eade)s5 upon £he auinbeir ©f 
assiswsatships allocated £o tlte Bej^artiaaent . Ia £he iEtsrsst; 
of ajsiafcsiniiig eb-s high ealiber of iastructioa aad She respest 
that £he progrsBft isajoysj as a pert o£ the Uaiveirsiey Gor® 
Curriculum, it is assentiffil ehst ®e leasS 501> of ehe Ib- 
sfeffuctloaai loa4 ia this area eoafciisu© to foe assigned fee 
£he fuXl>£iffle faculty. 

[3) Budge £ 

The increase iu s^hs number o£ B&cti&ns sad in S:ba number of 

teaching s£a£ie^5£& hss placed grseter demands upon ehe «i^uali£y 
aad quaiiSifcy of e^ulpaeat required £© support setiviSy an4 
laboratory classes. Growth of the XaSrssiuraX aad Saturday 
aad Sunday voluntary "free play'- prograias results in s need 
for Icsrger iaveasories of game ©quipaaent required eo support 
these programs. The budget under 13 Account must Sherefsr® 
be sufficieat to procure equipmesfe for scheduled classes, 
voluntary prograsag and ESiaeaia ©a iavea£ory whiah is sdequ23£e 
to meet cOEtiagencies « 



10- 



DepartiQsnt of Physical Educatioa &qx WomBu 



(1) A Dance-Ghoi-eogiTjaphy Major should be initiated at 

the University of Jiassachusette . No major institution 

in t;he East offers she progsram* The Departiaent has 
taade a significant stars fcoward acquiring ehe faculey 
necsiSEaKy to offer such a prograsi but will nead at 
least one additional faculty raambeE- witli a doctorate 
ic dance. 

(2) The ©eparfccieat piaas to be nsore active in the area of 
Slesaentsry School physical education. the addition of 
several English tralaed faculty memfoscs is a goal of 

the Department. The English approach to Elemenfcery 
physical education is an excellent ons «nd is just foegisi" 
aiag to be recognised in this country, 

(3) The usoet critical need of the Womea^s nepasrtinent 
continues to be the need for £$n addition to the 
Women^s Gyanasiusj. This addition must be realised in 
the near future in order to maintain the prasent 
CKC©IlsK& qualitjr of instruction. 

Department of Recreation 

4>7ith approval of the new eurrieuluja the first priority project 

for the coming year consists of informational services to 

high schools, eomisunity colleges, an4 similar sources 9i high 
cdliber student prospects > 

fhe antlelpfited rapid growth in major e&rolltnent vtll necegsi» 
tate Additionsl faculty positions in the future^ Good condio 
d^tes are in criticjally short supply, due in part to the 
relative attractiveness of field positions and partly to the 

rapid increase in number of institutions starting recreation 
departments. 

Our needs continue for reisodelling and renovation of sp^ce in 
Hicks. Requessts for this work are being submitted on s unit 
basis so that each segment of the building %'ill be ready for 
use whan needed, 

la e lottger-range view three future prograras are considered to 
be inportant possibilities. First, a graduate program should 
be inaugurated as soon as the department is assured of adequate 
resources to support it. At least some of the eaphasis will 
be on interdeparttuental cooperation such as through the antici- 
pated broadly-obased graduate prograsa in regions! planning. 

Secondly, a sferong research effort Is much-needed nationally 
and this department is anxious to plan an important part in it 
whan the graduate program becomes a reslityc The possibility 
of becoming the location for one of the proposed federally^ 
supported Outdoor Eecreation Research & Training Units is 
being pursued by this department. 



■1 i. « 

hlrdlyf there are many types oS ivapottani:. extension seicvices 

•eatiosi which asra ne..siled by various ageacies, governcienfcsi 
'aKiCSj and commercial enteritises throughout the Coaimonwcalfcho 
Three approaches to fche provision of such services bave been 
d in a number of states* The least successful devise ia 
£ state interagency~comHiitfcee which in Massachusetts is restricted 
fco oufedooi: recreation^ A. few states have established a state 
recraatioia boar<i6. These have been maskediy successful in some 
sfcates, but the prospects ia Massachusetts arc dim. The third 
approach, that of e. Recreation Extension Service emanating 
from the state university, offers several strong advantages 
and seems oicst appropriate ivi Massachusetts. 

e «. Graduate Frograa 

'.'jhG i:.chooX of Physical Educstioa plssas to initiate a ?h„l). 
program in 1969. This prograaa will be unique and of the 
highest <j«aliey. To realise this goml we will require continued 
support by the University Adminlstrstion and Trustees. 

f, Sucjmary 

<1) Facilities 

The School of Physical Education is particularly concerned 
^it;h the need to provide certain facilities to meet demgnds 
of increased student slumbers in both Fhysicel Education and 
Athletics. Immediate r^eeds of the School are as follcii^s: 

(fi) The developrasent of Plot 2 is projected to b® 
started in the spring of 1967. This will 
provide Athletics and Hen^s Physical Education 
t»ith desperately needed outdoor playing fields. 
An additional appropriation will be needed to complete 
this project.. 

Cb) The projected Hockey Areas which would include 

dressing facilities for Athletic Teams utilizing 
fields sad areas in Plot 2 is badly needed. £t is 

hoped that architects^ fees will be realised in 
the n&Kt fiscal ysar. 

(c) The need to add additional teaching stations and 

offices to the Icemen's Physical Education Building 
should receive high psiorlty consideration. The 
present building was Inadequate at the date of con«> 
structlon <I957) because of lack of funds. 

(2) Personnel 

The School of Physical Education is in critical need of 

faculty in the Associate Professor and Professor rank. I'his 

rased has become ©ore apparent with the growth of the Graduate 
Prograta. The number of School personnel ellglbl® for Eaeabsr» 
ship in the Graduate Faculty is presently six. This has 
imposed unreasonable work load requirements on these faculty 
members. The School will continue to endeavor to upgrade 
the staffing psfctera to reach a balance in rank and cspabilitry. 



APPENDIX 

Personnel by DepcSrCraect 

1. Oepartnieitt of Physical Education for Men 





1963-'64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


Department Head 


1 


1 


i 


Professor 


2 


2 


4 


Associate Professor 


3 


2 


1 


Assistant Professor 


3 


3 


3 


Instructor 


6 


6 


6 



2. Department of Physical Education for Women 

1963-64 1964-55 1965-86 

Depdrtment Head 1 1 1 

Associate Professor 4 4 4 

Assistant Professor 2 3 5 

Instructor 2 4 4 

Part Time Instructor 2 2 1 

3. Department of Recreation 





1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


Professor 


1 


1 


1 


Assistant Professor 


* 


* 





Instructor 


2* 


I 


2 



Students Served by Departmnet 

1. Department of Physical Sd-ucatlon for Men 

1963-64 1964-65 1985-6( 

Majors 167 191 210 

General Program 2068 2202 2600 

Students Taugkt 2653 2969 3440 

2. Department of Physical Education for Momea 





1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


Majors 


73 


90 


137 


General Program 


1512 


2127 


2277 


Students Taught 


1767 


2479 


2821 



3. Department of Recreation 





1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


Majors 


32 


34 


33 


Students Taught 


173 


134 


181 



^One Assistant Professor on leave. 



June IS, 1966 



President Jotm Lederle: 

Sir, I beg leave herewith to present wy tenth annual report 
of the School of Education* 

The past year has been an active one for the School in some 
areas and a period of consolidation in others. The only constant 
factor over the years has been the rapid increase in enrollment* 
This is continuing, particularly on the graduate level. With 
this rapid growth comes an increasingly difficult problem of 
recruiting new faculty and holding on to the ones we have. 

One of the encouraging elements this past year has been the 
rather dramatic increase in funded projects. Several faculty 
members are involved in these while several others have submitted 
projects which were not approved. This interest in research 
should pay dividends for the future of the School. 

I wish to assure the administration of our continued loyalty 
and support* 



Albert W, Purvis 
awp:lph 



.!':ioq£-: i^n;■;::: 



in J So 



f:'^!:? ncB'i aarl t«sx ;;5gfiq fi'lH.* ,«>I«i> grjiais^jiv.'. 



\vri): . . ■_■■ . 



GROWTH OF THS SCHOOL 

Since the organization of Teacher Education at the University of 
Massachusetts into a School of Education in September, 1956 its most ob- 
vious characteristic has been that of growth. The statistical tables at 
the end of this report show the details of this growth and indicate 
that the growth is continuing. A summary of this growth is shown below: 



Enrol Inent 


1958 


1965 


Increase 


Increase % 


Area 










University Undergraduate 


4267 


8935 


4668 


109% 


*School Uiidcvrgradcate 


912 


2128 


I'lS 


133 


El63inr*i:ar<; Education Majors 


274 


695 


4>1 


154 


*Seccridflry Education Prac. Teach. 


78 


243 


U5 


161 


*Hist'.uy c: Sduc?.tion 


216 


577 


3'Jl 


167 


University Graduates 


568 


2240 


U72 


294 


*Schojl Girciduates 


395 


1727 


1332 


337 



^^^ese are class enrollment figures 

The above sucmary shows that while the University has been growing 
quite rcipidlja the School of Education has been growing even mere rapidly* 
The growth in graduate enrollment in the Scliool is particularly to be 
noted. Soon graduate enrollment will be greater than uadergrn^uate if the 
trend of the past seven years is to continue. 

Implications of Growth 

It appears that soon a policy decision will have to be made. Are 
the resources of the School sufficient at present and are the resources 
likely to be sufficient in the future to permit rapid growth on both the 
undergraduate and graduate levels? If the resources are not likely to 
be sufficient, and they were woefully lacking this year, which level should 
be placed on quota and which area should be expanded? If, as recommended 
by the Willis Report, the University is to be the sole source of the 
doctorate among the state institutions of higher education then a rapid 



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eKpansion of the Doctor of Education program would appear to be logical 
and even mandatory both in terras of increased enrollment and in terms of 
additional training programs. 

However, the realities of the situation mitigate against the logic. 
For years the School has been trying, often with Inadequate resources, to 
keep both undergraduate and graduate programs going with the result that 
both levels have become quite lean from inadequate nourishment. Any con- 
siderable increase in the graduate program would appear inadvisable for the 
next few years because: 

First, the present building is not adequate for an enlarged sra^^k^ate 
program^ It may be possible^ although not desirable, to scatter an under* 
graduate program all over campus but a graduate program to be at all 
efficient must be concentrated in areas and at present we will be unable 
to do this much beyond our present offering. Also these special graduate 
areas must be quite specialized in terms of clinical, observation, group 
therapy and research facilities and these our present building does not 
provide. Ue began urgently requesting an addition to the present build- 
ing in 1963. At the moment of writing we appear to be further behind in 
our request than in 1964 when the planning money request was sent to 
Boston. Our request is not even on the list this year. The reality of 
the situation implies that it will probably be 1972 or 1973 before we 
can hope for an addition so the reality weighs against much increase in 
graduate programs. 

Second, graduate programs require more professional staff and more 
supporting staff and raavy more Graduate Fellows. It is unrealistic indeed 
to think that a graduate program with all its committee work, research, 
internships and so forth can be run with Faculty on a 15-1 ratio.. This 
ratio must be drastically reduced if an adequate program is to develop. 
Also along with advanced graduate programs comes more research and more 
consulting and more and more the School is expected to exert leadership 
and to perform service and this adds to the pressure on staff time and the 
necessity to reduce reaching loads. Here again, the realities would seem 
to argue against the logic of an increased graduate program because there 






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seems little reason to expect that the Faculty of the School vill be 
increased very rapidly in the next few years and certainly not touch 
reason to expect that it will be increased enough to adequately support 
both expanded undergraduate and graduate programs and all the other 
demands as well. The situation is much the same as regards numbers of 
Graduate Fellows. No Graduate Faculty in Education can be expected to 
do everything it is called upon to do without a rather large number of 
Graduate Fellows. Indeed one of the criteria usually used in judging 
a graduate program and one usually asked about by top-notch candidates 
for positions is the number of Graduate Fellows available to help in 
teaching and research. This year the School of Education with the 
second highest graduate enrollment of any School on campus has twenty- 
five thousand dollars for Graduate Fellows and next year it will have 
seven thousand dollars more. An adequate amount would be nearer one 
hundred thousand dollars. The fact that the School has obtained from 
outside sources nearly one hundred thousand dollars for twenty-three 
additional Fellowships for next year does not entirely change the 
situation because these Fellowships are for training and research in 
highly specialized areas. Our greatest need for additional Fellowships 
is in the service and training areas. At present the reality regarding 
prospects for additional staff seems to weigh heavily against any sub- 
stantial increase in graduate programs, 

Third» graduate work and its attendant research and service function, 
is rather prodigal of funds in the budget categories needed to keep the 
show on the road* Increased funds for conferences, for consultants, for 
special teachers, for travel to conferences, for travel for supervising 
interns, for special research equipment, for better libraries, for more 
sophisticated special media to itame but a few are in large demand. The 
School's budget in these categories has not been increasing rapidly enough to 
adequately serve both expanded graduate and expanded undergraduate pro- 
grams. Indeed in some years, including the present one. It is not much 
more than enough to support either one of these taken separately. 



i^I:Ui/ 



•:S-ioqq!Je.:-^ic 



.jso.riJjilo/z-qotr vd disofi. 



,tpt^ S^t-^*., ■ 



5 - 



In sutnmary, the situation seems to be that although logic points to 
the conclusion that the School should undertake a greatly expanded graduate 
program the reality of inadequate resources in terms of buildings, faculty 
and budget would seem to weigh against it. Under the present conditions 
we can only recommend a gradual expansion of the undergraduate program 
with a rather severe quota placed on the graduate. 



RECRUITMENT 

Recruitment of good faculty members this year has been very difficalt. 
\le did not know how many positions would be available until February and we 
had no funds for travel and honoraria until late in March. The School finally 
had five positions to fill and to this was added the necessity to replace 
four resignations. Several conclusions appear evident from the experience 
of this year! 

First, we must begin active recruiting and appointing before New 
Years. Ife have been told by many Placement Directors that October and 
November are the best months for recruiting candidates for Education. This 
means that under our present budget system the best solution would be to 
carry over several positions each year by filling them with temporary help. 

Second, it seems obvious that good candidates in Education cannot be 
obtained by sitting in Amherst and sending out letters to Placement Bureaus 
and to top men in the areas for which candidates are to be recruited. My 
fellow Deans tell me that the time has arrived when \je must travel to find 
the good candidates. They insist that nothing can take the place of face> 
to-face discussion XTith the top men in the various fields. It would appear 
that definite provision should be made for travel for recruiting purposes. 

Third, our School of Education is growing at a time of great compe- 
tition for faculty. It would appear unrealistic to believe that we can 
continue to obtain good candidates by staying within our average salary 
for the various ranks at the University. For example, in science educa- 
tion, guidance and English Education young men with little experience and 



^^' ^A-^.- 



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.-.• ■■? c,i, 



vaiifc 



;f fine 



rn ha 



,*iV:,:, 



. 6 



"expecting" the doctorate this summer are asking and getting nine thousand 
five hundred dollars <eftile other young men with the same training and ex- 
perience in special education and research are asking and getting twelve 
thousand dollars. 

Fourth} it appears unrealistic to believe that we can continue to 
find equally good candidates for all positions, that is, equally good candi* 
dates in terms of the criteria used by the University* As an exan|>le, 
given ample time, we can find good candidates in Educational Foundations 
with some teaching, research, and publication for ten thousand dollars 
because this area still has a good supply. To get candidates with the 
same training and experience in Educational Administration we would have 
to go seven thousand dollars and two ranks higher. However, it is realistic 
to assume that we cannot staff the whole area of Educational Administration 
with professors with salaries over seventeen thousand dollars. We must 
include two or three lesser candidates who cannot n^et the regular criteria 
but who can serve to do some teaching in elementary courses, some service 
and some phases of consulting work. 

This would plane the major emphasis in reciMitment for the next few 
years on obtaining two or more top faculty in each area who would be 
supported by several others of varying quality and on more or less temporary 
appointment. This in turn would mean that judgment on the appointn^nt of 
any candidate should be made on the basis of the total staff picture in 
that area and not on the basis of that individual alone. It could also 
be successfully argued that the judgment of what is available in this 
"temporary" category should be made by the appropriate Dean who is re- 
sponsible for keeping the show on the road and who knows the supply, the 
competition, the special area picture, and the special area needs. 

Despite the difficulties listed above, the quality of the faculty Is 
on the whole quite high. The appendix lists some information on the 
faculty fron which the following summary has been derived: 



i')n?,r.aof' 



'Ibimc 



;i;i.'-i«3i i<!uq br.B ^fir. 



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- 7 

Summary 





Number 


Percent 


Total Faculty 


39 


100 


Professors 


4 


10 


Associates 


10 


26 


Assistants 


15 


39 


Instructors 


6 


15 


Lecturers 


2 


5 


Unfilled 


2 


5 


On tenure 


12 


30 


Experience here 
years 


7 


18 


1 year 


10 


26 


2 years 


4 


10 


Over 2 years 


16 


46 


With doctorate 


29 


78 


isasters 


8 


22 



The percentage of faculty with doctorates remains high (78) but 
it is doubtful if this percentage can long be maintained. The percent- 
age of faculty on tenure (30) would appear to be normal. The percentage 
of faculty who have been at the School only one year or less (44) and the 
fact that over half the faculty (54%) have been at the School oidy t\,io 
years or less can be ascribed in part to the fact that the School has 
been grovring quite rapidly. It also can be ascribed to the fact that 
we continue to have three or four resignations each year as the competi- 
tion for teachers brings nany o^'portunities at other institutions at 
higher rank and salary* For example^ three of the four faculty who resigned 
this year have gone on to positions paying from fifteen hundred to three 
thousand more than they xfould have been getting here in September. It 
appears, therefore, that the regular salary scales at the University 
make it not only very difficult to appoint new faculty but to hold on to 
the ones we have* 



. 8 . 



THE LABORATORY SCHOOL 

The Mark's Meadow Laboratory School has proved to be a very Important 
facility in our undergraduate program. It is the observation laboratory 
for Education 009, 039 and 059. In these courses approximately six hundred 
elementary education majors spend an average of sixteen hours a year watch- 
ing good elementary school teaching, either from the observation corridor 
or on closed circuit television. The usual procedure is (1) to hold a &hort 
briefing session to tell the students what to loolc for in the particular 
lesson and then (2) to have the students observe for an hour and then (3) 
to have the students n^et with the teacher whose lesson ^ras observed to 
discuss the lesson and to ask questions. This ten thousand student-hours 
of observing time takes considerable organization but it is paying dividends 
in the increased sophistication and motivation of the students which makes 
possible muoh more highly geared methods courses in the senior year. The 
closed-circuit television is being used extensively for observation purposes* 
particularly since the School has procured a television tape recorder. 
Now lessons can be taped at any time of the day and shown when students 
are available. 

In addition to the above, several teachers in the School of Education 
are using Laboratory School pupils to demonstrate various newer methods. 
There is a class in the newer mathematics, two professors are demonstrating 
phases of the Language Ar^:s, lessons have been taped by Labors ^rory teachers 
to demonstrate the team torching organization, and grades 4, 5 and 6 have 
been organized in reading to demonstrate th3 Joplin plan. Through all of 
this it is hoped that our majors will have a wide knowledge of various 
educational innovations before they graduate. 

So far, the Li>.boratovy School has not proved as valuable 3n research 
as had been hoped. Sever;'! re83arch studies have been crnducl:Gj but the 
full potential In my opinion has not been realized, With our new doctorate 
in Curriculum and Instruction the possibilities for research should multiply. 

I wish to report a rather exceptional degree of cooperation between 
the staff of the Laboratory School and the staff of the School of Education 



- 9 



and between the School and the Amherst School Committee and its administra- 
tors. I stress this fine cooperation because we are informed it is fre- 
quently lacking among these groups on other campuses. This fall the co- 
operation will be extended and strengthened when the Amherst Regional High 
School and the School of Education are connected by closed-circuit television* 



THE UGANDA PROJECT 

The Tororo Girls School despite various problems seems to be progressing 
favorably. It is now in its second year of operation and has an enrol In^nt 
of two hundred and ten students, half in grade nine and half in grade ten. 
I made n^ annual inspection trip in February and in my report I noted the 
following: - 

"The real test of the success of any educational institution 
is the grov7th and development of its students. From this point of 
view I think that we all can take considerable pride in what is 
happening in Tororo. The girls are very happy in their new school 
environment; they are proud of their school; they are behaving very 
well; they are working hard; they have developed surprising poise 
and confidence in the one year they have been there. One has merely 
to conqiare the S. girls with the new S girls to see that much has 
been accomplished. On this trip I visited many important Ugandans 
who live around Tororo and Hbale. Everywhere I heard expressions 
of pride in the new school and expressions of happiness that their 
children could attend. Several times I heard, "This is the best 
school in Uganda." 'Jhile some of this can be discounted, the fact 
remains that the general evaluation is good to excellent. 

Thus, while admitting that there are problems in the school 
and while admitting that there is still much to be done, we should 
start our considerations from the point of view that we have already 
wrought well but that we are now anxious to progress from a good 
school to a better school." 



10 - 



One of the problems the project will face in the future is the 
pressure to take in tnany more students than the facilities were originally 
planned to accommodate. Again quoting from my report: 

"In making changes and improvements we should always bear in 
mind the original concept that the school should exemplify the best 
in American ideas, methodology and equipment; that the educational 
opportunities should emphasize the best in curricular and extra« 
curricular practices to the end that these girls xrould not only learn 
about their new world but also would learn how to live in it in a 
gracious manner; and that the program should be comprehensive. In- 
cluding at least academic, business, and home economics. This is 
a broad concept, unique in Africa, and very well received by all 
Ugandans who were consulted in 1961. The concept is Just as valid 
today as it was then and it still offers Just as much promise of 
value in the long range future. 

The chief danger to the broad concept will undoubtedly come 
from the pressure to increase errollments. IJhile one must sympa- 
thize with the great need for additional secondary school spaces, 
and while every effort should be made to obtain efficient use of 
the present facilities, yet to do so at the expense of the original 
educational concept might well be false econon^ of the worst sort so 
far as Uganda is concerned." 

Some problems arose among the staff of the first two years, due in 
part to the inadequate orientation before the staff started for Africa. 
It seems necessary to stress (l) that there is a Headmistress and (2) 
that a boarding school demands much of the time of the staff and (3) that 
in the absence of adequate recreational and cultural activities the staff 
are thrown together to a greater extent than at home and (4) that all 
Americans abroad, and particularly teachers, are goodwill ambassadors 
and must work toward establishing a good image. We are recruiting for 
several new staff members this year and it is hoped a stronger team 
spirit can be developed among them. 



11 



The Dedication of the Tororo Girls School in June, 1963 t^as attended 
by President and Mrs. Lederle and n^self. The main address was delivered by 
Mrs, Obote the wife of the Prime Minister of Uganda who spoke on the importance 
of education for women and who expressed xrarm words of appreciation for the 
gift by America of this fine school to the people of Uganda. Brief replies 
to her address were made by President Lederle and Dr« Zake, the Minister 
of Education for Uganda, both of whom very fittingly spoke of the mutual 
benefit to both countries which comes from such cooperative enterprises. 
After the ceremony trees were planted by Mrs. Obote, President Lederle and 
myself in front of the Dining Hall and at a reception in the evening Mrs. 
Lederle was elected Honorary Headmistress of Tororo Girls School by the 
students. I wish to exprsss i^y appreciaticci to President and Mrs* Lederle 
for accompanying me to this ceremony. They added much to the prestige and 
to the graciousness of the occasion. 

The size of this project so far as the University is concerned is 
seen in the budget for the next three fiscal years; 

1966-67 $ 350,181 

1967-^68 273,378 

1963. 69 ;^-' 2,0^9 

Total (3 years) $1,045,608 

It is now anticipated that the project will terminate on June 30, 
1972 with a budget from 1969-72 someirhat comparable to the above. This 
means that the tot>»l- A. I. D. /University contract for this project will 
probably surpass two and one-half million dollars. 

Mr. Doubleday, who performed exceptional service to the project 
while stationed in Uganda for two years is now the Campus Coordinator on 
the University Carapas where his Uganda experience is prcving very valuable 
in administering this end of the operation^ 



. 12 - 



PARTICIPANT TRAINING 

One o£ the problems in the Uganda Project is to provide the proper 
education for the African participants the Ministry will send to the 
University for degree programs. At first it was planned to bring only 
degree women teachers but this was abandoned because of the scarcity of 
such in Uganda, ^/e then were requested to take several students who had 
passed the General School Sxatn (4 years of secondary) and had one or more 
years in one of their Teacher Training Colleges. This did not seem ad- 
visable because they are not the best students in Uganda and they are not 
acceptable as degree candidates in I^akerere College in Uganda. We have 
asked the Uganda Board of Education to send us high scorers on the 
Advanced School Certificate (6 years secondary) because they are accepted 
at Nakerere College and they seem best able to compete in our under- 
graduate program* We are now told that t^akerere is taking the top fifty 
on the list this year and this caused us to send a strong cablegram 
protesting that since we are paying the full charge of college education 
for these participants we should be assured of at least some of the top 
candidates. A further problem comes in the best program for these people. 
The British undergraduate program is largely concentrated in one area 
and the success of teachers and the level at which they are placed de- 
pends on a very heavy concentration in one subject, e.g. geography. The 
amount of specialization is hard for Americans to understand. A Geography 
teacher, for example, will have geography instruction con^rising 1/3 of 
the last three years in high school, 1/3 of the first year in college, 
1/2 of the second year in college and all of the last two years In 
college or the equivalent of 115 credits in geography before the bachelors 
degree in geography is awarded. The participants have difficulty in 
understanding our system x^here breadth of program is emphasized. The 
problem is to give them a realistic program in terms of Uganda needs 
without sacrificing academic integrity as practiced in the United States. 
With our degree in geography a Uganda teacher could teach geography in 
grade 9 and 10 and perhaps in grade 11 but would be unable to go much 
beyond this. These considerations should be weighed very carefully 



- 13 - 

before we get too much involved in participant training and certainly the 
inferences should be carefully explained to participants before they leave 
Uganda. 



OTHER FUNDED PROJECTS 

The School has been active during the past year in writing up projects 
for funded research and it has had considerable success as is shown by the 
following brief report: 

The current situation regarding research funds in the School 
of Education and prospects for the future, 

(1) Purvis. The Uganda Project* New contract has now been 

prepared. 1966-67 — $380181 (firm), 1967-68 — 
$273378 (projected), 1968-69 — $392049 (projected). 
The original commitment called for approximately one 
million dollars through 1969. This sum has now been 
increased to over one and a half million. This pro- 
ject will probably continue through 1971 for an addi- 
tional million dollars. 

(2) Purvis. Kellogg grant for $22000 for three years to work 

with Community Colleges. 

(3) Purvis, Wolf. Federal Dept. Vocational Education in Dis- 

tributive Education. Approved. First phase $30000 
to be fol lolled by at least a two-year program at 
$50000 per year. 

(4) Ulin, Institute For English Teachers, H.E.W. Approved. 

$56228. 

(5) Wolf. Kettering Foundation. Research On Diffusion Vehicles. 

Approved. $100000, 

(6) Anthony, Wolf et al. Training Research Grants in Curricu- 

lum, H.E.W. Approved. First year $90000, Probable 
$100000 each year for two additional years. 

(7) Wyman. Center For Overhead Transparencies. Approved. 

First phase $29176. 



- 14 - 



(8) IJyman, Center For Research In Teaching Of Deaf, H.E.U, 

Approved, First year $60000, Approximately $120000 
annually thereafter. 

(9) Wyman. Mobile AV Center. Approved. First phase $6000. 

If report accepted, probable $90000 annually there- 
after. 

(10) Pippert. DevQlopmental Grant In Special Education, H.E.IJ, 

$6000. 

(11) The 1 en, Wolf, Fellowships (8) in training teachers of 

Biology, $48000, 

If the above projects all come through in their second phases as is 
anticipated the following funds should be available during the next fiscal 
year or a month or two beyond: 



(1) 


$ 380,181 


(2) 


8,000 


(3) 


50,000 


(4) 


50,000 


(5) 


100,000 


(6) 


90,000 


(7) 


29,176 


(8) 


120,000 


(9) 


90,000 


(10) 


6,000 


(U) 


48.000 



$ 971,357 

Two or three other requests of the inany others submitted still look 
quite promising. It seems that iny estimate that we would have a million 
dollars in funded projects may be correct. Success in this field has been 
due to a considerable extent to Dr. Holf who was appointed as an expert 
in writing projects and negotiating contracts and to Dr. Wyman who is 
rapidly becoming a national authority in his field of Audiovisual educa- 
tion. 

One of the dangers in the search for funded projects is that such 
projects will become ends in themselves and that finally the "tail will 
wag the dog". This point has not been reached yet in the School but the 
possibility cannot be ignored. If projects are written only in areas 
that are likely to be successful; if projects are draxm up only in the 



- 15 



wdy the sponsoring agency demands; if research is confined to large fund- 
able projects then, indeed, Washington and the large foundations are 
determining the way research will go and to a degree the way training will 
go. 17e are hoping to prevent this outside domination by having a Future 
Directions Committee of our Faculty study preferred directions for the 
School. Once these directions are determined then funds can Is sought 
for projects which will aid in implementing progress in those desired 
directions. In this way funded research will be an aid in meeting objec- 
tives and not a determinant of objectives* 

Another consideration for concern is the housing of these projects. 
On the one hand we are enjoined to seek funded research and en the other 
we are questioned on whether we have room to house the project. Realism 
suggests that any research project of any size will require space. Should 
projects be turned down because we cannot "guarantee" that we xirill always 
be able to house them. If we did this we would seek no research money 
at all because it is obvious that in a few years the School of Education 
will be scattered all over campus just to take care of normal enroll- 
ment increases. It would hardly seem wise to have the School mark time 
on funded research until a new addition is available to house it. It 
would seem better to go ahead as best we can to develop this aspect of 
the School in the hope that some day the School's need for space will 
be recognized and something dene about it. 



MAINTENANCE 

Since we entered our neir building in September, 1961 the maintenance 
problems have been mostly small ones and projects have been requested 
when the nee*-} arose. 

The one major problem which still has not btjen reaolved is the state 
of the drapes. All the windotrs in the building have besn fitted with 
two sets of drapes. Each set is nox7 in very poor shape because the thread 
used in sewing on the holding hooks was obviously too light in weight. 



-hjMr 



xS^Blp' 



sis %{■: 



16 



The result has been that a large number of hooks have now become separated 
from the cloth and the drapes are hanging in all sorts of odd shapes. 
The result is disgraceful but we have been unable in two years to get any- 
one to accept any responsibility in the natter. It has now reached the 
stage where a decision should be made on whether it would not be better 
to remove the drapes entirely rather than to have them remain in their 
present unsightly state. 

We have also reached the stage when it becomes necessary to draw up 
a maintenance plan for patching and repainting. Since the Mark's Meadow 
School is filled with children and since it is one of the most visited 
buildings on campus it appears reasonable to plan a complete refurbishing 
every six years. The following is suggested as a maintenance plan and 
each year trork orders will be submitted to implement it. Needless to 
say, if this plan is not followed in any one year it will throw the whole 
scheme out of order: 

Summer 1967. Fill in cracks and paint six classrooms. 
Summer 1968. Fill in cracks and paint east-west 

corridor and observation corridor. 
Summer 1969. Fill in cracks and paint remaining 

seven classrooms. 
Summer 1970* Fill in cracks and paint kitchen and 

cafeteria. 
Summer 1971* Fill in cracks and paint remaining rooms 

and corridors. 
Summer 1972. Repeat painting for 1967. 
Summer 1973. Repeat painting for 1968, 

The remaining part of the building is occupied largely by college 
students and with the exception of the floors and the seemingly inevitable 
cigarette bums, should be kept in reasonably good shape on an eight year 
maintenance plan. 



17 



A suggested scheme for the School of Sducation part of the building 
vould be: 

Sunmer 1967, Filling cracks and painting classrooms, 

corridors and lobbies of main classroom 

floor. 
Sunmer 1968. Filling cracks and painting offices and 

corridors of main office floor. 
Summer 1969, Filling cracks and painting library and 

lobbies of patio wing. 
Sucmer 1970. Filling cracks and painting classrooms 

and corridors of top classroom wing. 
Summer 1971. Filling cracks and painting offices and 

and corridors of top office wing. 
Summer 1972. Filling cracks and painting offices and 

corridors of patio wing. 
Summer 1975. Repeat 1967. 



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CO 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



Name 

Budde, Ray 
Capelluzzo, Emma 
Chenault, Joann 
CI egg, Ambrose 
Cdgecomb, Philip 
Fiorino, John 
Fredrickson, Ronald 
Griffiths, William 
Hillman, Thomas 
Parody, Ovid 
Romanella, Alan 
Scher, Saul 
Ulin, Richard 
Winder, Alvin 
Wolf, William 
Zaeske, Arnold 
Zimmer, Jules 

Schweiker, Robert 
Spalding, Howard 

Case, Ethel 
Hulsen, Albert 
King, Robert 
Lunney, Gerald 
Rudman, Masha 
White, James 



Non-Tenure Faculty 
Rank Appointed 


College 
Experience 


Tenure 
Decision 


Asst* 


1966-67 





1971-72 


Asst. 


1966-67 


1 


1970-71 


Assoc, 


1966-67 


10(3) 


1968-69 


Asst* 


1963-64 





1968-69 


Asst. "A" 


1966-67 


I 


1970-71 


Asst. 


1964-65 


5(3) 


1966-67 


Asst. 


1963-64 





1968-69 


Asst. 


1964-63 


1 


1963-69 


Asst. 


1963-64 





1968-69 


Prof, 


1966-67 





1971-72 


Asst. 


1965-66 





1970-71 


Asst. 


1965-66 





1970-71 


Assoc. 


1965-66 





1970-71 


Assoc. 


1965-66 


6(3) 


1967-68 


Assoc. "A" 


1965-66 


5(3) 


1967-68 


Assoc. 


1965-66 


8(3) 


1967-68 


Asst. 


1964-65 





1969-70 


Vis.Lect. 


1965-66 


4(3) 


1967-68 


Vis.Lect. 


1966-67 





1971-72 


Inst. 


1965-66 





1970-71 


Inst. "A" 


1964-65 





1969-70 


Inst. 


I963-r34 





1968-69 


Inst. 


1966-67 


3 


1968-69 


Inst. 


1965-66 


1 


1969-70 


Inst. 


1966-67 





1970-71 



1. 



2. 







APPENDIX A 






Appropriations - Education 










1962 - 63 


1963 - 64 


1964 - 65 


1965 - 66 


03 


22000 


29940 


42665 


28000 


10 


5000 


5500 


9200 


6700 


11 




37 


22 


600 


12 


1000 


1000 


1000 


1000 


13 


5700 


6250 


7255 


9800 


14 


1400 


1400 


1400 


2400 


15 


5000 


7500 


8210 


1000 


16 


400 


225 


300 


300 


Library 


6000 


7000 


11000 


5000 + ABC 




46500 


58852 


81052 


54800 + ABC 


Appropriations - Audiovisual 








03 


700 


2500 


2500 


1900 


10 


200 


500 


550 


550 


11 


500 


200 


200 


200 


12 


1200 


3500 


3500 


3500 


13 


4000 


5400 


6300 


6300 


14 


350 


600 


300 


550 


15 


2:30 


5000 


5000 


5000 




9480 


17700 


18350 


18000 


Personnel - Teaching; - 


Education 








Instructor 


1 


3 


3 


4 


Instructor "A" 






1 


1 


Asst. Prof. 


12 


14 


17 


13 


Asst, Prof. "A" 


1 


1 


1 


I 


Assoc, Prof, 


3 


3 


2 


7 


Assoc, Prof, "A" 








1 


Professor 


3 


3 


3 


■3 


Professor "A" 




1 






Visiting Lecturer 








1 


DeeH} Assistant 






t 


1 


Dean, Head' 


1 


1 


I 


1 


Positions Unfilled 


21 


26 


29 


2 
35 


Personnel - Other • Education 








Electronic Tech, 


1 


1 


1 


3 


Technical Asst, 








1 


Principal Clerk 






I 


1 


Sr. Clerk-Sten. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Jr, Clerk-Sten, 


5 


4 
6 


5 
8 


7 
13 


Personnel • Audiovisual 








Asst, Director 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Staff Assistant 




I 


1 


I 


Radio Maint, Super. 


1 


1 


1 


1 


Tech, Assistant 


1 








Electronic Technician 


1 


1 


2 


2 


St. Clerk-Typist 


1 


I 


1 


1 


Jr, Clerk-Typist 


JL 

6 


JL 

6 


7 


1 
7 









APPENDIX B 












EDUCATION 51 History of 


Education 






YEAR 


UND. 


GR. 


TOI. F UND. 


GR, 


TOT. S 


TOT 




F 


F 


S 


S 






57-58 


119 


7 


126 88 


2 


90 


216 


58-59 


140 


9 


149 115 


6 


121 


270 


59-6C 


151 


5 


156 124 


7 


131 


287 


60-61 


136 


9 


145 132 


9 


141 


286 


61-62 


197 


16 


213 152 


10 


162 


375 


62-63 


229 


8 


237 137 


10 


147 


384 


63-64 


276 


26 


302 176 


13 


189 


491 


64-65 


304 


24 


328 238 


11 


249 


577 


65-66 


325 


30 


355 301 


6 

Increase 


307 
206% 


662 



APPENDIX C 



(a) Number of niajors (Elementary) 



September 1958 
September 1959 
September 1960 
September 1961 
September 1962 
September 1963 
September 1964 
September 1965 



274 
331 
397 
426 
448 
485 
607 
695 



Increase 154% 



(b) Number of students taught 

First Semester 
YEAR Ungrad. Grad. Tot, 



Second Semester 
Ungrad. Grad. Tot. 



Year Total* 
Ungrad. Grad. Tot. 



1958-59 


436 


183 


619 


476 


212 


688 


912 


395 


1307 


1959-60 


545 


225 


770 


547 


189 


736 


1092 


414 


1506 


1960-61 


553 


197 


750 


598 


203 


801 


1151 


400 


1551 


1961-62 


748 


239 


987 


741 


223 


964 


1489 


462 


1951 


1962-63 


866 


277 


1143 


814 


323 


1137 


1680 


600 


2280 


1963-64 


903 


402 


1305 


890 


459 


1349 


1793 


861 


2654 


1964-65 


1023 


656 


1689 


1035 


665 


1700 


2058 


1331 


3389 


1965-66 


1062 


776 


1838 


1066 


951 


2017 


2128 


1727 


3855 






. 


, 




Increase 58 


•6S 


1216 


1332 


2548 






J. 


• 


■ ■• 


Increase % 


58.65 


133 


337 





'?) 



A M K U A L REPORT 
19 6 5 - 19 6 6 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMIKiSXRATIO?^ 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



TABLE 



EASE 



r, PROLOGUE c. 1 

SOME FACTS Am FSSORES 3 

Ac FaeaiXty Ac-tivity. 16 

Bo Business Advisorv v-.^ui..-' ?'? 

C» Report of Assosiatt' Dean Conlonc .. 2b 



Annual Report, 1965 - 1966 J«a», 1966 

School of Business Adiainis^ration 
University of Massachusetts 

gROLOGUE 

The past two years and particularly the yea? of 1965 ° 1966 have been very 

productive for the School of Business Admini strati on,, Although it would be 

obvious to anyone that we have not achieved the heights of Femassus^ still 

we have aehierwed much, but most of all we have futly covered the transition 

period from purely a teaching institution to one of teaching, research and a 

greater degree of public service <, I would ecPiphasiae: 

lo The appointment mid laaintenance of highly qualified faeultyo 

2o The receipt of more^ although not generous^ research grantSo 

3a The increasing scholarly productivity of the faculty, 

4o The establishing of our Center for Buslnest; and Eeonomie Research 

and Che appointanent of a Directora Dr,, Get^rge SinusionSt, formerly of 

Columbia University Graduate School of Bua\nesSo 

5o The final touches on our PhaDo proposal by our faculty and our 

Graduate Committee and the insainent acceptaaee of the proposal by 

the Board of Trustees. We view this as one raore step In our progress 

toward the status of a fully fledged School in a State Univereityo 

6o The first meeting of our Business Advisory Council was held in 

April, 1966» The matters of mutual interest were explored and 

the groundwork for another meeting next Ocfeobar was iaido A list 

of the present ssembcrshlp will be found in Appoi'idix Bo 

7 a X do wish to add the welcome fact that the qualiv.y of our students is 

rlslngo Many more of our students are found In ir.he 3oO cumulative 

average and above,, For the first time in these past nine years we 

have had a few students who graduated Magna Cum Laude and more in 

the Cum Laude class„ It takes time but the rising qi^ality of our 



.2- 



i&&ilty mxBt hav® sosn® bearing on thm qualify of si'udsnSSc As 
SgSiools ©f Business Adiainl»Sra£ioii los© their fonasff "Image" as 
m&r% Srade schools and mov© Into a highex' level of edusafioiial 
a©hi@V8aiienfe w® not only aSfesfsee beStar sttidents bia^ a finer faetsltyo 

SSnes I shall r©^ir© (and sres^gn) as at July 31, 1967 I wish to indieafee Shafc 
the steps leading te our pjf®s-3n.t ststus hs.-'/a bsen psfffe of a gsneiral piano Firsts 
'fihis Sehoel n©ed(§d seej^edieatien by fthe MCSB^ bofeh ok th'S: undergraduate® and 
graduate l©velo This Sehoel needed a sehoiax'ly faculty eapabie of leadership 
atid eapable In beiiig a^ailahlni te lenders of Business as well as Ge'/gstBij-sinfeo 
This 5l«jad<srshljj is Inea-'-sasiBgly in ®v!id©ne®o The danger of Schools ©f Business 
Adiiainisferstion in this eownfery Ms been t,h® imdis© and exaggerated d«f@r®ne@ t© 
bu^inegse i^nSerprls® to €he neglect of Gi&@&ll&n'Q& in s^olarly £tei:iviti@So Rssptaee 
is no!: von this way, wh&teiwev ^Ise is wono It has ba@n my funesion as a D@an 
fco aeh|«vo mu^al respeeis raeh®^ Chait piibliieiey for a qualJfcy ncs£ y©t eehiev®do 
l?f Eh feb@ aid of good peoples wifeh tte> sjmpathy and support of an esteellent President ead 
Trcn^OfiiS, I feel we have aade "treisisadou* progress in a number of avenues a 

Whafe©v«&ff are th& n®©e8sSties of s. Stats University in public service the 
ehief and n^aver en-dlng obligation is as en edu®'ja£ional instittitiono Whatever 
'm do aad t*at@v®r we wish to d© lausfc bs done on a Uiiivarsity level or w® have 
no reason for @xls£ene©o Our public ssyviee (of whieh sh© University of Masss^' 
ehuisettes is e©3?ribly dssfleleat ^^a ail know) mmt b® e© raise fche sights of th© 
public, to influen€@ standards so that the gesteral publi(3 will reeo^^lse its 
Stat® University as the location &t learning^ of exe^llenee^* ot pisblie eonfefibu° 
5ion and wortho It is obvious &t tM« point of history that the publie of th@ 
''ojiisnen'sjQalth of Massachusetts and Itfs General Ceurt do not y®t know ®f or wish 
•m «8xe@ilent Unlveraltyo It is elsar to mm that th® corrupting pass relation- 
ship prior t© the Autonomy Act has tao many ©argy ovss-Sc In addition there Is 



always ehadsfsrence paid the private colleges said imiversxfclsSo No doubC the 
wholQ <aaviromsont will ehange» We Icaow 5t Is bettar tbaa it: was^ but so Is the 
-rfhoie Unl^^earsitye Oisr nesds and our quaiitles still outstrip the Tf^sion of tha 
public and the Lntsrest of the General Courts I asa wily sorry that S shall not 
be here long enough to participate in a3?5r spectaeuSar chaBg© wtietip aad if » 
it ocearsa 



OME FACIS AND FX6USES 










U Ap^ropriatio2is ' 


1963»I964 


I964«1963 


1963-1966 




03 


$8^200 


$11^400* 


$21^900 ' 


C$§Joo)** 


10 


ij>700 


1,800 


3^800 


C 1^800)** 


U 


100 


100 


lOQ 




12 


600 


600 


1,200 




13 


2.,20S' 


2^200* 


3,200 




14 


3^100 


3^500* 


4^660 




15 


UOOO 


500 


1,000 




16 


150 


600 


100 





* Dafiaifcs In thesa accounts were eovered by th© Provost ^ 
** Original allocation, 

2o Faculty and Graduate Assistan ts 

■[■iiiWMFnii I iini*TT»w>wiiMiiiiiii ■ nniwin iinaiBn»iMiiiiii> hiibi ihiiiii i»pi»iiiiiiii»iii»wi \m» 

-Aa.of .Se^tQmbgg__ 



Associate Professors.,b.. 
Assistaiit Psrofessors c.c«o 
Instruetorsa «,o.9o<.»,.,<,« 

Graduate Assistants.*,*,, 



Notes These figures Inelude faeuXty on leave of absssiceJ 

Two Professors and One Assistant Profeasor ia 1964 | 
One Professor and toe Assistant Professor in 1965 a 



i2^ 


MM 


1965 




5 


7 


8 




8 


8 


11 




9 


13 


13 




2 


3 


5 




9 


10 


18 





=4"= 



Student's 



General Busin<gss and Fixianoe« » « • » o 

JN^FfiCGCZla^'a £>«eP0O4A&oeoOOOO»b«de-C>frO 

30pinO&BOv6S o » » c ft « ff 9.0 a««ioO(>oe«oo9O0 

Graduate SSasdents^ oocoo«o«»a«ooo»o 



ica>««OQOo 



As 


of Sei^teinber 


1963 


1964 


1965 


83 


U4 


148 


59 


57 


73 


69 


87 


148 


63 


56 


78 


142 


144 


196 


17S 


248 


260 


47 


82 


103 


641 


788 


1,006 


46 


42 


45 



Total stud@n£:s on ^asBpuSox 
Graduace strudsnts at Pittsflslda, 

Total students taught <m caaspus 1^638 1,955 2^50® 

* Students aele^t their majors In the s^«@ad h&IS of tbfti? 
so^tojaors year^ It should be noted thaS 0at Soplioa»rs elaisa i« 
almost invsriably larger than oxsr Fr&^m&s. ®1&bs 4vm te trsaiBi»t& 
fr«iin both inside and outside the Unlversltyo 

Enrollioents in Schools of Business Administration ieyeJlIed off between 
1959 and 1964 but are now rising, particularly is this true of our School o 
As In other fields, graduate enrollments are rising at a faster rate^ Ws 
have between 9<,5 and 10% of the total University enrolliaent but if one eseludes 
woiaen our per ^ent is between t'hirteen and fourteen o£ the meno . 



4J 




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A> w>) 



•Because S feel Shafc-ehe sfcaeasa^infe In fehe 1964-1965 ^^P°'^^ ^^ ''''^'^^ 
pertinent S aan inclutUiig it l^ere again with v&vy few changeSo A Doenj like 

a Prevosi: and a Prasideiifc ISj in part^ a welfare laseifcutlcin as .well as asx 

adisinistratoi* vlfch a sasablance of skill and cosspetaaeao It is an old arts 

well undessfcood sjocong adnsiBisfcrafeors that one ean weaken and/or destroy any 

School or College or DepastaMKife S^ eiis siraple snsaiis of withhoidi!ng tuppore or 

sKpaatlBg £?@2!@sideag «^itsrife«ESes»s and results even with fche x?ery miniiausB of 

finaneial alloea&ionSo 

"A strong fa€«lt:y is s d^saending faculty aM this is as it should be hcft?eva-. 

difficult this may appear to adslaietratorsc It is alssost axioEsaeie that the 

stronger the faculty the less eeomosie coBsldsrations suah as budget lis3i£a<» 

tions are tak&n into aesosjsto The day has elasosS goa® by when facuiey 

rfi€o^isss finarteiai cosi5traints„ This Is not bs^ausa this ourrsnt gmisratioB 

of faculty think In atropian terms but because the stronger imong them are 

snobSle and do not mind traasferlng to that f.m?.v©rsity that offers th® W3>st^ 

This Is cnly part of th« reason noted by jnany that loyalties to Sehools and 

Universities are vsekwr than loyalties to subject asatter and professional 

associations and colleagues^ A ^COEiotunity of S^holas-^^ has more scholarglilp 

and less €oimmjnit^ these daySc This is an acadessic faet of l^fe and tnakes 

the Job of Deans and other administrators different than in the paste 

Relianee on dedieatlon, loyalty, eioa© ties and "spirit* Is less a positive 

faetor than reliance on support of research, ae&sss to stenographic help, 

association ^th ^teaius" of one^s oim professional colleagues, association 

with graduate assistants.^ participation in acadeiaic poli@y and the likeo It 

is quite rtsmarkable that it seemed to taka so long to recognize ^"^is facto 

But it is a basic principle that <;, scarce resource relative to other resourcssj, 

jBUst be conserved^ paid for in higher values and recoginized as strategic „ A 

present day faculty is such a resource and his association vlth other scarce 

resources such as laboratory equlpssen&g research grantSg professlcmal sieetings 



ad infliiifeusB Is valued sioi's highly than besu&ifui scenerj^ (tfeei's are 
excepCionsj of eourse) and IntelligeR!: ad3Biiiist:s'a£off8o The latCer 'must deliver' 
or the aiost lovable among thess nisasis ncthlngo Tha art of *H?Man R&lati&ns^ 
vihtoue finaaeial support is She arfc of living in H©aveii er Ofcopia bufc aot 
on this e.estho" 

Our faeulay has bean vsiry active this past year osi Sdtool and Universiey 
Comsl^tdes, In their o^m profes^Emal ssseetiKigs as speaker asid panelistg^ in 
research and publication, in teaehLng as evldene^d hy essp&eim&sx&s in xi@w 
BBdthods axid in emphasis in tim quasi!: It ativ® and behavioral sclsnoe®^ als@ 
the coajpufcero In addition a auaber of our faeuife^^ partieipated lisx programs 
sptmsored by the "^rsozmel Bivision end tb@ CobssIs^ loner of FInasiee and 
AdsaijiistraSion at the Stafcs Hoissso Ws are pleased -that owr State G^verKmeat 
Is f laelly discovering us aad Is willing to sssive away froffl Boston for aid in 
its programSo 

Iner»asingly are business firsis seeking our aid for research projects snd 
for eonsuitingo PartieularSy is this true f** the Mass Merchandising l-\duBtryo 
I shall expand on S:his under the Special Frograxss headings I have reeeived 
many estls from various tirmB asking whether th^ had Eiceaitive Training 
PrograJiiSo Aside freai the JEt Program ws d© not;,but expeet to within the n^t 
two years now that we have faculty to have such programs on tha level essential 
for sue«esso Cfer new Bireetor, Cr„George Siaanonse has k wide acquaintance 
with Fwtndations and leaders of corporations and will be: helpful t» these 
asfeets of publie service as w&ll as In fu&dsstsntui raseareh for our faeuityo 

Publications? Aetivities and Research by Departments » (31@ase se@ Appendix A)o 



SPECIAL gR OGBAMS 

lo Twenty^eight young businessmen froai Kurope and o&her tsomieries axs 
pa2i:lei panes in our sighfch JET <Jimior EjceeuCiva Ttaining) Program iinanced^ 
imdsr ©ur Juriadietion by the 'EKpsriinent -In Intetnatioxial M-^lxi^^. These 
students seay wieh us for sis naeks aad t;al<e courses an Masiag^mane, Fiaaaeej, 
Quantitative Methods,, Marketing and Industrial Reiatioasa Professor Robsrt 
Lentiihon is th® Coordlimfeor tJiio^ with the aid of a faculty eoiamlttee plaaaed 
tha l^ograffin Next year Professor Hasry Allan wiil realae© Professor Leatilhor-. 
as Coordinator u 

We were pleased th&t Professor Lentiihon was seieeted to visit ^Swed©a 
for a EJonth'^8 stay in a program of 'The EjcperlmeRtj'* financed substaafcially 
and sponsored by Swedish b«si3iiessaEeu« 

2„ MTo Kaigs DcddSp Instructor in this Departmsjit of Markotinga pJaim®d s 

V€!ry suctsessfwX Sohool of Buslnses Admini strati on Coiloquiim thia seasoao 

On the program weres 

Fall S«B&ster« 1965 

October 18 Professor John Dunlop^ Departiasnt of EeonoBieesHarvard Uni%''©rsiey8 
"The Futtare of Labor^Monageiaent Selatioiis,'* 

Nov<fflBber 9 Daaa David Moore,, New York Stat© School of IndtastrSal and Labor 
Relations? ••The Enterprising Man*** 

i 
Decaniber 2 Robert Jfones, Vlee President and Comptroll^sr of the N©tf England 

Telcpboiie Cosapany: ♦*Bell Systesa FJaeri^Ing aJid the Rels of Profits^" 

February 24, Professor J^hn Howard, Dspartment of Mark@ting, CoXuiabla 
XJnivsrsitys "The Theory of Buyer Behavior,," 

Mar«^ 15 Professor John Dearden, Professor of Basiness Adaalnl strati oxij, 

Harvard Unlversitys "Potential Icipacts of Cosjputsr Teehnology 
on Manageteanto*' 

April 26 Dean Clarsnee Walton, School of General StudieSj Columbia 

University: '^Values in Administrative DeelsSonSe" 



tti^a 



3e The Mass MerotondisJng ConforenCQi, joini:?.y organized and sponsored by 
ax\ 'Jndwstsry and School CommitKees was hald aC Atlsaifcie CiCy April 25» 25 and 
27, 1966o Profeesox" Robert Dret'T-»Bear wass Chaircian of our eoEsai'ctoao This yoar 
8 immber of out faculty parCieipa&ed either as speakers or as panel masab^rse 
Prof essois Allan, Dminler, Drew-Bear, Mi«hael, Shapiro, Wolf and Youngo 

This year the Industry fOCTied tho Mass Msrchandlsiasing Researeh Foimdation 
and initially gave xi& a grant »f $79 500 for research ^urehaaeg: , It Is the 
intention of the Foundation to establish a fs^nd between $30500Ci and $305000 
that vill b© offered our School for ressarsha ll=fe haVB & eoRtmitt©© aistivily 
working on projeefcSt, All such grants will be under the jurisdiction of our 
Conter for Business and Seon<»slc Researeho ^e hop©, of c-oisr.'5«, that these 
grants will b© furnished by other Industries to aid us in supporting research 
and our graduate work, 

Althou^ Schools of Business Adaiint strati on furiiish industz-y in this 
country with about 16% of students with bachelor *s degrees the aiaount of 
industry financial eupportp or that of govemiaeait, comes to less than 2% of all 
grants allocated. As wa Vxiaw the great bulk of all sionsy go&s to the Sisienees 
and Engineerings No doubt the day will eoais when the importance of the skills 
and learning essential for oianageDQent will receive greater attentions This 
is not to deny the graat Importance of Science and Technology but there is no 
autcxnuatie relationship between learning and sophistication in these areas and 
the necessities in managamente 

As we move into higher standards for both fa^mlty and students and 
greater University support In facilities and equSpssent^we sliall receave a 
greater share of i^rporate and government support. 



4ffi Ifedar the joinfc Chairmanship of Associate Dean Con.lojijDirector Ben. 
Seligsean and Associate Disfeefcor Harvey Friedman of the Labor RelaCions and 
Research Center about 300 attended a vesry suecsssful Arbitration Conference 
for Labor and Masmagejaenfe repressntrativeso A ©eeoad Conferentse will be held 
sonsatime in the fall, 

5o We as"e ©ontinuingi^ now on a full elme basis» our work In Report and 
Case Writing for our graduate students,, MTc Dwight Littla^ a doetosral candidate 
in Engllshg w^ll join our faculty as a Lecturer in Case feS tinge So far we 
are pleased with the rssultSo Hr^ Little grades the writing part of all case 
reports in our graduate classes^ he aids those students needing correction 
and holds classes for all students both collectively asvd individuallyo It 
is ganerally agreed asaong our faeulfey that t|jer® has been a great deal of 
improvesa^it shown among sfeudentSo Other Schools of Biisinf&ss Administration 
have shown an interest in what we are doing „ 

60 Although a Pho Do Prograis snay not be eonsidered "Sgfeclal'^ it is at 

the sKMnent Special for us and I shall describe it brlafly» 

When fully approved we shall be the first State University in 
New England to have a doctorate in Business Administration^ indeed there 
are only a few offered in the Northeasts We feel we are prepared for this 
significant stepa We envision our attracting graduate stud«its, partieul^arly 
those who desire to enter the academic profession and xse also feel confident 
that we sliall attract and hold excellent faculty., Whether or not this ought 
to be so, it iso EKcellent graduate work not only strengthens the under<» 
graduate program (I deny the orthodox view on this) but enhances the 
intellectual environment of the School and University« With the Sneroasing 
sophistication of business enterprise there is constant need for the higher 
levels of education, for the greater abstract and theoretical fonmslatimts 
as applied to concrete business problems and issues. With few exceptions 
the day of the self made taan Is past and the day of a miniisiuaii education 
in business is also paste 



Our Pho D,- Program lias two main parfcs,, The. firsfe year i& generally 
tnade jp of roqiilred ©our^seso The sfcudeaat will study both th& quant i tat I vs 
and behavioral aspeefcs of Businass Adaainisfcratiouo He wISI atudy Systesnjs^ 
Decision Models and Research Methods^, end also advaxiced Eeonomieso In 
shorts the first' year is laterdiseapliaary and not. spaelaXisado 

Speeifillaatlon will Goum the s«seot5d year when the s&udea,tt may choose 
among a msnbsy of areas such as Inforatseion and Control Systems » Quantitative 
Mana^&mmxt Seiene©., Aecoimting, Flnaa«© or Marketing to anentSon a fewo 

Written exaialnafcions and ©r&ls atwi the Sfceisis will eap fch© prograsio 
Given our present and' futissre facuifey we es^^e*: a great 4eal of owr f/r-ospscfes 
for a soimd prograai of high quality™ 

lo X wish to sasphasis® arid rtpssfc hara ay ©oacsm expressed saany ttnses 
that no program iu Business AdmlnlstraCioR or anything substantially like it 
under anothei* ttsssi® shomld be ©stablf.Khed at th® Bosten Braiieh without the 
participation of the Deaa and the Sehool of Business AdmlnlsferatSono 1 urjd^r^-- 
stand that nothing will happen wIthowC ous* kacwii:ig about Jlfcg but 1 mitry about 
ic anyhoffo Fsmwd say toowledge of &h© faeulty at to© Universley of ^5asss«ilM®e•tes/ 
Boston, t:h@x-e iis no one vrhc has ixusight Into the meaning of Bta^iness Ad]aln» 
isfcration nor the experience to develop a prograsn e<<r®n under the heading ©f 
novelty^ xsrdquen^ss or innovaciorio 1 think ehat whatever happens in Boston 
wiW have a very inportant iapaet on us heirs o Sin^e any new Dean that succeeds 
ma will obviously fenow AACSB standardSj, ha •vrlll have jaor© than a passing J.nte®r®3t 
In Boston as well as the parent University and School » 

2o On0 of the great essentials for our School Is the n^ed for a nmr 
building^ primarily a building for graduate i?ork including a tibsfajry,. Given 
th& d^velopinont of this Sehool and Its r«ia®h«s into a PhoD:. ProgJfasa as '^sli as 
an Increase in undergraduate ignrollsaeatt it is utterly awaaing to ma I^m litt'lB 
interest there appears to be in more spae® artd faeilitaes for •uso How forStanati* 
the Ualvarsity was In having our present buildings 'H-iink of the nonaai (if there 



U" 



to l.Z.a> 



Is such a thing) tim© tafoiSo Affcsr reeaix'ing plfsraiing laonsy iC Cakes a year 
to geC 5he capital owtlay^ fchsn about a year in planning and designang the 
building, than two years in feh® building of ife„ If^ the initial saoney came 
In 1967 \?9 eould aww© into the building In 1971, All i can state is that 
there is going to be a terribly tijght squeezes And If there has got to be 
a squeeze all arotmd the Univsrslty it is high tiiae that the School of 
Business Administration is gSvMi priority aasong those being squeezed, I hsve 
listened to a lot of fancy words and thumping sounds and looked at well dons 
charts but I roaain unimpresaed that any of this tabi© tfeumbiag should place 
the School of Business Administration in a subsidiary positi®n» Unless plans 
for a new building are firmed for 1966»I967 the situation will b®coa(«s desperate 
in the sense th^t the School of Business Administration will be severely limited 
in the role it must, or should play, in the future of the University of 
Massachusetts^ 

3, these past tmr years I have been convinced that Schools of Business 
Administration must play a more important part in the relationship bett^een the 
Fine Arts and Business Administration„ As more and more of our students 'Krill^ 
in later years, be in a position to review designs for buildings^ art objects 
and landscaping they must have more than a minimum appreciation of design, form 
and the esthetic qualities of a civilisationo Businesses are sponsors and 
patrons of the arts and it must be that businessmen might avoid much of the 
crude and ugly aspects of structures, of radio and TV programs » of gaudy and 
spurious advertisingo We have not yet Impressed students with this essOTitlalo 
this real needo Indeed we are fortunate if we can impress many of our University 
students to appreciate and respect the beauty of their campus and the quality of 
our buildingSo X feel that our educational efforts are still punj^ concerning 
the job to be donee I can envision the time when Schools of Business Adminiso 
tration will take th«r leading part in the development of tlm fine arts as related 



to our industrial ciV3llifflafcion„ Rather tium daam cue civilization as is now 
done in many quarters of the HiatoanitJes, these fields with us^, snlght very 
well work toward a finer quality of Industrial life on which ail of us depend 
irrespaetlve of what trade, professions art we inay be a part» Evan, Beatniks 
stmsfflBing guitars need s<m& caampasvy ^^ maimfactur® the precious instruaient 
on which they might sing thair songs of protest and folklore,. 

This next acadsaie year I shall propose to our faculty the developmsnt 
of a eurrlcuXum concerning the Fine Arts and Buslnoss Administration, 

4o We have come to the point in our developHient where we een seriously 
consider Exeeutive Davelopment PrograinSo We reeeJve eoi\stant inquiries both 
froffl Industries within and outside th& Cojnsaonwaalth, Such Programs ean be 
valuable, also a gimmick as well as costly. There ar@ Sehools ti'iat have 
refused to have sueh programs (, The Tuek Schools for instance^ Many large 
corepanies, however, appear to consider th«m important, although asost studies 
indicate that it is diffl(iult to appraise their valueo This is an area, as in 
Education generally, where !t Ss extremely difficult to laeasure conerete resuifcSo 
It is easier to state likes and dislikeso In any event we should carry on 
our mm experiinents with the progranis. No doubt they establish an important path 
to various Industries and that fact can be valuable for both parties. 

It is well to state that Eseeutlve Developiaent Progreuis requixe 
resources, mostly highly qualified faculty. Usually no additional faculty are 
required although Harvard and MIT have Directors of Prograssi- arid sosae faculty 
are on 'Veleased ttiDe," I have heard some mild '"griping" that the programs 
took faculty away frois teaching and researcho W^qti onta tries to allocate 
valuable limited resources (including faculty) problems of priorities naturally 
resulto Is it better to announce to the public that X University has a program 
for the Du Pont Executives or have the faculty for teaching mid research? For 
even if the Du Pont Company should establish a Research CSrant, this also means 



added faculty and facilities as we ell kno<!?o I doubt If any of us has 
consciotsalys y&^v studied the prlorltiies of our resouro^So We have done 
this w^lthln Che S«hoo5. but rsot with rs-ferenee 60 £he Uni'^ersltye 

AsBong £ui::cii7e plaits and r^seds I ^ould pla<go MgJi on the list; 
the great sieed for a Choyough study of faculty salasry admlnlaerationo 
I think w@ need an overall series of guides for Sehoois and C©lleg@Sc 
The problem is dlffi^islt at best and no guide can be so apeeifie and so 
erystal clear so that a^yon@s at anytisse, @an get an ansf^es' to a con©r@t€: 
problem. But there is need to do store thinking about salaries and 
differentials aiaong ranks Ineludixtg administrative positions^ I realize 
that ^e eannot lose valuable people and that the a€ad(snle market Is 
eontrolliKg as faculty are iaobile ajid can move any^s^'® at the sound of 
SDore Sioney^ But it still has a terrifie isspaet on all of us vh@n salary 
Increases are scad© outside the usual pe^'iod^ paytiewlarly if made In any 
^olesale fa&hlon to any one departitentc I appreciate the necessity and 
defend the desisions^ but I eould defend thsnt vith a greater degree of 
rationality if X Knew i!K>re about the necessities in advance, at least, 
as expressed in general guidelines and University policyo 

We knowg given the way ve now use our Readir^g Room, that there is an 
urgmit need of upgrading our present retsources Into a species of Sub^Llbraryc 
It Is that rxsKf, except we eaimot receive the Library services we desire 
and the Library '"s professional attention &s long as «e are looked upon 
as having only a Reading Room^ A recent survey g, as our Provost, Dr<, Tippo, 
knows, has disclosed the fact that our Room ean hold froa 12,000 to 13,000 
books and periodicals. We could hold miah tsore by using taller cases. 
Even this Library would not be substantial « but it would be far better 
than what we havao Furthennore I objaet now and hava always objected to 
the low status accorded our needs in library resources o Not that 



15. 



cl TC 



Hugh Monfcgoiasvy Is unsympathetic. He Is .nofe» IiMle«sc! he is very helpful « 
But he works within the iimJ tat ions iffiposed by present policy... 

I catmot eoiaplete this Asmual Report without exprassingo warmly 
and with gr@at satisfaction* a Daasi'a respect tor eaeh and every loeabar 
of Che fa«s«lfey and adajinistrefelve persoM in the School of Business 
Admlnistrationo The tremastdows suceesses of mzr Chairmen in recrultinig 
ex<sellent neu' faculty (we had our deep failures tm') ^ill be itt evld®n@e 
for years to eonseo To Assoeiate Deaa Conlon we sw® a brilliant organisa- 
tional feat In bringing together faeulty and eoasmlttees to haaacsr out a 
Pho Do Program of which this University ean be proudi To Aissistasie Dean 
Tlntrlo Johnson X wish to pay tribute for bringing order out of a fragmented 
Advising Program^ Mu@h remains to ba done but his insight and awarenesis 
t»{ that t&et ke&ps us frosi beeoising amtgo 

Th« Administrative Cdsmittee e(»aiposed of the Associate Dean, Dr<, Conlon» 
Assistant Dean Johnson, Chafnnens Professors Claimeh. Dennler^ Hardy and 
Ludtke, has been a *'right hand man" significant always for valuable advlc-e 
but aostly because no "y©s Jasn" exist on it« This is an institution of 
the School that is rolevant^ effective and continuingo This Report, 
this Dean axxd this School eotild not be the saute iiithout these men and 
their relationships with our faeultyo 

Respectfully subiaitted,, 



H„ Bo KIrshen 
HBKSEA Dean 




i6c 



clOo 



APPENDIX A 



Gjcaats^ ^Researehs Pi^bUeatioRS and Fa culty. Acifci^ity 

The follo^isig is tmvm a goed arastdoffl ssmpl© of faewlty activity than a 
coti^le&s li&t 0f all tha£ has h&pperisd £0 «ach ead e^^sry ti^a^r o£ the 
faculty as v@ll as in ^hst activities tha D@a{%o Associate and Assistant 
Dsans parigicipat^sdo Ail of tss have had ^ux sbsxi& of eon£@r@£acee» spgi^h^s^ 
panels and professional n^etit^So I doubt if any of us easi b@ aeeused 
of profsssioftial pr«wiclal4snio I sae ao as^d of listimg ©^©ryfihing ia 
t:hls Annisal R^&porto Our fosms ar@ quits ccmpl^t© that t^€ sead t® the 
Pro^post for tenur®^ salary and pros»tion purposes o Xtidesd there vmy be 
some vay th@s@ can b@ attached to an Anaual Report or a crosa r&f@rea@e k@ 
ffled«o In additiosg we hasre appointed a autnber of new man prior to th«i 
b€igi(mlng date of this Report but whose rssearehs publications aad aetisciti^s 
are not htare reported « 

Departmsat o f Aec outi tlng 

COKFIRENCES 

All ntembers of the Accounting Departments except Professor MullStigg 
attended the Northeast Reg&orval Meetings of the Atneriean Accounting 
Association at Columbia University^ April 22 & 23^ 1966o 

Professors Dennler and Plon attended the Anericen Economic Association 
meetings in H&s York^ December 27 « 29^ 1965o 

Professor Detmler attended the nestings of th« Aineriean Accountis&g 
Association in Normaca^ Oklahoniao August 29 « Septesiber I« 1965o 

FACULTY' ACTIVITY 

ir IB— I >i w i ri — I !■ mil III! i Mw iii iiiii w H I iiiwi 

Johsi Anderson; Member of tha Education Cotian&ttee of the Masso 

Society of CPA»Sc 

oi'iairman of th& Departiognt September 1963 ^^ Ftsibri^ry 
28, 1966. 



5 7. 



" It. l " 



(Cliai raian) 



Disciwsion leader for KAA S'3J!?i'aa3." in Net? York City^ 
Idarch 28=»29o Subjects "Pricing Policies and Decisionss 
Techniques and Practice" «, 

Panelist^ Mass Merchamiising Cosife^fcriCep Subject: 
"Operating SfcatlstXes for 1964''o 

Manuscript review for McGrs«'=Hill Book Cooj- "Decision 
Matheraatics'* By Dersiis Eo Gra 



Robert Lentl Ihcnrt,: 



Article: "Hesults of a Questionnaire Survey Sent to 
Accounting Graduates of the Univo of Masso'S ColXegiate 
Nees & Views B Volo XIX* Noo 3^ ppe 15"16b March I%67 



Coo^ordinator of JET Program^ 1966 » 



Anthony Krzystofik: 



Named most valuable tnessber of the year o£ tbe Springfield 
Chapter of the NAAo 

Publication Conaalttee atSEibesTj, Masso Society of CPA^So 

Hsr"e^ard Case Study Progranjp susacer 1965 (wrote a case 
vhieh will soon be pubIished)o 

Instructor J, Staff Training Prograns sponsored by AICPAo 

Moderator of a pansl *a Octobers 1965 and panelist in 
Aprils 1966 ioT NAAo 

Holds office of Auditor of Masso Society of CPA»s 

Chainnan of General Business & Finance Cossnittee for 
selection of departtne&t chairmano 



James O'Conneli; 



Chairman of Accounting Careers Council, Control #22 

(MesSo) 



Frank Ao Singer: 



Ford Fouvidation Fellowship Grants, i965°66o 
Public ations; 

^— Wtamnmiii- ■ mi »■■» n iwi 

Article s: "Progress in Programned Instruction j* The 
Accounting Revieae Vol XLg Noo 4? ppo 847"8533 Octo 19638 

"A Note on ^Teaching Approaches to Eleaientsry Accounting"' p 
The Acc ounting R eviewg Volo XLI9 Noo lo ppo 133-1349 
Januarys, 1966 



I 



Depsi'ttsjettt of Accounting 
(continued) 

Frank Ac Singers Co-author! Coten^ KoJos GiltmzBs T.C*, and Singer, 

(continued) Frarikj Ao "The Use of a CoKsputer in Csreidit &?al«atiori 

of Bank leoan Appiicatiofts'-'j, Bulletin of tb® Robert 
Morris Associatasg Volo 48^ Hoo 4^ ppo 206»2209 Dacenfceir 
1965 o 

Books a^ Cpntributionst Co°a«tltor: Cohetij, KoJo, Gilmores 
ToCa,aad Singer^ Fsaiik A© "Bank Proeedures for Analyzing 

Buslaess Loan Applicatioiis" Aitalytical^ Methods in^ Bankiaga 

RoDo Irwin & C009 1966^ ppo 2i9=>249o 



=19= 



Daparttnent o f Geaeral Bu simess and Fina nce 



FACULTY ACTIVITY 



James Ludtke: 
(Chairman) 



Completion of 29 revised chapters of a text oooAasterl can 
Finai^cial System3» the first edition published by 
Allyvi aad Bscono 

"Deposit Activity at Savings Banks'* (A paper delivered 

at the Harvard Workshop in Fir^neej Suffimerj 1956) o 



■'arry All«n: 



''Orgaalsatiott Theoryj, Sociology of Law^ and Business: 

Divided Parts of the Same Field?" in Araegican Btaelness 
LgG?^^ Journal B Volo 4p Springj, 1966, ppo 39=31o 

"Asi Etsplrical Test of Choice and Decision Postulates 
of the March»Cyert Behavioral Theory of the Finrf'g 
accepted by AdcdLni strati ve Science Quarter It q 

Reviews, accepted by AiaerScan Busine ss l^.w jQumal» of 
the Manaseaent of Conf 1 i c fcg>Appea 1 Systems in Organizs" 
tions by William Go Seotto 

Textbook in Business Law with H© Richard Hartzler^ 
Tentative title: Basic Leg^l Dec^nsions of Econoaaic 
Management a Contract with Scott'^Forestnano ppo SSO'SOOc 

Participated^ with Ste^.mn Michaels in s program spon° 
sored by Mro McCarthy j, State Consaissioner of Finance 
and AdiRlnisUretiono 



Pao Chang: 



'•Toward a Theoi^r of Coaipetition by Pronsotiott Astong 
Fiuanciai Firsis" in Nff^ Res earch in Marketin^ pLee 
Preston t, Sdos Institute of Business and Econosulc 



Researchg University of Callforniaa Berkeley;, 
ppo 17c.2So 



1965. 



"Conflict Bargaining end Zeuthen^s Principle.-)" Accepted 
prot?isionally by Maiiaja;ement Scienceo 

"Strategy Augpsentation and Stability of Cooperatica" 
in Research in Bsger iaental Econotnics o Vemcn Stsaith and 
Lo Lave 9 editors 9 Camsgie Institue of Technology o To 
be published in the falls 1966o 

"Risks Aspii-iatioa Lev^el and its Social Adjus'tmsat*' 

in hands of Behavioral Science for readings 

Book: Matheajstieal Statistic s fo r 
published by Aliyn and Bacono 



20- 



OiiUo 



Depasrti'nsnt o£ General Business and Finance 

■ .■■;''■ (emttaiiued) 

Ho Richard Hartzler: See item under Harry Aliai-to (Tsst in Business Law) 

'^'The Need for Legal Scholaars and a Suggested Source 0" 
accept^id by the Journal o£ Legal Educatimto {Accepted) 



Robejft Rivers J 



"Airport Managerasnt: The Job aad tfee Mbu^^ The Traaspor^, 
tatio a ' Jo'aaraal Q Dtie Winter* 1966 issijec 

— IMIIMMIIiailllllll II III! lOBI III IMIHW IIM ^ 



•'Movrlng .Househoid Goods: Customer Carrier EelatloaSo*' 
Submitted to Busitisss Topics* Micb2"aa State UaiversitVe 



Ward Theilaaan: 



"Gold Preferencfe and feter national Reserves 3*" Iowa 
Busliiess^ Di gest s- .Marcha 1966 » pp© 9=120 

**Leverase Satios and Debt Capacityo*' Accepted pto-wision.'^ 
ally by th6 Southern EconoMc Jo«ri'saio 



MCm/.'/ ACTIVITY 



321e 



DeparctiTe ni: o f Menagetsent 



SJ/aey C launch: 



Resefirch itv Location Theory and in International 
Busanesso 



■Sosdon Chsn: 



Principal Investigator of a Psroposed Project ovi the 
"Cost Benefit Analysis of the AFDC Program in Massachuo 
setts" uades the joint spotisoxship of the Labor Rela- 
tions Center and the School o£ Business Adttiini strati on o 

"Careful Casting Company'' case 5 Bibliography of Cases 

in Business Adaranistrationo Vol X, 1966© Intercollegiate 

Case Clearing House (Hsrxrard)* 

Research paper "pimulats^w; of Production Inventoj-y 
Systesj in the Automoti-^re Industry" presented at Ford 
Foundation Faculty Research Seminar p Coamell University p 
Axigustj, 1965 o 

Research paper "Logical Constraints of Organisational 
Communication Systeius*' to be presented at the 13th 
international Meeting of the Institute of Manageiaent . 
SnienceSj) Philadelphia^ September^ l%6o 

Invited to participate in the Steel Industry Economic 
Seminar 9 University of Chicago j, August j, l%6e 



Arthur Elkins: 



"Personnel Msnagewent: l-Jhat It Is and Its Value To 
Your Hospital Organisationj," Hospital ProgresS n Vol© 
47j» Noo 60 June, 196&p po 77e 

Diarector of the University Honors Program 

Completing Thesis for the D.B.Ao degree^ Indiana Universityo 



Steven Michael: 



Presented a paper "Management Audits^-^What Government 
Can Learn from Industry*' on a panel at the 1966 National 
Conference on Public Administration^ Washington, Do Co 9 
April 14, 19660 



Consul tatioii with Office of Commissioner of Advninistra= 
tion and Finance of the Comnom^ealth of Massachusetts 
on training programs for middle and top administrators 
in State Government p February ^ Marcho 1966o 



'22= 



DepasTtiRSiit of Maiiagenienfe 
(cotttimxed) 



Walter O'Donnell 



"Privcate Eaterprjee Coafrouted with the Challenge of 
Tae Futware"^ (lit Spanish) Address to the Fifth latere 
AssericsR Ccmference in Mmsi^ Peins pwblisfeed in 1%5 
in Anales del Instittsito PegBano de AdiniiUstrfaeion de 
EsBpresaSo 

"The DevelopBEnt of Institutional Values*' paper pre^ 
seated at the meeting o£ the College o£ Marwgeinent 
Philosophy at the XII Iiitesnatiotiai Meeting of the 
Institute of Managetneat Sciences 9 Vietmas Aisstsisp 

Septembers 196 So 

"International Management end Emerging Comtmajty 

of Nations" published in s special New Year's edition 

(1966) in a Japanese <CIOS)t, 



Stanley Young: 



Management: A Systems Analysis » Chicago: Ssott=> 
ForestBan» 1966 jppo 450o 

"Manpower Trainlng^Some Cost Denvanslonso" Researeb 
Monograph s Office of Educations 19659, ppo l=70o 

"Organizational Decision Makingj" Hospital^ Adi8iKistra° 
tion« F all, 1965, ppo 38"65, 

OecasiCnal Research Reports: "Unions in a I^^boristic 
Socletyo" Sto Louis Universityj i965s, ppo l^lSo 

"Management Authority in Employment Relationshipg" 
Readings in Personnel Admin£8tration <, 1966 » 

"Designing Management Systems" from the American 
Management Journal to be included in Prasad; Modern 
In dustrial Manajjtanent to be published later in 1966c 

Participated; as speaker^ in a Collective Bargaining 
Seminar -sponsored by the State Bureaa of Personnel 
and Standardizations 

Serving as Chairman o£ the Research Committee of the 
Academy of Management » 1966* 



FACULTY ACTIVITY 



»23= 



Department of Marketing 



Harold Hardy: 
(Chainnan) 



ABS Carbon Cori^any (With Professors Chea and Zane) 
Case in Intercol legiate Bibliojyraphyiy ^f-?}^!^, A.T^,,,]?.^?^?^ ^.^ 
Admi ai strati on 9 Volo X^ Intercollegiate Case Clearing 

Rouse" "(Hai^ard) o 



Participant in Sales snd Marketirig Executives^Inter* 
aationai© Educational Round TablSg Bostong May l^ig 1966c 

Msniberf, Ed»icatlonai Cetcmittees Eastern Regional Confer- 
ence o£ Amerisan Advertising Agencies Associationo 



Hale Dodds: 



Chairman of tha School of Busiitsss Administration 
Colloquium CoitiQiittee responsible for organising program^ 
inv'iting distinguished speakerso 



Robert Dre^»Bear: 



On sabbatical leave for 1965-1968 but active in a 
number of ways: 

Consultant for Za3?re*s Discount Bapartntent Stores and 
considei'ed an authority in Mass Merchandising^ presently 
writing a booi< on its origins and developmento 

ChairtnavT of the School Cctranittee responsible, with the 
Industry CoBjmlttee^ for the Conference of the Mass 
Merchandising Industry at Atlantic City, Aprils 1966o 



George Schuartz: 



Development of Marketing Theox'y » translated into 
Japanese and published in Japan^ 1966» 

Development of Marketing Theory » published in the 
International Business Management Series for sale in 
Europe p 1966 o 

Member: Marketing Abstracts Staff 9 Journal of Market Inge 

Addresses: Massachusetts Chapter of the AMA, NoveiBberp l965o 
National Institute of Accountants, Springfield;, 
19660 



Invited to participate in National Marketing Theory 
Seminars) University of Vermontj August^ 1966,, 



>24> 



Departiaeni: of Markefcitig 
(coxatiniied) 



George Scht-7arts: 
(continued) 



Insrited to deliver e pa^r at the National Confereticeg 
Atneriean Marketing AssQCiatiorij, Indiana University^ 
September J 1966, 



l3*witi Shapiro: 



Delivered paper "Applying ths Marketing Concfspt to Mass 
Merchandising" at ^!ass Merchandising Coafersncej, April 9 
1966 o 



Jack Wolf: 



Will be Acting Chairttian of the Department beginning 
September, 1966 <, 

On panel of the Mass Merchandising Industry Confei-encso 
1966 o 

Co-chairman of the Research Coriimittee of the Mass 
Merchandising Research Foundatioiio 

'•Acadatnic Research and the Data Drought Diletiaaa" (with 
Charles Hinkle), Journal o f Marketing Research ^ Volo 3s 
May 9 1966 » ppo 196<=.198o 



a 2 J" 



Appendix B 
Business Advisory Co-ones 1 



Mto Charles Ao Cac5pfeelXooooooVice<=F^esidsn.ti, IoS<,Mo World Ti-aae Corporation 

82 i United Nations Plaza^ Kew York X7p Met-? York 

Mro Harold EMeroo.ooooooooooCiSiiara Mutual Plumbing and Hestiag Compap.y 

63 South Pleasatȣ Strestg Asihersfes MasBo 

Dx*o George ElliSoooo«oo.o«.o<.Presid€ntg Federal Reserve Bank of Bastots 

30 Pearl Stx'eetg Bostotis, Masso 

Mifo Fred Etsarsorioooeo.oooeoooUniversity of Msssaohusetts Trustee 

?ice»Fresi dents Spartan Saw Works InCo 
152 Fisk Avenue e SpringSield ?§ Mstsse 

Mr© Robert Harperoo6oo.ooooooVic«<=' President aad Getiesral Manager 

Greenfield Tap and Dis^ Greeafieldg Masso 

Mro Abe MarkSooooooo»o.o«8o<>ePi''£Sident of Hartfisld Storess, Kew York City 

Chairman 5) Board of Trustees: Mass Merehaadi sing 
Research Fomt.dstioti 

Mr© Roger Putnataeo,.oooooooooChairffiat» of the Boards Package Machinery Corporatioa 

East iongsjeadox^rp Masso 0102 S 

Dr© Leonard Silkooo.o»«o<..«»o8EconotRis£ a5td ?ice Chairmssis Editorial Board 

BUSINESS tJEEK 
330 West 42nd Street » New Yorlcg Kecir York 

Mrs Pliilip SiagletonooooooosePresideats, Pro<=.phy°iac=>tic Brush Coitsparty 

Florence 9 Massachusetts 

Mr<, Herman St«s£serp JrooosocPaartners Lybrand Ross Brothers and Montgonsery 

SO Federal Street^ Boston lOg M&sso 

Dro Stanley TeeleooeooooooocoForiner Dean o£ the Graduate School o£ Busii-xess 

Adfflini strati on at Hasrvard^ sad nmf 
Treasurer of Atnherst College 
Aitiltersto MasSo 



»26= 



App'SndlK C 

FROM: Jolm To Coviioa^^ Associate Dean DATE 5 June 7^ i9S6 
TOj Desii H« Bo Kirshea 
SUBJECTS Graduate Program 



lo Oust tnajor iHidertsMfig tMs past year tjas the drafting and stitelssion 
of oiir doctoral proposal o Because o£ the gsreat effort &■&& eoatKibiitiosi 
of so many of our i&anlty^ this proposal Ims been called fey leany the 
most ifl^ressive such proposal satettted ia recssens yearse Kith au£koriaa° 
tion to iatrodue© fcMs progsrasss and u-ith the q«ality of facul&y we aoH 
have and will contiaua to attracts ^je are aow In & posaSion to tneke s 
sigrsificaat confcrlbiitloa to the field of business adueatioa &Rd Isiusiaass 
sesaasrcho 

2o Astothar deyeiopment of irspovtancB is e&e developmeat of josat programs 
vi'ch. other areas within the tJulvsrsityo The first of thase waB in the 
Mo So in Labor Studies Program in cooperation with the labor Eeiatioiis 
and Research Ceafcero More recently we ha'^e collaborated with the 
Industrial Engineering Dep&rttaetit to offer a joint program 4ti Mansgemeat 
Science « Operations Research*, 

3o Applications for and earoilment in our ajaster*^ degree pr'ogratsB coutinue 
to expanda Our graduate student body grew from 80 in. the fall semester 
1964, to 99 in the fall 196So The M, S. Prograia iit Accounting is' not.? well 
established^ Oiir graduate program in Pittsfield remaiiis strongo Moderates 
but continued growth in all programs is anticipatsdo 

4o Because of developments at the graduate level we have now appointed a 
Director of Ctxaduate Studieso 

5o. Our long range planss, say for the nest five year period^ includes 

a) successful introduction o£ a quality doctoral prograsso 

b) probable introduction of the previoitsly authorized Mo So in 

Finance Program* 

c) reduction of teaching loads of the Graduate Faculty ,to six 

houra^ in part to condensate for th®i» activities on 
Guidance Consul t tees o 

d) continued development of cooperative graduate prograriss with 

other departisents within the Uni'S'ersity (so go a five 

year coa&ination BoS« » M«B,A, with Industrial Engineering) o 



»». J- -U J. -L >i, .1, >U -<- J. ^L ^l. ^ ..L ^ .1. JL 



J^J, 



J^J, 



1 July 1965 - 30 June I966 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



.1. J^ X JL .^ 



** 



ANNUAL REPORT 

jLju. jujii. 

JL.Jt, JL^ 

OF THE 

*■;< ft* 

ftft ft* 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

ftft ft* 

AA ftft 



ftft 



ft* 



June 1966 
ftft ftft 



J. J~ J' .•. J, J. .u .L J. J. J, .(. .r. J. J, J. .(. .L ^ .^ ^t. ^ ^ J. ^^ 



Annual Report 



School of Engineering 

University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

1 July 1965 - 30 June 1 966 

15 June 1966 



1 . Appropr iat ions 



1963-6't 



1964-65 



1965-66 



01 



Salaries, Permanent 



02 Salaries, Temporary 

03 Salaries, Non-employees 
Ok Food for Persons 

10 Travel 

11 Adv. & Printing 

12 Repairs 

13 Suppl ies 

I't Office Expenses 

]k-] Telephone 

15 Equipment 

16 Rentals 

Personnel 



$ 557,135 


$ 665,622 


$ 775,343 


16,897 


30,017 


58,669 


1A,700 


26,100 


22,800 


100 


100 


100 


3,300 


4,550 


7,250 


260 


250 


250 


8,400 


8,400 


8,400 


17,750 


22,500 


20,500 


2,000 


2,000 


2,700 


2,200 


4,400 


4,400 


27,000 


32,000 


35,000 


880 


1,500 


4,200 



The table indicates number in each rank as of September (full time eqiriivalents) 



963 



Deans 

Department Heads & Chairmen 

Professors 

Associate Professors 

Assistant Professors 

Instructors 

Teaching Assistants 

Lecturers 

Organization Chart as of September I965 

Please refer to the next page. 

Students served . 

a. Number of majors as of September 1965 



1 


4 


12 


16 


14 





15 


2 



1964 

2 

4 

11.5 
18.5 
15 

3 
22 

1 



1965 



2 


5 


15 


18 


17 


2 


33 

1 



Chemical Engr. 



Sr. 
Jr. 
Soph, 



1963 

26 
26 
12 



1964 

19 
20 
24 



1965 

18 
25 
35 



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Civil Engr. 
1 


Sr. 
Jr. 
Soph. 


f Electrical 


Sr. 
Jr. 
Soph. 


Industrial 


Sr. 
Jr. 
Soph. 


Mechanical 


Sr. 

Jr. 
Soph. 


Undesignated 
Eng ineer ing 


Jr. 

Soph. 

Fresh 


Total Undergrads. 




Graduate Students 





Pittsfield Undergrads. 
Pittsfield Graduates 

b. Students taught 

(graduate and undergraduate) 

c. Number of Degrees Granted B.S. 

M.S. 



-2- 

1963 

2A 
k8 
16 

38 
63 
3k 

10 

20 

3 

44 

62 

9 

137 
277 

849 

72 

20 


2295 



125 
19 



1964 

39 
57 
49 

53 
^9 
84 

17 
19 
17 

41 
53 
56 



303 
900 

107 

12 



3142 



150 
14 



1965 

42 
57 
40 

43 
60 
56 

10 
20 
17 

37 
60 
51 

12 

36 

275 

894 
125 




2430 



120 
35 



5. Faculty Publications, Research Grants, Research Projects, and other Professiona l 
Act iv i t ies 

a . Publ icat ions 

Civil Engineering 

1. Feng, T. H. (C. E. Dept.) "Behavior of Organic Chloramines in Disinfection" 

Jour, of Water Pollution Control Federation 38 , 
4, 614-28 (April I966) 

2. Carver, C. E. "Measurement of Laminar Velocity Profiles with Non-Newtonian 

Additives us i ng Photom icroscopy" 

Engineering Research Institute, Univ. of Mass., Fluid 

Mechanics Laboratory Technical Report No.l, Sept. 1965. 

3. Carver, C. E., (with 3 co-authors). "Fluid Flow Relations in Circulation 

Cleaning", Jour, of Milk and Food Technology, 28_, No. 12, 
377-378 (Dec. I965). 



-3- 

k. Bemben, S. and Esrig, M. I. Formal discussion: "The Influence of Strain 

Behavior Upon the Shear Strength of a Soil". 
Proc. Sixth Intl. Conf. on Soil Mechanics and 
Foundation Engineering, Montreal Volume 3 (in press) 

5. Hendrickson, K. N. "A Geophysical Approach to the Design of a Large Optical 

Test Stand". Proc. Univ. of Mass. Conference on 
Economic Geology (Jan. I966). 

6. Anderson, J. M. "Analytic Aerot r iangulat ion : Triplets and Sub-Blocks" with 

2 co-authors, Photog rammet r ia I966. 

7. Chajes, A. and G. Winter, "Torsional - Flexural Buckling of Thin-Walled 

Members" Jour, of the Structural Division, Proc. 
of A.S.C.E. , August, I965. 

8. Boyer, W. W. and Santoro, L. "COG036: Engineering Users Manual". 

Engineering Research Institute, Univ. of Mass.1965. 

Electrical Engineering Department 

1. Monopoli , R. V. & Lindorf, D. P. - "Control of Time Variable Nonlinear 

Mul t ivar iabl e Systems Using Liapunov's Direct 
Method". - NASA Contract Report CR-^07, March, I966. 

2. Monopoli, R. V. S Grayson, L. A. - Discussion on "Two Theorems on the Second 

Method." page l40-l4l, IEEE Transactions on 
Automatic Control, January, 1 966 . 

3- Hutchinson, C. E. & Bona, B. E. - An Optimum Stel 1 ar- I nert ial Navigation 

System - Journal of Institute of Navigation, 
Volume 12, No. 2, Summer, 19^5 

k. Hutchinson, C. E. & Bona, B. E. - Optimum Reset of an Inertial Navigator from 

Satellite Observations, Proc. of NEC, Volume 21, 
October, I965. 

5. Hutchinson, C. E. - An Example of the Equivalence of the Kalman and Weiner 

Filters. IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 
April , 1966. 

Industrial Engineering Department 

Several papers were presented during the year. These and other manuscripts 
from I.E. are in the process of publication and should be included in next 
year's report. 

Mechanical Engineering Department 

1. Keyser, C. A., Four articles in Encyclopedia Americana: Alloys, Amalgam, 

Annea 1 i ng , Anod i z i ng . 



Research Grants 

Chemical Engineering 

Proposal 66.2: E. E. Lindsey and D. C. Chappelear - $25,300 from NSF (GK-lllO) 

for research on "Deformation and non-Newtonian 
Behavior in Suspensions". Two years. 

Proposal 66.4: L. H. S. Roblee, Jr. $26,733 from ONR (Nonr 335.7 (02) for 

research on "Dropwise Condensation". 
(Renewal). 2 years beginning July 1966. Renewal. 

Civil Engineering 

Proposal 66.8: T. H. Feng, et.al.: Graduate Training Program (Renewal of 

ITI-WP-77-01) "Water Quality and Quantity." 
Federal Water Pollution Control Administration, 
$23,190 for 12 mos. beginning 1 July I966. 
Plus supplementary grant $8078. 

Proposal 66.12 M. P. White, et. al.: "Nuclear Blast Studies on Aircraft Carriers" 

$18,574.80 from David Taylor Model Basin, U.S. 
Navy. 

Proposal 66.18 T. H. Feng: "Effects of Chemical Impurities in Water on Disin- 
fection by Halogens". $35,102 from U. S. 
Army Medical Research and Development Command 
for the first year of a proposed three-year 
program . 

Electrical Engineering 

Proposal 66.9 R. V. Monopol i : "Control System Analysis" $9,300 Research Initiation 

Grant from NSF for 2 years (GK-8I7). 

Proposal 66.10 C. E. Hutchinson: "Statistical Parameters for Optimum Estimation 

of System State Variables". $17,900 for 2 years 
Research Initiation Grant from NSF (GK-8IO). 

DEAN'S NOTE: The NSF Research Initiation Grant Program in Engineering (new 

faculty < 3 years from PhD) was highly compe- 
titive. About 1 in 3 proposals were funded. 
Our School submitted 5 proposals. Two in C. E. 
were rated close to the funding cut-off. Our 
E.E. group did well. In all some 20 proposals 
were submitted in 1 965-66 some to more than one 
agencyo Three were submitted jointly with Chemistry 
as part of a Polymer Science and Engineering Program. 
One of these, for $600, was granted by the U. M. 
Research Council for a conference on polymer 
educat ion. 



-5- 

c. Fellowships and Training Grants Received 

Chemical Engineering 

2 new NSF Tra ineeships. 

2 new NDEA Graduate Fellowships. 

1 new NASA Traineeship. 

d. Papers Presented 

1. Prof. G. R. Higgins (C.E.) served on a panel with Messrs. Grof, Motts, and 

Hopkins at the U. of Mass. Conference on Ecomonic Geology 26 January 
1966 to discuss Water Resources of Massachusetts. 

2. Dr. C. E. Carver 

"Photom icroscop ic Measurement of Laminar Velocity Profiles with Non- 
Newtonian Additives", paper presented at Water Resources Conference, 
A.S.C.E., Symposium on Non- Newton ian Flows in Civil Engineering, 
May 16-20, I966, Denver, Colorado. 

"A Photomicroscopic Technique for the Measurement of Laminar Velocity 
Profiles with Non-Newtonian Additives", paper presented at the 5th U.S. 
National Congress of Applied Mechanics, University of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, June 17, I966. 

3. Prof. K. N. Hendrickson 

"The present status of Foundation Practice and Design in Western 
Massachusetts". Presented to the Western Branch of the ASCE, 
February, I966. 

"Application of Geodetic and Seismic Principles to Fire C Control of 
Polaris Missile", April, I966. Reserve Officer Research Co. 

k. Dr. C. E. Hutchinson 

"Optimum Reset of an Inertial Navigator from Satellite Observations". 
National Electronics Conference, October 25, 1965, Chicago, Illinois. 

"Optimum Use of Reference Information and Inertial Navigation" 
National Aerospace Electronics Conference, May 17, 1966, Dayton, Ohio. 

5. Prof. R. V. Monopol i 

"Estimation of States with Unknown Parameter Variations" 

IEEE Region 6 Annual Conference, April 28, I966, Tucson, Arizona. 

6. Dr. R. W. Trueswel 1 

"Determining the Optimal Number of Volumes for a Library's Core 
Collection", Libri (Danish journal in library science). Accepted 
(January, I966) for publication. 

"A Study of the Information Searching Behavior of X-Ray Crysta 1 lographers", 
paper presented at the Institute for Management Sciences 1 966 American 
Meeting, Dallas, Texas. February 16-19, 1966, 



-6- 

7. Dr. E. J. Rising and Prof. R. N. Millen 
"Work Sampling in a Hospital Rehabilitation Unit", presented at the 

Hospital Research Branch Symposium of the National A! IE Meeting in 
May, 1966. 

8. Prof. R. N. Millen 
"An Elementary Hospital Admissions Simulator", presented at the 
Hospital Research Branch Symposium of the National AIIE Meeting in 
May, 1966. 

e. Special Grants 

The Chemical Engineering Department received a total of $4,500 in unrestricted 
grants: $2,500 from Hercules Powder Co., $1,000 from Monsanto Co., $1,000 from 
Gulf Oil Corp. Foundation. 

The School of Engineering received $2,000 in unrestricted grants: $1,000 from 
the R. C. Gunness Foundation and a matching grant of $1,000 from the Standard 
Oil (Indiana) Foundation. 

f. Continuing Education 

Two more groups (25 men each) of Monsanto Co. scientists and engineers were given 
the Advanced Engineering Mathematics course by Professors Roblee and Novak under 
the continuing professional education program begun two years ago. 

Profs. Higglns and Patterson organized a successful Computer Orientation Program 
sponsored by local chapters of Am. Society of Civil Engineers and Am. Society of 
Mechanical Engineers. 

6. Major Accomplishments of the School 

a . I ndustr ial L ia i son 

The period began as we ended our search for a Director of Industrial Liaison. 
Dr. Howard D. Segool was appointed to this post early in the fiscal year and 
began his duties in September, 1965- He set up an office in the Engineering 
Building which after a few months became known as Commonwealth Technical 
Resource Service or COMTECH. It provides the technological service link 
between the University and industry. 

On September ]k, 1 965 The State Technical Services Act became law (P.L. 89-I82) 
One of the sponsors of the Act was Representative Conte of this district. He 
was encouraged by Dean Lindsey and Prof. Maunder, who was invited to be pre- 
sent at the White House for Its signing. Its purpose is to develop wider 
diffusion and more effective application of science and technology in business, 
commerce, and industry as essentials for growth of the economy, higher levels 
of employment, and improved competitive position of United States products in 
wo r 1 d ma r ke t s . 

Under assignment by the Governor's Office to the University, COMTECH is now 
concentrating on the development of the Commonwealth Five-Year Plan and First 
Annual Technical Services Program authorized under Public Law 89-I82, the 
State Technical Services Act of 1965, and funded by the U.S. Department of 
Commerce. This is considered to be an excellent base from which to develop 



the desired Interrelations, and from which to demonstrate statewide leadership 
in the area of technical service to industry. 

COMTECH is developing a corollary interface for the University with governmental 
agencies, sister educational institutions, and professional, trade, and regional 
organizations similarly engaged in efforts which will lead to improved or new 
technological ly-based industries. 

Internally, COMTECH coordinates not only with the engineering facility, but with 
the range of scientific, technological, and business resources of the University 
which correlate with the operations of business, commerce and industry. 

The initial Federal Approprjat Ion is for planning by the designated agency, 
which in this state is the Governor's office. Some of the funds have gone for 
regional planning on a five-state basis (Maine, Mass., N. H., Vt., R. I.). As 
agent for the Governor, COMTECH has engaged some assistants and looks to start 
work on a state plan beginning about 1 July 1 966 after some delay in receiving 
funds . 

Graduate Programs 

As of this date two new PhD programs have been cleared by the Faculty and the 
Administration and are on their way to the Trustees for consideration. This 
would bring the number of PhD programs begun since September I963 to k. 

One program is In Industrial Engineering. Here we have vigorous, aggressive 
leadership and a small but dynamic and young faculty with a modern outlook. 
Drs. James and RIkker, two excellent young men, were appointed to begin 
September I966. Therefore we are hopeful. If established, it will be the 
only such program in New England. 

The other program is in Polymer Science and Engineering. It is an interdisci- 
plinary program which will be run by a committee which will in many respects 
function like a department. It is a natural development for the University 
to undertake. The state has many businesses and plants which are based on 
polymers. Also we have had for fifteen years in Chemistry a small group in 
polymers headed by Dr. R. S. Stein which has gained an international reputa- 
tion. To the present group composed of two polymer physical chemists, 
Drs. Stein and MacKnight; and an excellent m icroscopi st , Dr. Marion Rhodes, we 
are adding a polymerization chemical engineer well established in his field. 
Dr. Robert Lenz, and a chemist who is one of the country's outstanding rheolo- 
gists, Dr. Roger Porter. It is hoped this program will be the first pillar in 
a broad program In material science In polymers, metals, ceramics, glass, and 
possibly wood and fibers and involve chemists, physicists, engineers, and others. 

Competition for good graduate students is keen nationally. However, the quality 
of our new graduate students continues to improve and in some department the 
quality is exceptionally good. In this we have been helped by increased support 
from the University In the way of ass i stant sh i ps and Increased outside support. 

The Mechanical Engineering Department has revised and updated it's Master's 
Degree program. In addition to establishing new core requirements, the program 
offers specialization in aerospace engineering, applied mechanics, heat transfer, 
machine design, and materials science. New courses are planned to support the 
new areas of specialization. Graduate enrollment increased significantly in 



this department this year. 

The appointment of Dr. John R. Dixon from Swarthmore College to head the 
Mechanical Engineering Department next year is the culmination of a thorough 
but satisfactory search for outstanding leadership. Dixon is a specialist in 
thermodynamics, heat transfer, and design. He is also editor of "Engineering 
Reviews" for McGraw-Hill and is author of two recent books. 

New Fac II 1 1 ies 

The Engineering Building East (EBE) was occupied last summer. It was dedicated 
]k May 1966. It provides much critically needed laboratory space, office space, 
classrooms, and importantly, an auditorium for lectures. 

Space has been remodelled in Goessmann and in Gunness to provide additional small 
laboratories in Chemical Engineering badly needed for research. 

A new $52,000 analog simulation facility has been set up in Goessmann, financed 
about 50^ by an NSF equipment grant to Profs. McAvoy and Novak, and 50% by 
University equipment funds. 

A new 4000 sq . ft. sanitary engineering laboratory has been set up in EBE. Major 
new items of equipment are: a gas chromatograph, a U-V spectrophotometer, a 
differential resp i rometer , mlllipore filters. 

Other new major apparatus now operating in EBE includes a tensile testing machine 
capable of operating at high temperature, a subsonic wind tunnel, and a multi- 
speed controlled strain triaxlal soils testing machine. 

Recogn It ion 

Prof. Marcus won the 1965 Metawampe Award for distinguished service to students 
and was the Opening Convocation speaker. Prof. Dittfach won the Outstanding 
Teacher award In I965. 

Prof. John Mitchell won the 1 966 Metawampe Award. Though he is strictly a 
member of the English faculty, he advises the student Engineering Journal, 
teaches technical writing to engineers, and has an office in E.B. so we have 
some claim to him. 

The Student Chapter of ASME received recognition for excellence this year. 

The Student Chapter of ASCE received a commendation and was judged outstanding 
in New England for the sixth straight year. 

Prof. C. E. Carver is (1) President, Univ. of Mass. Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa 
and (2) President-elect, Univ. of Mass. Chapter of Sigma Xi. 

Facul ty 

Our recruiting has been very successful this year. We look very attractive to 
many potential faculty, so much so that we have been able to be very selective 
in our appointments. We were given five new positions and a sixth was allotted 



I 



to I. E. to meet a| special need. Five have been filled and we expect an offer 
to go out to a sixth shortly which we believe will be accepted. 

We have appointed two outstanding men as Dean and as M. E. Department Head, 
respectively. Both are to begin July 1. 

On the other hand we have had two resignations late in the year. One is in the 
very critical area of sanitary engineering. Prof. F. H. Edwards was on sabba- 
tical leave September 1965 to June 1966, studying with Dr. M. V. Wilkes at 
University Mathematical Laboratory of Cambridge University. 

Special projects or programs. 

Most of these have been covered elsewhere. 

A training program in sanitary engineering was begun in September 1965 supported 
by a grant from PHS. 

The Freshman Orientation program was operated for the fourth year. This two- 
weei< session before the opening of full term serves a useful purpose in moti- 
vating and directing freshmen and in reducing attrition. 

Future Plans and Needs 

Any firm assessment of plans and needs should await the arrival of the new Dean 

of Engineering, Dr. K. G. Picha, who can give us new perspectives as well as 
dynamic leadership. However some needs I judge to be particularly critical I 
feel I should list. 

1. Additional graduate- 1 evel faculty in Mechanical Engineering. 

2. Additional graduate-level faculty in Electrical Engineering. 

3. A new building for chemical and nuclear engineering. This may need 
to include additional space for polymer engineering. 

4. An organization and funds to support continuing education for employed 
engineers, as mentioned in the last reports 

5. Some highly skilled and qualified technicians. 

6. "Seed money" for research and specialized research equipment. 

This is my last report. During my brief tenure I feel we have not stood still but have 
made some significant progress. 

1. PhD programs were begun in Civil and Chemical Engineering and two other 
new ones are in process. 

2. The freshmen program has been reorganized. 

3. Industrial engineering has been set up as an independent program and 
materially strengthened. 

h. A new building (EBE) has been completed and occupied. 

5. Graduate enrollment has more than doubled, 
is 
Most of this/due to action of progressive departments .and their heads, their fine coopera- 
tion and to the support of the administration. 

Respectfully submitted, 
E. E. Lindsey 



ANNUAL REPORT 



School of Home Economics 
University of Massachusetts 



July 1, 1965-June 30, 1966. 




Submitted by : / / / OA^-^fyi 
Date: 





Marion A. Niederpruem^ Dean 



W^^A^ 




I. APPROPRIATIONS 

1963-64 $18,720.76 

1964-65 31,867.15 

1965-66 27,635.00 



II. PERSONNEL 



a . RANK 



Professors 
(including School He 

Extension Professors 
Associate Professors 
Extension Asso. Prof. 



Sept. 
1963 


Sept. 
1964 


Sept. 
1965 


ad) 1 


2 


2 


1 


1 
(12% time) 


1 (50%) 


5 
(1 80% time) 


6 


6 


2 


2 


2 (10% time) 



(10% time) (12% time) 



Assistant Professors 4 5(1 25%) 6 (1 25%) 

(1 7 5%) 

(3 100%) 

(1 100% res.) 

Extension Asst. Prof. 11- 

(10% time) (12% time) 

Instructors 3 3 2 

Visiting Lecturers - 2(Parttime)3 (Parttime) 



TOTALS 17 22 22 

N.B. The Extension faculty for 1965-66 taught courses in the 
percentages so noted. 



- 1 - 



b. FACULTY ON LEAVE - None 

c. PROMOTIONS AND MERIT INCREASES 

Effective 
Promotions Rank Date 

Dr. Mary E. Lojkin Assoc. Prof. "A" 1/31/66 

Merit Increases 

Ralphaella Banks 1/31/66 

Gladys M. Cook 

Dr. Mary E. Lojkin 

Jane F. McCullough 

Dr. Elwood F. Reber 

Marjorie F. Sullivan 

Helen R. Vaznaian 

d. RESIGNATIONS 



Ralphaella Banks 
Lillian A. Geraci 

e. RETIREMENTS - None, 



- 2 - 



NON-PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL 



Grade Sept. Sept. Sept, 
No. 1963 1964 1965 



Secretaries 



Title: 










Principal Clerk 


09 


1 


1 


1 


Senior Clk. S Steno. 


07 


1 


1 


1 


Junior Clk. S Typist 


02 


1 


1 


1 


Lab Asst., Others: 










Laboratory Assistant 


04 


1 


1 


2 


Nursery Asst. (R.N.) 


03 


1 


1 


1 


Housekeeper 


03 


1 


1 


•. 



h. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION 

Current Salary Breakdown - Professional Staff - See (A) 

Current Salary Breakdown - Technical S Secretarial Staff - See '^l* 

Organizational Pattern of School - See (C) 

Organizational Chart - See (D) 



- 3 - 



(A) 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



Salary Breakdown 

Professional Staff 
January 31, 1966 



Dean, School of Home Economics 
Marion A'. Niederpruem 

Professor 

Verda M. Dale 

(50% of $13,686,40) 
Elwood F. Reber 

Associate Professor "A" 
Virginia Davis ' 

(1/12 of $11,299.60) 
Mary E. Lojkin 
Marjorie M. Merchant 

(1/12 of $11,299.60) 
Elizabeth M. Rust 
Helen R. Vaznaian 

Associate Professor 
Gladys M. Cook 
Dorothy Davis 
Sarah L. Hawes 



Profess or 
Arnold 



Assistant 

Susanna Arnold (1/1 
A. Raymond Cellura 
Lillian A. Geraci 
Jane F^ McCullough 
Marjorie F. Sullivan 



Instructor 

Ralphaella Banks 

Joan Coughlin (1/2 time) 



time; $9939.80) 



Visiting Lecturers 
Marilyn Aninger 
Judith Keldsen 
Anna Russell 



(part time) 



Annual 




Salary 


Source 


$18,499.52 


01 


6,843.20 


01 


16,905.20 


01 


941.63 


01 


10,826.40 


01 


941.63 


01 


12,719.20 


01 


13,858.00 


01 


11,772.80 


01 


10,826.40 


01 


10,826.40 


01 


2,484.95 


01 


12,027.60 


01 


11,143.60 


01 


10,540.40 


01 


10,699.00 


01 


8,681.40 


01 


4,005.30 


01 


2,670.00 


03 


2,015.00 


03 


2,015.00 


03 



■:/'•■. "..c, •-!.;./•■. -v-tr '^?.',.'"i.t ! ■■'('• )r:''i 



, '■. nn.- 

■' : • i i ■ 



•J 'wii'JW 



i.n ;;:^ 



^^ ■■■ 



It J \ ;■■■)■" 



1 . 






.1 :;-.,:. i»K; 







vi ;^:J-';b!..- 



Technical Staff 



(B) 



I 



Laboratory Assistants 
Helen Morrissey 
Arline Stoughton 



Grade 



04 



Annual 
Salary 



$4,347.20 
4,061.20 



Source 



02 
02 



Housekeeper 

Emergency Person 

(1/12 of $3317.60, base) 



03 



276.22 



02 



I 



Nursery Assistant 
Ruth G. Smith 



03 3,597.44 



01 



Secretarial Staff 



Principal Clerk 
Dorothy E. Menard 

Senior Clerk-Steno . 
Phyllis Handrich 

Junior Clerk-Typist 
Patricia Bysiewski 



TOTAL 



09 



07 



5,735.60 01 



4,803.00 



02 3,460.20 



$207,473.49 



01 



01 



Total Personnel Services 



01 


$ 192,088.87 


02 


8,684.62 


03 


6,700.00 




$ 207,473.49 



i 



l/31/66:m 



(C) 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERN FOR SCHOOL 

TEACHING-RESEARCH- EXTENS ION 

FOOD AND NUTRITION 

Chairman - Dr. E. Reb^r 
Dr. "M. Bert 
G. Cook 

D. Davis 

Dr. M. Lojkin 
J. McCullough 
M, Merchant 
Dr. E. Rust 
H. Wright 

TEXTILES, CLOTHING AND ENVIRONMENTAL ART 

Acting Chairman - Dr. M. Niederpruem 

S . Arnold 

J. Coughlin 

L. Geraci 

V. Davis 

S . Hawes 

R. Johnston 

MANAGEMENT AND FAMILY ECONOMICS 

Chairman - V. Dale 
B. Higgins 

E. Knapp 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 



Chairman - Dr. 


A 


Raymonc 


M, 


Aninger 






R. 


Banks 






J. 


Burroughs 






J. 


Keldsen 






A. 


Russell 






R. 


Smith 






HOME 


ECONOMICS 


EDUCATION 


Chairman - H. 


Va: 


snaian 


W. 


Eastwood 






M. 


Sullivan 







6/66:m 



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! I 



IV. 



a. Number of majors, undergrad . 
Number of majors, graduate 



STUDENTS 






Sept. 
19 6 3 


Sept. 
1964 


Sept. 
1965 


177 


213 


289 


6 


7 


17 



1963 
1st 2nd 



1964 
1st 2nd 



19 6 5 
1st 2nd 



I 



b. No. students taught each sem. 428 574 559 644 861 783 
(undergrad. 8 graduate) 

No. of non-majors 130 223 118 252 246 266 

No. of courses offered 26 21 26 27 29 25 



c. Current data on enrollment figures - See (E) 



I 



- 4 - 



<r:) 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS UNDERGRADUATE ENROLLMENT 

FALL 1961 — FALL I965 

Fall Semester 1 96 1-62 

Freshman - 26 

Sophomore - 3^ 

Junior - 26 

Senior - 30 

Total ~1W 

Fall Semester 1962-63 

Freshman - 37 

Sophomore - 32 

Junior - 4o 

Senior - 28 



Fall Semester 1964-65 



Total 137 

Fall Semester 1963-64 

Freshman - 62 

Sophomore - 44 

Junior - 35 

Senior - 36 



Total 177 



Freshman - 74 

Sophomore - 63 

Junior - 4o 

Senior - 33 

Special Students - 3 



Total 213 

Fall Semester I965-66 

Freshman -101 

Sophomore - 94 

Junior - ^2> 

Senior - 36 

Non-Classified - 5 

Total ~7BT' 

Percentage of Increase - Fall I96I to Fall 1965 l49.1^ 



6/1/66 :h 



V. FACULTY PUBLICATIONS, RESEARCH GRANTS, RESEARCH 
PROJECTS, AND OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES. 

FACULTY PUBLICATIONS 

Bert, M.H., F. Fu, and E. F. Reber. Biological evaluation of pro- 
tein quality of radiation sub-sterilized shrimp. Fed. Proc. 25 , 
2751, 1966. 

Davis, D. Book review of Marion Jacobson, Food Principles , An Intro - 
duction to Experimental Study of Foods and Food Preparation . 
Pullman, Washington: VJashington State University, 221 pp. J. 
Home Econ. ^, 65, 19 66. 

Lojkin, Mary E. Effect of nitrogen intake on tryptophan metabolism 
and requirement for pregnancy. Fed. Proc. 24_, 56 9, 19 65. 

Stanley, D. VJ., M.E. Lojkin. Tryptophan metabolism and requirement 
for pregnancy. Fed. Proc. 2_5, 675, 1966. 

Niederpruem, Marion A. Foreward for book. The Theory of Fashion De - 
sign by Helen Brockman: John Wiley S Sons, Inc., N.Y. 1965. 

Niederpruem, Marion A. Man and Clothing . Focus, 1966. (Article). 

Raheja, K. L., and E. F. Reber. The effects of testosterone and di- 
cumarol on blood coagulation in rats. Fed. Proc. 25_, 2429, 1966 

Reber, E.F., K. Raheja, and D. Davis. VJholesomeness of Irradiated 

Foods. An Annotated Bibliography. pp 749-819. Radiation Pro- 
cessing of Foods. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Research, 
Development and Radiation of the Joint Committee on Atomic En- 
ergy. Congress of the United States. Eighty-ninth Congress. 
1965. 



RESEARCH GRANTS AND PROJECTS 

Dr. Mark H. Bert, Faculty Research Grant; $10 00. 

Title: Enhancement of the nutritive value of unicellular 
algae. 

Dr. A. Raymond Cellura, Office of Economic Opportunity. June 19 66; 
$8,250. 

Title: Head Start Orientation Training Program. 

Dr, Mary E. Lojkin, National Institute of Health Grant, 1963-6M,v'- 
1964-65, $7200; extended through Sept. 30, 1967: $12,875. 

Title: Tryptophan metabolism and requirement for pregnancy. 

- 5 - 



RESEARCH GRANTS AND PROJECTS (contd) 

Dr. Elwood F. Reber, Faculty Reseai-ch Grant, 1964-65, $1000; 1965- 
1966, $500. 

Title: Biological evaluation of radiation sub-sterilized 
clams . 

Dr. Elwood F. Reber, Office of the Surgeon General 

Title: Compilation of an annotated bibliography on the whole- 
someness of irradiation preserved foods . 

Dr. Elwood F. Reber, Atomic Energy Commission 

Title: Evaluation of the wholesomeness of irradiation pas- 
teurized clams. 

Dr. Elizabeth M. Rust, Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, April 19 66- 
March 1967, $4,318. 

Title: The influence of radiation, storage time and method 

of preparation on the palatability of selected marine 
products . 

OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES 

The following faculty attended and participated in professional meet- 
ings as follows: 

Mrs. Susanna B. Arnold - New York Fashion Group - American Spring 
Fashion Preview; New York City. 

Ralphaella Banks - Western Massachusetts Association for the Educa- 
tion of Young Children, Mt. Holyoke College, So. Hadley. (Presi- 
dent) . 

Western Massachusetts Association for Education of Young Child- 
ren, Smith College, Northampton. 

National Head Start Meeting for Universities and Colleges Planning 
Teacher-Training Sessions, St. Louis, Mo. 

New England Association for the Education of Young Children, 
Rhode Island College, Providence. (Member-at-large of Execu- 
tive Board) . 



- 7 



OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (contd) 

Ralphaella Banks - Class on "Guiding the Pre-School Child" for 
the conference on The Home and Family. Sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Cooperative Service. 

Dr. Mark H. Bert - The 13th Annual Food Management Seminar (National) 
University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

National meeting of the Federation of American Societies for Ex- 
perimental Biology, Atlantic City, N.J.; presented nutrition re- 
search paper. 

Dr. A. Raymond Cellura - Northeastern Psychological Association Meet- 
ing, Boston. 

American Educational Research Association Meeting, Chicago. 

National Head Start Meeting for Universities and Colleges Plan- 
ning Teacher-training Sessions; St. Louis, Mo. 

Mrs. Gladys M. Cook - Food and Drug Administration Conference, Boston, 

American Dietetic Association Annual Meeting, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Western Massachusetts Dietetic Association Meeting, Amherst. 

Western Massachusetts Home Economics Association Meeting, Go'^hr 

Dorothy Davis - Lecture-demonstration meeting for home economists, 
Berkshire Gas Co., Deerfield. 

Workshop - "Working with Lovj-Income Families" - Framingham. 

Food Forum, New York City. 

Lillian A. Geraci - National Retail Merchants Association Annual Con- 
vention, New York City. 

Dr. Mary E. Lojkin - IVth International Congress of Dietetics, Stock- 
holm, Sweden. 

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, At- 
lantic City, N. J. (presented paper). 



- 8 - 



OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (contd) . 

Jane F. McCullough - Food Service Executives Association National 
Meeting, New York City. 

Massachusetts Food Service Executives Association, as first 
vice-president (October); April, as acting president; elected 
president, April. 

Northeastern Section of International Food Technologists Meet- 
ing, University of Massachusetts, Amherst. 

National Meeting of Society for Advancement of Food Service 
Research, Cornell U., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Massachusetts Food Service Education Council (six meetings), 
and planning committee for 13th Annual Mass. Food Service 
Seminar, Jan. 196 6; planning committee for 14th Annual Mass. 
Food Service Seminar, 19 67. 

13th Annual Massachusetts Food Service Seminar, University of 
Massachusetts, Amherst. 

Eastern Territories Conference of Food Service Executives Asso- 
ciation, Rhode Island. 

Dean Marion A. Niederpruem - Annual Meeting of the Association of 
Land-Grant Colleges and Universities, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Northeastern Home Economics Administrators Annual Meeting, 
New York City. 

American Home Economics Association Annual Conference, San 
Francisco, 

Dr. Elwood F. Reber - 36th Annual Meeting of the New York Dietetic 
Association, Syracuse, N.Y. (presented paper). 

Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, At- 
lantic City, N. J. (2 papers presented). 

25th Annual Meeting of Institute of Food Technologists, Kansas 
City. 

Northeastern Regional Meetings on Cooperative Nutrition Pro- 
grams, College Park, Md. 



- 9 - 



OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (contd) 

Dr. Elizabeth Rust - Northeast Section Institute of Food Technolo- 
gists, (2 meetings - 1 Amherst; 1 Boston). 

Massachusetts Dietetic Association, (2 meetings), Boston. 

Food Service Executives Association Meetings, (three), Northamp- 
ton, Granby, Worcester. 

Sigma Xi Meeting, Amherst. 

Marjorie F. Sullivan - Workshop "Working with Low-Income Families" - 
Framingham, Mass. 

College Chapter American Home Economics Association Meeting, 
Regis College, Weston. 

New England District Association of Student Teaching Annual Con- 
ference and Meeting, Lexington. 

American Home Economics Association College Chapter Advisers 
Workshop, Michigan State U., East Lansing. 

Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development Dialectic 
Conference, Storrs . 

Regional Meeting, FHA, Amherst. 

Pitkin Conference, New England ASCD Conference, Educational Po- 
licies Commission, Keene, N.H. 

Meeting for Home Economists, Berkshire Gas Co., Deerfield. 

Massachusetts Home Economics Association State Meeting, Westfield. 

Western Mass. Home Economics Association Meeting, Goshen. 

Ford Foundation Project, Curriculum Workshop, Bennington, Vt. 

Helen R. Vaznaian - Nevj England ASCD Victor Pitkin Institute, Planning 
Committee, Keene, N.H. 

Second Dialogic Conference on Factors Which Inhibit or Facili- 
tate Change in Institutionalized Arrangements (Consultant), Storrs 
(New England Education Policies Commission of ASCD) . 

Massachusetts Home Economics Association, Westfield College, West- 
field (key speaker) . 



- 10 - 



OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES (contd) 

Executive Board Meeting, New England ASCD, Keene, N.H. 

Food Service Industries Meeting, Boston. 

Meeting for Home Economists, Berkshire Gas Co., Deerfield. 

Cooperative Project for Curriculum Development in Southwestern 
Vermont (consultant - two day institute), Bennington, Vt. (Ford 
Foundation) . 

New England ASCD, The Victor Pitkin Institute, Keene, N.H. 

Massachusetts ASCD Mid-VJinter and Annual Meeting, Lexington and 
Needham . 

Connecticut ASCD Meeting, Storrs, Conn. 



- 11 - 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 
DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 196 5-1966 ACADEMIC YEAR. 

STATE OF THE DEPARTMENT IN FALL 19 6 5 

In the Fall of 1965, a departmental chairman was appointed in the 
Human Development program. Previously, there had been no full- 
time chairman. Consequently, there was a very limited opportunity 
to develop educational programs, plan and provide for needed facili- 
ties and appoint new faculty, as well as other administrative acti- 
vities necessary for a sound departmental program. 

DEFINITION OF " PROGRAM GOALS 

The program in Human Development is concerned with the study of sub- 
stantive and methodological problems related to the analysis of sta- 
bility and change of human characteristics over the life cycle. The 
program is intended to provide an organizational setting in which: 

a. social and biological scientists may focus the 
analytic power of their disciplines upon develop- 
mental phenomena; 

b. students interested primarily in the study of sta- 
bility and change of human characteristics over 
time may acquire the competency required to analyze 
these phenomena; 

c. techniques may be developed that are specially suited 
to facilitate the study of developmental phenomena; 

d. the units of analysis generally associated with a 
particular discipline may be organized into a unified 
science of human development. 

Curriculum Development . Courses are being developed at the under- 
graduate level to provide our majors with the theoretical, empirical 
and philosophical background necessary for work with pre-school aged 
children. At the graduate level a program leading to the Ph.D. in 
Human Development is being developed. The program will emphasize 
theoretical and empirical experience in three areas of human development; 

1. psychological development 

2. socio-cultural development 

3. political-economic development 



There are an insufficient number of courses offered in the Human De- 
velopment program for undergraduate and graduate specialization in 
this area. In the Fall of 19 6 5 there were only eight courses offered 
at the undergraduate and graduate level. A request has been initiated 
to add four courses for the fall of 19 65. These are: 

a. Language and Cognitive Development (3 cr.) 

b. Theories of Human Development (3 cr.) 

c. Observational Child Study (3 cr.) 

< d. Theories of Social Learning (3 cr.) 

Each of these courses is to be offered for both undergraduate and gradu- 
ate credit. 

Program Standards . Policies have been defined for acceptance of 
undergraduate and graduate students in the Human Development program. 
At the undergraduate level, transfer students may apply to the program 
if their academic cumulative average is a 2.0 or better and they indi- 
cate a definite interest in work with pre-school aged children. At 
the graduate level admissions are based upon an analysis of performance 
on the graduate record exam (Math and English, the Miller Analogies 
test, previous course work^ and letters of recommendation). Applicants 
to the graduate program are required to have maintained a "B" average 
in their undergraduate work, a score of at least 60 on the Miller Ana- 
logies test (approximately the 7 5th percentile for among graduate stu- 
dents in the social sciences) and math and English scores on the gradu- 
ate record exam at approximately the 7 5th percentile for graduate stu- 
dents . 

DEPARTMENTALIZATION 

With the other areas in the School of Home Economics, a request has been 
initiated for formal departmentalization. During the academic year, 
administrative procedures have been established to allow a smooth transi- 
tion to departmental status should this request be accepted. Admissions 
criteria, budget procedures, faculty evaluation procedures and proce- 
dures for the identification and assessment of candidates for positions 
in human development have been established. 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

In the Fall of 1965, the Human Development program consisted of a faculty 
of three persons (only one had graduate status), one visiting lecturer, 
three head teachers, and one secretary. Two positions have been as- 
signed to the department for the academic year, 1966-67, and one resig- 
nation was submitted. Over UO applications were received for the posi- 
tions which were open. Eight candidates were interviewed and two ap- 
pointments were made: 

Dr. Margaret Fernandes, Ph.D., Brigham Young University 
Dr. Elis Olim, Ph. D., University of Chicago 



There are an insufficient number of courses offered in the Human De- 
velopment program for undergraduate and graduate specialization in 
this area. In the Fall of 1955 there were only eight courses offered 
at the undergraduate and graduate level. A request has been initiated 
to add four courses for the fall of 1966. These are: 

a. Language and Cognitive Development (3 cr.) 

b. Theories of Human Development (3 cr.) 

c. Observational Child Study (3 cr.) 

d. Theories of Social Learning (3 cr.) 

Each of these courses is to be offered for both undergraduate and gradu- 
ate credit. 

Program Standards . Policies have been defined for acceptance of 
undergraduate and graduate students in the Human Development program. 
At the undergraduate level, transfer students may apply to the program 
if their academic cumulative average is a 2.0 or better and they indi- 
cate a definite interest in work with pre-school aged children. At 
the graduate level admissions are based upon an analysis of performance 
on the graduate record exam (Math and English, the Miller Analogies 
test, previous course work, and letters of recommendation). Applicants 
to the graduate program are required to have maintained a "B" average 
in their undergraduate work, a score of at least 60 on the Miller Ana- 
logies test (approximately the 7 5th percentile for among graduate stu- 
dents in the social sciences) and math and English scores on the gradu- 
ate record exam at approximately the 7 5th percentile for graduate stu- 
dents . 

DEPARTMENTALIZATION 

With the other areas in the School of Home Economics, a request has been 
initiated for formal departmentalization. During the academic year, 
administrative procedures have been established to allow a smooth transi- 
tion to departmental status should this request be accepted. Admissions 
criteria, budget procedures, faculty evaluation procedures and proce- 
dures for the identification and assessment of candidates for positions 
in human development have been established. 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

In the Fall of 1965, the Human Development program consisted of a faculty 
of three persons (only one had graduate status), one visiting lecturer, 
three head teachers, and one secretary. Two positions have been as- 
signed to the department for the academic year, 1966-67, and one resig- 
nation was submitted. Over M-O applications were received for the posi- 
tions which were open. Eight candidates were interviewed and two ap- 
pointments were made: 

Dr. Margaret Fernandes, Ph.D., Brigham Young University 
Dr. Elis Olim, Ph. D., University of Chicago 



Both appointees are eligible for graduate faculty status. A third 
appointment is pending. 

One staff resignation has been accepted. One staff appointment as 
head teacher has been allocated and filled. An appointment for a po- 
sition opening as a head teacher in the Nursery School is pending. 

FACILITIES 

Planning was initiated during the 1965-66 academic year for facili- 
ties to meet the needs of program growth. The need for expanded 
facilities has been recognized by the University administration. Con- 
sequently, the following facilities will be available to the Human De- 
velopment program faculty, staff and students: 

A. Human Development Laboratory . This new laboratory will 
occupy Room U and the adjoining lavatory in Skinner Hall. 
This new laboratory will be equipped as a nursery school 
room with sound proofing and observational facilities 
which include an observation booth with sound system and 
one-way mirror. This laboratory provides for: 

1. an increase in our research facilities 

2. the potential for greater flexibility and 
educational and research programming 

3. a laboratory for the placement of child 
development majors during their nursery 
school internship 

B. Departmental Office and Laboratory Space ( Hampshire 
House . Arrangements have been made to house the 
Human Development program faculty and staff in 
Hampshire House. The assigned area includes nine 
faculty offices, a secretarial office, a graduate 
student room, a machine room, a storage room and 

a testing room. A request is pending for the allo- 
cation of a conference room and a curriculum work- 
shop. Space is also available for program expan- 
sion in Hampshire House. 

•^K SEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS 

At the request of the Office of Economic Opportunity, a program train- 
ing grant proposal was developed, submitted and approved. The grant 
authorizes the Human Development Program to conduct a Head Start Ori- 
entation Training Program to initiate the training of head-start teach- 
ers prior to their assignment in Child Development Centers throughout 
Western Massachusetts. O.E.O. has authorized the allocation of $8200 
for an 8-day period. In addition, the Human Development faculty has 
been authorized to act as consultants to Child Development Centers in 



various communities throughout Western Massachusetts, under a sepa- 
rately negotiated arrangement. The contract approval by the Trea- 
surer is pending. 

A proposal is being initiated in cooperation with officials of the 
Springfield Area Poverty Program to establish a Child Development 
Center. This center would serve as a focal point for a human develop- 
ment training program at the undergraduate and graduate level with 
the culturally disadvantaged. Activities would include research, 
teaching and community service. 

PROGRAM GROWTH 

Enrollment. There has been a substantial increase in the under- 
graduate and graduate enrollments in Human Development. In the Fall 
of 1965, there were approximately 79 undergraduate majors in Child 
Development. At the end of the academic year there were 95. It is 
anticipated that the undergraduate enrollment will approach 120 majors 
in the Fall of 1966. 

Graduate Enrollment . Enrollment at the graduate level has been 
restricted purposely until staff increases allow the execution of 
strong programs. There is, however, one graduate student in Human 
Development and a research assistantship has been allocated to her. 
She expects to complete her program in August of 19 66. Her thesis 
concerns: 

The Relationships Between Female Adolescent Sex Role 
Identity, Socio-Economic Status and Parental Orienta- 
tion. Her thesis committee includes: Drs . A. Raymond 
Cellura (Human Development) and Harry Schumer (Psycho- 
logy) . 

Teaching assistantships in the amount of $2500 have been allocated for 
the 1966-67 academic year and four applications to the graduate pro- 
gram are now pending. 

COMMUNITY PROGRAMS 

Staff members have, throughout the year, engaged in various community 
service programs. Included have been radio and television appear- 
ances, workshop presentations, and adult education seminars. 



Submitted by 

A. Raymond Cellura 



MANAGEMENT AND FAMILY ECONOMICS 
DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 196 5-19 66 ACADEMIC YEAR. 



I. Faculty publications, research projects, other professional 
activities. 

a. Publications: 

Barbara Higgins contributed case studies for The Spender 
Syndrome , (Brenda Dervin and Jane Ehman, editors) , Center 
for Consumer Affairs, The University of VJisconsin, Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

Edward K. Knapp, Our Housing , Publication 434, Coopera- 
tive Extension Service, University of Massachusetts, 
Amherst, Mass. 

b. Professional activities: 

Three members of the department — Marjorie M. Merchant, 
Edward K. Knapp, and Verda M. Dale -- are engaged in doc- 
torate study. Mr. Knapp has been on leave this year. 

Barbara Higgins was one of the faculty for a two-week New 
England School for Credit Union Managers . 

Marjorie Merchant participated in planning two state-wide 
Consumer Conferences with the Massachusetts Consumer Asso- 
ciation, and presented an overall view of consumer educa- 
tion needs and problems at the Massachusetts Consumer Con- 
ference in November 1965. 

Verda M. Dale was a participant in the Massachusetts Home 
Economics Association sponsored workshop "Working with Low- 
Income Familis \." 

II, Major accomplishment of the Management and Family Economics De- 
partment during the fiscal year: 

a. Work with Low-Income Clientel: 

One of the most exciting and challenging projects of the 
department has been the developing and adapting of manage- 
ment and family economics teaching materials to meet the 
special educational needs of individuals who are culturally 
and economically deprived. A major portion of the Exten- 



sion Division program has been oriented to this work. 
Work in this field has included: 

1, Serving as a consultant and coordinator for a home 
management training program for low-income women, 
under the auspices of the United South End Settle- 
ments and the Boston V/elfare Department. The 
training is a part of the manpower training pro- 
gram, and the home management training is pre- 
vocational in intent. One class of 33 women has 
been graduated; a second class of 47 V70men is in 
progress, and a third class is anticipated. Of the 
first class that graduated, 15 women have continued 
some form of educational training -- some in basic 
education and others in job-oriented training. In 
addition, 14 women are now undergoing work experi- 
ence. This leaves only 4 of the original class, 
because of various personal and family reasons, 
unassigned. (Verda M. Dale) 

2, Serving as resource person or teacher for home 
management and family economics subject matter for 
a number of county extension programs and community 
programs directed toward low-income clientel. (Mar- 
jorie M. Merchant, Barbara Higgins, Verda M. Dale) 

3, Serving as educational consultants and teachers to 
professional vjorkers who will be involved with low- 
income programs . These workers have included per- 
sonnel from United South End Settlements, Boston 
Redevelopment Authority, Red Cross and Boston Welfare 
Department. Training has included special work in 
family finance (Boston Welfare Department case workers 
and Barbara Higgins), a three-vjeek home economics 
orientation program {Boston Redevelopment Authority 
personnel with Marjorie Merchant as coordinator), and 
individual conferences and teaching. (Barbara Higgins, 
Marjorie Merchant, Verda Dale). 

Special projects: 

A new venture for the department has been the beginning of con- 
tinuing education, non-credit seminars in Consumer Economics. 
Two five-week seminars have been held — one at the University 
of Massachusetts campus in the fall, and the other at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts/Boston location in the spring. In addi- 
tion, a 10-week seminar on the same subject was held in Pitts- 
field. A large majority of the students are professionally 
allied to some phase of education. The seminars, from evaluation 
reports by those in attendance, appear to meet the needs of con- 
sumers and those working with consumer groups for timely informa- 
tion as to consumer problems and the responsibilities of consumers. 



Submitted by: 
Verda M. Dale 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 
DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 1965-1956 ACADEMIC YEAR 



Research Activities 

Consultant to Cooperative Project for Curriculum Development, Benning- 
ton, Vt. Othei"' cooperating institutions, made possible 
by a Ford Foundation Grant, are Bennington College, the 
University of Vermont, Williams College, State Univer- 
sity of New York at Albany, the Vermont State Department 
of Education, and Massachusetts State College at North 
Adams. Our role in this project is both specific and ex- 
tensive. 

Consultant to Newton Public Schools, Newton, Mass., on their Ford 

Foundation Project: Revision and Curriculum Development 
in Occupational Related Areas in Home Economics, Busi- 
ness, Industrial Arts, Technical-Vocational Programs at 
the Secondary School Level. The project will extend to 
education for the years 13 and 14; i.e., post high 
school, junior college and adult education. 

It is perhaps timely to report that a portion of our research carried 
on at the Weeks Junior High School, Newton, Mass., will be presented 
by two of the teachers directly involved, Miss Sylvia Thompson and 
Miss Diane Ward, at the American Home Economics Association Meeting in 
San Francisco, June 28, 1966. The presentation is titled, "An Enrich- 
ment Program in Home Economics: A Team Approach to Learning,," Permit 
me to say this is but one small portion of the entire project. 

In addition, we are directly involved with the Nev; England Association 
for Supervision and Curriculum Development Educational Policies Com - 
mission Research Project , " Factors Which Facilitate and Inhibit Change 
in Institutions. " Thus far, the research has been carried on at the 
University of Connecticut. It will extend geographically into each of 
the remaining New England States. 

Finally, we are currently engaged in a dialogue with the Amherst Public 
Schools. We expect to engage in a research project of mutual concern 
commencing September 1967. 

Other Professional Activities 

The department has participated in a number of professional meetings at 
the state, regional and national levels; frankly too numerous to men- 
tion. Of particular importance was, perhaps, the Annual Spring Meet- 
ing of the Massachusetts Home Economics Association where Miss Vaznaian 



served as key speaker. 
Major Accomplishments 

1. Complete revision of the Undergraduate Program in Home Economics 
Education. 

In the new program, credit requirements in general education have 
been extended from 55 to a minimum of 67, with a possible poten- 
tial of 73. Of this number, 55 credits are in specified course 
work; 12-15 in elective course work. Opportunities for a semester 
of study at the Merrill-Palmer Institute in Detroit, Mich., or 
for combining Journalism vjith Home Economics Education, add signi- 
ficant and essential dimension to our program. 

2. Reorganization of three courses ; namely, 

HEEd. 388, Problems in Home Economics Education 

HEEd. 391, Seminar in Home Economics Education 

Edu. 38 5, Observation and Student Teaching in Home Economics 

3 . Initial reassessment of the graduate program in Home Economics 
Education. 

There can be no doubt that a major undertaking for the current 
fiscal year, as well as for the next, is and vjill continue to be 
the total reorganization of our graduate program in Home Economics 
Education. This undertaking is currently in the initial stages of 
critical analysis. It will necessitate the cooperative and colla- 
borative efforts of all department heads if we are to achieve a 
program of excellence. 

Special Projects 

1. A pilot program with intent to develop a more meaningful and 

challenging program in Student Internship was introduced at the 
John W. Weeks Junior High School, Newton. The pilot program in- 
volved several phases: a) Orientation of cooperating teachers; 
b) Procedural expectations; c) Development of observational/ev-^l na- 
tional instruments; d) Supervision redefined; e) Two-hour seminar 
sessions held weekly with all students currently involved in the 
internship program. The nature of the results reassure the di- 
rection our student internship program will take; i.e., the signi- 
ficance and need of necessary changes . 

In conjunection with our findings, Mrs. Sullivan has been survey- 
ing schools in the state of Massachusetts which will more ade- 
quately meet our needs . 






I 



A one-day institute was organized (Ford Foundation) for five 
cooperating communities in Bennington, Vt. A variety of ma- 
terials and methods were explored in the development of wage- 
earning programs applicable to meeting the needs, interests 
and abilities of the students and communities. The institute 
was under the direction of Helen Vaznaian. 



Submitted by 
Helen R. Vaznaian 



FOOD AND NUTRITION 
DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 19 6 5-19 66 ACADEMIC YEAR. 



Accomplishments 



Dr. Mark H. Bert joined the Food and Nutrition in De- 
cember 19 65. Dr. Bert was appointed to membership on 
the Graduate Faculty of the University of Massachu- 
setts. Appointed to serve on the Health Council of 
the University of Massachusetts, by the Faculty Senate 
Committee on Committees . 



A request was made to the Graduate School to divide 
Food and Nutrition course 704, Advanced Nutrition - 
Vitamins and Minerals, into two courses. The request 
was approved. Therefore, in the future. Food and Nu- 
trition will offer course TOU, Advanced Nutrition - 
Vitamins and FN 70 5, Advanced Nutrition - Minerals. 



All members of the Food and Nutrition staff have parti- 
cipated in the preparation of a request to grant the 
Master's degree and the Ph. D. degree in a graduate 
department of Nutrition and Food. Discussions and pre- 
paration of this application have been taking place 
during the past two years. The application has been ap- 
proved by the appropriate University committees and the 
several administrators concerned with this application. 



Submitted by 
Elwood F. Reber 



HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION 
DEPARTMENTAL REPORT 19 6 5-1966 ACADEMIC YEAR 



The emphasis during the year has been to involve adults, profess- 
ional and lay, in experiences of exploring ideas through study and 
discussion. Problems which adults and a community of adults face 
have been the focus of the seminars, workshops, conferences and 
in-service training sessions. The staff has developed areas for 
teaching and has answered requests of groups for certain topics. 

Lay participants have been from middle income and low income. The 
low income audience has grown during the year due to the Division's 
becoming more involved with projects over the state under the Econo- 
mic Opportunity Act. 

The largest group of professionals have been teachers, followed by 
social and welfare workers . In-service training was provided for 
the Extension field staff, county Extension Home Economists and 4--H 
agents. 

Major Accomplishments 

The Division staff has taught or organized just under 50 different 
opportunities for citizens to have an in-depth learning experience 
of from tvjo to ten sessions. The total attendance has been under 
2000. 

During 1965-66, the Division initiated four on-campus seminars, tv;o 
at Amherst, and two at Boston. The two different topics were: 

Attendance 
Amherst Boston 
"American Adolescent in the Mid-Sixties" 67 59 

"Consumer and the Economy" 3 9 7 5 

(The attendance was too large at all sessions to be a true seminar - 
rather a lecture-discussion series.) 

Each seminar met five evenings for two hours . A breakdown of en- 
rollees in the "American Adolescent" included: secondary school 
teachers, county Extension staff, youth leaders, guidance council- 
lors, doctors, clergy, social workers, dietitians, nurses, religi- 
ous education leaders, and business men. "Consumer in the Economy" 
included: secondary school teachers, county Extension staff, gradu- 
ate students, credit union personnel, editor, civil engineer, secre- 
tary, auto service manager, legislature observer, consumer consult- 
ant, consumer research personnel, home guidance specialist (poverty 
program), and cooperative director. 



"Whereas I am also a registered nurse I have had previous 
courses in Psychology but have never enjoyed the subject 
matter as fully as in this course. Previous courses in 
Psychology have primarily dealt with the adult and I found 
this to be very dull. With a good basic understanding of 
child behavior and complications, as presented in this 
course, I maintained a high degree of interest. Found 
this course to be of great value to me at work in under- 
standing the thinking and acting of this age group (stu- 
dents have even remarked to me how much more understanding 
I am of them since taking this course)." 

Paul E. Aldrich 

Barber School Instructor 

"This has been a very stimulating session for me, and my 
first exposure to the Consumer Economic Courses. Al- 
though I stress consumer buying and money management in my 
courses, I am convinced that it has been a result of my 
own experiences. The bibliography and outline of areas 
will help for self study. More information on the market 
structure vjould probably give a clearer understanding of 
the area . " 

Mrs. Joan Leach, Teacher 

The Division expects to continue offering non-credit professional im- 
provement seminars and workshops on both campuses. Those attending 
in 1965-66 are requesting more on the same subjects, plus requests 
for different areas of subject matter. 

The Economic Opportunity Act has re-introduced into our society with 
nevj emphasis a concept that lay persons can be trained to carry a 
helping-teaching role. One important role the new program has in- 
troduced is the Home Management Aide (a sub-professional). The 
homemaker is selected from the neighborhood, trained and then 
given certain families to assist. The Division has trained five 
professionals to act as Home Management Trainers, and has contri- 
buted to the training of 110 Home Management Aides in South End and 
Roxbury , Boston and in Springfield. The Aides have been selected 
from the Welfare rolls and at the time of selection were neither 
working nor attending any type of learning activity. In the first 
class of 23, graduated in Springfield, six are not on part time or 
full time employment and are no longer on welfare. 

The traditional Extension program, for middle income has continued, 
for which the Division staff trained over 900 leaders to teach an 
area of subject matter in the 250 homemaker groups in the state. 
Over 200 adult leaders were trained to teach in the 4-H county 
programs. Forty-eight telecasts were made by the Division staff 
over VJHDH-TV, Boston, on topics of Consumer Education and Human 
Relations . 



The Division has assisted the twelve county Homemaker Councils to 
carry out their role as advisory to the county program in Home and 
Family Life. The Division staff is often requested as a lecturer 
or speaker, which is considered by the University as public service. 
The staff gave sixty-two days to this in the past year. 

In 1965-19 66 a start was made on a long time study by the State 
Homemakers' Council on State and County Government, with the Divi- 
sion Head as advisor and coordinator of the study, which has included 
two days of program and two tours to the State House. 

A second new program for the Council is a study which is to continue 
over tvjo years on Latin America. A two-day workshop was held at the 
University, Amherst in October 1965. A second v.'ill be held in the 
fall of 1966. 

The State Commission on Aging and the Extension Division of Home 
Economics have started a cooperative program of leader training for 
the senior citizen groups in the state, of v;hich there are several 
hundred. The training will include both techniques of leadership and 
subject matter. The first effort v/as one day of training for the 
officers of groups in Worcester County. 

The Division is a small group of faculty offering a program of adult 
education to the citizens of the state. The hope of the University 
is to greatly increase the faculty and facilities for Continuing 
Education. There is no lack of interest by professionals and lay 
in "returning to school" for non-credit and credit courses. Beyond 
this declared interest there are deep needs in the society in which 
the University should become involved. One vast area of need ai'-e 
the problems of urbanization. A university located in a small town 
is perhaps not as aware of the problems of complexity and needs for 
massive resources as one located in a city. 

If the urban State of Massachusetts is the campus, then the sooner 
we are permitted to have more resources for Continuing Education the 
better. 



Submitted by 
Winifred I. East\'70od 



VI. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS 



Request for Departmentalization 

On May 16, 1966, the School of Home Economics presented to the 
Provost a request for departmentalization. The Executive Council 
of the School and the faculty worked on this through the entire 
year;' This request is now ready for the next step in the proce- 
dural process. Eventually this will go to the Board of Trustees. 
The request for departmentalization dates back to November 2, 1964. 
However, preparing the presentation for the request has taken a 
great deal of time, thought and effort on the part of the School 
faculty. It is our hope this request can be acted upon during 
fall 19 66 by the Board of Trustees. 

New Five-Year Developmental Plans 

As part of the presentation of the request for departmentalization, 
each area of subject matter re-evaluated their Five Year Develop- 
mental Plans and revised them in light of the developments which 
have already taken place. Thus we have new plans which are current. 
Each subject matter area (department) has short range and long 
range plans for development. Some areas are in the beginning stages 
of development while others are much more sophisticated in their 
development due to the fact that they have larger staffs and have 
been established for a longer period of time. These plans are pre- 
sented in Appendix A. 

New Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures 
o f the School of Home Economics 

The Executive Council of the School of Home Economics developed a 
new Faculty Manual of Policies and Procedures for the School of 
Home Economics . This was presented to the faculty at the Septemb er 
faculty meetings which were held before registration day. Various 
committees worked on this and evolved policies and procedures for 
the numerous activities that go on within the School. In some in- 
stances, new policies and procedures were developed; in others, the 
standing ones were updated. This manual acted as a tool this past 
year for more efficient operation of the School. 



- 12 - 



Recruitment Activities 

Certain activities took place which were concerned with recruit- 
ment of candidates and certain other activities v;ere performed 
pertaining to admissions. One person worked on this for about 
one-third of her time, thus the accomplishments in this area were 
somewhat limited. There is a real need for greater activity in 
recruitment. We are getting better students applying and more 
students applying, but the attrition rate as of June 1966 was 
nearly 50%. There is some evidence that removing the curfew for 
women and the negative reaction to "YA-HOO" had something to do 
with this higher rate of attrition. VJe need to investigate this 
situation and see what is really going on which is effecting this. 

The report of recruitment and admissions is to be found in Ap- 
pendix B. Perusal of this will give a clear picture of what acti- 
vities have been carried on in the past year relative to recruit- 
ment and admissions. Data is also presented to verify our status 
in relation to the current enrollment situation. 



- 13 - 



VII. SPECIAL PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS 



Improvement of present Faculty . 

There remains the problem in the School of rehabilitating cer- 
tain faculty members who have been here a long time and who 
have tenure. Various activities have been carried out in order 
to improve this situation. They are as follows: 

In the continued striving for improvement, faculty members have - 

1. Submitted outlines of their course offerings to depart- 
ment chairmen and the Dean of the School of Home Econo- 
mics. The outlines include information relevant to con- 
tent, teaching methods, resources, and bibliography. Op- 
portunities for sharing information about course content 
in various subject matter areas have been provided. 

2. Conducted evaluations of their courses at the end of the 
semester . 

3. Participated in conferences with the department chairmen 
and/or Dean relative to professional development. 

U. Continued graduate and post-graduate education. 

5. Participated in a one-week workshop on Team Teaching under 
the direction of Dr. Henry Olds, Harvard University. 

6. Participated in a one-semester Seminar on Curriculum under 
the direction of Professor Helen Vaznaian. 

Despite these efforts , very little progress has been made in several 
cases . The poorest teacher among the faculty persists in saying ~ 
that she is an excellent teacher and there is no need for her to 
take further course work or study in her subject matter area. 
Others who need to improve are more openminded about this type of 
improvement. Assignments for poor teachers will have to be care- 
fully worked out so that the courses are not impaired by their poor 
teaching. These faculty members will have to be assigned to lower 
level courses and will have to have other work assignments to make 
up a fulltime work load. 

Reassignment of Personnel's Duties . 

There has been a reassignment of responsibilities within the pre- 
sent staff for more effective performance in teaching, extension 
and research. The assignment of two-thirds of the extension fa- 

- m - 



I 



I 



culty to parttime resident teaching is of particular signifi- 
cance. Secretaries in the School have been reassigned for per- 
forming more effectively within the total operation of the School, 
However, there remains a great shortage of clerical help to sup- 
port the development of the departments and the research activi- 
ties. This is hampering the growth of the departments and the 
School . 

New Head Start Training Program 

The Human Development Department presented a proposal for a Head 
Start Training Program. A grant of $8,250 was received from the 
Office of Economic Opportunity to operate this program from 
June 23 to July 2nd. This is the first time we have engaged in 
this type of effort and is a credit to Dr. A. Raymond Cellura's 
leadership. 



I 



15 - 



VIII. FUTURE PLANS AND NEEDS 



Need for New Personnel and Sufficient 
Rank and Salary to Attract Same. 

It is not only necessary to secure new positions for the School 
but also vital to have sufficient rank and salaries to attract 
people to our faculty. Each department is developing and expand- 
ing at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and with in- 
creased enrollment in courses and a growing number of student 
majors in the School, it will be necessary to have new positions 
for the coming year. The market in home economics is so tight 
that we have greatly increased our recruitment activities to try 
to secure qualified people. One of our major problems is the 
fact that we have several faculty who are very poor teachers and 
who downgrade the program by their incompentencies . We must, 
therefore, have adequate staff to overcome this handicap. We 
need to bring in more good people to raise the caliber of our 
course work. 

The School is in a critical stage of its development. We have 
lost bright young undergraduate women this past year because our 
course work was not challenging enough. They transferred out of 
the School of Home Economics. We must bring in good teachers to 
counteract this situation. 

Needs of Departments for New Programs 

The departments evolved descriptive analyses of their plans for 
new programs and policies for next year and the ensuing years. 
These are to be found in Appendix C. 

New Laboratories 

The School of Home Economics has requested monies for renovations 
for 1966-67. These include such things as fluorescent lighting in 
three rooms, blackout shades which will permit the viewing of 
films and projections in three rooms; the installation of corkboard 
on portable screens; and the renovation of two rooms into offices. 
In addition to this, it will be necessary to have available for 
September 1966, a Home Economics Education Laboratory and a Home 
Management Laboratory. 

If the Homestead is available next year for our use, we need approxi- 
mately $2,000 worth of classroom furniture in order to make the 
Home Economics Education laboratory adequate as a teaching labora- 
tory. 



- 16 - 



If the Homestead is not available for these two teaching labora- 
tories next year, September 19 67, then two alternative plans are 
proposed which will require renovations: 

Plan A . 

It would be necessary to obtain two large rooms outside Skinner 
Hall that would be suitable for a Home Economics Education Labora - 
tory and a Home Management Laboratory . To renovate a room for 
the Home Economics Education Laboratory would require sectioning 
the room for reading materials and for viewing of audio-visual 
material. This renovation, plus the necessary laboratory and 
classroom equipment, would come to approximately $8,000. 

A second large room would be needed for the Home Management Labora - 
tory . This would require special wiring for large and small elec- 
trical equipment; it would also require water installed in sink 
cabinets- Laboratory and classroom furniture, as well as equipment, 
would also be needed for this room. This would cost close to 
$9,000 to renovate and furnish. 

This would total $17,000 for renovating two laboratories outside 
of Skinner Hall. 

Plan B. 



It would be necessary to find additional animal laboratory space 
for the experiments of Dr. Lojkin, Dr. Bert and Dr. Reber over 
and above that space which Dr. Reber will be getting in Morrill 
Hall. Such additional space would have to have facilities of water, 
controlled heat and air, and garbage disposal. Renovations for a 
new animal laboratory would be approximately $3,000. 

Then Room 17, vjhich is now being used as an animal room, could be 
•^"•^.-ca into a Home Management Laboratory . It already has water 
ci/ailable and suitable electrical wiring could be tapped from 
available sources in the building. The cost of renovating and 
equipping Room 17 into a Home Management Laboratory would be about 
$8,000. 

In order to have a Home Economics Education Laboratory in the build- 
ing, it would be necessary to convert the auditorium for this pur- 
pose. This would mean renovating the auditorium into a multi- 
purpose room for Home Economics Education class work. This would 
entail dividing the room into sections for various purposes and 
equipping the facilities x^/ith classroom furniture and equipment. 
This would probably cost around $9,000. 

For renovating a new animal room, the auditorium, and Room 17, the 
cost would be approximately $20,000. 

- 17 - 



In summary , it is requested that the amount of $4,0 50 for items 
one through five, be appropriated to the School of Home Economics 
as of ^Jluly^-i, -ISS-fr. ' 

I n addition , if the Homestead is not available next year, the sum 
-o"f $17,000 is requested for Plan A, or the sum of $ 20,000 is re- 
quested for Plan B. 

Finally, the total amount requested is either $4,050 or $19,0 50- 
$22,050, depending on the availability of Home Management and 
Home Economics Education laboratories for September. 

New Addition to Skinner Hall 

Planning money is requested in the year 19 68 for an addition to 
Skinner Hall , or new building , to accommodate increased enrollment 
of majors and students in classes along with the expansion and de- 
velopment of each of the five subject matter departments in all 
teaching, extension and research activities. 

In order that each department can expand and develop in the three 
functional aspects of their work -- teaching, research and exten- 
sion — it will be necessary to have an addition to Skinner Hall 
by 1970. 

We are now at the stage where we have to move out of Skinner Hall 
into other facilities in order to take care of the development and 
expansion of the Human Development subject matter area. This in- 
cludes office space for new and present faculty members and gradu- 
ate assistants, laboratory rooms for research, and a seminar room 
for graduate work. In Food and Nutrition, the animal research work 
mu'^t be moved into facilities outside Skinner Hall. This has yet 
to be accomplished. 

At this time vje do not have adequate space for graduate assistants 
and students in the other departments , or enough faculty offices 
for staff coming in September 1966; we do not have adequate facili- 
ties for the necessary teaching laboratories that are needed for 
supporting our course work. This is the situation facing us as of 
September 1966. 

We expect increased enrollment as follows: 

As of September 1966: 

Class of 1967 - 53 

Class of 1968 - 95 

Class of 1969 - 101 

Class of 1970 - 125 

Total 374 
- 18 - 



10% increase based on September 1966 figures: 

Fall 1967 - 1+11 

Fall 1968 - H52 

Fall 1969 - 497 

Fall 1970 - 546 

We expect the trend to continue of greater demand for our cur- 
rent courses by the present students. This will increase the 
number of sections of classes and will require additional la- 
boratory space. 

With the initiation of new policies and programs in each of the 
five subject matter departments, we will need additional facili- 
ties for specialized teaching laboratories, offices, seminar 
rooms, research work areas, teaching classrooms, and regular 
classrooms . 



Continuing Education 

There is a real need to provide graduate courses in Home Econo- 
mics off campus, preferrably on the Boston campus. The Willis 
Report has recommended that teachers in secondary education ac- 
quire a master's degree. We should be providing this type of 
educational opportunity to home economics secondary school 
teachers . 

To offer more extensive graduate work, we should offer, beginning 
1967, graduate courses on the Boston campus. These courses 
would be for graduate credit and would be transf errable for a de- 
gree which would be awarded on the Amherst campus. 

Additional courses should be given for the improvement of secon- 
dary school teachers in home economics. These courses could be 
taken for credit but not necessarily toward a degree. These also 
would be offered on the Boston campus. We should provide leader- 
ship in the state for home economics on the higher education 
level. We have barely begun to do this. There is an urgent 
need to improve teachers already in service and to provide mas- 
ter's degree work so that secondary school teachers in home 
economics can obtain a master's degree from the University. Non- 
credit extension seminars, workshops and courses should be expand- 
ed to meet the needs and demands that are constantly being made 
by the people of the state of Massachusetts. 

We have been hampered in our initiating of this endeavor due to 
lack of staff, lack of course work and programs to meet these 
needs and demands . 



- 19 - 



Critical Need for Additional Clerical Assistance 

The situation of support staff for the departments is extremely 
critical . We do not have sufficient clerical help to write up 
proposals for research grants, to prepare materials for course 
work, to help in the development of the departments, and to 
carry on the operational and administrative activities of the 
departments and School. All the secretaries in the School of 
Home Economics have been realigned as to their work assignments 
for greater efficiency but this has not relieved the shortage 
of help. We must have additional positions for secretaries to 
help us carry on our work. We are not able to function effect- 
ively under the present setup. 



6/23/66:m - 20 - 



APPENDIX A. 



FOOD AND NUTRITION 

DESCRIPTION : 

Food and Nutrition encompasses subject matter concerned with 
man's use of food and its relationship to his total health 
and well being. 

PURPOSE: 



The purpose is to explore the relationships of the principles 
and theories of the physical and biological sciences to Food 
and Nutrition. Economics, sociologic, and psychologic fac- 
tors are included. 

OBJECTIVES : 

1. To provide students with the basic courses for careers 
in Food and Nutrition. 

2. To service other Schools and Departments in the Univer- 
sity with Food and Nutrition courses required in their 
curricula . 

3. To provide professionals and non-professionals with 
opportunities for continuing education. 

U. To evaluate on a continuing basis the course offerings 
and methods of teaching in terms of changing needs. 

5. To expand the graduate program. 

6. To expand the research program. 

7. To promote the recognition of the need for a basic 
course in Nutrition for all students in the University. 

Five-Year Projections for Food S Nutrition 
UNDERGRADUATE 

The undergraduate major will be in Food and Nutrition. Curricula 
will be designed to provide the student with a liberal education 
and professional competency. A curriculum is available for a major 
in Food and Nutrition who would desire to enter Graduate School. A 
major could fulfill the Home Economics Education requirements for 



for teaching in secondary schools. There is a growing demand 
for graduates with specialized preparation in fields of con- 
centration. Two examples of such specialized fields of con- 
centration are presently offered under the program leading to 
the B.S. degree in Home Economics. They are Foods in Business 
and Dietetics and Institutional Administration. 

Dietetics and Institutional Administration - The present curri- 
culum in this major provides the academic requirements estab- 
lished by the American Dietetic Association for the fifth year 
Student Dietetic Internship or a Master's program. The acute 
shortage of dietitians and nutritionists for positions as ad- 
ministrators, teachers, and research, therapeutic, and clinic 
dietitians highlights the need for a continued emphasis of the 
curriculum. An expansion of this major field viill be designed to 
meet the demand for professional administrators of school food 
services . 

Food in Business - The existing curriculum in this major prepares 
the students for positions dealing with product promotion, recipe 
and food testing, and public utility service. For those inter- 
ested in research and product development, a program with a high 
science requirement is available. Students who have the inter- 
est and aptitude for employment in the communication field may 
select a program with emphasis on oral, visual, and written com- 
munications. Positions are open in the field of communications 
for the student who combines her knowledge of Food and Nutrition 
with Journalism, English, Public Speaking, Television and Radio. 
Graduates with a major in this sequence are also placed in adver- 
tising and public relations agencies or with consulting firms. 
Future plans include the use of closed circuit television for 
training in this communications media. For example, food adver- 
tising on color television is a very big commercial operation. 

Projections include the development of undergraduate field of 
specialty in Nutrition - A program entitled "Curriculum in Nutri- 
tion" has been proposed by the American Institute of Nutrition 
v;orking on graduate and undergraduate programs. It is planned to 
use their proposal as a basis for developing our undergraduate 
program. In the undergraduate program. Nutrition and Food Science 
courses account for six units only. It is in the graduate program 
that the individual specializes. A significant number of courses 
in Food and Nutrition are available now which would enable us to 
offer an undergraduate and graduate education in the field of nu- 
trition. 

There is no nutrition laboratory course available either at the 
undergraduate or the graduate level for students specializing in 
Food and Nutrition in the School of Home Economics. The develop- 
ment of such a laboratory course is planned. In this course vie 
would hope to expose the students to some laboratory experiments 



the students to some laboratory experiments involving radioiso- 
topes. The equipment needed for this type of experimental work 
is expensive and extensive. The amount of equipment needed for 
teaching such a laboratory projected over the next five years 
would probably cost about $50,000. It is planned to prepare a 
request for an equipment grant from National Science Foundation 
or the Atomic Energy Commission to help purchase the needed la- 
boratory equipment. It will be necessary for the subject matter 
area to add to present offerings such courses as the Chemistry 
and Physics of Food Preparation, Research Methods in Food and 
Nutrition, Nutrition for Community Services, Food Purchasing and 
Management, Institutional Food and Equipment Purchasing, and 
School Food Service Administration. 

GRADUATE 

Development of graduate department of Food and Nutrition - When 
the present area chairman accepted the position in this institu- 
tion, the administration supported and encouraged him to direct an 
expansion of the present research in Food and Nutrition and to 
develop a Master's and Doctoral degree program. Departmentaliza- 
tion at the undergraduate level would facilitate the development 
of the graduate department. We must departmentalize to enable us 
to give advanced degrees in specific disciplines. The specific 
discipline in this case is Food and Nutrition. Therefore, our 
graduate curriculum must be entitled, "Food and Nutrition." A 
program leading to M.S. and Ph.D. degree program in Food and Nutri- 
tion has been approved by the appropriate committees in the School 
of Home Economics. 

The most important projection during the next year is the develop- 
ment of the Ph.D. graduate program. At the present time the pro- 
posal is being discussed within the administration. Clarifica- 
tion of our position will enable us to proceed with budgetary re- 
quests. It would be anticipated that we could have added to our 
available assistantships one research or service assistantship each 
year. 

RESEARCH 

Experiment Station projects in Food and Nutrition v;ere closed at 
the end of the 1962-63 fiscal year. New projects are under way. At 
the present time, there is a project supported by the National In- 
stitute of Health on the utilization of tryptophan during pregnancy, 
and a study supported by a Faculty Research grant on the elimina- 
tion of off-flavors and the retention of moisture in the reheating 
of cooked meat. A Faculty Research grant has been approved to study 
the protein quality of irradiated marine products. A Faculty Research 
grant has been approved to study processing methods to improve the 



quality of algae. An Atomic Energy Commission contract has 
been in effect for two years to determine the wholesomeness of 
irradiation pasteurized clams. An Office of Surgeon General Con- 
tract has been in effect for two years to support the compila- 
tion of an annotated bibliography on the wholesomeness of irra- 
diated foods. Recently a grant has been awarded by the Bureau 
of Fisheries to determine the effect of radiation on the odor, 
flavor, and taste of fish. 

However, additional grants for projects in Food, Nutrition, and 
Institutional Administration are needed to develop an active and 
adequate research program in each of these fields. 

The future research program will depend primarily on the interest 
and background of the subject matter area personnel. In each of 
the fields within the area there is a vast variety of challenging 
problems to be solved. Projects will be submitted for financial 
support from several agencies as research personnel becomes 
available. An expanding research program vjill require additional 
space and facilities. 

EXTENSION 

The purpose of the Extension program in Food, Nutrition, and Health 
is to help bridge the gap between man's knowledge in these areas, 
and the individual's application of this knowledge. In fulfilling 
this purpose, emphasis is placed on educational programs concerned 
with the following problem areas: 

1. The need for better understanding concerning nutri- 
tion, and its relationship to total health and well 
being . 

2. Understanding of nutritional needs throughout the 
life cycle. 

3. Understanding of the factors influencing food prac- 
tices and habits. 

"4. The concept of weight conti-^ol . 

5. Increasing understanding of food values and food 
composition . 

6. Increasing understanding of food production, market- 
ing and services and their economic effect on the 
consumer . 

7. Safety of food (including the role of regulatory 
agencies) . 

8. Medical quackery (including nutrition). 

9. Emergency preparedness. 

10. The interpretation of research. 



HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

DESCRIPTION ; 

The program in Human Development is concerned with the 
study of substantive and methodological problems related 
to the analysis of stability and chance of human charac- 
teristics over the life cycle. 

PURPOSE: 

The program in Human Development is intended to provide an 
organizational setting in which: 

a) social and biological scientists may focus the 
analytic povjer of their disciplines upon develop- 
mental phenomena 

b) students interested primarily in the study of sta- 
bility and change in human characteristics over 

time may acquire the competencies required to analyze 
these phenomena 

c) techniques may be developed that are specially suited 
to facilitate the study of developmental phenomena 

d) the units of analysis generally associated with a par- 
ticular discipline may be organized into a unified 
science of human development. 

STAFF : 

The Human Development faculty V7ill have representatives from 
the social and biological sciences whose interests are in 
human development. Among the disciplines to be included are: 

1. Early Childhood Education 

2 . Developmental Psychology 

3. Social Psychology (with Psychology or Sociology as 

root disciplines) 
U. Cultural Anthropology 

5. Physical Anthropology 

6. Pediatrics 

7 . Gerontology 

THE UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAM : 

The focal point of the undergraduate program continues to be in 
Child Development. The Child Development program provides the stu- 
dent with the theoretical, empirical and philosophical background 



necessary for work v/ith preschool age children in nursery schools, 
clinics for exceptional children, hospital recreation programs 
and community welfare agencies. In addition, the program provides 
preparation for graduate training in education, psychology, social 
vjork and sociology. 

The major emphasis of the undergraduate program in Child Develop- 
ment is in liberal arts or general education. Students also re- 
ceive an introduction to the areas of study in Home Economics, a 
concentration of courses related to Child Development in the social 
sciences and specialized courses in early childhood education. 

GRADUATE PROGRAM 

Currently, an M.S. is offered in the Human Development area. How- 
ever, a program leading to the Ph.D. in Human Development is re- 
quired. The purpose of the graduate program is to increase the 
opportunities for specialization in the study of developmental pheno- 
mena. Interests may range from, the study of psycho-physiological 
growth phenomena to systems analysis in contemporary social institu- 
tions. The program will emphasize theoretical and empirical experi- 
ence in three areas of human development: 

1. Psychological development 

2. Socio-cultural development 

3. Political-economic development 

Doctoral candidates will be accepted to specialize in one of the 
three areas, but will also be expected to acquire theoretical and 
empirical experience in the other two. The curriculum will be or- 
ganized to: a) place emphasis throughout the training period on 
the development of research and teaching competencies in the stu- 
dent's area of specialization, and b) to provide a milieu in which 
the student becomes familiar with the rationale, concepts and tech- 
niques which characterize the activities of social scientists in 
related disciplines. Essentially, the program would involve course 
work in the areas of theory, process and methodology relevant to 
the study of developmental phenomena. 

RESEARCH 

Research activities will be in general focus on developmental pheno- 
mena that reflect the differing interests of department members. 
Research programs currently in progress include: 

A social learning approach to the analysis of aca- 
demic achievement behaviors. 

An analysis of social class value systems. 

The relationship between maternal style and cognitive 
development of the child. 



COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAM 

The major responsibility of the program in Human Development is 
to the undergraduate and graduate education of our students. How- 
ever, the department shares with the University as a whole, strong 
and valuable traditions binding its intellectual resources to com- 
munity needs . 

The function of these community service programs in Human Develop- 
ment is : 

a) to facilitate the flow of ideas to the community 

b) to provide translations of these ideas wherever 
feasible into sound practices, and 

c) to derive from the crucible of community experience 
ideas which can be translated into the research and 
teaching activities of the University. 

EXTENSION PROGRAM 

The Extension Program in Human Development represents an important 
formal link with the community. Through programs designed to provide 
continuing education for adults and young people, each of the func- 
tions noted above are manifest in a way that underscores the Univer- 
sity's commitment to community service. 



* 



HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



DESCRIPTION : 

Home Economics Education is an area of study encompassing back- 
ground knowledge from the subject matter fields of home economics 
integrated with specialized procedures and philosophy from educa- 
tion. 

PURPOSE: 



The program in Home Economics Education is intended to provide 
professional education for future teachers of home economics in 
secondary and post secondary schools, and for the Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service. Opportunities for the continuous education of 
those already in the profession or for those returning to the pro- 
fession will be made. In addition, responsibility for the leader- 
ship in the development of Home Economics Education programs vjhich 
are dynamically responsive to the times v/ill be assumed. 

OBJECTIVES ; 

1. To provide undergraduate majors of the School with special- 
ized instruction as preparation for professional careers in 
secondary education and extension. The program of study will 
include the major subject matter areas of human development, 
and textiles, clothing and environmental arts. 

2. To provide professional home economists with opportunities 
for continuous education by offering in-service training pro- 
grams, late afternoon, evening and/or Saturday classes, and 
by providing individualized programs of study for those wom.en 
returning to the profession after a period of absence. 

3. To develop and expand the graduate program to meet the grow- 
ing demands and needs within the state. 

4. To develop a research program with cooperating disciplines 
and with cooperating agencies at the local, state and national 
levels . 

5. To provide leadership within the state for the development of 
a viable program of Home Economics Education at the secondary 
school level. 



UNDERGRADUATE 

The undergraduate program in Home Economics Education continues 
to combine liberal arts course work with professional prepara- 
tion. The nature of the course v-jork focuses upon the develop- 
ment of insight and understanding of human growth and develop- 
ment, knowledge and skills essential to interpersonal relation- 
ships, competencies in the management of individual and family 
resources, as well as knowledge essential to basic competencies 
in the fields of foods and nutrition, and textiles, clothing and 
environmental arts. 

A significant increase in enrollment is expected to occur in the 
department of Home Economics Education due to the unprecedented 
focus upon the significant contribution that teachers of Home Eco- 
nomics at the secondary school level can make in creating meaning- 
ful programs of education for homemaking, for occupational employ- 
"ment, and towards specialized programs (team approach) for the dis- 
advantaged. Federal Aid Programs — The Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965, the Urban and Rural Comn^unity Action Pro- 
grams Title II, Pt. A, the Vocational Education Act of 19 63, the 
Work-Study Program, Sec. 13 — will prove highly supportive in the 
implementation of innovative and imaginative programs of home eco- 
nomics at the secondary school level. 

It perhaps is worthy to note that our present enrollment has tripled 

within one year. Based upon this and the aforementioned reasons, 

it seems reasonable to assume our enrollment will double within the 
next five years. 

The Department of Home Economics Education expects: 

1. to revise undergraduate curriculuni in order that it be 
more dynamically responsive to the times. This will 
necessitate the introduction of new courses, the re- 
vision of some, and the elimination of others. 

2. to provide optional expanding experiences — an affi- 
liation with the Merrill-Palmer Institute, Mich.; 
directed field experiences with extension, community 
social agencies, and/or with specialized programs such 
as "Upward Bound." 

3. to evaluate and introduce significant changes in the 
student internship program in cooperation with several 
school systems within Massachusetts. 

4. to initiate a pilot or demonstration program in Home 
Economics Education at the Secondary School level with 
one or more cooperating school systems. 



GRADUATE 

The Willis' Report can be expected to have a significant impact 

upon the expansion of our graduate program at the Master's Level. 

The next five years are crucial to the establishment of a viable 
program. 

It is expected that: 

1. An increase in Consultant Services vjill occur as School 
systems expand existing programs in Homemaking and ini- 
tiate programs in occupational wage-earning aspects of 
Home Economics Education. 

2. An increase in in-service workshops for teachers of Home 
Economics Education will occur in centers for learning 
throughout the state of Massachusetts . 

3. An increase in innovative interdisciplinary joing demon- 
stration and/or pilot projects will occur: 

a) within the School of Home Economics at the 
University of Massachusetts 

b) with selected and/or cooperating schools 
throughout Massachusetts 

c) with industry related to occupational skills 
and knowledge gained through Home Economics 
Education 

4. New courses will be introduced to meet the educational needs 
of teachers pursuing graduate work. 

Imperative to the growth of the graduate program is the addition of 
professional and support staff. We expect that the present pro- 
fessional staff will quadruple within five years. Expansion de- 
mands cannot be met unless there is adequate support staff. 

RESEARCH 

Research facilities and personnel with experience and time to devote 
to research are not presently available in this area. Any contribu- 
tion to the improvement of educational programs in home economics 
at both the college and high school level is dependent upon evidence 
obtained by individuals and groups carrying on various types of 
studies. Maximum value from these efforts will be derived only 
when conclusions and techniques find their way into classrooms and 



i 



serve as stimuli for changed practices and continued study by 
those directly responsible for teaching. 

It is, therefore, the aim of this area to initiate, guide, and 
coordinate a long-range program of research involving graduate 
students in home economics education and secondary schools and 
teachers within the state. Responsibility for dissemination of 
findings thus obtained will rest upon this school. Able per- 
sonnel, experienced in research activities and guidance of 
graduate students, will be necessary additions to the staff. 






i 



MANAGEMENT AND FAMILY ECONOMICS 

DESCRIPTION : 

The area of management and family economics is concerned with achieve- 
ment of goals and mediation of values within the family. 

To the public, home management is often broadly conceived as being 
synonomous with homemaking. As a field of study, however, home manage- 
ment and family economics is relating, coordinating and integrating 
the various aspects of home economics and other disciplines through 
a knowledge and application of the concepts of decision-making and 
organization. 

PURPOSE : 

Through professional and liberal subjects, 

1. The education of 

a. Undergraduate students, both non major and in a proposed 

major 

b. Graduate students through advanced professional study in 

the area leading to a Master of Science Degree 

c. Professional and non-professional adults in the subject 

matter of the area 

2. The investigation of new and related bodies of knowledge through 
independent and/or cooperative research. 

Such an education should prepare individuals to do an effective pro- 
fessional job and to understand relationships of the subject matter 
to the economic and cultural structure of our society. 

OBJECTIVES : 

The objectives of the field are: 

1. To increase students' understanding of how a family performs 
its roles in society. 

2. To help students and families become aware and recognize re- 
sources available to families, as consumers and as social 
units. 

3. To prepare students to apply knowledge and understanding in 
the intelligent evaluation and informed choice of consumer 
products. 

U. To help families think objectively in the allocation of the 
family resources, economic and social, and in the measure- 
ment of the consequences of choices. 






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5. To provide students with an understanding of changes in the 

distribution system of their relationship to consumer economic 
behavior. 

Projections For Management and Family E conomics 

This projection is directed toward the development of a department with 
a more balanced education contribution to the profession of Home Economics. 
The various aspects of the program are designed to complement and support 
each other rather than compete. 

Undergraduate 

The Management and Family Economics offerings have served students in the 
various majors in Home Economics and other departments of the University. 
It is anticipated these offerings will continue as contributions to other 
majors. 

In addition, it is proposed that a major curriculum be instituted entitled 
Management and Family Economics. The purpose will be to provide an inte- 
grated course of study in Home Economics based on the social sciences as 
related to needs of families in providing for living amenities at various 
income levels. Students who choose this curriculum will be prepared to 
work with adult education, social, and welfare agencies as well as having 
a foundation for graduate work in this subject matter area. It is pro- 
posed this curriculum be established in 1967-68. It will be unique in 
Massachusetts, as no School of Home Economics in Massachusetts has either 
an undergraduate or graduate major in management and family economics. 

It will be necessary to revise and add courses to implement this curriculum. 
Additions to the faculty will be necessary as well as provisions for 
laboratory space. 

Gr aduate 

There exists a critical shortage of persons holding advanced degrees in 
Management and Family Economics and there is an increasing demand for 
persons with this education. The demand for graduates has always far 
exceeded the supply. Only a limited number of institutions have graduate 
programs in Home Management and Family Economics, particularly on the 
doctoral levels It is imperative that provisions be made for graduate 
work, although realistically it must be limited to the master's degree 
at the present. 

A graduate program leading to the master's degree will rely heavily on 
the supportive disciplines of economics, sociology, anthropology, social 
psychology and labor policy. 



Graduate students could concentrate in either of two fields: 

1. Home Management theory and its application 

2. Family Economics, with strong consumer economics orientation 

An expanded graduate program could more adequately serve the needs of the 
following: 

1. Degree candidates with an area of interest in management 
and family economics 

2. Degree candidates in other Home Economics areas of graduate 
emphasis (heavy potential is anticipated in Home Economics 
Education) 

3. Qualified non-degree students seeking refresher courses in 
this subject matter area 

Teaching staff and research facilities will be necessary to establish 

a graduate program in the area. These must be provided as soon as possible. 

Research 

Research in the area of Management and Family Economics has not kept pace 
with the demand, both from the public and the professional worker and need 
for increased knowledge in these areas. Three broad areas for investigation 
as envisioned now are: 

1. Theoretical studies to gain further knowledge about the process 
of management 

2. Consumer behavior in relation to allocation of resources 

3. Practical studies in the development of homemaking skills as a 
basis for determining both the content and teaching methods for 
the expanded vocational training program 

Research will develop with the graduate program. Staff added to the 
department will be selected partially on what contributions they can 
make to directing research activities of graduate students as well as 
engaging in research activities themselves. Plans are under way at the 
present to initiate regional cooperation in research in this subject 
matter area. In addition, scholarships, grants from foundations and 
graduate assistantships will be sought. 

Extension 

The purpose and objectives of the department are also the purpose and ob- 
jectives of the extension program in the department. However, as an off- 



campus program that is directed toward volunteer participants, the extension 
program is oriented to problem solving. Some of the problem areas that 
face Massachusetts families include: 

1. Identifying family values and defining goals that are con- 
sistent with these values 

2. Becoming aware of resources, and developing ability in 
choosing and utilizing them for maximum satisfactions 

3. Organizing and coordinating many activities of family 
members into a meaningful pattern 

M-, For some segments of our population, escaping from poverty 
to become full participants in our productive efforts and 
standards of living 

5. Obtaining clear, honest information in order to make informed 
choices 

6. Becoming informed about the economics areas and issues affect- 
ing the welfare of families 

The extension personnel will direct their efforts toward solving these 
problems to a varied audience in a variety of ways. While continuing to 
support county personnel by guiding and advising on county programs, more 
emphasis will be placed on developing programs with depth, using a team 
approach to problems, and introducing more formal methods of teaching 
to certain audiences. Extension personnel will teach their subject matter 
!:o other professional workers who are interested in family welfare, and 
v7ork with agencies and groups in developing educational opportunities 
for families. It is anticipated that more emphasis will be placed on 
-7orking with disadvantaged families of our society. 



* 



TEXTILES, CLOTHING AND ENVIRONMENTAL ARTS 

'.3CR IPTI0N : 

This is an area of study which encompasses subject matter in Textiles, 
Clothing and Environmental Arts. The term environmental arts is used 
here to include studies of art, interior design and fashion merchan- 
dising as they apply to textiles, clothing and the home. 

:. T lPGSE : 

Culture and professions are clearly interdependent in our society. 
Eased on this philosophy, the subject matter area of Textiles, Clothing 
and Environmental Art assumes as its purpose: 

1. the education of: 

a. undergraduate students majoring in Fashion Merchandising 
and Interior Design, through the study of liberal and 
professional subjects; 

b. non-major undergraduate students; 

c. graduate students through advanced professional study 
in the area leading to a Master of Science degree; 

d. Professional and non-professional adults in the subject 
matter of the area. 

2. the investigation of new and related bodies of knowledge through 
independent or cooperative research. 

: -icii a program of liberal education and specialized study is intended to 
■■'rimulate personal and professional growth; to further the understanding 
"f -Vc.^ subject matter as it relates to the economic and cultural structure 
' :: -^u".^ society; and to develop and motivate individual effectiveness in 
■ c:.-ving human wants and needs as related to the subject matter. 

P~ J ACTIVES: 

The area of Textiles, Clothing and Environmental Arts indicates that it 
aims to: 

A. Extend the frontiers of knowledge concerning textiles, clothing 
and the environmental arts. 

B. Contribute to liberal and professional education through the 
study of textiles, clothing and environmental arts. 



1 



C. Use the principles and theories from the natural sciences, 
the social sciences and the humanities in the study of 
textiles, clothing and environmental arts and explore the 
interdisciplinary relationships among these principles 
and theories. 

D. Develop appreciation of textiles, clothing and environ- 
mental arts as social and cultural media. 

E. Examine the economic significance of the production and 
distribution of textiles, clothing and home furnishings. 

F. Increase knowledge regarding the physical characteristics 
of textiles, clothing and home furnishings. 

G. Relate the social, cultural, physical and economic aspects 
of textiles, clothing and the environmental arts to the 
concepts of personal-family management. 

H. Further the understanding of the art, design and aesthetic 
aspects of textiles, clothing and home furnishings. 

PROJECTIONS FOR TEXTILES, CLOTHING AND ENVIRONMENTAL ARTS 

ACADEMIC 

Undergraduate 

""■^TS department will continue to develop its undergraduate program in the 
xollowing ways: 

Through the continuous re -evaluation of courses for content 
and method; 

Through the introduction of specific courses to further imple- 
ment and strengthen the existing Fashion Merchandising major; 

Through expansion of the Retail Field Program, thereby offer- 
ing students a broader, more diversified work experience as 
well as field experience in more specialized areas of interest; 

Through the introduction of a second major of study, entitled 
Interior Design. Additional teaching personnel, equipment and 
research facilities will be required to serve adequately the 
needs of students majoring in this new area; 

Through development of minor areas of study utilizing the faci- 
lities of the two major programs, servicing others interested 
in this subject matter area; 



• > ■ . MM 



'. I 



Through the development of a Distributive Education Program 
utilizing course offerings of the TCEA curriculum and, the 
School of Education and the School of Business Administration. 

"Distributive Education refers to a vocational, retail-oriented 
program of study offered at the secondary school level. Curricula, 
content of courses, work-study features and certification of teachers 
for such programs are carefully prescribed and supervised by each 
state's Board of Education or equivalent accrediting institution. 
The Federal Government, under the provisions of the George-Barden 
Act of 1946 and Vocational Act of 1963, may share with each state 
the cost of maintaining Distributive Education programs in secondary 
schools. Certification requirements for Distributive Education 
teachings differ in the various states. Candidates may check with 
the state's Department of Education. Preparation for certification 
to teach Distributive Education is currently offered by outstanding 
teachers' colleges and universities throughout the country." 

Graduate 

The emphasis in this subject matter area at the graduate level is upon: 

The historical aspects of Textiles, Clothing and the Environ- 
mental Arts; 

The behavioral aspects of Textiles, Clothing and the Environ- 
mental Arts; 

The marketing and consumption of Textiles, Clothing and other 
goods and services implied in the term Environmental Arts. 

An expanded graduate program will more adequately serve the needs of the 
following clientele: 

1. degree candidates with an area of interest in TCEA subject 
matter ; 

2. degree candidates in other Home Economics areas of graduate 
emphasis; 

3. degree candidates from other graduate schools of the Uni- 
versity; 



4-. qualified non-degree students seeking refresher courses 
in this subject matter area. 



Additional teaching personnel and research facilities must be provided as 
soon as possible to support an adequate program of graduate study in 
Textiles, Clothing and the Environmental Arts leading to the degree of 
Master of Science. It is expected that this major area at the graduate 
level will be initiated September, 1967. 

RESEARCH 

Limited amount of existing research data available to support instruction 
at both the graduate and undergraduate levels indicates an urgent need 
for depth studies relating to: 

The historical aspects of Textiles, Clothing and the Environ- 
mental Arts; 

The behavioral aspects of Textiles, Clothing and the Environ- 
mental Arts; 

The marketing and consumption of Textiles, Clothing and other 
goods and services implied in the term Environmental Arts- 

In view of the urgent need for research in this subject matter area, scholar- 
ships, graduate assistantships, grants-in-aid and foundation grants will be 
sought; personnel will be added and present teaching staff will be given time 
to engage in research activities. 

EXTENSION 

Purpose 

To provide opportunity for Massachusetts families, adults, youth and pro- 
fessionals dealing with family problems to continue their education in the 
areas of textiles, clothing and environmental arts; to assist in the in- 
creased appreciation, understanding and evaluation of their visual and 
cultural environment in relation to the home and family members. 

Developmental Plans 

The Extension program in the Textiles, Clothing and Environmental Arts area 
ill be developed to meet the following problem areas: 

1. National problems affecting the home and community i.e., 
density and complexity of population, mediocrity and 
ugliness of environments, and disadvantaged families 
in an affluent society. 



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2. Lack of basic art and design in formal education of county 
extension agents, both adult and youth. 

3. Interest of basic art and design in formal education of 
county lay peoples of all ages. 

1+. Tremendous social and economic pressures on families in 
decision making, determination of values, standards, 
consumption patterns and the use of human resources. 

5. Technological advances in textiles, clothing and furnish- 
ings. 

6. Interest of lay people in programs with depth of subject 
matter. 

7. Integration of knowledge of extension specialists in all 
home economics subjects as they affect home and family 
living. 

Goals and Programs 

The goals and related problem-oriented programs, for extension in this 
department, will be: 

1. To create an understanding of the role of cirt and design 
in family living; 

2. To stimulate an appreciation for design and color as they 
affect the home and family clothing; 

3. To provide families with information on the current accept- 
able practices in decision making, improved buying practices 
and the use of family resources; 

^■. To continue the assistance to families in understanding the 
technological advances which affect their behavior in the 
market place; 

5. To continue the training of agents and lay people in those 
skills which are fundamental to providing clothing and home 
furnishings; 

6. To find methods and improved techniques for working with dis- 
advantaged families; 



7. To use knowledge, principles, and skills of textiles, cloth- 
ing and environmental arts in assisting Massachusetts families 
to assess their situation, their resources and values and 
to reach their goals. 

To meet present day demands and in order to expand effectiveness in the 
areas outlined, more staff is needed. 



APPENDIX B 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SUMMARY REPORT ON RECRUITMENT 
Academic Year — I965-I966 

Nature of Recruitment Activities 

I. The year, I965-I966, has perhaps been unique in the number of analyses which 
have been made to discover increasingly effective means to attract and keep 
students of high caliber in the School of Home Economics. The following 
summarizes our studies: 

A. High School Guest Days 

An analysis of those who attended the High School Guest Days 
during the month of October, I965, reveals that 71^ of those 
who indicated an interest in the School of Home Economics at 
these sessions did indeed apply for admission. Of this per- 
centage, 66-2/3^ were accepted by the Admissions Office. These 
results deem it worthy of intensified efforts to make our 
specific role increasingly significant. Appropriate extension 
of effort on our part would be to: 

1. Keep the main office open from 11 AM to 1:30 PM on 
High School Guest Days in order to answer questions 
and extend a warm welcome to those who wish to see 
the physical plant at Skinner Hall. 

2. Develop a tour-guide service to accommodate those 
who wish to see the School of Home Economics fol- 
lowing the conclusion of the general orientation 
session at 12 noon. Members of the Home Economics 
College Chapter or work scholarship students might 
perform this service. 

B. Transfers Within, Out or Into the School of Home Economics 

On November 23, 19^59 an analysis of transfers in, out, and 
within the School of Home Economics was presented to all faculty 
advisers. Essentially the data showed: 

1. That the greatest number of students transferring OUT 
of the School of Home Economics occurred during the 
first three semesters of a student's academic program. 

2. That the greatest number of transfers - in, out, or 
within occurred on both registration and counseling days. 

3. More students transferred into the School of Home 
Economics than transferred out of the School. 

The following chart summarizes the findings. 



.LOG 



Summary Report on Recruitment 

Nov. 23, 1965 





1964 
Jan. -Dec. 


1965 

Jan. -Nov. 


23 


May 


through 
12, 1966 


Total 


Transfers OUT of 

School of Home Economics 


41 


40 






39 


120 


Transfers WITHIN 

School of Home Economics 


12 


10 






12 


34 


Transfers INTO 

School of Home Economics 


45 


(>5 






49 


lii 



An analysis of the data for the period November 23, I965 
- May 12, I966 reveals the following transfers occurred: 





T 


R 


A N S_ F E R S 


Within 






Into Out 


8 






28 26 


2 






7 4 


1 






10 3 


1 






4 4 



Department 

TCEA 

HEEd. 

HD 

DIA 

FN 2 

There were inherent weaknesses in the study due to the 
lack of some pertinent data on the Transfer Record form. 
Consequently, the form has been revised (copy attached) 
and will prove most helpful in future studies. 

C. Longitudinal Study 

We are in the process of completing the data for our first year 
of the four-year study of the Class of 1969. One value which seems 
to have already accrued is the fact that those who were predicted 
to achieve a I.9 cum did considerably better. Those whose predicted 
cums were 1.8 or less did significantly poorer than expected. Im- 
plication : any student admitted to the School of Home Economics 
with a predicted cum of 1.8 or less must be considered for the present 
a major risk . This information and all related data have been pre- 
sented to Dr. Tunis. 

II, Direct Recruitment Activities 

A. Follow-up letters were sent to 250 principals and guidance counselors 
in the state of Massachusetts regarding the availability of profes- 
sional staff members for the presentation of career information in 
the field of Home Economics to students interested and qualified for 
University admission. 






;^l . ::■'..■ ■ 



■ c: ■\ • 



^,Uii;)■■5•■:;■;B:. - 



Summary 


Report on Recruitment 
B. Career Assembl 


ies and Programs 






3 




1. School Programs 








Date 


Location 


Audience 




Speaker 


Contact Person 


Dec. 13 


Attletoro High 
Attleboro 


32 Junior & Senior 
College Bound 


H. 


Vaznaian 


Elizabeth M. Kelley, 
Guidance Counselor 


Dec. 13 


Newton South High 
Newton Centre 


107 Junior & Senior 
College Bound 


H. 


Vaznaian 


Esther Mathews, ■ 
Guidance Counselor 


Jan. 12 


Hawley Junior High 
Northampton 


44 8th Grade Top 


M. 


Sullivan 


Home Economics 
Teacher 


Jan. 13 


Wachusett Regional 
High, Holden 


27 Grades 10,11,12 


H. 
M. 


Vaznaian 
Sullivan 


D. Geraldine Guertin, 
Guidance Counselor 


Jan. 2k 


Amherst Regional 
High, Amherst 


27 Grades 11, 12 


M. 


Sullivan 


Marjorie Day, Home 
Economics Dept. 


Jan. 2? 


Watertown High 
Watertown 


57 Grades 10,11,12 


D. 
H. 


Davis 
Vaznaian 


Mr. Ed. Colbert, 
Dir. of Guidance 



Jan. 


27 


Watertown High 
Watertown 


Feb. 


10 


Milton High 
Milton 


Mar. 


8 


Newton High 
Newton 


Mar. 


16 


Classical High 
Springfield 


Mar. 


21 


Weeks Junior High 
Newton Centre 


Mar. 


24 


Bigelow Junior 
High, Newt on 
Corner 


Mar. 


29 


Warren Junior 
HighjVf. Newton 


Apr. 


20 


Provincetown High 
Provincetown 


Apr. 


22 


Nauset Regional 
High, Orleans 


Apr. 


26 


Northampton High 
Northampton 


May 25 


Agawam High 
Agawam 



32 Junior & Senior 
College Bound 

32 Grades 11, 12 



26 Grades 11, 12 
500 Grades ?-9 
340 Grades 7-9 

700 Grades 7-9 
75 Grades 9-12 
12 Grades 9-12 



42 Grades 10-12 
College Bound 

13 Grades 11, 12 



H. Vaznaian 
H. Vaznaian 
H. Vaznaian 
Diane Ward 



Helen Jane Sears, 
Guidance Counselor 

Elinor Brillante, 
Home Economics 

Mr S.Margaret Ramos, 
Guidance Counselor 

Diane Ward, Home 
Economics 



Sara Pettinelli Sara Pettinelli, 
Home Economics 



Helen Brehm 
Mary Thomas 
Mary Thomas 



Helen Brehm, Home 
Economics 

Mary E. Thomas, Cape 
Cod Ext., Barnstable 

Mary E. Thomas, Cape 
Cod Ext., Barnstable 



M. Sullivan Home Economics Dept. 



M. Sullivan Mr. Skolnick, 

Guidance Director 



^ '. . t. -> 









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:.'-.Hi;;: J o ^;> ■ 









Summary Report on Recruitment 

B. (continued) 

2. TV Programs 

An innovation in recruitment this year was the 
presentation of two career information programs - 
one oreinted to careers in Food and Nutrition, the 
other to Human Development. Dr. Elizabeth Rust, 
Associate Professor of Food and Nutrition, presented 
the first program; Helen R. Vaznaian, Associate 
Professor of Education, the second. The time was 
made available by the Cooperative Extension Service 
on Joe Kelley's Almanac, Channel 5j Boston. A total 
of 105 requests for specific career information, 
some from as far away as Maryland, were received as 
a result of the program. All requests were filled. 

3. Personal Inquiries, Requests for Career Information 

An analysis of the number of responses to letters re- 
questing information about the School of Home Economics 
reveals that 264 requests have been filled with an 
accompanying personal letter. The breakdown is as 
follows: 

a. Requests as a result of TV programs 105 

b. Requests as a result of High School 

Guest Days 56 

c. Other individual requests 103 

In addition, congratulatory letters were sent to all 
students admitted to the Class of 1970, School of Home 
Economics. This numbered 221 (I89 fall freshmen, 32 
summer), bringing the total number of letters sent 
from this office to 485 . 

Based upon request, 2? personal interviews and tours 
of Skinner Hall and the University Campus were arranged. 

III. Enrollment Data, Class of 1970 

(The data is based upon the most recent IBM Compilation from the Dean of 
Admissions Office dated May 10, I966.) 

Total Number of Applications Received 350 

Total Accepted 189'-'' 

Total Rejected 159 

Total Unprocessed 2 






v.0>-; ■■ 



Summary Report on Recruitment 

Potential Enrollment on Total Acceptances 

One hundred eighty-nine at University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 

plus 21 summer freshmen 210 

Data as of June 6, I966, shows the following: 

Ninety-six fall freshmen have paid first and second fees and have, 
as of June 6, I966, signed for Summer Counseling. 

Seven Summer Freshmen have signed for Summer Counseling, 

It therefore seems reasonable to assume we will have 105 students in the 
Class of 1970. This total number represents a disappointment in our 
anticipation of a class size of 125. 

Relevant to this discussion are the following facts: 

1. The total number of applications (350) for fall admission to 
the School of Home Economics represented an increase of ^1% 
over the previous year . 

2. Although the number of those admitted this year was totally 
greater than that of June I965 - 210 vs. 174, our withdrawal rate 
was almnst 5C^ (97 accepting; ^3 withdrawing) among the fall 
freshmen. (189 plus 21 summer freshmen = 210) This would seem 
to warrant a follow-up study of the where and whys of withdrawal. 

The percentage of withdrawals by summer freshmen applying to 
the School of Home Economics is approximately 75%- 

IV. Enrollment Data - Transfer Students 

As of May 1, I966, twenty-one students from a variety of Junior Colleges 
and Four-ryear Colleges had applied for admission. Information relevant 
to their acceptance is not available as of this writing. 

Concluding Remarks 

In my Summary Report on Recruitment 1964-1965 , I recommended the following: 

1. That continued effort be made to enlighten educators and 
Guidance Personnel of the significant changes in the School 
of Home Economics . In our written communications (250) , in 
our enclosures of career materials, and in our visitations 
when requested, we have attempted to do this. However, re- 
sults seem indicative of the need to undertake boldly , in 
addition, a one-day program designed for Guidance Counselors 
and Administrators utilizing the collaborative efforts of 
all department heads and administrative staff of the School 
of Home Economics. 



K'- :'■ 



■ : .: :.0'. 



■J S '■■; ■ 

.10:; 



Summary Report on Recruitment 

2. That several aspects of the recruitment procedures and activities 
he carefully assessed. This has been done. The longitudinal study, 
though in its infancy, has already proved valuable. The analysis 
of transfers into, out of, and within the School of Home Economics 
has shed considerable light; and the analysis of the results of High 
School Guest Days has given direction. 

3. That continued efforts must be made to strengthen the internal structure 
of the school on all levels. 

4. That we recognize that we will never be able to do enough (how much is 
enough?) in visitation to schools, in dialogues with guidance counselors. 
The request and desire will always be for MORE. And the need is for 
MORE . 

Finally, that serious consideration be given to assigning Recruitment Activities 
as the singular task of one member of the staff, A supportive committee from 
the faculty (perhaps a representative from each department) could be appointed 
to assist as needed. Or, perhaps, the Publicity Committee and those responsible 

for Recruitment could work together in a harmonious partnership, one enriching 
the other. Another alternative would be to incorporate publicity, public re- 
lations, and recruitment under one umbrella, the Public Relations and Recruitment 
Committee. Presently, conflicting and converging demands as a result of multiple 
role responsibilities interfere with the potential effectiveness and continued 
growth of the program. 

Respectfully Submitted 



Helen R. Vaznaian 
Assistant to the Dean 
School of Home Economics 



June 8, 1966 



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APPENDIX C 



PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATION 
CONTINUING EDUCATION 



There is a real need to provide graduate courses in Home Economics off 
campus, preferrably on the Boston campus. The Willis Report has re- 
commended that teachers in secondary education acquire a master's degree. 
We should be providing this type of educational opportunity to home 
economics secondary school teachers. 

To offer more extensive graduate work, we should offer, beginning 1967, 
graduate courses on the Boston campus. These courses would be for 
graduate credit and would be transferrable for a degree which would be 
awarded on the Amherst campus. 

Additional courses should be given for the improvement of secondary 
school teachers in home economics. These courses could be taken for 
credit but not necessarily toward a degree. These also would be offered 
on the Boston campus. We should provide leadership in the state for 
home economics on the higher education level. We have barely begun to 
do this. There is an urgent need to improve teachers already in service 
and to provide master's degree work so that secondary school teachers 
in home economics can obtain a master's degree from the University. Non- 
credit extension seminars, workshops and courses should be expanded to 
meet the needs and demands that are constantly being made by the people 
of the state of Massachusetts. 



* * * 



PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATION 
FOOD AND NUTRITION 



1. Development of undergraduate field of specialty in Nutrition 

A program entitled "Curriculum in Nutrition" has been proposed by the 
American Institute of Nutrition working on graduate and undergraduate 
programs. It is planned to use their proposal as a basis for develop- 
ing our undergraduate program. In the undergraduate program. Nutrition 
and Food Science courses account for 6 units only. It is in the graduate 
program that the individual specializes. We are fortunate that we have 
available more courses in Food and Nutrition that do some schools that 
would like to offer undergraduate and graduate training in the field 

of nutrition. 

There is no nutrition laboratory course available either at the under- 
graduate or the graduate level for students specializing in Food and 
Nutrition in the School of Home Economics. Dr. Bert and Dr. Reber 
have discussed the development of such a laboratory course. In this 
course we would hope to expose the students to some laboratory experi- 
ments involving radioisotopes. The equipment needed for this type of 
experiemental work is expensive and extensive. The amount of equip- 
ment needed for teaching such a laboratory projected over the next 
five years would probably cost about $50,000. It is planned to pre- 
pare a request for an equipment grant from National Science Foundation 
or the Atomic Energy Commission to help purchase the needed laboratory 
equipment. 

2. Development of graduate department of Food and Nutrition When 

Dr. Reber accepted the position in this institution, the administration 
supported and encouraged him to direct an expansion of the present re- 
search in Food and Nutrition and to develop a Master's and Doctoral 
degree program. 

A prerequisite to the development of the graduate program is the depart- 
mentalization of the School. We must departmentalize so that we are 
able to give advanced degrees in specific disciplines. The specific 
discipline in this case is Foods and Nutrition. Therefore, our graduate 
curriculum must be entitled, "Foods and Nutrition." A program leading 
to M.S. and Ph.D. degrees has been suggested by the American Institute 
of Nutrition. A detailed proposal for the M.S. and Ph.D. degree program 
in Food and Nutrition has been approved by the appropriate committees 
in the School of Home Economics. 



Probably the most important projection during the next five years is the 
development of the Ph.D. graduate program. At the present time this is 
under discussion due to comments about the program which have been made 
by Dr. Esselen of the Food Science and Technology Department. Clarifica- 
tion of our position will enable us to proceed with budgetary requests. 
It would be anticipated that we could have added to our available 
assistantships one research or service assistantship each year. 

3. Senior-Clerk Typist position -- in September 1961+, I brought with me 
two contracts from the University of Illinois. At the time there was no 
secretary and a very minimum of secretarial help available either to the 
Department or for research publication activities. Therefore, from 
September 1964- until the end of March 1966, I have used funds to employ 
a secretary. This secretary did work related to the contracts and depart- 
mental work as well. This has been very unsatisfactory. After a great 
deal of discussion, a secretary was reassigned from the Extension area 
to Food and Nutrition. There are at present eight full-time staff members 
depending on a secretary. This is unsatisfactory. There are two pro- 
jections over the next five years which should be considered. An additional 
secretary is needed. A second secretary is needed at the present time 
and the need will increase with time- The other projection is the up- 
grading of the present secretarial rating to that of a secretary-clerk, 
senior grade. This should be done at the earliest possible time. 

An enumeration of secretarial work would be lengthy and detailed. How- 
ever, it includes various things such as: 

a. Work for Miss Wright (Extension) - typing letters, travel 
vouchers, monthly reports, and most other general work; 

b. Necessary typing involved in application for grants, re- 
search activities, and publications; 

c. Teaching requirements such as preparation of the exams, 
laboratory procedures, and reports. 

4-. Laboratory technician position There is a need for a laboratory 

technician. The work which is being done by the research personnel in 
the dpeartment is dependent upon support personnel who are paid on an 
hourly basis. This is an extremely unsatisfactory situation. For ex- 
ample, there is no consistent program for the care of the animal room 
facilities. The janitor will not do any type of clean up in that room 
including the floor. We are particularly handicapped at vacation times. 
It is true that we can compel some graduate students to do this work, 
but this is just a passable situation. The immediate need is for a 
person who could do part time work in the animal room and part time 
work as a laboratory technician. 



There are exploratory research activities which are impossible to do 
with grant money. In order to have a research program function at 
its peak, we need to carry on such exploratory work. A technician in 
needed to heli^ do this. Another very important factor is that the 
amount of time indicated as spent on research is higher than actually 
is the case. I find the administrative responsibilities of the 
position I have, take much more time than we had anticipated, I do 
not object to this. However, it is important that the University 
does make a positive contribution to research projects. We should 
not expect the Federal Government to finance them entirely. A research 
technician would give a great deal more freedom to carry out research 
than is presently the case. 



* * * 






PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS 
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT 

The program in Human Development is concerned with the stu^y of substantive 
and methodological problems related to the analyses of stability and 
change in human characteristics over the life cycle. The program is inter- 
disciplinary in character and should include persons from the biological 
and social sciences who are interested primarily in developmental phenomena. 

Although a program in Human Development is now available at the M.S. level, 
a proposal for a Ph.D. program will be initiated in the fall of 1966. The 
development of the program will require a staff that would include: 

A. Specialist (s) in Early Childhood Education 

B. Developmental Psychologist (s) 

C. Social Psychologist (s) with root disciplines in 

psychology or sociology 

D. Cultural Anthropologist 

E. Physical Anthropologist 

F. Pediatrician 

G. Gerontologist 

The purpose of the program broadly stated is to increase the opportunities 
for specialization in the study of developmental phenomena. Therefore, 
the program will emphasize coursework in the areas of theory, process and 
methodology relevant to the study of developmental phenomena. The develop- 
ment of curriculum is anticipated in the following areas: 

1. Psychological development 

2. Socio-cultural development 

3. Political-economic development 

The program is intended to help students acquire the competencies necessary 
for research and teaching in Human Development. This program will require 
new facilities in addition to those now available in Human Development. 
These would include: 

A. Small groups research laboratory 

This laboratory is required for experimental and ob- 
servational studies in the development of social 
interaction over time . Instrumentation required would 
include an audio-visual control center for manipula- 
tion of communication patterns. 



I 



B. Developmental assessment laboratory 

This laboratory is required for the acquisition of 
normative data on the development of behavior patterns 
in infants and children. It would require the in- 
strumentation and equipment usually found in a pedi- 
atrics office. 

C. A physical anthropology laboratory 

This laboratory is required for the assessment of 
physical growth patterns. It would require instru- 
ments for the measurement of physical characteris- 
tics such as height and weight as well as Roentgenogra- 
phic equipment for skeletal measurements of growth 
phenomena. 

D. A neurophysiological laboratory 

This laboratory is required for the assessment of bio- 
metric changes in response patterns over long periods 
of time. It would require devices for the measurement 
of electrodermol and electromyographic phenomena. 

Budget Projections 

1966 - 1967 

Faculty salaries (1) $ i+8,000 

Laboratories & equipment 23,700 

Assistants 17,9^0 

Other 31,996 

$ 121,636 

1967 - 1968 

Faculty salaries (4) $ 50,000 

New faculty salaries (2) 2'+,000 

Laboratory & equipment 2M-,000 

Assistants 17,940 

Other 31,996 

$ 147,936 

1968 - 1969 

Faculty salaries (6) $ 80,000 

New faculty salaries (2) 28,000 

Laboratory & equipment 24,000 

Assistants 17,940 

Other 34,000 

$ 183,940 



1969 - 1970 



Faculty salaries (8) 


$ 108,000 


New faculty salaries (1) 


14,000 


Laboratory & equipment 


20,000 


Assistants 


20,000 


Other 


34,000 



1970 - 1971 



$ 196,000 



Faculty salaries $ 143,000 
New faculty salaries 

Laboratory & equipment 20,000 

Assistants 20,000 

Other 34_J300 



$ 222,000 



* 



I 



PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS 
TEXTILES, CLOTHING AND ENVIRONMENTAL ARTS 

The Textiles, Clothing and Environmental Arts department must necessarily 
engage in considerable development in order to meet the needs of under- 
graduate and graduate students. In addition to an anticipated 10% en- 
rollment increase, there is a real demand by the students for more sections 
of courses in this area of study. Therefore, additional personnel and 
facilities are needed. 

The development of this department includes establishing a new major pro- 
gram in Interior Design at the undergraduate level. This will require 
new courses and additional personnel and facilities for carrying on the 
work of this major. 

Beginning in 1967 and continuing in an escalating fashion in 1968 and 
thereafter will be graduate programs in Clothing and Textiles and in 
Environmental Arts. This will mean more personnel, facilities and new 
courses as well as new research activities and all this entails. 

By 1968, the new Distributive Education program should be under way. This 
should be a cooperative program between the School of Education and the 
School of Home Economics. This will mean an increase in the number of 
students in the courses that we offer in Fashion Merchandising and there- 
fore more sections of these courses will have to be offered. 

It will be necessary to add one new faculty member each year beginning 
1966 until five new faculty are added to the present staff. 

For all these new developmental activities in this department, additional 
personnel, facilities, and operating funds are needed over and above that 
necessary for the nominal 10% increase in budget for this department. 
This increased activity will continue through 1972 and thereafter. 



* 



PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS 
MANAGEMENT AND FAMILY ECONOMICS 



The Management and Family Economics subject matter area has had a most 
uneven development at the University of Massachusetts. The Extension 
program has been strong, with a broad and varied offering in adult 
education over the state. The undergraduate program has bee limited 
to service courses, and there has been practically no graduate work 
or research. 

This situation is inconsistent with the heavy demand for graduates, 
particularly those with a graduate degree, who have a background in 
management and family economics. Cornell University, which has had an 
outstanding program in this area for many years, reports that in 1965 
there was twice the demand for persons graduating in management and 
family economics than the year before. The demand for home management 
and family economics graduates with advanced degrees has always far 
exceeded the supply. At the present time, there is neither an under- 
graduate nor graduate major in management and family economics in any 
School of Home Economics in Massachusetts. 

It is proposed that an undergraduate major in Home Management and Family 
Economics be established, and that the curriculum be directed toward 
preparing students for a profession as well as give a foundation for 
graduate work in the subject matter. It is expected that graduates 
would be prepared for work with adult education, social, and welfare 
agencies. Certain courses would need to be revised and others added 
to give the strength needed for a cogent major. 

It is further proposed that a graduate program leading to a Master's 
degree be introduced, with the appropriate courses and research faci- 
lities. It is anticipated that many of the first graduate students 
will be high school teachers, and provisions for summer school parti- 
cipation must be made. Graduate assistantships are necessary in the 
development of a graduate program. 

Research will develop with the graduate program. The three broad areas 
for investigation as envisioned now are: 

a. Theoretical studies to gain further knowledge about the 
process of management. 

b. Consumer behavior in relation to allocation of resources. 

c. Practical studies in the development of homemaking skills 
as a basis for determining both the content and teaching 
methods for the expanded vocational training program. 



To develop the above plans, additional staff is essential. Extension 
Specialists will contribute toward the teaching of undergraduate and 
graduate courses, but at least two more faculty members will be needed 
to supplement the teaching and to advise graduate students in their 
programs of study and research. One faculty member should have a 
background of family economics, preferably with a strong consumer 
economics orientation; the other, in general management of family 
resources. Secretarial assistance will be necessary for support of 
the program. 

This expanded program will require additional laboratory and research 
space and facilities as well as office space for staff. 

In order to attract students for the proposed undergraduate and graduate 
programs, well qualified staff and facilities are essential for the 
development. Increased monies and effort will have to be expanded for 
a period of at least five years. However, it is believed that after a 
period of five to eight years, and a graduate program is firmly established, 
the cost of the program should level off. 



* 



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r- ■ T.. 



PROGRAM AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS 
HOME ECONOMICS EDUCATION 



Home Economics Education at the secondary school level takes on a new 
urgency in the need to help both youth and adults expand their capacity 
to make discriminating use of human and material resources in the face 
of novel situations without historic parallel. Because the past is 
not a complete guide to the present and the future, teachers of home 
economics, as well as other professional staff members, are challenged 
by the task to educate youth at the secondary school level for adapt- 
ability and versatility. All youth need a broad education for the 
responsibilities of home and community membership, and many will require 
a specialized secondary education for the development of employable 
skills. Thus, home economics education at the secondary school level 
is charged with the specific responsibility to: 

A. Educate for homemaking by providing a program of study 
focused upon 

1* insight and understanding of human growth 
and development; 

2. management of personal and family resources; 

3. personal and family relationships 

In addition, with the passage of the Vocational Education Act of 1963, 
preparation for youth and adults for gainful employment in occupations 
using the knowledge and skills of home economics becomes a reality. Of 
relevance is the fact that the December 1965 issue of the Occupational 
Outlook Quarterly , based upon Bureau of Labor Statistics, predicts un- 
precedented growth rate in service oriented occupations such as health, 
teaching, food preparation, and retailing, for the 1970's. Based upon 
a broad liberal and professional program of preparation in the School 
of Home Economics, teachers of home economics education at the secondary 
school level can and should make a significant contribution to education 
for homemaking and education for occupational employment . 

The Department of Home Economics Education in the School of Home Economics 
at the University expects the following new developments to occur: 

The Undergraduate Program 

A significant increase in enrollment is expected to occur due to the un- 
precedented focus upon the significant contribution which can be made in 
secondary school programs be teachers of Home Economics in education in 
implementing for homemaking, for occupational employment, for specialized 
programs for the disadvantaged. Federal Aid Programs -- the Elementary 
& Secondary Education Act of 1965, the Urban & Rural Community Action 






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'"' ■ '.'/.i 






Programs, Title II, Pt.A, The Vocational Education Act of 1963, The Work- 
Study Program, Sec. 13 -- will prove highly supportive in the implementa- 
tion of innovative and imaginative programs at the secondary school level. 

In addition, the "phasing out" of the Home Economics Department at Regis 
College, the internal reorganization at Simmons College as well as the 
significantly higher cost of education at these aforementioned institutions 
may be expected to result in an additional increase in our total enroll- 
ment. Along with consideration of these factors, we should recognize that 
our present enrollment in Home Economics Education has tripled within one 
year. Should we not assume that we will continue to grow beyond the normal 
expectancy rate of 10% for the next 5 years? 

1. The undergraduate curriculum is currently undergoing 
careful evaluation with a view to becoming more dyna- 
mically responsive to the needs of the secondary schools 
and society. 

2. Opportunities for expanding educational experiences 
will be made possible with an optional affiliation 
with the Merrill- Palmer Institute in Michigan. 

3. The student internship program is carefully being 
evaluated. We expect to make several significant 
changes in this area of prime concern. 

It is paramount that budget allocations support: 

1. the increased travel expenditures essential to student 
teaching supervision 

2. the addition of staff members essential to a program 
of teaching and supervision 

3. the increased cost of additional educational supplies 
indigenous to Home Economics Education. 

Graduate Program 

The VJillis Report can be expected to have a significant impact upon the 
expansion of our graduate program at the Master's level. The next five 
years will be crucial to the establishment of a viable program in Home 
Economics Education- Personnel, facilities and operating funds are 
necessary over and above the nominal 10% increase to enable the depart- 
ment to fulfill a role of leadership in Home Economics Education for 
the state of Massachusetts . Only a program of excellence can hope to 
make a breakthrough in the decidely "disadvantaged" programs current in ' I 
the secondary schools of Massachusetts, at the present time. Only a 
program of excellence can hope to attract graduate students of high calibre; 



■>i,;f;>V; -d) ,^.-'^)! 



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only a program of excellence can stimulate one's imagination and desire to 
peruse, discover and contribute to knowledge through research. All are 
conspicuously absent from the present scene. 

Continuing Education 

It is expected that: 

1. an increase in Consultant Services will occur as school 
systems expand existing programs in Homemaking and initiate 
programs in occupational wage-earning aspects of Home 
Economics Education. 

2. an increase in in-service workshops for teachers of Home 
Economics Education will occur in centers for learning 
throughout the state of Massachusetts. 

3. an increase in innovative interdisciplinary joint demon- 
stration and/or pilot projects will occur; 

a. within the School of Home Economics at the 
University of Massachusetts 

b. with selected and/or cooperating schools through- 
out Massachusetts 

c. with industry related to occupational skills 
and knowledge gained through Home Economics 

Education 



June 16, 1966 

From: Graduate Office, Edward C. Moore, Dean 

To: Mr. Robert McCartney, Secretary of the Univeraity 

Subject: Annual Report, Fiscal 1966 

This report covers the areas of activity for which the Graduate Dean 
is administratively responsible. These are: 

a) Graduate Program 

b) Research Council 

c) University Research Computer Center 

d) Cooputer Science Program 

e) The University Press 

f) The Water Resources Research Center 

g) The Office of Research Services 

1) Annual Appropriatloas< Annual appropriations for these operations 
In Fiscal 64, 65, and 66 were as follows: 



Graduate School: 

Operating Budget 

Research Council 

Faculty Research Grants 
Faculty Growth Grants 
Massachusetts Review 

University CoBq>uter Center 

Departnant of Conputer Science 

University Press 

Water Resources Research Cantar 

Office of Research Services 
TOTAL 



M 


^ 


- 66n 


41,062 


59,434 


74,110 


50,000 


75.000 


100,000 


10,000 


10,000 


SO, 000 


10,000 


10,000 


10,000 


41,560 


55,509 


115,119 


13.296 


22,342 


32,619 





60,000 


75,000 





52.295 


87,500 


27, 85 J 


34,9?? 


37,33^ 


193,773 


379,573 


551,684 



« 



2 - 



2) Personnel 


Sept. 1963 


Sept 


:. 1964 


Sept, 1965 


Graduate School 










Administrative 


1 




2 


3 


Clerical 


3 




6 


9 


University Computer Center 


5 




9 


14 


Department of Coi^uter Science 


1 




2 


4 


University Press 







1 


4 


Water Resources Center 










2 


Office of Research Services 


_3 




-J 


Ji 


TOTAL 


13 




23 


40 



3) Graduate School Organization Chart 
See Following Page 



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4) Students or clientele served In the iMrloas branches of this office are: 
a) Graduate School: 

Enrollaent (fall) 



Admissions Data 

Inquiries Received 
Applications Processed 
Rejected 
Accepted 

b) Research Coordinator: 

Facultjr Research Grants 

Proeassed 
Faculty Growth Grant* 

Proeassed 
Sponsored Research 

Ippllcatlons Processed 



c) Office Af Research Services 

Secretariat (3/4 year) 
Electronics Shop 
Class Shop 
Woodworking 
Machine Shop 
Welding 

Total Hour* Use 8,056 



1963 


xn^ 


^9^5 


1303 


1849 


2240 


;?64 


1965 


1966 


7,690 


11,077 


16,300 


3,331 


4,633 


6,216 


793 


1,350 


2,007 


2,021 


3,005 


3,593 


;?^4 


im 


,1966 


82 


93 


181 


17 


17 


36 


m 


199 


260 


225 


298 


477 


Hours of 




Humber of 


Vfe 




Departments 


755 




19 


1,055 




26 


1,956 




23 


1,061 




10 


2,276 




22 


. 555. 




IS 



I 



- 5 - 

5) Publications and Professional Activities: 
Edvard C. Moore: 

a) Ispresented the University in the foraation of the Massachusetts 
Association for the Marine Sciences and, with Professor Dayton Carritt of M.I.T., 
was elected co- chairman of the Association. 

b) In May of 1966 a neaber of a panel of the Mew England Conference on 
Graduate Education on the subject of cooperative graduate programs. 

c) Served as a aenber of the Executive Conaittee of the Division of 
Graduate Work of the Rational Association of State Universities and Land JCrant 
Colleges, during its terainal year. 

d) Elected to the Executive Coaaittee of the Hew England Conference on 
Graduate Education for 1966-67. 

e) Elected President of the University of Massachusetts chapter of 
Phi Kappa Phi. 

f) Appointed editor of the Journal; The Transactions of The Charles S. 

6) Major accoaplishoMnts during 1965-66: 

a) During the year 1965-66, 467 advanced degrees were gllren of which 48 
were at the doctoral level. The record for the last five years is as follows: 

1962 1963 19>4 1965 196§ 

Doctoral 26 31 27 36 48 

Master's 196 176 2l9 279 419 

"l25 "257 "IJ5" "Us" 467 

b) Mew Programs : 
The School of lursing entered the graduate field with its first 

graduate prograa: The Master's of Mursing AdaitfLstration. The School of Home 
Econoaics offered its first doctoral prograa the Ph.D. in Rutrition and Poods. 

Six law Ph.D. programs aad one imw Bd.D. program were added this year. 
The Ed9D now includes "Specialist. in Currieulua and Instruction." The fields available 
for the Ph.D. now include Business Adainistration, Imdustrial Engineering, Forestry 
and Wood Technology, Rutrition and Foods, Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, and Polymer 
Science and Engineering. 



Five new master's programs have been added in Music, Mursing Administration, 

Nutrition and Foods, Polymer Science and Engineering, and in Veterinary Science. 

The master's in Landscape Architecture has been rewritten into & two- year 
program. 

c) Graduate School enrollment increased by a figure of 391. Enrollment 
for the last three years was: 



1303 



1964 
1849 



1965 
2240 



d) With the increased federal and state fellowships, the University 
fellowship and asslstantshlp picture has materially Improved. In 1964-65 only 
70 fellowships were available. In 1965-66 207 students were on fellowship 
suppprt. Of this number 162 were from federal funds, 42 from state funds, 
and 3 from industrial funds. 

e) Research Activity: Calendar year 1965 



External support 
Research grants 
Training grants 
Equipment grants 
Facilities grants 

Total external 



Number of 



181 

14 

7 

5 



207 



Amount of 
U65 Income 

1,900,922 
186,139 
396,666 
265.900 

2,749,627 



University support 

Faculty Research Grants 
Faculty Growth Grants 

Total Intermal 

6RAMD TOTAL 



110 

128 
335 



66, 906 
18.000 

84,906 

2,834,533 



- 7 - 

f) University Research Conqjuter Center 

During the early part of the year the new CDC 3600 computer was in 
trouble because the air-conditioning system did not work properly. With the 
help of the physical plant department this problem was solved and use of the 
computer has increased steadily. By the end of the year use was exceeding 
200 hours a month. 

Two hundred and forty- six coaq>uter projects from 35 academic de- 
partments were active at the end of the year. 

g) The Computer Science Program served 300 students in 196A, 500 in 1965 
and 1200 in 1966. In 1966 approximately 20 graduate students were majoring Isi 
Computer Science. 

h) The University of Massachusetts Press: 

The Press had a very satisfactory year. Six books were in print at 
the beginning of the year. Tea more were published in 1966. Over 125 manuscripts 
were considered by the Press In order to select these tltlas. The Syphoniea of 
Ralph Vauahan Williams was cited by the Judges of the Hew England Book Show for 
overall excellence. Between Wari . a book of poems by Anne Halley, was selected 
for an English edition this spring by Oxford University Press. St;udies in the 
Philosophy of Charles Sanders Pelrce and T^^e T^i,kat^vf Prfffi,dent were selected by 
Choice , a publication of the Anarican Library Association, for its list of 
outstanding academic books of the year. 

1) Wateir Resources Research Center: 

The Center obtained its first full- time Director in April of 1966 
when Mr. Bernard Berger, formerly of the U.S. Public Health Service, was appointed 
to that position. 

In 1966 the Center was supporting seventeen research projects in- 
volving 4 in Civil Engineering, 3 in Geology, 3 in Microbiology, 3 in Aquatic 
Biology, (me i^ .Plant Science, one in Soil SclcBce, 3 in Agricultural Engineering, 
and one in Chemistry. 



- 8 - 

In an effort to develop regional cooperation a Council of Mew England 
Water Center Directors has beaa formed of which Mr. Berger has been elected 
chairman. The Council plans to hold a regional conference on water rights 1;^ 
in November Of 1966. 
7) Special projects: 

For the Graduate School this has bean a year of retrenchment and stock- 
taking. The graduate program of the University has grown very rapidly in the 
past few years. Since 1961-62 the graduate program has grown from 800 students 
to 2600 for the fall of '66. The doctoral programs have increasflid from nine to 
thirty- two Ph.D. programs and three Ed.D. programs. It was time to review policies 
and procedures, to adjust tham to a new level of operation, to gear them up to 
a stage appropriate to the larger situation. 

An internal review of the Graduate Office procadures has been accomplished. 
The basic forms used have bean re- studied and largely re-written and a great many 
of the office procedures have been reprogranmed for electronic data processing. 

At the policy level, the Graduate Council has reviewed the policies for 
the admission, retention and graduation of graduate students. The following 
changes have been made by the council: 

1. Admission to the Graduate School In the past required a 2.5 

undergraduate cumulative average. The new rule reads "Admission 
to the Graduate School normally requires an undergraduate grade 
point average of 2.75 or better. Exceptions may be made to 
this rule upon recommendation of the major department, providing 
that the applicant can present other substantial evidence of 
capacity to do satisfactory graduate work." 

A further change in admissions procedure calls for the Graduate 
Record Examination to be submitted for application to the Graduate 
School. 



2. In Che past students have been dropped from the Graduate School 
only when a department Initiated a recommendation to that effect. 
A new procedure has been adopted that requires the student to 
maintain a 2.8 overall cumulative average In all graduate courses 
in the field of his major. 

3. In the past the only graduation requirement has been that no more 
than two C's were credited toward the degree. This allowed a 
student to graduate with less than a B average. A new policy 
has been adopted: "In the grades which a student is offering 

to satisfy degree requirements, a minimum standard for satis- 
factory work is a B average." 

Under section 18 of Cha^tar 572 of the 1965 Acts of the Commonwealth (The 
"Willis Report Act") the University was charged with a responsibility to cooperate 
in the development of doctoral programs at all state institutions. To implement 
the provisions of that act a publication, "Standards end Procedures for Doctoral 
Programs of the University of Massachusetts" was prepared. It was approved by 
the University Graduate Council and the Board of Trustees. It also received 
approval of the Lowell TechaAlogical Institute, which is the only other state 
institution currently active at the doctoral level. 

In response to a request from Chancellor John Ryan, an asrangement was 
developed to make possible cooperative Ph.D. programs in Physics and Chemistry 
at UM/B under essentially the same arrangement as the Four-College Cooperative 
Ph.D. 

A Graduate Student Senate was formed and its constitution was approved by 
the Board of Trustees. The President of the Student Senate has been added to the 
membership of the Graduate Council. 



- 10 - 

8) Future Flans and Needs: 

The future plans of the Graduate School include a Graduate Research 
Center In the Fhysical Science which nay go to construction In January of 1967 
and my be completed In 1970. Unfortunate delays, due primarily to a lack of 
experience on the part of the architectural firm, means that « great many plans 
predicated on the original completion date of 1967 will have to be dropped. 

A portion of one of the new high-rise dormitories in the Southwest 
Complex has been assigned foir graduate student use. One general purpose floor 
six residential floors will house 192 unmarried graduate students. It is time 
for the University t« begin to develop married graduate student housing. A pro- 
posal is currently being prepared by the Graduate Office for submittal to the 
Master Flannlng Conmittee. 

The operation of the Graduate Office has io^roved greatly this year 
with the provision of additional staff help and with the added services of Dr. 
Arthur Gentile as Assistant Dean. Dean Gentile has primary responsibility for 
the graduate students and their welfare and for the research ooordlnator functions 
of the Graduate Office. 

At the end of the year a program in Polymer Science and Engineering was being 
launched. Administrative responsibilities for this inter- disciplinary program 
has been assigned to the Graduate Dean. Possible new programs for next year may 
include genetics and marine biology. The conmitment to a State Geological 
Sarvay is also under review. Development of aa inter- disciplinary graduate pro- 
gram in Resource Flannlng and Development will continue to be discussed next 
year. Efforts by Dean Gentile to establish a cobalt radiation source on campus 
have matured with the approval of the Atomic Enfrsy Coamilaslon for financial sup- 
port for the radiation source. HIH support is currently being requested. The 
staff of the Computer Center is working on plans for a remote inquiry system in 



- 11 - 

connection with the CDC 3600 computer and st year's end a proposal had been sub- 
mitted to NSF for hardware supports Efforts to further atuowete the University 
Library procedures have laeved very slowly this year. because of Inability to 
obtain coiq>etent coi^uter people Interested In taking on a library project. Plans 
to develop a handbook for graduate faculty and & handbook for graduate students 
were begun this year but were not con^tleted. It Is hoped they will be coiiq>leted 
next year. 

The Gradtiate Council sponsored a "Seminar on College Teaching as a 
Career." Although the seminar was not for credit, a notation was made on the 
records of all students who attended five out of six of the meetings. Seventy 
students received such notations. 

Noteworthy honors accruing to the branches of the graduate office 
were the appointment by Governor John Volpe of Mr. Bernard Berger as a member of 
the State Public Health Council and the election of the University of Massachusetts 
Press to the Association of Aaierlcan University Presses. 



2200 



GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 

1965-1966 



2000 



1800 



1600 



z 
u 



l«+00 



1200 



1000 



800 



600 



i|00 



200 



inHVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS 



"55 55 57 W — 59 — TQ ST 

Academic Years 



"52 63 ^k ST 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 



Department 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Art 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Geology 

German-Russian 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Romance Language 

Sociology 

Speech 

Zoology 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Agrlc. & Food Econ. 

Agric. Engr. 

Agronomy 

Dairy & An. Scl. (Poultry Sclsncs) 

Entom, & PI. Pa-di. 

Food Scl. & Tech. 

For. & Wildlife 

Horticulture 

Plant & Soil Scl. (Hort. & Agron.) 

Poultry Science 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATiaN 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Chemical 

Civil 

Electrical 

Mechanical 

Industrial 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SCHOOL OF FHYS. EDUCATION 

UNCLASSIFIED 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

STATISTICS 

PITTSFIELD 

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

LABOR 

GRAND TOTAL 



Fall 62 


Fall 63 


Fall 54 


Fall 65 


4 


7 


28 


47 


16 


15 


23 


27 


70 


118 


154 


149 


16 


25 


44 


51 


HI 


78 


119 


148 


15 


20 


22 


35 


19 


21 


25 


46 


69 


73 


74 


65 


29 


34 


66 


85 


21 


32 


35 


63 


9 


16 


16 


25 


6 


7 


15 


29 


20 


21 


26 


58 


62 


63 


9Z 


118 


It* 


13 


29 


47 


25 


25 


41 


53 


9 


16 


25 


24 


i|9 


631? 


65 


61 
llfl 


30 


22 


25 


35 


12 


10 


16 


19 


^ 


3 


•. 


.. 


9 


10 


11 


27 


m 


16 


20 


22 


21 


18 


35 


45 


12 


23 


43 


46 


•t 


«♦ 


._ 


... 


.. 


— a. 


12 


24 


7 


3 

i5TF 


7 


lis 


38 


51 


80 


86 


197 


223 


457 


498 


20 


28 


46 


39 


9 


17 


23 


38 


8 


12 


16 


21 


11 


12 


16 


10 





3 

17 


11 

TR- 


22 

TW 


6 


6 


IO 


18 





18 


13 


28 





130 


22 


11 


12 


8 


17 


17 


■■«» 


a... 


5 


17 


62 


43 


42 


42 


avdSB 


•»» 


.. 


17 


•*« 


■••V 


««. 


5 



975 



1303 



1846 



2240 



- 2 - 



GRADUATE SCHOOL ENROLLMENT 
Head Count and Full Time Equivalent 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Art 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Geology 

German>Rus8lan 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Romance Languages-French 

Spanish 
Sociology & Anthropology 
Speech 
Zoology 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Agric. & Food Economics 
Agric. Engineering 
Entomology & Plant Pa-tti. 
Food Science & Technology 
Forestry, Wildlife & Fisheries 
Landscape Architecture 
Plant & Soil Science 
Veterinary & Anlnfial Science 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Accounting 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Chemical 

Civil 

Electrical 

Industrial 

Mechanical 

SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 

SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Men 

Women 

PUBLIC HEALTH 

INTERDISCIPLINARY 
Computer Science 
Labor Relations 
Statistics 
Other 





Converted to 




Full Time 


Total Student Count 


Equivalent 


U7 


39 


27 


24 


149 


145 


51 


44 


148 


113 


35 


33 


46 


38 


65 


56 


85 


66 


63 


59 


25 


23 


29 


26 


58 


54 


118 


111 


33 


25 


14 


9 


53 


44 


24 


19 


61 

ITTi 


59 
9&i 


35 


23 


19 


16 


22 


20 


45 


41 


46 


42 


22 


18 


24 


20 


27 


24 


113 


93 


15 


14 


498 


299 


39 


29 


38 


30 


21 


17 


10 


8 


22 

i3iy 


17 
I(5T 


18 


14 


21 


19 


7 
7b 


7 
7E 


17 


14 


17 


6 


5 


5 


17 


14 


11 


5 



GRAND TOTAL 



- 3 _ 



2240 



1782 



GRADUAL SCHOOL STUDENT STATISTICS 
Fall 1965 

Of 2240 
Total 

Students 

Sex * 

*Male 1146 504 1650 

Female 304 286 590 

Marital Status: 

Married 472 515 1003 

Single 981 260 1237 

Residence: 

Massachusetts 687 637 1324 

Out of State 573 103 676 

Foreign 190 50 240 

Level: 

Beginning 1069 570 1639 

Intermediate 355 210 565 

Advanced 26 10 36 

Class * 

Master's 840 301 1141 

Doctor's 400 152 552 

Provisional 88 22 110 

♦Teacher's Certificate 13 12 25 

CAGS 3 16 19 

♦Unclassified 106 283 389 



Of 1450 
Full Time 
Students 


Of 790 
Part Time 
Students 


1146 
304 


504 

286 


472 
981 


515 
260 


687 
573 
190 


637 

103 

50 


1069 

355 

26 


570 

210 

10 


840 

400 

88 

13 

3 

106 


301 

152 

22 

12 

16 

283 



L 



„ n 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 


DEGREE STUDENTS 




FALL 


1965 


Average 


Department 


Students 


Undergrad QPA 


Spanish 


13 


3.10 


Mathematics 


57 


3.05 


Womeii's Physical Education 


7 


3,01 


Psychology 


108 


3.00 


German 


35 


2.99 


Philosophy 


27 


2.96 


Finance 


2 


2.95 


French 


28 


2.93 


Zoology 


51 


2.92 


Statistics 


15 


2.91 


Sociology 


45 


2.89 


Chemical Engineering 


33 


2.88 


Wildlife 


10 


2.88 


Anthropology 


3 


2.87 


English 


121 


2.85 


Microbiology 


20 


2.85 


Food Technology 


i(l 


2.84 


Art 


36 


2.80 


Labor 


5 


2.80 


Government 


59 


2.78 


Home Economics 


12 


2.78 


Men's Physical Education 


18 


2.74 


Physics 


50 


2.73 


Education 


350 


2.72 


Botany 


23 


2.70 


School of Business Admlnlstrstlon 


108 


2.70 


Chemistry 


127 


2.69 


History 


66 


2.69 


Economics 


»m 


2.67 


Biology 


3 


2.65 


Agricultural Engineering 


24 


2.62 


Public Health 


10 


2.62 


Accounting 


15 


2.61 


Geology 


31 


2.61 


Industrial Engineering 


9 


2.61 


Agricultural Engineering 


17 


2.60 


Landscape Architecture 


20 


2.56 


Plant & Soil Science 


17 


2.56 


Computer Science 


5 


2.55 


Fisheries Biology 


9 


2.54 


Electrical Engineering 


19 


2.53 


Speech 


21 


2.52 


Japanese 


1 


2.50 


Animal Science 


21 


2.42 


Entomology 


14 


2.41 


Forestry 


14 


2.41 


Mechanical Engineering 


16 


2.41 


Civil Engineering 


37 


2.35 


Plant Pathology 


4 


2.33 


GRAND TOTAL 


1822 


2.76 



- 5 - 



GRADUATE ASSISTANT AND FELLOW DATA 
AS OF DECEMBER 12, 1965 



Department 


Students 


Undergrad QPA 


Philosophy 


14 . 


3.39 


Mathematics 


36 


3.17 


Food Science 


13 


3.16 


Romance Language 


28 


3.15 


German 


23 


3.11 


Computer Science 


3 


3.07 


Psychology 


71 


3.02 


English 


59 


3.00 


History 


17 


2.98 


Sociology 


35 


2.93 


Zoology 


53 


2.88 


Chemical Engineering 


20 


2.84 


Government 


37 


2.83 


Microbiology 


20 


2.82 


School of Business Administration 


21 


2.81 


Physics 


m 


2.79 


Plant & Soil Science 


l«t 


2.76 


Statistics 


7 


2.75 


Botany 


17 


2,74 


Physical Education 


22 


2.74 


Education 


19 


2.73 


Art 


21 


2.72 


Economics 


10 


2.72 


Chemistry 


117 


2.71 


Home Economics 


8 


2.71 


Agricultural Engineering 


17 


2.68 


Geology 


24 


2.65 


Agricultural & Food Economics 


11 


2.62 


Environmental Science 


3 


2.62 


Forestry 


22 


2.61 


Veterinary Science 


13 


2.59 


Labor Relations 


5 


2.58 


Food Technology 


19 


2.56 


Landscape Architecture 


3 


2.56 


Electrical Engineering 


10 


2.55 


Geology 


2 


2.52 


Civil Engineering 


13 


2.49 


Industrial Engineering 


4 


2.47 


Mechanical Engineering 


8 


2.45 


Public Health 


7 


2.45 


Speech 


10 


2.44 


1+-H 


2 


2.41 


Entomology 


14 


2.36 


GRAND TOTAL , 


916 


2,83 



- 6 - 



GRADUATE FELLOWSHIP HOLDERS SUMMARY 

Department 

Art 

History 

Mathematics 

Philosophy 

English 

Romance Language 

Sociology 

Industrial Engineering 

Food Science 

German 

Education 

Botany 

Physics 

Psychology 

Geology 

Zoology 

Food Technology 

Entomology 

Mechanical Engineering 

Chemical Engineering 

Chemiatry 

Microbiology 

Agricultural Engineering 

Statistics 

Economics 

Forestry 

Labor Relations 

Civil Engineering 

Government 

Speech 

Home Economics 

GRAND TOTAL 207 3.00 



Students 


Undergrad QPA 


2 


3.50 


2 


3.1*6 


2 


3.1*5 


10 


3.1*0 


m 


3.29 


13 


3.28 


15 


3.21* 


1 


3.21 


6 


3.20 


8 


3.13 


2 


3.12 


«♦ 


3.08 


10 


3.03 


29 


3.03 


5 


3.01 


10 


2.98 


2 


2.97 


1 


2.91 


1 


2.83 


7 


2.80 


16 


2.79 


«f 


2.74 


li 


2.72 


1 


2.68 


2 


2.66 


10 


2.58 


5 


2.58 


6 


2.57 


10 


2.57 


t 


2.57 


1 


2.56 



- 7 - 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS (TEACHING) SUMMARY 



Department 


Students 


Undergrad QPA 


Philosophy 


U 


3.36 


Mathematics 


3H 


3.14 


Psychology 


22 


3.11 


German 


15 


3.10 


School of Business Administration 


«♦ 


3.08 


History 


8 


3.05 


Forestry 


1 


3.00 


Romance Language 


14 


3.00 


Microbiology 


9 


2.94 


English 


43 


2.93 


Government 


27 


2.93 


Zoology 


38 


2.88 


Computer Science 


1 


2.84 


Art 


4 


2.83 


Economics 


7 


2.81 


Physical Education 


16 


2.78 


Physics 


28 


2.70 


Chemistry 


57 


2.68 


Landscape Architecture 


1 


2.68 


Chemical Engineering 


6 


2.67 


Sociology 


18 


2.67 


Geology 


12 


2.63 


Botany 


11 


2.58 


Education 


7 


2.58 


Electrical Engineering 


10 


2.55 


Civil Engineering 


6 


2.52 


Geography 


2 


2.52 


Home Economics 


2 


2.44 


Public Health 


2 


2.44 


Mechanical Engineering 


7 


2.40 


Speech 


3 


2.33 


Entomology 


4 


2.27 


GRAND TOTAL 


If 2 3 


2.83 



- 8 - 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS (RESEARCH) SUfWARY 



Department 


Students 


Undergrad QPA 


Forestry 

School of Business Administration 


3 
3 


3.40 
3.22 


Agricultural Engineering 
Food Science 


1 
3 


3.14 
3.08 


Chemical Engineering 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Botany 

Home Economics 


6 

17 

2 

2 

4 


3.06 
2.95 
2.92 
2.84 
2.84 


Physics 
Chemistry 
Microbiology 
Education 


6 

40 

7 

1 


2.81 
2.71 
2.71 
2.68 


Plant & Soil Science 


2 


2.67 


Zoology 

Food Technology 

Entomology 

Agricultural & Food Economics 

English 

Geology 

Environmental Science 


5 
9 
1 
2 

1 
4 

1 


2.66 
2.63 
2.60 
2.47 
2.44 
2.42 
2.26 


Industrial Engineering 
Public Health 


3 

1 


2.10 
1.99 


Civil Engineering 


1 


1.90 


GRAND TOTAL 


125 


2.76 



- 9 - 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS (SERVICE) SWMARY ANALYSIS 



I 



Department 


Students 


Undersrad Q 


Computer Science 


2 


3.30 


Food Science 


4 


3.11 


Romance Language 


1 


2.92 


Chemical Engineering 


1 


2.8»f 


Education 


8 


2.83 


Psychology 


3 


2.81 


Environmental Science 


2 


2.80 


History 


7 


2.78 


Plant & Soil Science 


12 


2.76 


Statistics 


6 


2.76 


Chemistry 


•f 


2.71 


Agricultural & Food Economics 


9 


2.67 


Agricultural Engineering 


12 


2.64 


School of Business Administration 


14 


2.63 


Physical Education 


6 


2.60 


Veterinary Science 


13 


2.59 


Art 


15 


2.57 


Public Health 


4 


2.57 


English 


1 


2.50 


Forestry 


8 


2.50 


Economics 


1 


2.48 


Landscape Architecture 


2 


2.W 


Food Technology 


8 


2.42 


H-H 


2 


2.41 


Speech 


3 


2.39 


Geology 


3 


2.37 


Education 


1 


2.32 


Entomology 


8 


2.27 


Home Economics 


8 


1,99 


GRAND TOTAL 


161 


2.62 



- 10 - 



GRADUATE ASSISTANTS & FELLOWS SUPPORT AMOUNTS 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Art 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

Geology 

German-Russian 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Romance Languages-French 

Spanish 
Sociology & Anthropology 
Speech 
Zoology 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Agric. & Food Economics 
Agric. Engineering 
Entomology & Plant Path. 
Food Science & Technology 
Forestry, Wildlife & Fisheries 
Landscape Architecture 
Plant Sr Soil Science 
Veterinary & Animal Science 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Accounting 



Number of 




Number of 


Total 


Students 


Number of 


Students 


Nuanber of 


rlth $2000 


Students 


with no 


Degree 


or over 


below $2000 
17 


support 

15 


Students 


«♦ 


36 


17 


_. 


6 


23 


76 


41 


10 


127 


9 


1 


34 


44 


39 


20 


62 


121 


m 


10 


7 


31 


21 


2 


13 


36 


20 


17 


22 


59 


9 


8 


49 


66 


26 


10 


21 


57 


15 


5 





20 


11 


3 


13 


27 


35 


9 


6 


50 


58 


13 


37 


108 


28 


1 


12 


28 


_. 


„« 


«• 


13 


27 


8 


13 


48 


10 


•• 


11 


21 


50 


3 


— 


53 


11 




13 


24 


11 


6 


_• 


17 


11 


3 


4 


18 


27 


5 


9 


41 


16 


6" 


11 


33 


.. 


3 


17 


20 


13 


1 


3 


17 


8 


5 


8 


21 


8 


13 


87 


108 


„„ 


_. 


15 


15 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



13 



331 



350 



SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 

Chemical 

Civil 

Electrical 

Industrial 

Mechanical 



12 


8 


13 


33 


9 


4 


24 


37 


10 


.. 


9 


19 


1 


3 


5 


9 


8 


_. 


8 


16 



SCHOOL OF HOME ECONOMICS 



14 



SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Men 

Women 



22 



18 
7 



PUBLIC HEALTH 



10 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 
Computer Science 
Labor Relations 
Statistics 
Other 



3 
2 



5 

5 
15 

2 



GRAND TOTAL 



-11- 



664 



248 



910 



1822 



FOREIGN STUDENTS 
Fall 1965 



Arts & Sciences 
Agriculture 
Business 
Education 
Engineering 
Home Economics 
Physical Education 
Interdisclplinai?y 



Nuiid)er of Students 
TvHl Time Part Time 
105 

37 



TOTAL 



5 

22 

1 

9 

190 



Total 



22 


127 


18 


55 


2 


8 





5 


5 


27 


1 


5 





1 


J_ 


11 


50 


2U0 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS PRESS 
REPORT * 1965-66 

1 . Appropriations 

1963-64 $12,000 
1964-65 40,850 
1965-66 75,000 

2. Personnel , number in each rank 

. September 1963 1 - Director 
September 1964 1 - Director 
September 1965 1 - Director 

1 - Production & Design 
1 - Sales and Promotion 
1 - Secretary 
1/2- Shipping 
1/2- Editorial Assistant 

3. Table of Organization 

Graduate Dean: Edward C. Moore 
Press Committee: Howard H. Quint, Chairman 

Press Staff: 

Director: Leone A. Barron 

Production & Design: Barbara Ellis 

Sales 6e Promotion: William Wiljanen 

Secretary: Lillian Williams 

Editorial Assistant: Bernadette Small 

Shipping: Richard Scully 

4. Clientele Served 

The Press has several kinds of customers : the wholesale 
and retail book trade, and Individuals and libraries. 
Accounts are now regularly served in the fifty states, 
the British Commonwealth, the Netherlands, Scandinavia, 
and Japan. 



6. Accomplishments 

Six books and one journal were already in print by 

July 1965; ten more, with two issues of the Transactions, 



UNIVERSITY PRESS 



have since been published. In terms of size of staff, 
this is a substantial accomplishment. Wesleyan Univer- 
sity Press, for exanqjle, also a new press, published 
fifteen titles this year with eight full-time employees. 



1965-66 list: 

1. Come Out Into The Sun : 
Poems New and Selected 

2. Urbanization of Japanese 
Laboi; 1868-1955 

3 . Between Wars and Other Poems 

4. The Lyman Letters ; New 
Light on Emily Dickinson 
and Her Family 

5. Thoreau In Our Season 



Dialectics and Nihilism: 
Essays on Lessing, Nietzsche, 
Mann, and Kafka 

The Rhetoric of Tragedy: 
Form In Stuart Drama 



8. Max Weber's Political Ideas 

In The Perspective Of Our Time 

9. Socialism and The Workers In 
Massachusetts. 1886-1912 

10. Jean Giraudoux. The Theatre 
Of Victory and Defeat 



Robert Francis 

Thomas 0. Wilkinson 

Anne Halley 
Richard B. Sewall 



Edited by 
John H. Hicks 

Peter Heller 



Charles 0. McDonald 



Karl Lowenstein 

A 



Henry F. Bedford 
Agnes G. Raymond 



11-12 Transactions Of The Charles S. Peirce Society , Volume 

Remaining in production: 

Check List Of The Publications Compiled by 

Of Thomas Bird Mosher of Benton L. Hatch 

Portland, Maine 



November 1965 

December 1965 

December 1965 
January 1966 

March 1966 
May 1966 

June 1966 
June 1966 
July 1966 
June 1966 
: I,ii; II, i 

Fall 1966 



f 



UNIVERSITY PRESS 



During the year, over 125 manuscripts and projects were 
submitted to the Press for consideration. The Press 
Coinnittee approved for publication the following manu- 
scripts, which are now in editorial or production and 
design phases : 



Maurice Baxter: 
William T. Scott 
William Sheldon: 
Maurice Golden: 
David R. Clark: 
John A. Scott 



Daniel Webster and the Supreme Court 
: Erwin Schrodinger; Nature and the Self 
The American Woodcock 

Fielding's Moral Psychology 

Monographs of Yeats Plays 
The -Defense of Gracchus Babeuf 



Several Press publications received special attention 
during the past year: 

Between Wars - featured in Books ; selected for an English 
edition this spring by Oxford University Press 

The Symphonies of Ralph Vaughan Williams - a Publisher's 
Choice selection, cited by the judges of the New 
England Bopk Show for over-all excellence 

Studies in the Philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce and 

The Talkative President - selected by Choice for its list 
pf. Outstanding Academic Books of the Year 

The sales record of the last year is beginning to be encour- 
aging, accounts payable averaging $1300 a month. Next year's 
billings can be expected to exceed this average, since each 
month the Press is better and more widely known, and the 
titles in print at that %ime will be the core of a fine back- 
list. Next year's sales will be boosted also by having per- 
sonal represetation in the trade. Automated sales analysis 
and record keeping are in initial stages of planning. Pro- 
motion and advertising during the year publicized primarily 
the existence of a new house to the trade and reading pub- 
lic. Advertisements were written, designed, produced, and 
scheduled in the following: 



New York Timies Sunday Book Section 
New York Herald Tribune Book Week 
New York Review of Books 
American Historical Review 
American Sociologist 
American Sociological Review 
Political Science Quarterly 
Massachusetts Review 
American Anthropologist 
Journal of Asian Studies 



Boston Globe 

Yale Review 

Poetry 

Amherst Record 

The American Scholar 



Library 


Journal 




Fact 
PMLA 
Journal 


of Philoi 


sophy 



UNIVERSITY PRESS - 4 



The accomplishments listed above represent the combined 
efforts of the Committee, which approves publication and 
establishes policy; of the staff; and above all of the 
Press authors. 



8. Needs 



Office and Warehouse space 

A single room in Munson houses six staff members 
and business associates. A handicapping situation. 
The staff looks forward to moving into quarters 
to be provided in the new Graduate Center. 

The attic in Munson houses the maximum load of 
books; a room in the Annex, recently assigned to the 
Press, temporarily postpones the inevitable need for 
a warehouse with shipping facilities. 

Equipment 

The list submitted several months ago, at Mr. Gentile's 
request, for Press Office equipment in new Graduate 
Center, covers major needs of next few years. Until 
office facilities are improved, acquisitions of new 
equipment will perforce be limited to items such as 
a typewriter and flat file, and miscellaneous small 
items. 

Personnel 

During the year, salaries of the present staff members 
were, happily, improved, and a new position, that of 
sales manager, created. At present three full-time 
employees share the major activities of a press : 
directing, editing, producing, designing, promoting, 
advertising, etc. In time, and even without a sub- 
stantial increase in number of titles printed per 
year, the editorial function should be largely separ- 
ated from that of directing; production and design, now 
over-burdened, should Involve the help of an assistant; 
and proofreading, now done on a free lance basis, should 
be in the hands of a cracker jack, if part-time, Press 
employee. 

Author-Publisher agreement 

For two years, the Press has operated without such an 



UNIVERSITY PRESS 



agreement. Since this agreement defines the rights 
and responsibilities of each party, it is essential 
to businesslike and equitable publishing. Its ap- 
proval by the administration is urgently requested. 



From: Water Resources Research Center Date: May 31, 1966 

To: Dean Edward C. Moore 

Subject: Annual Report for 1965 - 66. 



1 . Appropriation; 

Year Amount 



1963-64 

1964-65 $52,297.29 

1965-66 $87,500.00 

These appropriations represent the funds allotted to this program by the Office 
of Water Resources Research of the Department of Interior. An estimated equal 
amount was contributed by the University in terms of salaries of principal in- 
vestigators and services. 



2. Personnel; 



Date Professional Non-Professional 



September, 1963 

September, 1964 

September, 1965 1 1 

In addition to the above, the Center pays the wages of 7 graduate assistants, 9 
student laborers, and 3 non-professionals, all of whom are employed on the re- 
search projects. 



3. Organization Chart: 
Director 



Secretary 



-2- 



Sfudents or Clientele Served: 

Items a. and b. are not directly applicable at this time. 

c. The Water Resources Research Center supports 16 students — 7 as 
graduate assistants and 9 as student laborers. 



5. Professional Activities ; 

a. Seventeen projects were supported by Water Resources Research Center 
grants. 

b. These projects involved 5,0 man-years of research planning and services 
by the Director and Principal Investigators. 

c. These projects included two conferences for which the Center was co- 
sponsor: 

Municipal Watershed Management Symposium, November 9-10, 1965. 

This Land of Massachusetts: A Conference on Economic Geology, 
January 24, 25, and 26, 1966. 

d. Publications Record 

The publications record on June 30 is as follows: 

Number of papers published None 

Number of papers submitted for publication — 9 
Number of papers in preparation 3 



The following table shows the record by project: 



-3- 





Number 


Number 


Nurr 


iber in 


Project 


Published 


Presented 


Prep 


a ration 


WR-1 













WR-2 













WR-3 













WR-4 













WR-5 













WR-6 













WR-7 













WR-8 













WR-9 





2 







WR-10 





5 







WR-11 










1 


WR-1 2 













WR-1 3 





1 







WR-14 










1 


WR-1 5 













WR-1 6 





1 




1 


WR-17 














6. Major Accomplishments : 

These projects involved 9 University Departments. The principal investigators 
included 4 civil engineers, 3 geologists, 3 microbiologists, 3 aquatic biologists, 
one plant scientist, one soils scientist, 3 agricultural engineers, and one chemist. 

The 7 student assistants included 2 in agricultural engineering and one in each of 
the following disciplines: chemistry, civil engineering, zoology, aquatic biology, 
and soils science. 

The 9 student laborers included 4 in civil engineering, 4 in aquatic biology, and 
one in mathematics. 

Since the program was set up only a little more than a year ago, it can be stated 
that a good start has been made in focusing the University's intellectual resource 
on problems of water resources research. A permanent Director of the Water Re- 
sources Research Center came on duty in April of 1966. 

7. Special Projects or Programs: 

A start has been made in setting up regional research stidies in New England in 
which the six Water Resources Research Centers will cooperate. To advance this 



-4- 



effort, as well as to provide a means of pooling experience in program manage- 
ment, the Directors have formed the Council of New England Water Center 
Directors. The Council plans to hold q conference on water rights law in 
November, 1966. The objective here will be to clarify problems and research 
needs in this area. 



Future Plans: 



The Water Resources Research Center can fill a valuable function as the focus 
of water resources research planning. Initiation, and coordination in the Com- 
monwealth. It is planned that a core intra-mural research program be supple- 
mented by cooperative projects with other universities and agencies. To this 
end it is proposed that an archive of water resources research documents im- 
portant to Massachusetts be established and that an inventory and regularly 
Issued newsletter on research under way in the Commonwealth be established. 
It is further proposed that a continuing relationship be developed with federal, 
state and local agencies, other universities. Industry, consulting groups, and 
lay organizations for the purpose of effective communication on matters of 
common interest, including early identification of research needs. The develop- 
ment of this program will be accelerated in fiscal year 1967 and will require the 
use of additional personnel, equipment and facilities as follows: 

a. One additional full-time clerk-stenographer 

b. Desk, chair and typewriter for the clerk-stenographer 

c. It is estimated that 400 square feet of floor area is needed to serve 
this program in fiscal year 1967. At the present time, we have about 
275 square feet. 

As a focus of water resources research intelligence in the Commonwealth, the 
Center will have a growing responsibility for evaluating research In terms of 
the needs of the Commonwealth. Such evaluations must consider economic, 
social, legal and institutional factors as well as hydrological, engineering 
and scientific aspects. It is proposed therefore, that the Center staff be sup- 
plemented in fiscal year 1968 by an economist or social scientist who will be 
able to carry on this phase of the Center's program. The success of the Center's 
efforts will be measurable not only in new knowledge resulting from research. 
It will also be expressed in strengthening of water resources-related courses and 
training of students from diverse disciplinary backgrounds for work in the water 
resources fields. The devel opment of a long-range plan for this phase of the 
Center's program will be an important activity In FY 1967. 



/5/5/i>- 



'T- 



RESEARCH COMPUTING CENTER 

ANNUAL REPORT 
1966 



INTRODUCTION 

The installation in early 1965 of the Control Data 3600 system, 
one of the most powerful computers available, represented a signi- 
ficant step by the University toward its goal of becoming one of 
the country's major institutions for learning and research. With 
the new equipment there were new dimensions added to the capabilities 
and the problems of the Research Computing Center. The IBM 162 
remained in full service to the University community which it had 
served for four years. While continuing operations on the 162 0, it 
was necessary for the staff to learn new equipment and its associated 
software systems, and to aid the Center's users in converting their 
programs to take advantage of the newer, more powerful systems. The 
Center staff was aided in this transition by Control Data systems 
specialists who insured the proper functioning of the hardware and 
software systems, and provided training in these systems for the 
Center staff and various users. At the end of this first year of 
3600 availability, approximately 80% of the Center's computing work 
load is run on the 3600 system. 

The progress made toward development of the Research Computing 
Center into a distinguished computational facility is encouraging 
but the job has hardly been started. Currently, use of the 36 00 does 
not vary markedly from the patterjMi evolved for the much smaller 1620, 
except that a higher volume of jobs are run, some of which require the 
larger memory and more powerful instruction set available on the 3600. 



-2- 

The effectiveness of a major computing center is measured 
not so much by its available computing power as it is by the 
uses, and the efficiency of the usage, to which the computing 
power is' applied. Those centers which are ranked foremost have 
made significant contributions to the advancement of the compu- 
ting sciences. Their contributions have included innovations 
or refinements in the area of computing techniques and facili- 
ties which have advanced the use of computers as a tool for 
research in other disciplines; or they have represented a further- 
ance of the state of the art (or technology) of computer systems 
design, access, or usage. Such endeavors are especially appro- 
priate to university computing centers. 

The acquisition of a first-class computer provides the 
R esearch Obmputing Cfenter with the potential to a<:hieve a ranking 
place among computing centers. The achievement of that status 
is a goal which should dominate our planning. Progress toward 
that goal can only enhance the value of the fenter to the Univer- 
sity community, as its services improve and expand. 

The coming year is a critical one in which the direction for 
the future will be charted. The Cfenter must not stall at its 
current state of development, nor does it appear that it will. 
The University-wide interest in the UMffiS remote access system 
indicates strong support for the continued expansion and improve- 
ment of our total computing capabilities. The limiting factors 
in this growth will, it appears, be economic. The sine qua non 
of progress is people; we must attract and hold a highly qualified 
professional staff to provide the continuity, direction and 



-3- 

technical competence necessary to the continued betterment of the 
Gfenter in its service to the University and the 4-college community, 
'P survey of other university computing centers who have 3600' s, 
taken in. March 1966, indicates how minimal the Research Computing 
Qenter's current resources are. 

Breakdown of Staff by Type at 
University 3600 Installations 

Staff Half time Full time 
Place Mmin . Programmers Operation Total Students EguiVe 



Indiana 


2 


12 


11 


25 


7 


28 1/2 


cal, ,S.D iego 


1 


5 


17 


23 


5 


25 1/2 


Mich. S.U. 


2 


10 


28 


40 


22 


51 


Wise. 


3 


33 


29 


65 


15 


72 1/2 


Mass. 


2 


2 


8 


12 


5 


14 1/2 



Average 2 12.4 18.6 33.0 10,8 38.4 

Highest priority must be given to augmenting the Cfenter's 

programming staff with capable systems and applications programmers. 

It will also become increasingly difficult to meet expanding 

operational requirements without additional operations staff. iR 

reasonable minimum growth pattern which should be achieved is; 

Half time Full time 
Year Mmin . Programmers Operations Total Students Equiv. 



1965-66 


2 


2 


8 


12 


5 


14,5 


1966-67 


3 


4 


14 


20 


5 


22,5 


1967-68 


3 


12 


15 


30 


8 


34.0 



-4- 



Breakdown of Mass/6 8 by Title 



Operations 

1 - Operations Manager 

2 - Maintenance Engineers 
2 - Keypunchers 

2 - Secretaries 

2 - PBX Operators 

6 - Machine Operators 



Programming 

1 - Librarian 

2 - Consultants 

4 - Maintenance (System polishers) 

5 - Development (UMASS Mod 2) 



The University has established the Center with a major compu- 
ting system. It is our intention to match that excellence in 
hardware with a corresponding excellence in our capabilities for 
service to our community of users. 



ORGANIZATION AND STAFF 

The Center is organized under the Dean of the Graduate School 
and Coordinator of Research, Dr. Edward C. Moore, with the admini- 
stration of the Center being the direct responsibility of the 
Director, Dr. Caxton C. Foster, Associate Professor of Computer 
Science, who executes the policy formulated by the University 
Computer Committee under the chairmanship of Dr. Gail Oakland. 

The Staff organization is depicted in Figure 2,1. Fifteen 
full time positions, six half-time student positions, and a part- 
time Associate Director's position were authorized for 1965-66, 
Of these, all but one full time position were filled. Two of 
the programming positions are dedicated full-time to Cither depart- 
ments, and cannot be used in direct support of Center needs. 



-5- 



STAFF ORGANIZATION 



Asst. Director 

for 
Administration 
(vacant) 



Clerical 
Staff 

Mrs, I. Gurski 
Miss L. Boivin 



Dr. C.C. Foster 
Director 



Dr. J.A.N. Lee 
Associate 
Director 



Mr. Robert Hambleton 
Assistant Director 
for 
Systems 



T 



Mr. Everard Osbourne 
Operations Manager 



I 

Systems 
Programming 

Mr. F, Mirabello 
Student Assistants 



I 



Computer 
Operations 

Mrs . F . Markheim 
Miss I, Benoit 
Mr. T. Sullivan 
Student Assistants 



Keypunch 
Mrs. Y. Klimek 



Applications 
Programming- 
Consultants 

Miss K. Cowles 
Mr, D. Musante 
Student 

Assistants 

Programmers 

Mrs. J. Woodman* 
Mr. T. Osetek* 



♦Contracted to research projects 



Figure 2.1 



-6- 

1965-66 MAJOR EVENTS 

A. Control Data 3600 Operations 

During this year the Control Data 3600 assumed the major 
burden of the Center's computing workload. Programming aid 
and computer time were offered to users free of charge to aid 
them in conversion of all but the "hard core" 1620 programs 
to the 3600, The majority of this work was completed by the 
end of calendar 1965. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced with environment 
control equipment in the 3600 machine room throughout 1965. 
Continued efforts by the vendor (Hampshire Engineering) were 
only partly successful in correcting the difficulties. It 
appears that at least part of the problem is traceable to 
incomplete specifications provided the vendor* The advent 
of cold weather aggravated the problem until in December, 
the minimum environmental requirements could not be met. The 
result was a total suspension of 3600 operations while a 
Chrysler unit provided by the University's Physical Plant 
department was installed. This unit has functioned as the 
primary environmental control since its installation in 
February 1966, while improvements were made to the originally 
contracted system. Currently, both systems appear to operate 
satisfactorily, though the Chrysler unit is far more reliable. 
Plans call for the installation of another Chrysler unit for 
backup. 

At the beginning of the second semester, the basic programming 



-7- 

course of the Computer Science Program abandoned use of the 162 
and began use of the 3600. 3600 usage has progressed to three 
shifts of operation. Closed shop and open shop periods alter- 
nate throughout the shifts, with five closed shop runs during 
the prime hours. Two of the three shifts are manned by full- 
time staff and the remaining shift is manned by student help. 
This arrangement has been in effect throughout the Spring 1966 
semester. 

Figure 3,1 indicates the hours of usage by month. Note 
that in March the Basic Programming problems added signifi- 
cantly to the hours used. Figure 3.2 indicates the total number 
of jobs processed each month. 

B, Acquisition of LGP-30 

An LGP-30 computer system with Flexowriter ijiput and output was 
acquired by the Center at no cost to the University in April 1966 

C. Software and Services 

Software efforts have largely been directed toward the 3600. 
Significant accomplishments have been: 

1. Adaption of "Fast FORTRAN" obtained from Michigan State 
University, to our system for use in Computer Science course 
work. This system operates five to ten times as fast on 
student jobs as does the manufacturer-supplied FORTRAN 
system. Work on Fast FORTRAN was completed in time for its 
use by students for the Spring semester. 

2. Design and implementation of an automated computer time and 
services accounting and billing system. The complete system 



HOURS USED 
CDC-3600 



Student 



D J 



56 



'■:///(//'■///,/, - Unsponsored Re 



search 



i!i:j!'|i;,ji.:' t! - Sponsored Research 




Figure 3.1 



-9- 



i:^llMi 



NUMBER OF JOBS PROCESSED 
CDC-3600 



- Student 



8000 



7000 



6000 



5000 



4000 



3000 



2000 



1000 



'I'lW 



"Ij! Iji 



- Unsponsored Research 



- Sponsored Research 



P 



L 



m 

A 







^ 






:k- 



J.^...U. 




M 



1965 



— V — 
1966 



M 



Figure 3.2 



-10- 

was used for the first time for the /pril 1966 billing. 
Bills were ready before noon on the first working day in May. 

3, Gbmpleted translation of the COGO (Coordinate Geometry) 
system to the 3600, This is a set of routines to which a 
civil engineer can input field observations such as points, 
angles, distances, azimuths, etc, and receive answers about 
areas, grades, distances, etc. The system had been written 
for an expanded 1620 with disks. The COGO system has been 
made available to 6ther 3600 users through COOP, the 3600 
user ' s organization . 

4, Converted ECAP, a problem solving system for electrical 
engineers which is analagous to COGO for civil engineering, 
from IBM 7094 language to run on the 3600. The system is 
operable, but undocumented pending copyright waiver from 
IBM on their ECAP reference manual. 

5. The BMD series of statistical programs was obtained and is 
being incorporated into a program library system which is 
under development. The BMD programs were originally written 
by the staff of the UCLA Health Sciences Computing Facility 
for the IBM 7094, Conversion to 3600 was done by Indiana 
University. The Research Computing Center staff plans to 
convert a new series of programs recently announced by UCLA. 

6. Procedures have been established for the collection and use 
of a library of general purpose applications programs useful 
to students and researchers. Much redundant programming 
effort can be eliminated by a properly controlled program 
library. 



-11- 

7. A newsletter describing Center policies, services, hours, 
new programs, programming techniques, etc. has been estab- 
lished. The initial issue will appear in June 1966, with 
copies sent to all users. 

8. Plans for a remote multiple access computing system using 
teletype lines connected to the 3600 through a PDP-8 have 
been approved. The system, designated UMASS {Unlimited 
Machine Access from Scattered Sites) , will permit up to 64 
users to simultaneously enter problems written in the FORTRAN 
language into the 3600, and receive answers within a few 
seconds, ("Solutions computed while you wait,") The 
system is scheduled to be available in January 1966, 

9. Consulting Services 

Two full time consultants and a half time- student consul- 
tant are available to Center users to assist with program- 
ming problems. This service continues to be widely used. 
During the transition period from 1620 to 3600, an additional 
special consultant was available on a full time basis to 
aid in program conversion, 
D. 1620 Operations 

The IBM 1620 has continued in use by a dedicated group of users, 
and by the Computer Science Program. One closed shop run per 
day is scheduled. This policy is expected to continue. Pro- 
gramming effort on the 1620 by the Center staff has dwindled 
to zero. The system and its software have been extremely 
reliable. 



-12- 

E, Personnel 

During this year, a full time Director and an Assistant 
Director were appointed. An additional Assistant Director's 
position remains unfilled. 



-13- 

COMPUTING CENTER USAGE 

At the close of this year, 35 departments in the 4-college 
community have projects which use the Research Computing Center 
facilities. Seventeen graduate degree programs have no projects 
active at the Center; of these, four might be expected to have 
research projects on which a computer could be of aid. These 
data are summarized in Figures 4,1 and 4,2. 

Appendix A contains the abstracts of the problems currently 
using the Center facilities. 



-14- 



Computing Center Projects 
(by Departments) 



Administration 20 

Agricultural Engineering 3 
Agricultural & Food Economics 6 

Astronomy 6 

Basic Engineering 3 

Business Administration 10 

Chemical Engineering 7 

Chemistry 25 

Civil Engineering 13 

Computer Science 1 

Electrical Engineering 5 

English 2 

Food Science & Technology 5 

Forestry 12 

Geology 5 

Government 6 

Health Service (University) 1 



Industrial Engineering 1 

Library (University) 1 

Mechanical Engineering 9 

Philosophy 1 

Physical Education 3 

Physics 9 

Plant & Soil Sciences 4 

Political Science 1 

Psychology 36 

Public Health 1 

School of Education 6 

Sociology 11 

Speech 1 

Statistics 9 
Veterinary & Animal Sciences 5 

Zoology 1 

Commercial 10 



Total - 246 Projects 

35 Departments 
17 degree programs not represented 



Figure 4.1 



-15- 

DEGREE PROGRAMS WITH NO RESEARCH COMPUTING CENTER PROJECTS 

Ph.D. Masters 

♦Botany *Anthropology 

Entomology Dramatic Arts 

French Fine Arts 

German German-Russian 

History Horticulture 

Microbiology *Labor Studies 

Plant Pathology Landscape Architecture 

Spanish Romance Languages 

♦Wildlife & Fisheries 
Biology 



8 9 

17 with no projects 
♦Typically, a computer might be applied in this field. 



Figure 4.2 



I 



-16- 



PLANS 

In the introduction, the dominant goal of the Center was 
established as the achievement of recognition for excellence in 
service and in the computing sciences. A significant step in 
that direction has been made with the decision to implement 
the UMASS system. 

UMASS stands for Unlimited Machine Access from Scattered 
Sites. It is designed to extend computer access to multiple 
points about the campus (and possibly about the state) which can 
simultaneously submit problems to and receive answers from the 
Center's 3600. Information will be entered and recorded on 
teletypes, and transmitted over telephone lines. The advantages 
to this mode of operation are numerous. First, access to the 
computer is greatly simplified for the majority of users. 
Secondly, total problem solution time is reduced because of the 
immediate availability of results. Third, the computer itself 
can serve many more users in a given period of time, and is used 
more efficiently. Fourth, with the capability to save programs 
on a mass storage device, and to edit them from the teletype, 
the handling of cards with its inherent opportunities for intro- 
ducing errors is greatly reduced. 

Several disadvantages are also obvious. One is that users 
are restricted in the size of the problem they may submit, and 
by the language in which it may be expressed. It should be noted 
that this disadvantage will apply to a minority of users, A 
second disadvantage to these users is a more limited schedule 



-17- 

for batch processing of their jobs. (This is the manner in which 
they now are processed) . Our ultimate objective is to refine and 
extend the basic UMASS system until these quoted disadvantages are 
eliminated or at least minimized. Design work on the initial ver- 
sion of the systeiTi is under way, with the first operational version 
scheduled for January 1967, 

Additional hardware is needed to implement the UMASS system, 
A PDP-8 is on order to interface between the teletypes and the 
3600. For the 3600, additional mass storage in the form of high 
speed magnetic drums and disk units are also on order. The drums 
were scheduled to arrive in June 1965 but have been delayed sever- 
al times. We now expect them late in the summer. Disks will 
probably be deliverable in the Spring of 1967. 

The drums will serve two purposes. In the *tIMASS system, 
they will act as intermediate storage for messages being sent to 
and from the teletypes and for temporary storage of programs which 
are in various stages of processing. When the UMASS system is not 
operating, a drum-based batch processing system (Drum SCOPE) will 
be in use, which uses the drums to increase batch program throughput. 

The disks will provide a rapid access on-line storage capability 
for programs and data which are submitted and retrieved under con- 
trol of the UMASS system. Until the disks are delivered, slower- 
access tapes may be substituted. 

The additional programming and operational requirements im- 
posed by the development and use of these systems requires an 
augmented staff. Between now and June 1968, we should add ten 



-18- 

programmers , and seven operations personnel. The total staff 
breakdown for June of 1968 should be: 

Operations and Administration 

1 - Operations Manager 1 - Program Librarian 

2 - Maintenance Engineers 2 - Programming. Consultants 

2 - Keypunchers 4 - Maintenance (system error 

2 - Secretaries correction and improvement) 

2 - PBX Operators (for switching 5 - Development (design and 

phone lines to UMASS teletypes) implementation of extended 
6 - Computer Operators capabilities for UMASS, 

computer-aided instruction 

etc) 

15~ 12~ 

Beyond the development of the UMASS system, we foresee an 
increasing sophistication among our users levying additional pro- 
gramming and operational requirements on the staff. Some examples 
might include real-time experimental data acquisition and reduction, 
real-time stimulus-response generation and analysis, computer-aided 
classroom instruction, on-line business gaming with multiple par- 
ticipants, graphics and display control, and on-line scheduling. 

The currently planned increase in equipment and staff will 
require at the very least some modification of our physical arrange- 
ment. The projected staff can barely be housed in the current space, 
even with interior partitioning added. Equipment placement may pose 
a serious problem if any equipment other than that on order and on 
hand is acquired. Adequate space has been scheduled for the Center 
in the new Graduate Research Building, It is not yet clear whether 
we will outgrow our present quarters before the new facilities are 
ready , 



Report of Computer Science Program 
1965 - 1966 

Submitted to Dean E. C. Moore 
June 1966 





1963/64* 


I96V65* 


1965/66 


Appropriation 


- 


- 


$2^,850 


personnel 


1 


2 


5 


Ifo. of majors 


- 


- 


20 


;'o. of students 


300 


500 


1200 



* CSP as part of RCC 



I 



REPORT OF J.A.N. LEE 3. 

[nvited Talks etc. 



I 



COMMON Users Group ; 

Chairiuan, Technical Sessions, Fall Conference in New York, October, I965. 
Chairman, Nominations Committee. 

Joint Users Group 



Member, Executive Board. 

Conducted workshop session for Executives of Computer User Groups on the 
organization and speaker of Users Groups, Boston, April, I966. 

Appointed representative of JUG to ASA Committee on Programming languages, 
X3'^«2C, PL/I. Also representative of JUG to ACM Committee on Programming 
language s . 

UMASS Student Chapter ACM - Faculty advisor and institutional representative. 

- On February, I966 gave a talk on "The Computer is 
a Public Utility - A need 85 Justification". 

A. I. I.E. - Gave talk on - "The Computer is a Public Utility - The Philosophy 
Jk & Concept", March, I966. 

U.S. Coast Guard Academy - Gave one-day seminar on "Advances and Projections in 

Programming Languages", May, I966. 

3C Users Group - Gave talk on the place of Users Groups, Boston, April, 1966. 

Conferences Attended: 

ACM National Conference, August I965 

COMMON Users Group, October I965 and March I966 

SYMSAM, April I966 

JUG, April 1966 

SJCC, April 1966 

DECUS/JUG Workshop, April I966 

PUBLICATIONS: 

"The Use of a Large Computer on a Bureau Basis." by A. S. Douglas 
Computing Reviews, Vol. 6, no. h, pp. 222, July - August I965. (Review) 

Lee, J.A.N., Brown, R., Windover, L. 

"Highway Bridge Vibrations III: Cantilever Type Structures" 

Ontario Joint Highway Research Program Report #39, January I966 

Lee, J.A.N., Brown, R., Windover, L. 

"Highway Bridge Vibrations III: Cantilever Type Structures" 

Dept. of Civil Engineering, Queen's University at Kingston, Ontario 

C.B. Report #1^6 



Lee, J.A.N., McGowan, J, P. 

"The Prediction of the Buckling Load of Columns by Non-Destructive Testing 
Methods" Department of Civil Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, 
Ontario. Ontario Joint Highway Research Programme, Ontario Department of 
Highways, Report #Ul, August, I965. 

Lee, J.A.W,, Hope, B. B. 

"Tests on a Laboratory Bridge III- — Lateral Stability of the Trusses", 

Ontario Joint Highway Research Program, Report #23, October, 196i|-. 

LEE, J.A.N., "The Effect of Cross Frame Stiffness and Torsonnal Restraint 
on the Buckling of Pony T as Bridges" Ontario Department of Highway 
Research Program. Report #35^ June, I965. 

KINGSTON FORTRAN II Language Specifications 

3rd Printing University of Toronto Press. (Revised) January 1965 
4th Printing Conrputer Science Program, University of Massachusetts. 
(Revised) December I965 

Text on "Computers & Numerical Analysis" presently in page proof stage by 
Reinhold Publishing Co. Due for publication June 1966. 

Currently working on text on Compiler. Writing for possible publication 
by Prentice Hall. Manuscript is to be complete by September 30, I966. 



RESEARCH: 



Continued in the development of the KGTII system, now slated for implementa- 
tion on System 360. In particular have been investigating techniques for 
the extension of the basic language. 

Continued to investigate techniques of algebraic and symbolic manipulation. 

Have started work on the development of mathematical models of non-natural 
languages with a view of their more meaningful definition, extension, 
development and testing. Such a model will be machine independent and will 
enable a language originator to check for syntactical, semantic and pragmatic 
arabigultieB. Further, such a model might form the basis of a computer meta- 
language so that new laiiguages could be implemented rapidly. 



REPORT OF J. J. GODA 
Report July 1, I965 - June 30, 1966 

A series of six 1--| hour lectures on FORTRAN programming presented during the 
fall and spring semesters as a part of the Review Mathematics course which was 
set up by Dr. L, H, S. Roblie, Department of Chemical Engineering, University 
of Massachusetts for Monsanto Chemical, Springfield, Massachusetts. 

Special Projects 

During the period covering this report, a course very similar to our own 
CS 121 was given to three high school groups. There were 53 students from 
Cathedral High School, Springfield, 28 from Amherst Regional High School, 
Amherst and 37 students from St. Michaels High School, Northampton. 

The course consisted of between I8 and 25 hours of lecture at the various 
high schools plus workshop sessions at the Research Computing Center on 
Saturday mornings. Basic Fortran Programming by Decima Anderson was used 
as a text and most of the problems in the text were solved by the students 
outside of class. A final exam was given to the Cathedral High School 
group onlyj their performance for the most part was at least equivalent 
to our own students, and several of the students were above average when 
compared with University students. This program will continue next year 
under the sponsorship of the Student Chapter of the Association of Computing 
Machinery at the University of Massachusetts. 

A report of this work is in preparation and will be submitted to educational 
and technical journals for publication. 



REPORT OF S. RUBENSTEIN 

From September I965 to March I966, I served as a Programmer-Analyst for the 
Master Plan Study Group of the Massachusetts Bay Community College Program. 
Working with Mr. William Arthur, a Graduate Assistant at the Research Computing 
Center, UMASS, I developed a solution technique and did the programming for 
the following problem: 

Given the Public School Enrollments for each town in the Commonwealth, 
grade by grade for the years 1950 to 19^2, use numerical analysis techniques 
to fill in gaps in the data and to project the sizes of the high school 
graduating classes in the year 1975* Then, combine these figures ^^rith 
. commuting times throughout the Commonwealth Eind with geographic locations 
of the towns of the Commonwealth, and determine the Optimum Location of 
a Minimum Number of Community Colleges which will be capable of serving 
at least 95^ ot the available high school students . Constraints enforced 
included maxim'um and minimum sizes for the colleges and commuting times 
from student homes to the colleges. 

It appears from the work that we did that the research was justified. 
Other methods of analysis indicated that at least 11 Community Colleges 
were necessary. Our analysis showed that only 8 were necessary. This will 
eventually result in savings to the Common-vTealth of about $30 Million. 

At the present time I aiil preparing a paper concerning this work to be 
submitted to educational & Technical journals. 



7. 



6. Major accomplishments 



I believe the major accomplishment of the Computer Science Program this 
past year has been that it existed. The whole offering of the program has 
been produced and formalized though much still needs to be done to even- 
tually have a rich enough offering to expand to a Ph.D. program. Our 
current problem^ which is common with that of the Research Computing Center, 
is that the competition with industry in obtaining qualified instructors 
is to find that one can only hope to attract those persons who are dedicated 
to the academic life. Further, programs such as our oim have not yet pro- 
duced graduates who would fill the gap. 

8. Future Plans 

The future of the Computer Science Program will depend not only on the 
personnel attracted to the academic ranks but also on the type of education 
and research being conducted within the group. To this point of time, all 
efforts of the group have had to be concentrated on education with little 
time left for research. Such extra projects as have been operated have 
either been in the field of extra curi^cular teaching in the surrounding 
schools or in the maintenance or extension of systems in the Research 
Computing Center, 

In, the future it is hoped that a single research topic might be found which 
would Involve the talents of the whole group and which woxold be attractive to 
graduate students as a basis for M.S. thesis topics. Such a task could be 
the design and construction of a CRT display system with the subsequent 
software development which would lead to the availability of displays on 
campus in other departments. With such a system, Computer Science graduate 
students would became involved in the development of c"oiiiputer driver systems 
for automated teaching machines, the development of systems for graphical 
communication and design, and the techniques of information retrieval display. 

One of the great needs in the computer industry today is for students trained 
in the intricacies of computer software systems for supervision, monitoring 
and timesharing. While we can expect that the availability of the CDC 360O 
and the anticipated development of the UMASS system will provide such 
experiehce, we currently possess inadequate means of providing training in 
this area. The CDC 36OO is primarily for the benefit of the researchers on 
campus and is an expensive piece of equipment to allow students to learn 
upon. Further, its use as a teaching tool is inconvenient since any time 
which is available for such student experimentation is during the night hours. 

It is therefore the hope of the Computer Science Program to obtain a small 
computer for such training with the peripheral equipment necessary for re- 
search in graphical display systems and with the capability of having new 
equipment added as it is developed. Unfortunately the cost of supporting a 
meaningful Computer Science Program is far greater per student than most 
other courses of study and it cannot be anticipated that sufficient funds 
will ever be available for the purposes of Computer Science research. Thus 
as a starter it is hoped that the existing IBM I620 be made available for 
this purpose, with the allowance that experimental peripheral devices might 
be added and that the main frame be updated to allow the addition of the 
available devices to simulate the equipment necessary to support a supervisory 
and monitor system. 



On the other hand^ much of this cost might be avoided if a contract to 
develop software for a nev computer can be negotiated \rith a manufacturer 
Tjhich ivTOuld include the provision of the computer. 

As a start to this work it is proposed that in the next fiscal j^ear, the 
Computer Science Program group build a CRT device to be attached to the 
IBM 1620 to prove the compatibility of the team. Such a device would cost 
approximately $7^000 as opposed to the cost of an inexpensive commercial 
display at $37,000. 

With a meaningful program of researchers, it would be expected that the 
task of attracting staff would be made easier. 

The Computer Science course of study is, by definition, a galloping devouring 
octopus whose tentacles are clutching at and using the products of, many 
other disciplines. In some schools, the extension of Computer Science into 
other fields has been by the interest and subsequent education of the staff 
of Computer Science while in other schools, the specialists, in those other 
fields, have been drawn into the computer field to fill the void and have 
been given the computer knowledge necessary to exercise their skills in 
this area. 

At the University of Massachusetts there are voids in the Cosmputer Science 
Program needing courses of instruction and needing staff with special skills, 
while in the whole community there are gaps in courses of study where the 
Computer Science Program has the staff. In particular, the Computer Science 
Program has the need for staff skilled in linguistics and logic while the 
neck of applied mathematics in the University has been thoroughly wrung 
outside the Computer Science Program. 

This without sticking the neck of the Computer Science Program out too far, 
it would seem that the time is ripe to investigate the possibility of extend- 
ing the scope of the Computer Science Program (majdae under another najne) to 
provide service courses in these other areas, while gaining the specialized 
courses and the research project leaders needed. 

Unfortunately, the prime opponent to such a scheme will be the attitudes of 
most department heads who are not favorably disposed to not being able to 
control the activities of their staff hourly, nor are prepared to support 
the proposition of joint appointments, since it will admit to their lack of 
justification for a full appointment. 

As examples of joint sponsorship of course offerings, the following ought to 
be considered. 



TOPIC 



DEPAETMEa^lTS CONCERNED 



Information Theory 
Quantitative Linguistics 
Theory of Language 
Artificial Intelligence 
Computer Graphics 



Corap. Sci., Statistics & Elect. Eng. 

Comp. Sci., Language & Statistics 

Comp. Sci.., Language & Philosophy 

Comp. Sci., Philosophy & Psychology 

Comrp. Sci., Basic Engineering, Art. 



With regard to the course offerings In the Computer Science Prograai as 
presently approved by the Graduate Council & the Board of Trusties, after 
a year's experience and particularly after teaching these courses for the 
first time, it appears that in several instances, I overestimated the 
amount of information that may be taught in one semester. I, therefore, 
anticipate that certain courses will be extended to 2 semester sequences. 



i 



UNIVERSITY HCHJSIKG OFFICE 
UNrrERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Aimherst- Massechusetts 



ANNUAL REPORT 



(July 1, 1965 » June 30, 195S) 



John C. Welleo 

Director 

June, 1966 



GENESAL wmwacnm 



The Kousii^ Office has onoe again undergone vast changes and 
Improvements during the 1965-66 fiscal year, The staff loaci over 
the p88f two fiscal, years has increased two^'fold in r^sp&trt to the 
normal increase of totel student enrollment. The Hotsalng Office 
Staff has willingly undertaken iassny nesf tasks with b«r^h gpatefulnees 
and enthaslaetie accord. 

the material contained herein is a tabular fossn of both procedures 
end eccG«apllsh«©nts acted upon or achieved by the total office staff. 
It Is our firm belief that we «m£8t here to serve the stud^at body and 
staff of the University of MassEiSiusetts. <?e expect t<> receive an 
ever incressia^ amount of student and staff contact ae the next fiscal 
year unfolds. 



X H D £ X 



TOPIC mOE 

I. Appropriation for the fiscal ye«p 1963n»6'J, 

X£. Per9«ana>l <* number in each s«ank (Sept. 1963, 

III. U, ©f M. Keusios Office O£'g{s«%isational Chart <,,aoe 2 

IV. SttJdents or cllentsl® 8«x^ed (Sept.. 1963, 

8«pt. 1S6«J, Sept, 1985) ....»..,.....«• 3««J 

V. Faculty publications «resess7eh grants, research projects 

end otiier professionel »etivitles, , i., ,.,,.. .»«»,»•,«...... 5 

VI. Major acfCcmtpTlshwewts during the fiscal year 195S«>66 .,„» 6-7 

VII. Special projects or progr@ma opespated by the 0, of M. 
Hmising Office during the 1965-66 fiscal year...,,. 8 

VIII. Future plane and needs , .,. 9><-10 

IX. Appendex 11 



••♦ X *• 



AHPRQPRIMIOK for the Fiscal Yeans laes-^ei*, 196%-6S, 1885-66: 

^gfousinp; ]?q«^l^ Stude nt Affairs 

l963-6if « 



1969-65 - 
T965»66 « 



Total 



$1» 265.00 
$3,0«J5,00 
$5,380.00 



$ie«).00 (Frcra Student Senate foi? 

Forei^ Student Receprtiott) 



$108.00 (From Stucteat Senate f&v 

Foreign Student Eeceptioza) 



$2,625,00 



$7,905.08 



iz. FBRsoeiisa[i3 

A Segtmber 1963 

Director of Housing 
Staff Assistants 
Adainietrative Assistent 
Assistant IBousing Offiee£« 
Senior Clerk Stenographer 
Junior Clerk Stenc^repher 

B. September I96»t 

Direotos' of Kousii^ 
Staff Aseistants 
Adnialstretive Assistant 
Housing Officer 
Assistant Bousins Officer 
Senior Clerk Stenographer 
Junior Clerk Stenographer 

C. Septeiaber 196S 

DlrectOir of Housing 
Staff Asalstente 

Sraff Assistant (Foreign Studeate) 
Administrative Assistant 
Housing Officer 
Assistant Rousing Officer 
Senior Cleik StenQgr<n^ter 
Junior Clerk Stenographer 
Temporary Clerk Typists (03} 
Temporary Clerk Typist (03) 
Work StuAy Students 
Haintenanee Helpers 



Hunber iia Position 



1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
5 
2 



(As of May 1, 1966) 

(Ine. 1 as <»f F«8b. 1, 1968) 
(To Feb, 1, 1966) 



{Foreign Student Affaire) 
(As of A^il 26, 1966) 
(1 fts of 6A/6S) 



t 



CO 



CO 

o 



g 



en 

i 



o 

w 

K 
W 
O 




to 
to 



«• 3 «• 



IV. sTimsHrs ^ cliehtsle servers 

A. Septeaibar 1963 - 

Served a total cliantelc which included uiulergr^duste students 
in residence halls, faculty in l!Riv@£>sity«cnmed i^uwllings, staff in 
Univex>£tity<»«eRitdi SimlX±a^ tmA {p^sduata sti^ente $m l!iidv@i%it^^*oim@d 

2. Sept«Eaber IS^ » 

SeF^f^S Itt excess of 9,000 issdividuals in the eiNHis of rot»! 
asslgisnenats, apartment assigosssnts aod help iia <lis>«etis^ itkdvidisele 
^o «ev« ®e<&iqg off-^caropus acccsnmodatiims. 

C. Segrteralj^r 1965 » 

1. Frecisssfid residenese hall spplications f&v nare than 
7,(H96 undes^iraduatd ettiSewts. fhis figure inelisdiies aiors 
thMm HOQ Stckckbri^e @tude»ts and over 200 Graduate stttdents. 

2. Processed aseignnefiats for over 800 stud@atts in fHE>sterEtitie8 
ai^ sororities. 

3. Staff msnbers individually spoke with and snreeoBsed billing 
information for o^fer 1300 students who are either coasautirsg 
fsetna hcem or living in private facilities off-cantpiss. 

4. He-rcssigncd 4S0 Stockbridge students to f^tmroyear residence 
halls in preparation for occupancy in SefFtfisnbov «f 1968. 

5. Various meBibers of the office staff wet with smd counseled 
all of the University^'8 292 foreign studa&t«« 

6. Presently in the process of assignii^ ettadent rotsns for 
1956 for epproximat«ly 9o025 students. 

7. Have recently processed over 4,000 Susimer School applications 
for the current year. Of these more than 1,200 ware personal 
contacts, 

8. Daily contact with student, faculty and staff Ba^ahers 
seeking off'^eampus acconooodatimis totals warn 9,S0O persons. 
As many of these individuals may return to this office more 
than once the atftual muEiber of contaots «Eay have reot^hed as 
BKHiy as 8,000. 

9. The total office has handled raore than 2»000 piecies of 
correspondence going from the University to other parts of 
the world. 

10. Personally met with or correspmided with SHure than 150 
home ownezn, landlords, landladies and real ftstste agents. 
(Present file of rental listing cards nuntbers In excess of 
1.000) . 



I 



11. Screeoed applicatiosts for ^50 individuals seeking accomno» 
dations in University^ee^tsed dtrallii^s. Of these 12S assign^ 
Btents wsre made. 

12. Handled bus sehsdules for field trips and other events for 
offacampus and out=^f«state travel to more than 30 departments 

13. Assisted in preparing residence hall^ for the occupancy of 
ov<er 30 conferences «^ich izscluded apprc^iioatGly 8,000 confereee, 

If. Helped to secure loans for 38 f<^eign students « totaliitg 
$2,360. ( All loans were repaid as of ^y of 1936), 



- 5 =. 

V. TACmsr FtlBLXCATXOSS, BESEiffiCH GEMSfS, BESEMCH E^QJECTS AKD 0?M£R 
FROtS^SiamL HCTIVrflES: 

A. Particlpafed in The Katimsal ^socletion of Collie and 
University Housing OfficfSFS pssidence hall cost study progran 
(eopy on file at Penn State University, !Jnive»eity ?%i?k, 
Peona.}* 

B. Completed and pttbliahed study entitled ^A Study of Qff»C«»pu8 
Stooslng At The University of efetssachc^etts^ (see A^emdex) . 

C. Published brochure entitled "Qff-Cenepi» Priyately<aC%med Houaing" 
(see Appendex), 

D. Preeently foi?Dnilating br^^nire for "Uiiiverslty«>Oai^S Kentals". 
(Sroelmre in press). 

E. Developed a University broGhure pertaining to iBfeaenstion 
involving the Southwest Ccraplex. (Brochure in i^ress^ . 

F. Presently developing a University tsap cnid direotioaal information 
for iaeosdng students. (Zn press) . 

6. Condueted annual foreign student census for the XnCemational 
J^titute of Educaticm (cofy on file at Zo2aE« Office in Bt^ton). 

H. Surveyed faculty and rep^E^ed to the Internaticmal Institute of 
Education on research dealing with 2ntez*national EdsseatioQ 
Exchanse eoi^ucted at the University of Ksssachusetts* 



«9 6 tt» 

VX. IttJCR ACCOMPLZSIIMENTS during the fiscal yeax< 196S-SSs 

A. Integration of Stoekbpidga ScJiool of ^riculture students 
into foixr^yeer x<e8idenee halls. 

B. Publication of heretofm*e taesationed brochtircs and/or studies. 

C. Itelped to develop sew data pipocessing roaa, hewed sxsi billing 
casd for undergraduate studeate. 

D. Served as csKultants for ax^ participated in degigaing progratss 
for the Dniversity CoUe^ Ceos^nating CoBSBittec (developed 
spseial requirements for residence balls) . 

E. Added the Foreign Student Affairs Office as part of the 
Housing Office function (Sfey 1, 1966) . 

F. Acquired two preventative Kaietenan<» personmsl to help in 
locaticst nsricii^ and repairing various pieces of furniture for 
The University of Hassachusstts Building Authoritj^ Xesidence 
Hklls. 

6. Fonmilated a new undergraduate studeat rooa eeleetitta proce&ire 
(assigned acccanodatione to over 9,000 tmde^^rdduate and graduate 
students) • 

R. Developed and carried throng a proposal for the University of 
Hassachusetts Graduate Siause (192 grai&iate etudsete)* 

I. Developed a new l}niveraity<=>owEied apartment ^^lication keysort 
card. 

3, Completely developed and fcowelated a rental evaluation form 
based upon a square foot system for all University^owned dwellings. 

K. Developed a new maintenewM woric request ccmtrttl vyat&a for a 
iBOre effective and efficient completion notification process. 

L. Succeeded in adding several new work study students for research 
projects and general office help. 

H. Transferred the married student, faculty and off-eanpua housing 
office to a more suitable location in order to serve clientele 
sior* adequately. 

N. Produced lU new office forms to streamline office procedures. 

0. Developed a keysort card system for foreign students ii^ich 
includes all pertinent information concerning each student's 
stay at the University of HRssachusetts. 

P. Developed extremely elose ccwrdinatlmi ~ 1 Women* s 

Affairs Cosmittee of the Stmdmt Sewite » ss of 

•••Ipiins student rooms fmp Septeadwr 19t ions to 
halls t«tati«K msre than 1900 r 



Q. Developed an extremely good wortdtng relation. .itb more than 

38 spasidsisee hall staffs <, 



:i \r TiiT ii» ■* «a V 



/k'iaai 



, (a:**!-. X iim\:i i^'juta g», . i-H»biicM>'. 



R. Px^>cessed over SSO voxk z^equeets for residsiiee halls and 
apartanent t«pairs and Im^aroveneBtSc 

S. Xxiepocted avee 70 Oeiv^raitynowaed apartments and fnrocessed 
all necessary «)ork involved. 

T. Accoo^anied over HO foreign students to the State Rouse on the 
Ammal International For^^ign 8t^k!nt 7)9y in BostOBa 

U. Aeeenpanied over tlO students on a trip to tAvt O. V. Bnilding 
sponsored by Mortar Board and Sttktent Senate* 

V. Participated in the Experiment £a Zntrematitmsl Iriving at 
Putw^, Vermont to discuss amd arrange for <»?i@it<itiiaiQ and 
hoMBoStays for accepted students enterring the 1lkii¥C9peity of 
Massachusetts in SepteaOser of 1966. 



8 •* 



VII. SPECIAL fSDSECtS (m. PROSBMS OFESATED W TISE mTfEBSlTi OF 
t^SSACHOSEXTS HOOSI^ O^ICB dorlng 1965»66 fiscal s^ar: 

A, Oae aember of the staff participated as a faculty fellow 
in tto Smrtlwest Residesrtial College, 

B* Kel|Hsd to develop, fox^iulete, ai%d add nsobesship to the 
Southwest Coordinating CcsasjLttee. 

C. One nenber of the staff served as a int3&a>er of the iiaives'slty 
College Coordinetii^ Canad.ttea» 

D. Presently developing a natien^^xde stu^^ to ■gafOGsae^ the various 
fondinS pirocedures fas? epat^tment unJLts usli^ soate SO institutions 
of higher learoiz^ fo? the gstherisg of iHseded dat{)» 

E. Preeently developlBg a itro^osai iax' a Qnivespsity of ^seadiusetts 
liaiisiiis Ag^eaaent or contract f^a* n^ldeoee hall otodeatSo 

F« Cosidaoted tours of the TTniversity of S^ssachuoette 22»story 
residence halls to more than 830 students, steff and dignitaries. 



i 



vixx. vmwE TLsm and seeds: 

&. The Hoasis^ Office is ean^stly Goncerai^ with that ^ev^lopmettt 
of an adexpsate «11 encoaafaeaii^ 2»!8l)^nc9 hell pvoyspraM, A» aa 
outllvM? for 8(SBe pE>^oaed ^etseeSi^eft that sv^ a fsrognan ni^t 
include «e list ths foXlewii^ as basic guidelisass: 

1. Sev@lcpaent of a staff ^^^itioa as Pxt^raa 6j^?&!toi* of 
Residiance Halls. 

2. Cl9«9 eoos<di[Qati«m batsieen all aspeeta ef Qniveraity 
eounaeliog aervieaa aod the propc^ed resl^ae® hell px>agFai]t. 

3. Dav«loposnt of a gradttsta fro^ipwn in st^sdnnt persisfmiel 
aspvices f m* hi^er e^teatioc to be g;ivea to Baa^ of 
Residemse and lesi^kant Aesistanta (doctoral aed master's 
lev«l}. 

<l* Ba««lopBent of a eontiauing i»<»aewice tsminlag pragf^em 
for Heads of Reaidattee, Resideat Asaistast mA Caun^elos^. 
¥hie tpaioiag pvos^NM to be offered with acad^sie a?edit. 

5. Zatenaal sreeideBusa hall va»|^H»£billtiin ^vSjSoSl into 
tlvBa* ax^aas: 

a. Bead of Reaidaaoe 

b. Asaistaat Head of Reaidence 

e. Acadenie and Ctsltusniil eraduate Aaaistant 

d. Soeial end Athletic tx^adixate Asaiatant 

e. Counaelors and /ev Resident Asaiata^te 

6. The xHeaponeJlbilities ftxt irasidenee hall g aveaw i we nt ahoold 
ba oanpletely in t!)e hands of students elected to vaviotta 
pasitiona with the Herad 9S Seaidouse and AaoietaBt Head of 
Beaidenee as advisnva, 

B. Maw etaff and mataviala* Xn «rder that this offioa may Ailfill 
all of the duties required and exacted the foGLlotfins are needksd 
additionae 

1. The hiring of a Staff Aaaistant to handle area affaixn for 
the Housing Office la the Sautfaweat Residential eoll^sa, 

2. The development ef an off»cmpas inspect ion and/or appvoral 
team eonaleting of a staff assistant witb sa<n?at«?ial help. 

3. Additloaal seeretaylal help for each ef the main Hamting 
Office functions {9a»eanpna and off'-caaqnm housing and fcxroign 
attident affairs) . 

H. The devolopHMnt of «i inoreased midanot tell preventative 
■aintenance staff. Xt lo n ■uiiiwiiiliia that tiOs staff include 
various labor tradoaman oudi as -iiniiiwlwn, vatBhwa* atachinisto, 
pliiri>eni, eloctrieinaa, oto. Xn adiltiiM to tida it io alao 
l a ua nat uaaul that otfanr poroomMl on this otaff «l|^ inel 
•a ayholotery tmA anmmtwmu ^bqp to ovro ffr tin w ndn ot 
vfiHiidenQe hall fluumitt»N» repairs. 



« 10 - 

5. Agaid, in cBe^Bv to sdeqafttely neet the oeeda, &iti®s and 
re8|^0D9ibilit£«8 placed vi^em xus &&&itioaal eqiai^ect must 
l>e ]^pemu»gd. 7he9« it«ats incltid® three &l«et»ie type«nc>ite¥«, 
a l^otographix^ »aehl^» a diuplicatin® tsMMna asodl a misaeo» 
gx^ph madiism, one adSlti<mE)l staff caff and the eapiipnent and 
vehicles necessary foe tbe abGv@ mentioned rea»idssc» hall 
Igwvventativa iosiotsnance eteff {tools « materials » and carry» 
alls OP tvadka}* 

C. fhe develoiment of a »®B£dence hall ami spartafsat depooit syst^i 
to immre fo^ the finances of r^^iring thssaut fseilitias should 
iiti«ss beenn hvdkmtt Xmt or stolen, in order to aecMvpHeh this 
tssk various acccNmting and hocSsks^eplng staff will ba needed, 

D. Foreigitt 8tn£»it Affairs. 

1. !ta9 to tlsi iaipl£e»ti«0 of ccuflietiag li^alties to fo^peign 
governments <ssfecielly as pertained to stiiAusts s g osa so red by 
their sovenu^nts, the le^alty oath reopiired of graduate 
QMiotaats bs waivad in tSm oase of fose^isn students » 

2« Ctmtinaed participatiim ia «xdhan@e prograMss 

a. A^icen Scholavship Prograa of Hio/evi/ssm Universities (ftSViO) 

b. International Student Service (XSS) 

e. national Assoeiati<» fotr faveim Stttdnot Affairs (KftFSA) 

end that it make a financial ecntributioo to the Zmtittite 
of Zntemational SdaeBt£«m. The University of Massechusetts 
is the only Mew England land Greet Ihiiveiwlty vMch does not 
now eontribute to Z.Z«,S» however, lU Z.XoE« related students 
attended the Univerisity of Stessacbusetts firing the 19€S»6fi 
eesdSMiic year, 

3» KAFSA Field Ses^oe CoiURiltations 

It is recoBamaded that the IJniversity accept in the very 
near ftetore the offer nade ipf JSkSSk to sand a Field Service 
Prc^am trained consultant to help assess the frresent 
IJttivsrsity of Kassachusetts forel^ student svogMn* offer 
an ^over-viev*^ of the natiaasRl foreign student situatitnt and 
advise the Oiiiversity in regard to acQr DPshlsisi «oiaeeraiag 
its itttematlonal «d»ati«iial exeliense prsgran. 



* 11 



IX. AFFdBHEX 



I 



A. Foreign Student erovth 
ExehanQCe Visitor Progr«« 
Foreign Student Enrolliaent 

Foreign Student Departn^rtal Breakdown 
Foreign Student Hcne Cfxmtvy 
fjndergraduste Foreign Student Loans 

B. Off-Csaap» Privately«0»ned Housing Brochure 

C. A Study of Off»Cs«pus Houeiiig at the University of Massat^usetts 



A 



FORhlGN STUDENT GhOWTH— UNIVERSI'lT OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Year 


Un. Grad. 


Grad, 


3tockbrid<?e 


Total 


IVdO-61 


10 


46 


— 


56 


i9ol"62 


10 


63 


— 


73 


lVo2-e,3 


18 


92 


2 


112 


19^3-64 


17 


132 


5 


154 


1904-65 


22 


219 


7 


248 


i9o5-66 


5}^ 


250 


9iHi- 


292 



* Includes 5 special students 
-X-* Includes 3 special students 



Two copies to be completed and returned to: Facilitative Services Staff 

Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs 
Department of State 
Washington, D. C. :^0!;20 

EXCHANGE- VISITOR PROGRAM 

Annual Report 

1. Exchange- Visitor Program No. p-r ^ . c:^r^ 2. Twelve-month period ending June 30. 

3. Please list below, by each type of activity offered, the number of exchange 
visitors participating in the Program during the reporting period: 

Activity Number 

Students \ ] 

Practical Training ........ 

Professors , 5 

Research Scholars . ]7 

Other (specify) . . , ^ 



TOTAL 



33 



4. If the Program is currently inactive, please check desired action to be taken by 
the Department of State: 

/ / Cancel the Program (This will not preclude future designation of a Program) 

;' ;' Continue the Program in effect (Please give reasons) , . 






5. I, the Responsible Officer or Lue frogram^ indicated above, certify that no 
participant has been engaging in activities other than those listed above. 



(Mrs,) Evelyn H. Russell 

Signature of Responsible Officer listed 
with the Department of State 



^ul y Ij 1966 



Date Report Submitted 



University of Massachusetts 

Name and address of sponsoring institution 
as recorded with the Department of State 

Amherst, Massachupetts. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS FOREIGN STUDENT ENROLLMJj:NT 

1965-1966 



COUNTRY 


GP^ADUATE 


ANTIGUA, 


1 


W. INDIES 




AUSTRALIA 


1 


AUSTRIA 




BRAZIL 


1 


CAi>ffiODIA 


1 


CAN/\riA 


16 


CHINA 


100 ■ 


COLOMBIA 


2 


CUBA 




ECUADOR 


1 


EGYPT 


2 


ENGLAND 


5 


ETHIOPIA 




FINLAND 




FRANCE 


5. 


GERMANY 


4 


GHANA 




GREECE 


4 


HONG KONG, U.K. 


4 


HUNGARY 


1 


INDIA 


26 


INDONESIA 


1 


IRAN 


1 


IRAQ 


1 


ISRAEL 


4 


ITALY 


1 


JAFIAICA 


4 


JAPAN 


7 


JORDAN 


2 


KENYA 


5 


KOREA 


15 


LEBANON 


1 


LIBERIA 




MALAWI 




MALAYSIA 


1 


MEXICO 


2 


NEPAL 


1 


NIGERIA 


1 


PAKISTAN 


5 


PANAMA 


1 


PERU 


1 


PHILIPPINES 


9 


POLAND 




PORTUGAL 


1 


RYUKYU ISLANDS 


1 


SAUDI ARABIA 


3 


SOUTH AFRICA 


1 


SPAIN 


1 


SWITZERLAND 


1 



UNDERGRADUATE 



1 
2 



1 
1 
4 



STOCKBRIDGE 


SPECIAL 


TOTAL 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


2 


1 


20 




1 


101 
3 
2 


1 




2 
2 

5 




1 


1 
5 
4 
1 
5 




1 


9 
1 

27 
1 
1 
1 
6 
3 
4 
7 
3 
6 

15 
1 


1 




1 


3-v 




8 
1 
2 
1, 


2 




4 
5 
1 
1 
9 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 




1 


3 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS FOREIGN STUDENT ENROLLMENT 

1965-1966 



COUNTRY . GRADUATE UNDERGRADUATE STOCKBRIDGE SPECIAL TOTAL 
TRINIDAD & 1 1 

TOBAGO 
TURKEY 2 2 

UGANDA ,11 2 

URUGUAY 1 1 



TOTALS 250 28 9* 5 292 

* includes three special one semester students 



NUMBEK OF FOREIGN STUDENTS IN VARIOUS DEPARTMENTS 
UNIVEl^SITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
1965-1966 



College of Agriculture 
Agriculture 

Agriculture and Food Economics 
Agricultural Engineering 
Agricultural Science and Technology 
Agronomy 

Animal and Poultry Science 
Entomology 
Fisho BioloQT 

Food Science and Technology 
Landscape Architecture 
Plant and Soil Science 
Plant PatholoQr 
DEPAEIMS&iT 'iOT. 

College of Arts and Science 
Art 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Computer Science 
Economics 
English 
Geology 
Ggrman-Bus s ian 
Government 
Mathematics 
Philosophy 
Physics 

Political Science 
Pre-med 
Psychology 
Romance Languages 
Sociology- 
Speech 
Zoology 



School of Business Administration 
Business Administration 
Accounting 



School of i^ducation 

»3chooi of Engineering 
Engineering 
*^heiuical ^%gineering 
•^ivil J^Rgineering 
Electrical Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering 
Industrial Engineering 



2 
6 

11 
1 
1 
6 
6 
2 

22 
2 

7 
2 



3 
1 

37 
3 

11 

4 
2 

5 

19 

a 

1 

25 
1 
1 

2 
6 

5 

1 

4 



7 

1 



1 

5 
21 

3 
4 
3 



JH. 



8 



JL^ 



I^UMBiJi. OF FOiiElGl^ STUDENTS IN VAIilOUS DEPARTMENTS 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
1965-1966 

School of Home Economics 6 

School of Physical Education 1 

Public Health 1 

Statistics 11 

S 

SpeciaJL Students 5 

Stockbridge 9 

TOTAL "292" 



o 

ts) 03 oi tp njl^a "Ti "T^ W| K cri d o t?i w.OiO toiS^JHi 



1 o "O o o 
! o <t) o " 

o o o 



Cfl hii O tr ET! Pi Oi (D 
«< : CD H «< p. r^ < M 

tr: e c« H- O • rt p.' 



' Crq cr k' o I o CD H^ o w 



' O (W iO (t c+jc+IO) 

H H ;t3 "o , i g ! :05 



O I-*- 






-< — i- 



S5lR" 



o 






I 

i C' 

CO 



22 W B ;c+icn VI 



cc 



, CD !c^' 



w 



t 



ic+i 
o 

H 



■DiTJ t-*,*^ '^l&l 

i c»-! c+-:cn icy-'i* 
-O o 




i { 



1 ct-IH-'CD ■ P '' " 
- '^ - ■ o 



; o lo jo let) V^ ; 



Al^ 



o 

JO W (W (W H 

>-i 

o 



»-J "-J "^ ct 
O O Q CD 



i=T- 



x: 



"^ H w Crj 



_L-L 



"Vtw 



X 

-M 



^-:jt 



,J,.- 



IN 



^p*s-' 



"tc 



I ( 



r 



-^psr- 



,-j — ^.._, 



40- 



iH , ... 



( 
— L 



UJ-l, 



-.-...+__ — ,_4 — .;.-i...-„]7^. ,....U^^4 



r^a- 






l=f 






■) 



, \ 

-i — u 



~r-Tl 



!H 



"1 — f 






^ ^o 



t-3 
CD 
O 



i 



.■„.L^-. 



; ^:>l(-J\^| 



tF^t 



Til 

'• ! 

in 
\o 





> 

O 





-!h-r 



s 



11 



_L- 



■ HK 



TT 



>iL 



._.Li._4!ii__Mitifci 



■H 



U .J. L. 

■■'-^ iJ—^-- - >— • 



! ! 



.4- 






I I 

I ! 



•Hi.' 



._.< x.._. 



XT 






._4 



~r-i — j- 
i 1 ! 

-r 



-I r; 



■""i" 



I 



~loT 



-f 



_^^.Jh'P] 



^.. -lAnAigua , W , I nd . 
I Australia 

Austria 

Brazil 

Cambodia 

Canada 

"China 

Colombia 

Cuba 
T 1 ^""Ecuad or 
T i ^gypt 



tti: 



* 1 

-t-t 



" England 



# 



Ethiopia 

J Finland 
[""""France 
'Germany 
Ghana 



1 j Greece 






FT^I 



±i 



..J I 

I 



•±t pfcl"" 



ii: 



4 

,.,p.U..._ 

' 1 



■■"I 



"TT ong Kong, U,K 
"H'ungary 
"India 
"Indonesia 
Iran 
'Iraq 
Ifilsrael 




o 
o 

c 

3 






Italy 

Jamaica 

:;_Japan 

jTordan 

Kenya 
-Korea 
_i>ebanon 
_Ij.beria 
-Malawi 
J^alaysia 

Mexico 

"Nepal 

Mgeria 

Pakistan 

Panama 

Peru 

Philipines 

Poland 

Portugal 

Ryukyu Is, 

Saudi Arabia 

ST Africa 

Spain 

Switzerland 

Trinidad Z Tobago 

Turkey 

"Uganda 

Uriiguay 




Antiguaj, Wl I^^^r. ., 

Aus t ral ia 

Austral _. 

Brazil 

Cambodia 
Canada 

China 

Colombia 

Cuba 

Eciiador 

Egypt 

England 

Ethiopia 

Finland _ 

France 

Germany 

Ghana 

Greece 

Hong Kong^ U._DT 

Humgary 

India 

Indonesia 

Iran 

Iraq 

Israel 

Italy 
jjamaica 

Japan 

Jordan 

Kenya 

Korea 

Lebanon 

Liberia 
.Malawi 

Malaysia 

Mexico 

Nepal 

Nigeria 
_Eiikistan 

Panama 

PW3U 

"Philippines 
Poland 
Portugal 
Kyukyu Is. 
5audi Arabia 
S, Africa 
'Sjpain 

Switzerland 
"Trinidad Z Tobago 
Turkey 
Uganda 
Uruguay 



o 

o 
a 



Undergraduate Foreign Student Loans-- — -Sept. lu, 1964-June 16, I966 



Name 
l^orman i^ung Man Chan 



iiwaebon Conatehi"' 
George Gdkonyo 



Vincent Gondive 
Abdullaln Ibrahima 
.j Reds on Kapitao 
Laston Adamson Kaunda 



Wainam k, Massai 
Abdulsalami Matazu 

Philip McClain 



William Mtawa4»i- • 



•Joshua Mtimuni 
) 



Jon<^3 Ntholo 



Loan 



150 



$30 

$150 
$200 
#50 



$60 
$50 



$50 
150 

$500 

$60 
|20 
$80 

$30 
$40 



145 

|ioo 

$100 
$100 
i|25 
$15 
$100 

$35 



$60 



$50 
$50 



$60 
$80 



Date Authorized 


Repaid 


2/1/65 

3/25/65 
9/21/65 
2/14/66 


2/1 9/65 

4/29/65 

10/30/65 

4/18/66 ($3C 

5/19/66 (^C 


6/15/65 


6/26/65 


9/25/64 

3/2/65 

6/3/65 

9/10/65 

1/13/66 

3/2/66 

4/22/66 


10/27/64 

4/27/65 

6/24/65 

12/15/65 

2/18/65 

4/12/66 

5/li/66(t3 

6/10/66-: ($3 


9/13/65 


9/27/65 


9/7/65 


10/27/65 


9/13/65 


9/28/65 


1/7/66 

2/18/66 

3/11/66 


1/24/66 

4/28/66 
4/29/66 


4/26/66 


6/2/66 


4/1 5/65 


5/18/65 


12/10/64 

2/1/65 

7/8/65 

10/1/65 

1 0/20/65 

11/24/65 

4/14/66 

5/18/66 


1/15/65 
3/16/65 
9/14/65 
11/1/65 
n/1/65 
1/11/66 
4/14/66 
6/9/66 


1/21/66 
2/1 0/66 
3/11/66 


1/26/66 

3/1/66 

4/29/66 


9/13/65 
3/28/66 


9/27/65 
5/9/66 


1/14/66 
3/11/66 


1/26/66 
4/28/66 



Undergraduate Foreign Student Loans— Sept. 10, 1964-June 16, 1966 



nock Ntokotha $50 6/14/65 7/»9/65 

yivanus Odur«kl(Ve ' $50 6/28/65 8/30/65 

$100 9/1/65 9/29/65 

TOTAL ^2360 



ALL FORIEGW STUDENT LOANS PAID IN FULL. 
June 16, 1966 



1 



£ 



Off-Campus 

Privately-Owned 

HOUSING 




Housing Office 

University of Massachusetts 

nherst, Massacliusetts 01002 

413-545-2785 



"^ 



9»c«ltT, BXmtt, gr«l — t« ■tuiaa'ts, aad oadar- 
graCoBt* atvlmt* ef tb« OalT«rslty <*o aeak off- 
eaavaa actMNodatlMU aaj ettalm ••■istaaca froa th« 
HoMlBf Offle*. FroTidad *re: 

1 . A card f 11* of landlords iriio hSTo ayart- 
■sBta, hoaavs, aad rooaa for rent and 
inforaatloD akoat honsea for aale. 

2. Rental llatlnga of local realtora, 
elaaaifled oavayafer rentals, and a 
tonlletin board iriiere peraona eeaklng 
a rooaaate aaj adTortlae. 

3. Inforaatlon about need furniture, local 
realtora, brochnrea of apartnont dcTclop- 
■enta, and aapa of the area. 

Bacaoae rental llBtlaga change qnlte rapldlj 
and Boat landlorda prefer to aeet a proapectlre tenant 
in peraon, it la lapractlaal to send 'lists" of rental 
aeeo^odatlona b^ sail. In addition, becanse personal 
roqalraaenta and taatea rary ao widely, the Hoaalng 
Office ia nnable to reaerre off-eaapna rentals for 
peraona; all contaeta and exchangee of aoney are aade 
directly between the renter and the landlord. The 
Hooaing Office doea atteapt to reaore rental liatings 
when they are no longer arailable, but becauae of the 
high rental tnmoTer it can not gviarantee the current 
availability of off-oaapua listings. 

If you find it inconTenient to Tialt Aaherat, 
the Houaing Office will be pleaaed to aaaiat aoaeone 
that you hare aaked to repreaent you, such as a 
friend, relatlre, or departaent aaaociate. If yon 
aak aoaeone to repreaent yon, pleaae gire thea your 
apeoific requlreaents and the aaziaua rent, including 
utility coat, that yon are able to pay. 

TTPgS OP B0P3IKG 

The rapid ezpanaion of the UniTersity has 
roaaltod in a aerlona shortage in off-oaapus housing. 
Boons, apartaents, and houses in the UniTeraity area 
are often rery difficult to find; aoderate priced 
rentals within three Biles of the UniTersity are 
usually taken early. The best tine to look for houaing 
ia in June and July at which time the greatest nnaber 
of Tacanciea occur. You should plan to spend a few 
daya in iaherst because housing arrongeaents can 
seldoa be aade in one day or by letter. 

There ia a great Variation in the quality and 
price of rentals. Host apartaents and houses listed 
are not furnished; a few do not haye a store or 
refrigerator. Host apartaents listed are in conTerted 
priTBte hones, but a few are in apartment baildings. 
Rooas that allow cooking priTlleges or the use of a 
hot plate are extreaely difficult to obtain. 

Rents are usually m the following ranges: 

?urni3hed Rooas 
Pumishcd Apartaents 
Unfurnished Apartaents 
Onfumished Houses 

Room rents usually include heat and electricity, but 
apartment and house rents often do not include these 
utilities. 



_ 


t 45 


to 


t 60 


per 


aonth 


- 


t 90 


to 


$160 


per 


aonth 


- 


1 80 


to 


«150 


per 


aonth 


- 


1110 


to 


«200 


per 


aonth 



LANDLORD-TENANT ASREEWRNTS 

The Housing Office urges you to pay a deposit 
and get a written agreement of occupancy when you 
decide to rent a room, apartment, or house. This 
1:; particularly important if you do not intend to 
occupy the rental for several months. Although 
It IS not required, the Housing Office strongly 
rrcommends that landlords and tenants make a 
written rental agreement before occupancy to avoid 
possible future misunderstanding about the rental 
terms. .Specific information can be obtained from 
the Housing Office about what points should be 
di.Tcussed and agreed upon before occupancy. 

D:::f:Kii«iWftTiON 

Landlords may select their tenants by having 
rcTuirements that apply to all University persons, 
but they may not discriminate because of race, 
religion, color, or national origin. All landlords 
who list their rentals with the Housing Office have 
.signed a pledge of non-discrimination. If you 
believe you have been refused housing because of 
discrimination, please notify the Housing Office. 



Private rental listings in the University 
area can be obtained from the following newspapers: 

AmhPist Record Journal (weekly). Cook Place, Amherst 

naijy Hampshire Gazette (daily). Armory St. Northam- 
pton 

Greenfield Recorder Gazette (daily), 397 Main St. 
Greenfield, Mass. 

lelchertown .Tentinel (weekly). North Main Street, 
Relchertown,, Mass. 



^ 



REAL ESTATE AfTD RENTAL AGENTS 
AS C? KAY 1966 



putlication of the following list of 
real est^^te acpnts by the Housing Office of 
the University of Massachusetts does not 
constitute an endorsement of these firms 
except to acknowledge that they have signed 
a statement that they will not discriminate 
against University persons because of race, 
religion, color, or national origin. (Note - 
R indicates rentals; S indicates sales.) 



Name 

AMHERST 

William Aubin, Inc. 
Robert Brown Rl.Est. 
Raymond Campbell 
William Ezbicki 
D. H. Jones 
Kamins Rl. Est. 
Lincoln Rlty Assoc. 
Robert Shiunway 
Wysooki Rl.Est. 

BELCHERTOWN 

Jackson t Harrington 
Real Estate 

Shaw Realtors 

Trembly Agency 

EASTHAMPTOH 

O'Brien - Craig 
Real Estate 

Walter Szary Agoy. 

Taylor Agency 

York Agency 

FLORCTCE 

Bernard t Joyce 

Real Estate 

a. A. Finck 4 Son 
SREEKPIELJ 

Cohn 4 LeTitch 

Parrell Realtora 

Kelly Rl. Est. 

Martin Rl. Est. 
HADLEY 

Jarrick Rl. Est. 

Pioneer Rlty 

Tomlinson Bldra. 
HATFIELD 

Rogaleski Rl.Eat. 



Phone Type 



Address 

239 Triangle St. 
320 N. Pleasant St. 

27 N. Pleasant St. 
894 West St. 
279 Amity St. 

55 S. Pleasant St. 

40 Main St. 
309 E. Pleasant St. 

15 N. Pleasant St. 



Woodhaven Dr. 323-7754 RS 

Main St. 323-7456 RS 

236 N. Main St. 323-6610 RS 



256-6344 


RS 


253-5555 


RS 


256-8141 


RS 


253-5198 


RS 


256-8181 


RS 


253-2515 


RS 


253-7879 


RS 


253-3995 


RS 


253-3630 


RS 



103 Main St. 

77 Main St. 

15 Glendale St. 

107 OliTer St. 



9 N. Main St. 
63 Main St. 

269 Main St. 

240 Federal St. 

20 Federal St. 

31 Federal St. 



527-0588 RS 

527-9292 RS 

527-3862 S 

527-4843 RS 

584-5123 S 

584-1970 RS 

774-4371 RS 

773-3686 RS 

774-4931 RS 

773-7402 RS 



293 Russell St. 584-0374 S 

102 Rooky Hill Rd. 253-2957 RS 

5 Meadowbrook Dr, 253-2084 S 



8 Maple St. 



247-3411 



RS 



Name 



Address 



Phone 



Type 



MONTAGUE 










Carroll A. Strysko, 
Agent 




N.Leverett Rd. 


367-2361 


s 


NORTHAMPTON 










Alexander Borawski 
and Company 


88 


King St. 


584-5555 


RS 


A-Z Realty 


100 


Main St. 


584-1987 


R 


Pelix Borawski 
Real Estate 


25 


Main St. 


584-8639 


R 


Desoarage Rl. Est. 


23 


Munroe St. 


584-9033 


RS 


Hampshire Realty 


4 


Main St. 


584-1913 


RS 


Klekot Realty 


227 


Bridge St. 


584-3777 


RS 


Mutter Real Estate 


351 


Pleasant St. 


584-3382 


RS 


Martha Simison 
Real Estate 


190 


Roimd Hill 


584-5367 


RS 


Skibiski Rl.Est. 




N. King St. 


584-3428 


RS 


Catherine Yates 


333 


Elm St. 


584-4006 


R 


PALMER 










Marion Allen Rl.Est. 


215 


Ware Rd. 


283-6421 


RS 


SOtJTH DEEHPIELD 










Strout Realty 




Rte. 116 


665-2172 


RS 


SOUTHAMPTON 










Lussier Rl.Est. Brtr 




College Highway 


527-4070 


RS 


Prank Wayne Rltr. 




High St. 


527-2354 


S 


SUNDERLAND 










Sanborn Rl. Est. 




S. Main St. 


665-2154 


RS 


Skiblski Rlty 




Main St. 


253-7222 


ES 


TURNERS PALLS 










Partridge-Zsohau.Ino 




Millers PallB 
Road 


863-4331 


3 


Chester J. Sokolosky 
Broker 


56 


Fourth St. 


863-9443 


S 


WEST HATPIBLD 










Yarrows Realty 




Boi 77 Weet St. 


247-5089 


S 


WILLIAMSBURG 










Duval HI. Est. 




Ciary Rd. 


268-7544 


RS 



PRIVATE APARTMENT DEVELOPMENTS 
AS OF MAY 1966 



Within the past few years several 
garden apartment type developments have been 
built near to the University. The University 
does not necessarily endorse these acoommo- 
dations, but it does attest that the rental 
agents have agreed to adhere to the University 
policy on non-discrimination because of race, 
religion, color or national origin. Specific 
information about availability, rent, features, 
brochures, etc., should be obtained directly 
from the rental agents whose business addresses 
appear on page 3. (Rental agents are located 
in the same town as the development unless 
otherwise indicated.) The developments in 
alphabetical order are: 



DEVELOPMENT NAME 


TENANTS 


(NO. 


OP 


UNITS), 


(RENTAL AGENT) 


ACCEPTED* 


SIZE 


. REHT/MO.»» 


Berkshire Apartments 


MP,MS,SP, 


(U) 


1* 


Rm (Studio) 


Highland 4 Smith Sts. 


SGM.SGW, 






$125 inc. 


Oreenfleld, Mass. 


SUM.SUW, 


(U) 


4 


Rm (iBr.) 


(Cohn t Levltch) 


C. 






$160 inc. 






(15) 


5 


Ra (2Br.) 
$180 inc. 


Colonial Tillage 


MP,MS,SP, 


(26) 


3 


Rm (1Br.) 


77 Belchertown Rd. 


SGM,S&W, 






$110 inc. 


Anharst, Mass. 


C. 


(♦5) 


4 


R» (2Br.) 


(Kulns Real Estate) 








$130 inc. 


Creatvlew Apartments 


M?,MS,SP, 


(20) 


3 


R« (IBr.) 


1001 N. Pleasant St. 


SOM.SGW, 






$130 inc. 


Aoharst, Mass. 


SUW.C. 


(22) 


4 


R« (2Br.) 


(D. H. Jones) 








$150 Ino. 


Crown Point Garden 


MP,MS,3P, 


(40) 


3 


RM (IBr.) 


Apartaents 


SGM.SGW, 






$135 


370 Northampton Rd. 


SUW.C.P. 


(40) 


4 


R» (2Br.) 


Aaherst, Mass. 








$160 


(Sklblskl Real Estate 










Xorthampton, Mass.) 










Boho Hill South 


MP.MS.SP, 


(56) 


5 


Rn (2Br.) 


Sslehcrtown Rd. 


C,P. 






$175 inc. 


Aaherst, Mass. 




(6) 


6i 


R« (3Br.) 


(William Aubin,Inc.) 








$195 inc. 


Haleourt Gardens 


MP,MS,SP, 


(4) 


3 


Rb (IBr.) 


Hallock Street 


SGM,SGW. 






$135 inc. 


Aataerst, Mass. 




(12) 


4 


Rm (2Br.) 


(Robert Shumway) 








$150 ino. 



r 



PEVELOPMRNT NAME 


TENANTS 


(NO. 


op 


TJMITS), 


(RENTAL AGENT) 


ACCEPTED* 


SIZE 


, RENT/MO . »• 


^Tillside Apartinent.K 


MF,MS,SP, 


(19) 


3 


Rth (IBr. ) 


Rour;d Hill 


C,P. 






tl'.S inc. 


Nnrthampton, Mans. 




(5) 


i 


Pra (2Br. ' 


( !\ipx Borawski ft Co. ) 








S1S0 inc. 


'■obart Apartnients 


r^p,ns,c. 


(2) 


5i 


Sin (2?.r. ) 


Hohart Lane 


p. 






$150 


Amherst, Mass. 




(8) 


6 


Rm (3Br. ) 


fi). H. Jones) 








$165 






(4) 


6 


Rm (3Br. ) 

»175 


Mill Hollow Apartments 


MP.MS.SP, 


(28) 


2* 


Rm ( 1 Br . ) 


Suminer Street 


SGM.SGW, 






S95 inc. 


North Amherst, Mass. 


c. 


(28) 


3* 


Rm (2Br.) 


(Jackson & Harrington 








S110 inc. 


Belchertown, Mass.) 










177 Apartments 


MP,MS,3P, 


(16) 


3 


Rm (IBr.) 


177 N. Pleasant St. 


SGW. 






$100 


Amherst, Mass. 










(D. H. Jones) 










Presidential Apts. 


MP.C. 


(30) 


3 


Rm (IBr.) 


1107 N. Pleasant St. 








8130 


Amherst, Mass. 




(12) 


4 


Rm (2Br.) 


(Kamins Real Estate) 








$150 


Town House Manor 


MP.MS.SP, 


(8) 


14 


Rm (IBr.) 


Easthampton, Mass. 


SGM.SGW, 






$75 inc. 


(O'Brien-Craig 
Real Estate) 


SDM.STJW, 


(22) 


4 


Rm (2Br.) 


C. 






$115 inc. 


University Park Apts. 


MP.MS.SP, 


(40) 


24 


Rm (1Br.) 


Main Street 


SGH,SGW, 






$105 inc. 


Amherst, Mass. 


SUM.SUW, 


(24) 


34 


Rm (2Br.) 


(E. J. Campbell) 


C. 






$130 inc. 



* (MP) Married Faculty, (MS) Married Students 
(SP) Single Faculty, (SGM) Single Graduate 
Men, (SGW) Single Graduate Women, (SUM) 
Single Undergraduate Hen, (SUW) Single 
Undergraduate Women, (C) Children, (P) 
Pets. 

** Bath not included in size description; 
inc. indicates electricity included. 



. 'I 



J 




r ( 




c 



c 



A STUDY OF OFF-CAMPUS HOUSING 
AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Robert Van Vliet 
Staff Assistant to the 
Director of Housing 
October, 1965 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
HOUSING OFFICE 

MEMORANDUM 

To* . , .IV*?T??t?^.??T?°"® .. . Date: January 6^ l^f^,,,. 
From- Rotiert Van Vliet, Staff Assistant to the Director of ^Housing 

Subject: ,"^ Study Of Off Campus Housing At The^Universit^ 

Massachusetts," 



The attached surrmary section of the above study is 
the result of a year long effort to survey the needs and 
requirements of our University population. Although the 
information is not necessarily privileged, the author 
cautions against indiscriminate use and further publication 
of the data. In many cases it is appropriate and necessary 
to review in detail the actual research of more than 250 
pages to fully understand the data contained in the summary. 
In addition, it should be clearly understood that the 
personal impressions, observations, and recommendations of 
the writer are not necessarily the same as many other 
persons of the University community nor are they necessarily 
to be taken as fact that future plans, action, and policies 
of the University will result as recommended in this study. 

The author will be pleased to meet with interested 
persons to review in greater detail the findings from this 
study. 



41 u ( /4a 1/ U 1 

Robert Van Vliet 
Staff Assistant to the 
Director of Housing 

RV:sw 



A Study Of Off-Campus Housing 
At The University Of Massachusetts 



Introduction 

When the author joined the Housing Office staff at the University 
during the summer of 1963, he was soon impressed with the apparent 
difficulty students and faculty were having in obtaining suitable 
housing in the University community. During the summer of 1954 the 
housing shortage became even more apparent. Dei^pite considerable 
apartment building activity by private developers, the demand for 
moderate priced rentals appeared to continue to exceed the supply 
available. Students continually brought the canplaint that the newly 
built garden apartments, despite their attractive features, were not 
fulfilling the need. Married students, in particular, commented that 
they would like very much to live in one of these new apartments, but 
simply could not afford the rent that was being asked. 

Concern about the apparent difficulty of the students motivated 
the researcher to undertake a depth study of the problem. What were 
the housing needs of University persons? What Informed recommendations 
could be made to the University and the surrounding communities to 
remedy the problem? This study, begun in the fall of 1964, now nears 
completion and represents thousands of man hours of work by many 
interested persons besides the originator. Actually, this study 
represents several surveys that are combined in this report. To assist 
the reader, the significant conclusions for each of these surveys are 
presented in the next section so that it is not necessary to read the 
entire study unless the reader is Interested in determining how these 
conclusions were arrived at. The surveys presented are: 

I - Forced Choice Survey Among Controlled Group 

II - Open End Survey Among Controlled Group 

III - Rank Order Analysis Among Controlled Group 

IV - Open End Survey Among Heads of Departments 

V - Comparisons of 1963 and 1964 Rents 

VI - Prediction of the Type and Number of Housing Units 
Needed by the University 

Following these next presented conclusions, the reader is invited 
to review each individual study. It should be understood that in some 
instances the conclusions for each study may not completely agree, 
probably because information was collected from different sources by 
different methods. In addition, it should be understood that the faculty 
referred to in this study were professional faculty and staff persons 
who had joined the University since October 1963; at the time the data 
was collected these persons had been at the University a maximum of 
one year. 



Conclusions I - Forced Choice Survey Among Controlled Group 



1, A strong interest exists in this survey as indicated by 
a very significant number of persons (74%) who desired 
to receive the conpleted results. 

2. Of the 443 persons in this survey, approximately % are 
Graduate Students , k New Faculty , and k Married Undergraduate 
Students. 



Most (61%) of the persons surveyed were married. 



Most (78%) of the persons surveyed were men. 
(58%) than men (42%) are Single Faculty . 



More women 



5. The Mean and Mode for each group indicates that most Married 
Faculty are in their early 30'So Single Faculty are either 
in their late 20 *s or early 40 *s (bimodel) , Married Graduate 
and International Graduate are in their mid 20*s, although 
more of the latter group may be in their late 20's. Married 
Undergraduate , Single Graduate Women , and Single Graduate 
Men are in their early 20 's. The compiler suspects that 
Single Graduate Men and Women probably continue to graduate 
school directly from their undergraduate studies whereas 
Married Graduate are more likely to return to graduate school 
after working for a few years, 

6. A very significant number (88%) of All Persons have cars. 
Most (56%) Single Graduate Women have cars, but a large 
number do not (44%) . Most (56%) International Graduate 
do not have cars , but a large number of them do (44%) . 

7. A very significant number (77%) of All Persons believe a 
car is absolutely or somewhat essential for commuting. 
Very few persons (7?o) consider a car not at all essential. 
Many people consider a car essential for commuting even 
though they live less than 2 miles from the University. 

8. Approximately half of All Persons live within 5 road miles 
of the University. Among the following listed groups, 
approximately half live within the indicated road miles of 
the University; 



Married 


Faculty 


Married 


Graduate 


Married 


Undergraduat e 


Single Faculty 


Single Graduate 


Men and 


Women 


International 


Graduat( 


D 



3 miles 

5 miles 

6 miles 
5 miles 

3 miles 



1 3/4 miles. All live 
within 4 miles. 



-2- 



9. 



10. 



11. 



12, 



Approximately half of All Persons would be willing to commute 
up to 9 road miles to the University. Among the following 
listed groups, approximately half would be willing to commute 
up to the indicated road miles to the University: 

Married Faculty 

Married Graduate 



Married Undergraduate 
Single Faculty 
Single Graduate Men 
Single Graduate Women 
International Graduate 



9 


miles 


9 


miles 


12 


miles 


9 


miles 


7 


miles 


4 


miles 



3 miles Very few would 
travel more than 7 miles. 



Many University people would be willing to commute 3 to 5 miles 
more than they now travel iJ^ new moderate priced housing were 
built, if easy road access was developed, and i^ the Planning 
Boards in the surrounding communities would permit the apartment 
construction that is desired by our University population. 

Married (91%) and Single Faculty (11%) reported that distance 
traveled to the University is of very little or no interference 
with their work. These persons live closer and nearly all have 
cars. Among the student groups, the majority likewise reported 
very little or no interference, but enough did report some 
(11% to 27%) or great (4% to 17%) interference with their studies 
to indicate that for sc»ne students, particularly International 
Graduate , that commuting distance may interfere with education. 
The writer suspects that those students who must often be at 
the University to use the library and to conduct research during 
the evening hours have more interference because of commuting 
distance. 

Although rents outside of Amherst are somewhat less, monthly 
commuting costs plus monthly rent are usually nearly equal 
to the higher rents in Amherst. Unless future apartment 
construction that requires commuting can be built to rent at 
somewhat less or no more than non-commuting apartments, there 
will not be an appreciable interest from University persons to 
commute further than they already are. Rent plus commuting 
costs must be less or no more than non-commuting rent. 

The Mean of all of the groups surveyed indicated their income 
from all sources to be in the following ranges: 



Married Faculty 



- $451 - $571 monthly, average of S560, 
The Mode reported more than $700. 



-3- 



Married Graduate 



Married Undergraduate 



Single Faculty 



Single Graduate Men 
and Women 



International Graduate 



$351 - $450 monthly, average of 
$325. The Mode reported $351 - 
$450 monthly, 

- $226 - $275 monthly, average of 

$240, the mode reported $176 - $225 
monthly. 

$351 - $450 monthly, average of 
$425, the Mode reported $451 - $575 
monthly . 



- $125 - $175 monthly, average of 

$150, the Mode reported $176 - $225 
monthly . 

$176 - $225 monthly, average of 
$180, the Mode reported $76 - $125 
monthly. 



Married Faculty income is more than Single Faculty . Married 
Graduate income is significantly higher than Married Undergraduate . 



13. The Mean of all persons surveyed indicated their monthly 
housing cost (including utilities) to be in the following 
ranges : 



Married Faculty 



Married Graduate 



Married Under- 



graduate 



Single Faculty 

Single Graduate Men - 



Single Graduate 
Women 



$116 - $135 monthly, average of $125, 

the Mode reported more than $160, probably 

because of home ownership. 

$86 - $100 monthly, average of $90, 
the Mode reported $71 - $85. 



$71 - $85 monthly, average of $75, the 
Mode reported $71 - $85. Bimodel $86 - 
$100, Average is probably influenced 
by County Circle tenants who pay $45 
monthly . 

$86 - $100 monthly, average of $95, 
the Mode reported $101 - $115. 

$31 - $45 monthly, average of $40, 
the Mode reported $41 - $55. 



$41 - $55 monthly, average of $47, 
the Mode reported $41 - $55. 



-4- 



International 

Graduate - $31 - $40 monthly, average of $40, 

the Mode reported $31 - $40. 

14. The percent of housing cost compared to income for each group 
is as follows: 



Married Faculty - 22% 
Married Graduate 



b 



Married Undergraduate - 33% 

Single Faculty - 29% 

Single Graduate Men - 27% 

Single Graduate Women - 31% 

International Graduate - 23% 

Married Undergraduate are hardest pressed because a larger 
percentage of their lower incomes goes for housing. With the 
possible exception of Married Faculty , the housing cost to monthly 
income ratios reveal that it would be very difficult for the above 
groups to pay more than their present rent, 

15. With the exception of Married Faculty and Single Graduate 

Men and Women , some of whom are willing to pay slightly ($5) 
more per month than their present rental, University persons 
are not willing to pay more for housing. Future apartments 
with significantly higher rent will have doubtful acceptance 
by Married Graduate and Undergraduate . 

If landlords are willing to accept Single Graduate Men and 
Women in groups as tenants for these higher rent apartments, 
there probably will be a demand for them. 

15. A very significant number (74%) ot All Persons and all of 

the groups are not willing to pay extra rent for such comforts 
as air conditioning, swimming pools, recreational areas, etc. 
T^ie one exception is Married Faculty who might (15%) be willing 
to pay $5 more monthly for these comforts. Most recent apart- 
ment construction includes many features not required and 
demanded by our population. For students, the greatest need 
is for reasonably equipped, reasonably sized, and reasonably 
priced apartments. 

17. Most (62% - 71%) married persons live in unfurnished housing 
whereas most (56% - 69%) single persons live in furnished 
housing. Single Faculty , however are nearly evenly divided 
between furnished and unfurnished housing. 



-5- 



18. Ajnong married persons there is a slight need for more 
furnished housing, but among single persons there is a 
greater need. Future housing should plan for: 

Married Faculty - 80% not furnished 

Married Graduate 

and Undergraduate - 65% not furnished 

Single Graduate Men , 

Women, and International - 15% not furnished 

19. Among Single Faculty, Single Graduate Men and Women , and 
International Graduate who prefer furnished housing, there 
appears to be some interest (17% - 31%) to pay up to $10 
more per month for furniture. There appears to be a need for 
a privately owned furniture rental service in Amherst if it 
could be provided at moderate cost. 

20. 60% of Married Faculty rent an apartment or house when they 
arrive; the other 40% buy their own home. 

Slightly less than 25% of Married Graduate live in University- 
owned apartments, nearly 50% rent private apartments. Surprisingly, 
15% buy their own home. 

Nearly 50% of Married Undergraduates rent a private apartment , 
less than 20% rent a University-owned apartment. The author 
suspects that most of the Married Undergraduates in University- 
owned apartments probably live in County Circle which is 
scheduled to be taken out of service in June ot 1966. 

Most (61%) Single Faculty live alone in a private apartment. 

Most Single Graduate Men are equally divided between renting 
a private room (40%) or sharing an apartment with others. (40%) 

Most (44%) Single Graduate Women share an apartment, some 
rent a private room (24%) . 

International Graduate usually (39%) share an apartment. 

21. Most (64%) Married Faculty prefer to buy a home. Many of 
those Married Faculty presently renting an apartment or a 
house will buy a home within a few years after arriving at 
the University. There is no increased interest among 
Married Faculty to rent a University-owned apartment or to 
rent a private apartment. There will probably be a small 
increasing requirement for more apartments of the right 
type for Married Faculty who prefer to rent while they 
become familiar with the area before they buy their own 
home. 



-6- 



There is a significant interest among Married Graduate 
(41?o) and Married Undergraduate (38%) to live in a 
University-owned apartment which results in a significant 
decrease in the interest for privately owned apartments. 

Single Faculty continue to desire to rent a private 

apartment alone, (6U%) . No increased interest is shown for University 

housing. There will continue to be a small increased 

requirement for more private apartments ot the right type 

for this group. 

For Single Graduate Men and Women and International Graduate , 
housing preference shows nearly the same interest to share 
an apartment, but shows a significant interest (28% - 33%) 
in a graduate residence hall. If such facilities were 
provided there would be a decrease in the demand for off- 
campus rooms in private homes. Future housing needs are 
for more off-campus apartments and graduate residence hall 
accommodations . 

The author's overall conclusion is that a significant number 
of married and single students desire the University to 
provide housing. 

22. Very few persons ( 0% - 3%) report many difficulties with 
their landlord. A small, but important, number of Married 
Faculty (15%) , Single Faculty (10%) , and Single Graduate 
Women (18%) , have had a few difficulties. The writer suspects 
that the landlord-tenant difficulties of our University 
population are not significantly different frcm any population 
group . 

23. Sux-prisingly , a comparatively small number of persons 

(9% - 15%) reported that they were dissatisfied where they 
presently live. Because of other evidence presented, it is 
difficult to determine the validity of this conclusion. 

24. Married Faculty (50%) , Married Graduate (60%) , Married 
Undergraduate (58%) , and Single Graduate Men (63%) have 
had more than ordinary difficulties in finding housing. 
Single Graduate Women (71%) and International Graduate 
(70%) have had even more difficulty than the preceding 
groups. Among all of the groups surveyed, enough persons 
indicated they had great difficulty (14% - 35%) in obtaining 
housing to indicate that this is a significant problem. 

25. Prior knowledge that they might have difficulty finding 
satisfactory housing, on the v^hole, would not have influenced a 
persons' decision to come to the University. The response 

to no influence ranges from Graduate Women (37/'o) to Married 
Undergraduates (63%) . The combined response of "probably and 
definitely would have gone elsewhere" is Graduate Women (22%) , 
Married Graduate (19?^ , Single Faculty (12%) , Married Under - 
graduate (10?^ , International Graduate (6%) , Graduate Men (5%) 
and Married Faculty (S°/S) . The percent range of 27% to 43% 



-7- 



for those groups who responded that they might have gone 
elsewhere should be of concern to any person interested in 
the future growth of the university. 

To date, housing has not significantly deterred persons from 
coming to the University, but if this problem becomes widely 
known and/or corrective steps are not taken soon it will 
exert a negative influence on persons interested in the 
University. 

25. A very significant number (70%) of persons (probably over 

4000 person contacts/year) seek help from the Housing Office. 
From 19 55 to 1965 total student enrollment has increased 
165% and off-campus and commuter growth has increased 284%. 
During this same period, the fulltime Housing Office staff 
has increased only 60%. 

27. Most persons (70%) report the service of the Housing Office 
to have been very or somewhat satisfactory. Although an 
important (10%)^ though not significant, number reported 
service to be very unsatisfactory, this percentage was far 
less than those who had reported that they had difficulty 
in obtaining housing. Until adequate staffing permits the 
implementation of plans for solutions to the existing problems, 
dissatisfaction with the services of the housing office will 
continue. 

28. Among married persons, the percentage of children per family 
is: 



Married Faculty 



Married Graduate 



Married 
Undergraduate 



no children (16%) , 1 child (21%) , 
2 children (37%) , 3 or more children 
(25%). 

no children (46%) , 1 child (25%) , 
2 children (16%) , 3 or more children 
(12%). 

no children (38%) , 1 child (40%) , 
2 children (14%) , 3 or more children 
(8%). 



Married Undergraduates are more likely to have children than 
Married Graduate; Married Undergraduate income is less as 
was reported in number 13, 

29. Married Graduate and Undergraduate have children who are 
predominately pre-school age. Apartment construction for 
this group will not noticeably increase the number of school 
age children in surrounding communities. 

30. Married Graduate (65%) and Married Undergraduate (83%) do not 
intend to increase their number of children while attending 



-8- 



the University. Few of those children who are born while 
their parents are attending the University will enter school 
before their parents leave. 

31. Many Married Faculty have 3 bedrooms (32%), but it should 
be remembered that a significant number (40%) are buying 
their own home. The ratio of number of children to the 
number of bedrooms appears to be balanced for Married 
Graduate . There is some imbalance among Married Under - 
graduate in the number of children to the number of bedroom 
ratio. This group probably requires more bedroom accommodations, 
The author suspects that the present bedroom ratio is probably 
adequate in the community to provide accommodations for all 
married persons and their children, but because single students 
occupy some married housing and/or some married persons with 

no children occupy housing with more than 1 bedroom, some 
imbalance exists. Therefore a requirement exists for more 2 
and 3 bedroom apartments in the community. 

32. Future housing construction should have the following 
bedroom ratio: 



Married Faculty 
Married Graduate 



Married 
Undergraduate 

Future University 
Built Apartments 



10% 1 bedroom, 15% 2 bedrooms, 40% 
3 bedrooms, 35% 4 bedrooms. 

5% studio, 40% 1 bedroom, 40% 2 
bedrooms, 15% 3 bedrooms. 

40% 1 bedroom, 50% 2 bedrooms, 
10% 3 bedrooms. 

50% 1 bedroom, 35% 2 bedrooms, 
15% 3 bedrooms. 



The existing bedroom ratio in Lincoln Apartments does not 
effectively meet the demand. 

33. Among those persons who required more bedrooms. Married 
Faculty would probably be willing to pay $10 to $15 more 
monthly and Married Graduate and Undergraduate probably 
$5 to $10 more monthly. 

34. The combined percentage responses of great and some interest 
from Married Graduate (56%) and Married Undergraduate (54%) 
indicates there is significant interest from these persons 
to live in a modern high rise apartment building located 
near to the campus . 

35. Married Graduate (82%) and Married Undergraduate (87%) 
believe it is desirable to live near faculty. Many (64%) 
Married Faculty believe it is desircible to live near 
married students. 



-9- 



35. A significant percentage (61% - 83%) of Married Faculty , 
Graduate and Undergraduate prefer to use their own washer 
and/or dryer within their dwelling. Where possible, future 
construction should allow the inclusion of privately owned 
washers and/or dryers, 

37. With the possible exception of Married Graduate , this 
survey reports data from full time students. Data from 
part-time students who usually work and therefore have 
different housing problems are not included. 

38. Future apartment construction should allow at least 35 
to 10 sq. ft. of storage space per apartment unit, 

39. Married Graduate (67%) and Married Undergraduate (76%) 
prefer not to live near single persons. Married Faculty 
and Single Graduate Men are evenly divided. Single 
Faculty (58%) and Single Graduate Women (76%) prefer to 
live near married persons. 

40. University persons would prefer (80%) to have some or 
few neighbors. Future apartment construction that allows 
close living with a degree of privacy should be well 
accepted. 

41. The futures of University persons are uncertain so most 
are reluctant to become involved with a lease unless it 
does not require more than a 30 day notice, 

42. As of November 1954, a significant number of Married 
Graduate (40%) and Single Graduate (62%) have been at 
the University less than 6 months. The average lengths 
are: 

Married - slightly more than a year and 

Undergraduate a half. 

Married Graduate & - approximately one year. 
Single Graduate Men 

Single Graduate - slightly more than half a year. 

Women and International 

Graduate 

43. The average additional time that all of the student groups 
will remain at the University is between 10 to 14 months. 

44. Student groups are mobile. Many seek different housing 
because they are dissatisfied. This trend will continue 
in the future until many more adequate and reasonably 
priced rentals are available. 

45. If landlords provided better facilities at more moderate 
rents, their tenants would be less likely to move. This 
could result in less financial loss to the landlord who 
might profit more in the long run. 



-10- 



45. Married Undergraduate , who have lower incomes, reported 
a significant interference (46%) with their studies or 
g-rades because of their present monthly income. 



-11- 



Conclusions II - Open End Survey Among Controlled Group 



1. A very significant (29% - 61%) percentage of persons 
have had difficulty in finding housing. Single Graduate 
(61%) and Single Faculty (48%) have had more difficulty 
than married students or faculty. 

2. A very significant (39% - 49%) percentage of persons 
believe that rents are too high. Married Students are 
most concerned about this problem. 

3. A very significant (29% - 51%) percentage of persons are 
concerned with the lack of necessary facilities in their 
housing. Married Graduate (47%) and Undergraduate (51%) 
are the most concerned, 

4. A significant (23% - 49%) percentage of persons commented 
on the poor condition of housing. Married Graduate (49%) 
were the most concerned. 

5. A sizable percentage of Married Graduate (25%) and 
Undergraduate (27%) have had difficulties with landlords 
and/or realtors. Note - Since the writer previously 
concluded in the Forced Choice Survey Among Controlled 
Group that there was not a significant landlord-tenant 
problem, the writer now concludes that most of the 
dissatisfication has been directed at certain realtors. 

6. A very significant (29% - 54%) percentage of persons 
indicated that more apartment construction was needed. 
Single Faculty (54%) and Married Graduate (49%) reported 
the highest interest, 

7. A very significant (34% - 53%) of persons indicated that 
the University should begin more housing construction. 
Very little interest (4% - 16%) was expressed in more 
housing construction by private enterprise. 

8. A very significant (20% - 50%) percentage of persons 
indicated the need for more low rent construction. Single 
Faculty (50%) , Married Graduate (44%) and, Married 
Undergraduate (43%) expressed the greatest interest. 

9. A very significant (20% - 49%) percentage of persons 
indicated the need for more construction with adequate 
facilities and/or an improvement in the condition of 
existant facilities. Married Graduate (49%) and 
Undergraduate (36%) were the most concerned. 

10, A significant percentage of Single Graduate (46%) indicated 
the need for a University graduate residence hall. 



-12- 



11. A very significant (51% - 76%) percentage of persons had 
general criticism of the Housing Office. This criticism 
was further defined as a need for: better service, more 
rental listings, more general information, more advance 
information, and frequent revision of rentals listings 
to keep them current. In general, the criticism was 
centered on the need for more service from the Housing 
Office. Little criticism (2% - 8%) was directed at 
the Housing Office personnel. 



-13- 



Conclusions III - Rank Order Analysis Among Controlled Group 

This section attempted to answer two questions, "what types 
of dwellings are in greatest demand in the University area so 
that future planning will encourage this type of construction?," 
and "of all the many factors that go into providing adequate 
housing for University people, which are the most important 
and which are the least important?" For definition, the 
researcher attaches the following significance to the responses: 

Extremely significant - above 65% 

Very significant - 50% to 6i4% 

Significant - 25% to 49% 

Some significance - 15% to 24% 

Little significance - below 14% 



1. Among married persons, the Rank Order section indicates 
that an individual house was the first choice as a dwelling 
for Married Faculty (75%) , Married Graduate (35%) , and 
Married Undergraduate (23%) . However, income limitations 
usually prevent the last two from obtaining a house. 

2. In the Total Numbers Responding section, a more realistic 
interest in the type of housing preferred is shown for the 
three married groups as follows in ascending order with 
the groups reporting the least interest first: 

Duplex House - "significant" 38% to "very significant" 

62% for Faculty , Undergraduate , and 
Graduate , 

Garden - "significant" 45% to "very significant" 
Apartment 50% for Faculty , Undergraduate , and 

Graduate . 

Individual - "significant" 38% to 45% for Undergraduate , 
House Graduate, and Faculty . 

High Rise - "significant" 26% to 45% for Faculty , 
Apartment Undergraduate , and Graduate . 



Cottage or - "some significance" of 17% to "significant" 
"A" Frame 40% for Faculty , Graduate , and Undergraduate . 



Multi-family - "some significance" of 15% to "significant" 
(converted) 35% for Faculty , Graduate , and Undergraduate , 



-14- 



One Apart/ - "little significance" of 5% to 
landlords "significant" 31% for Faculty , 
house Graduate , and Undergraduate » 

Trailer - "little significance" 3% to 13% for 

Faculty , Graduate , and Undergraduate . 

3. The "significant" and "very significant" interest in duplexes 
and garden apartments suggests that row houses might be popular 
if the housing factors subsequently discussed are considered. 

4. There appears to be a "significant" interest in high rise 
apartments , particularly among married students. 

5. Nearly all types of housing are acceptable to married 
students , but particular interest is shown for duplex 
houses , garden apartments , and high rise apartments . 

6. Total cost per month is extremely significant for all of the 
groups f72?^ to 91%) and is by far the most important housing 
factor . Future construction must bear this in mind when 
planning features that may not be necessary and which may 
increase the unit cost. 

7. The responses to private bath range fron a "very significant" 
54% to an "extremely significant" 85%. This is the second 
most important factor. 

8. The responses to distance from the University is "extremely 
significant" for single students (80% and 81%) and is in a 
"very significant" range of 49% to 61% for the other groups. 

9. The responses to the inclusion of a stove and/or refrigerator 
range from "some significance" of 23% to "extremely significant" 
72%, Future construction should include this. 

10. Responses to parking space as a factor range from a "significant" 
28% to "extremely significant" 73%. Previous data reports the 
high incidence of car ownership. Future construction should 
allow for this. 

11. With the exception of Married Faculty , a quiet study area 
as a factor shows a range from 30% "significant" to 66% 
"extremely significant." Study areas or cubicles should 
be considered in future construction. 

12, Responses to privacy from neighbors (sound proofing) as a 
factor ranges frcMn a "significant" 34% to a "very significant" 
51% with the exception of International Graduates . Sound 
proofing materials and construction is of great interest. 
Also, the design of buildings to allow privacy is desirable. 

13, The responses to adequate storage is in a range from "some 
significance" of 17% to "very significant" of 54%. Future 
construction should include storage lockers and adequate 
sized closets. See the previous section on amount of 

storage area required. 

-15- 



14. With the exception of Married Faculty , the other groups 
reported the inclusion of utility costs as part of the 
rent in a range of "significant" 34% to "very significant" 
51%. If a landlord could pay for utilities on a volume 
basis at a reasonable per dwelling unit cost, most tenants 
would probably prefer to have the utility cost passed on 
to them as part of their monthly rent. 

15. The range of responses to adequate number of bedrooms 

is from a "significant" 45% to an "extremely significant" 

68% among married persons. This factor has "little 
significance" for the other groups. 

16. Responses to furnished housing range from a " some 
significance" of 18% to "very significant" 50% among 
single persons. It shows "little significance"for married 
persons. 

17. Single Faculty responded that nearness to shopping was a 
"significant" 28%. The other groups reported in a range 
fron "little significance" of 10% to "some significance" 
of 22%. 

18. Responses to adequate laundry facilities range from 
"some significance" of 21% to a "significant" 36% among 
married persons and Single Faculty . This factor is of 
"little significance" among single persons, 

19. The responses to kitchen privileges are in a "significant" 
range of 28% to 44% for single students and International 
Graduate ; "little significance" was reported by married 
persons. 

20. The data reports that pla/ area for children ranges from a 
"significant" 30% to a "very significant" 51% from married 
persons; understandably, it is of "little significance^'to 
single persons. 

21. Responses to room to entertain has a "some significance" 

range of 18% to 20% for single students and has a "significance" 
of 36% for Married Faculty and 27% for Single Faculty ; there 
is "little significance" reported from the other groups. 
Future construction for Faculty might consider this factor, 
but it is not important for the other groups. 

22. Faculty responded with "some significance" that neighbors 
near and neighbors far were housing factors to consider; 
the response was very similar to either factor. The other 
groups reported "little significance," The researcher 
concludes that it is of little importance if neighbors live 
near or far as long as there is privacy and soundproofing. 

23. Although all future construction will be "new," newness of 
dwelling as a response showed "little significance." Older 
dwellings with adequate facilities as described above would 
probably be acceptable to all groups. 

-16- 



24, All groups consider the .xnclusion of air conditioning to 
be of "little significance." This is not necessary in 
future construction if it adds to the unit cost, which 
it obviously does, 

25. Likewise, all groups consider the inclusion of a dishwasher , 
garbage disposal, and adult recreation area to be of "little 
significance" as a housing factor, 

25. The author's overall conclusion is that University persons 
are most interested in adequate basic living features. 
The primary interest in total cost per month precludes the 
construction of dwellings with facilities and features 
that may be necessary to meet competition in other urban 
areas. 



-17- 



Conclusions IV - Open End. Survey Amona Heads of Departments 



1. Most (56%) Heads of Departments have not received reports 
from new staff members concerning difficulty in finding 
housing. However, there apparently is a large enough 
group (31/'o) that has had difficulty in obtaining housing 
to warrant some concern. 

2. As yet, the housing situation has not interf erred (88%) 
with the recruitment of new faculty, A few (12%) department 
heads expressed concern that it might in the future. 

3. A significant percentage (44%) of department heads have 
had problems assisting graduate students with housing 
difficulties . 

H , A significant percentage (67%) of the group expressed 
the opinion that the quality of education has not been 
influenced by the present housing situation. Many of 
those who replied to this question did not answer it 
directly, but instead elaborated on housing problems in 
general. 

5, A sizable percentage (28%) of the group believed that rents 
were too high. 

6, A very significant percentage (75%) indicated that their 
departments might have future problems because of housing. 

7, A significant percentage (54%) of department heads believed 
that much more low rent housing will be needed for single 
and married graduate students, 

8, A very significant percentage believed that more construction 
was needed, particularly by the University (50%) . Little 
interest (13%) was expressed for private construction. Some 
(23%) indicated the need to build graduate residence halls 
for single students, 

9, A significant percentage (40%) indicated the Housing Office 
was doing a good job. An equal number commented on the need 
for improvement. 



Possible improvements mentioned were, more frequent revision 
of the rental listings (40%) , more available information (24%) 
and greater assistance for graduate students (24%) . Heads of 
Departments are satisfied with the Housing Office, but they 
believe more and better service is necessary. 



-18- 



Conclusions V - Comparison of 1963 and 196M Rents 



1. During the above period, 56% o± the landlords listed 
with the Housing Office raised their rents. Although 
some (11%) landlords lowered their rents during this 
period, the net effect has been that a substantial 
number (45%) did raise their rents. 

2. The rental increase by the above persons ranged from 
approximately 13% to 2U%. The percentage rent increase 
has been slightly more for rooms than it has been for 
apartments and houses. 

3. The above percent rent increases were nearly the same 
for housing more than 4 miles from the University as 

it was for housing less than 4 miles from the University. 

4. Comparison ot rents for housing less than 4 miles from 
the University to housing more than 4 miles from the 
University reveals that housing less than 4 miles rents 
for more; approximately $1.50/month more for rooms, 
$10/month more for apartments, and $25/month more for 
houses. 

5. Although it has not been statistically verified, the 
author's impressions are that a similar rent increase 
occurred between 1964 and 196S as is described in #1 
and #2 above. 

6. The construction of Lincoln Apartments by the University 
has had little or no influence in stabilizing rents 

in the University community. 

7. Rents have risen, and will probably continue to rise, 
because of supply and demand. The demand exceeds the 
supply; landlords can get more, so they ask more. 
This trend will continue until private enterprise 
constructs many more moderate priced apartment units 
and/or the University constructs more married student 
housing. 



-19- 



Conclusions VI - Prediction of the Type and Number of Housing Units Needed 

by the University . 



At the date this study was written, this section has not 
yet been completed. It probably will require a few more weeks 
of preparation and then it will be inserted into this report 
at a later date. 

The author will attempt to estimate the University's 
future housing needs based on collected data, other information, 
and the "Long Range Enrollment Projection" of the Office of 
Institutional Studies that follows on the next page. The 
author will attempt to arrive at our needs in numbers of units, 
types, probable tenants, desired rent ranges, and proximity to 
the University. 

At this time, it is the author's impression that several 
hundred moderate priced apartment units should be built in the 
University area each year for the next ten years to keep abreast 
of our growth. 



-20- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LONG RANGE ENROLIMENT PROJECTION 
1965 - 1974 

The long range enrollment projections listed below represent the University's 
best estimate of probable growth and provide a basis for planning. They are 
subject to constant review and will be updated as necessary. They do not in- 
clude Boston or the Medical School enrollments. 



SEH'EMBER 
1965 


UNDERGRADUATE 
8,825 


STOCKBRIDGE 
500 


GRADUATE 
2,200 


TOTAL 
11,525 


1966 


9,685 


550 


2,600 


12,835 


I96T 


10,740 


560 


3,000 


14, 300 


1968 


11,730 


570 


3,500 


15,800 


1969 


12,720 


580 


4,000 


17,300 


1970 


13,T10 


590 


4,500 


18,800 


1971 


14,700 


600 


5,000 


20, 300 


1972 


15,700 


600 


5,500 


21,800 


1973 


16,700 


600 > 


6,000 


23, 300 


197^^ 


17,700 


600 


6,500 


24,800 



Office of Institutional Studies 
University of Massachusetts 
Noveaiber 1964 



-21- 



i 



Personal Impressions and Observations 



The position of influence that tlie University holds in 
the surrounding community is one of increasing jjnportance. 
It can be expected that as the University continues to grow 
in the next decade, that what the University does, or does 
not do, may have considerable effect on our neigliboring 
communities, particularly Amherst. What was once a small 
rural town is now becoming a small urban city. As changes 
occur, there are bound to be conflicts between those who 
desire the status quo, a legitimate desire, and those who 
desire to bring about dramatic change, again, a legitimate 
desire. 

It appears to the writer that the decision for urban 
growth and change was not made recently, but actually was 
made many years ago when the University was charged with the 
responsibility to expand to nearly 25,000 students by the 
mid 1970 's. The decision to change has already been made; 
it is extremely unlikely that it will ever be reversed. 

The author believes that the University must be concerned 
with its' relations with its* neighboring communities, but 
its ' primary concern always has and always will be the needs 
of the students that it educates. If community desires and 
student needs are in conflict, then the University administration 
must have considerable justification before it can with good 
conscience deny the needs of its' students. 

The writer concurs that the University should not 
encourage undergraduate students to marry, which might result 
if large numbers of low rent apartments were available, but 
it can safely be assumed that some undergraduates will continue 
to marry and that a significant number of our increasing graduate 
enrollment will be married. Though these persons will represent 
a smaller percentage compared to the single undergraduate enroll- 
ment, their increasing numbers have already required and will 
continue to require attention to their unique housing needs. The 
most pressing need appears to be financial. Married graduate and 
undergraduate students are unable to pay much more for housing 
from their modest incomes, indeed the present housing expense 
to total income ratio makes them hard pressed. It is probable 
that future married student incomes will gradually rise, but 
probably so will rents and other living expenses. 

For several years now the writer has supported the University 
policy of requesting private enterprise to house most of the 
faculty and married student population. The author still believes, 
but with increasing reservations, that in theory it is better for 
private enterprise to house much of our population than for the 
University to assume this obligation. Our primary purpose is to 
educate, not to house, If^ private enterprise will or can construct 



-22- 



the right type of facilities, the right number , and. at the 
right rental , then the University and the community would 
probably be better served by not constructing more on-campus 
married student apartments. 

The community was asked to provide housing for most 
of our married students at the time when it was the consensus 
that this was their desire. Unfortunately, despite the consid- 
erable construction activity of the past few years, our needs 
are not being met. The author believes this is because 
community desire and student need conflict and because the 
University has not adequately informed the community as to its 
exact requirements and future needs. It may be difficult for 
many persons to visualize the University's needs ten years from 
now; if the Graduate School alone grows from its present approxi- 
mate 2509 students to 6500 students as projected, this single 
group would require more than twice the number of housing units 
present in the University community, at this time. This estimate 
does not include the housing unit requirements for faculty, 
staff, and single and married undergraduates. Shortly, the 
author intends to submit a projection of our needs that will 
become part of this study. 

For the past few years, it has been the writer's impression 
that the University has exerted some small direct influence on 
the community to encourage the construction of the right type 
and number of housing units. But, during this period since 
the last decision on housing policy enrollment projections have 
increased and the community has not yet responded sufficiently. 
The solution is not easy. If the University takes a more direct 
role in bringing about change, it may be criticized by the 
community; but it it does not take a more active role, it also 
will be criticized by some members of the community and by the 
University population. If the University builds more married 
student housing, it may be criticized by the community; but 
again if it does not build more married student housing it will 
be criticized by some members of the community and by the Univ- 
ersity population. Can a compromise policy be reached that will 
please all persons concerned in the future? This critic thinks 
not. Since our purpose is to educate our students and iiousing 
is a prerequisite of this function, the writer believes the 
University should now become more involved in bringing about the 
required changes. 

The author believes that this study substantiates the 
conclusion that there is considerable interest within the 
University coiranunity for construction of more married student 
housing by the University. If the University does not concede 
to this interest, it must provide workable alternate solutions 
to solve the present and future needs of its students and faculty. 
It is extremely difficult to convince a married student, who is 
dissatisfied with his present housing, who has been waiting for 
a Lincoln Apartment for over one year, who now must wait for 



-23- 



another year because "your name hasn't yet worked its way 
up high enough on the waiting list," who questions why 
the University appears to be so eager to build high rise 
residence halls but not married housing, that the University 
administration really cares about his problem. 

It is also the author's impression that perhaps the 
community is also beginning to express desire for the 
University to provide more housing, although he has not 
yet substantiated it. Although, theoretically, it is better 
for private enterprise to house much of our population, the 
reporter has doubts if the University can or should expect 
the conmunity to do the entire job. Perhaps a reappraisal 
of the University's position on this matter and what, if any, 
direct influence we should exert is overdue. 

To date the job has not been done. It will and must be 
done in the future. Who will do it and how will it be done; 
the community, the University, or both? Somebody must do it 
soon. 



-24- 



Recommend at i ons 



This study should be reproduced in its entirety in 
a limited number of copies for internal University 
use. If necessary, other copies could be reproduced 
that would, exclude the lengthy sections of data at 
the end. Persons interested in the complete data 
could review it at the Housing Office, 

From the study, the most significant findings should 
be rewritten and published in a 10-15 page phamplet 
for wide distribution. Final determination on what 
should be included in the phamplet should be with 
Dean of Students Field. This phamplet should then 
be distributed to: 



a. Persons who requested a copy of the results 
in the survey, 

b. Town officials in all of the surrounding 
communities, 

c. Local and other lending institutions who 

might be interested in financing housing projects, 

d. Local and other builders and construction 
companies who might be interested in building 
housing projects. 

e. Local newspapers, with instructions that interested 
persons can secure a copy from the Housing Office. 

f. Local and other community organizations that 
might have an interest in housing, 

g. Local realtors and real estate brokers, 

h. Other interested persons who ask for a copy. 



3, The problem of how best to provide for married student 
housing should be fully explored with the hope of making 
necessary policy changes and decisions by April 1966. 
This problem should be given high priority for this 
academic year, 

4, The University should actively seek out and inform 
private enterprise, the surrounding community, and 
community officials of our problem. The University 



-25- 



must find out how much, if any, support it can 
expect to receive fran these people during the next 
decade. Since University persons might be willing 
to travel farther than they presently do, communities 
in addition to Amherst should be specifically contacted. 
This information should be available by the spring 
ot 1956 for planning purposes. 

b. In addition, it is important to determine the mood of 
the people in the surrounding communities. The 
University population has expressed their desire that 
the University should build more married student 
apartments. How do the people feel, particularly in 
Amherst? The consensus can be obtained by any of the 
following methods: 

a. votes at town meetings 

b. referendum or question on the ballot at the 
next election 

c. survey of propertly owners and/or registered 
voters on a simple IBM card questionnaire 
that would quickly be processed by data 
processing 

d. polls taken by outside agencies such as 
the League of Women Voters 

6. The University should adopt and publicize the following 
policy at this time, though not necessarily in these 
exact words: 



a. The University will probably grown from its 
present enrollment ot slightly more than 12,000 
to approximately 24,000 by 1975. 

b. This growth will require the construction of 
many new housing units of all types. At this 
time, the greatest need is for moderate priced 
apartments for married student couples. 

c. The University hopes that private enterprise in 
the surrounding communities will provide these 
facilities. Regardless of the Universities 
future decisions about building more on campus 
housing, there probably will be an increasing 
need for private housing. 



-26- 



7. The Housing Office should investigate sources of 
possible financial assistance for apartment 
construction. Specifically, certain FHA programs 
of the federal government should be reported on 
and this information made available to interested 
persons. 

8. Builders, contractors, and lending institutions 
should be encouraged to consult with the Housing 
Office to obtain specific advice and recommendations 
for the construction of future housing. The Housing 
Office should render this service when asked, 

9. The Housing Office should seek information from 
all sources to answer three questions: 

a. Can the University build married student 
apartments with adequate facilities to rent 
at less cost than private enterprise? 

b. Is the unit cost per apartment more or less 
for high rise construction? 

c. Is high rise construction a feasible solution? 

(Modest budget appropriations may be needed for field 
work travel) 

10. If it is determined that the University can build 
apartments for significantly less than private enterprise, 
the University should than begin plans to construct 
married student apartments in stages and in numbers 
slightly less than the numbers that interest indicates, 

11. Investigation should be begun for the necessity and 
desirability of constructing a single graduate residence 
hall and/or the conversion of existing undergraduate 
housing. Although the interest appears to be higher, 

if possible, the author recommends that commencing 
September 1966 provisions should be made to house full 
time single graduate students, 20% of the men and 25% 
of the women, in undergraduate residence halls. Graduate 
women should be given first consideration. If possible, 
approximately 50% of the number of rooms needed to house 
international students should be held available until 
August 1st and should be assigned only to newly arriving 
single international students until this date, 

12. The present University-owned apartment assignment 
procedure should be reviewed and possible policy changes 
should be enacted that would take place before the spring 
of 1966. Possible changes for consideration are: 



-27- 



a. Reduce the faculty occupancy limit to two 
years. 

b. Faculty will no longer receive priority over 
married students in Lincoln Apartments. 

c. Married Undergraduates, particularly those 
with children, should be given equal priority 
with married graduate students. 

d. Married couples with two or three children 
should be given priority over couples with one 
child for two bedroom apartments in Lincoln, 

e„ If there are no faculty waiting for a University 
Apartment after July 31st, vacancies should be 
offered to married graduate students. 

f. Married students living in County Circle Apartments 
before May 1, 1965 should be given priority over 
all other applicants for Lincoln Apartments when 
County Circle is taken from student use in June 
of 1966. 

13. Though it is probably desirable, any off-campus 
inspection or approval system should not be enacted 
until housing supply and demand becomes better balanced. 
Inspection and approval would attack the effect (i.e, 
quality) , but not the cause (i.e. lack of housing) . 
Solving the effect could result in increased rents from 
better housing plus landlords who are still able to rent 
their non-approved housing outside of the University. 

14. In view of the large number of automobiles that faculty, 
graduate students, and married undergraduates apparently 
own, future University parking space plans should be 
reexamined to determine their adequacy, 

15. Amherst town officials should be advised about how 
many additional automobiles the projected University 
growth might bring. 

16. The Housing Office should revise its present information 
and literature and publish it in a booklet form, 

17. The author recommends that the Graduate School mail 
this housing information along with their other 
information to all interested applicants rather 
than have persons write to the Housing Office after 
they have already contacted the Graduate School. It 
should be clearly stated that because of the University's 
expansion: 



.28- 



a. A critical housing shortage exists off-canipuso 

b. This critical shortage is even worse during 
the late summer months, particularly for 
housing within walking distance. 

Co The number of applications for Lincoln 

Apartments will require the student to wait 
over a year from the time of application, 

18. Dean Field's suggestion that married students be 
given a housing stipend so that they may better 
afford higher priced apartments should be fully 
explored. 

19, The legal aid assistance program recently proposed 

by the Dean of Students should quickly be implemented 
to assist students with housing questions of a legal 
nature. 



-29- 



Acknowledgments 



The originator expresses sincere gratitude to the many 
persons who assisted in the formulation, preparation, collection 
and interpretation of data, and publication of this study. Without 
their combined effort of well over a thousand man hours, this study 
could never have been accomplished. 

Information about graduate student enrollments furnished 
by Edward Moore, Dean of the Graduate School has been invaluable, 
Peter Park of the Sociology Department deserves most sincere thanks 
for his suggestions in developing the survey format. To Raymond 
Castelpoggi of the Office of Institutional Studies the author gives 
his thanks for his suggestions and advice on the format of the 
completed survey. Special gratitude is appropriate for Gail Oakland, 
Head of the Department of Statistics whose advice on statistical 
procedures throughout this past year were invaluable. The writer 
appreciates the comments and suggestions from the many students 
that the early form of the survey was tested upon. To Fred Utley's 
Mail Room staff he acknowledges the extra effort that was required 
to prepare the survey for mailing. 

During the early stages of data preparation by the 
Research Computer Center, Tom Sullivan's assistance and advice 
was most appreciated. Later programming assistance and data 
processing by Norm Menegat of the Data Processing Center was 
invaluable. The programming assistance for the final run of the 
data by John Goda of the Research Computer Center was very appreciated. 
It should be noted that without data processing, this survey could 
not have been completed. 

Special acknowledgment and appreciation is extended to 
David Foren, the researcher's student assistant. Without Dave's 
assistance in the preparation of most of the data during the last 
seven months, this survey would never have been completed. Deep 
gratitude is directed to Susan Wanat, secretary, who typed most of 
the written material and offered her invaluable assistance throughout 
the project despite her many other duties. To Nancy Farwell, Barbara 
and Phyllis Polchlopek, and Joseph Duke, student assistants in the 
Housing Office, goes the author's appreciation for capably assisting 
in the preparation of this survey in its final form. Finally, he 
offers his thanks to the other members of the Housing Office staff 
who have been inconvenienced by the extra effort required to publish 
this survey. 



-30- 



The Research 



The previous section that includes the author's 
conclusions, personal impressions, and recommendations is 
a condensation of the following detailed surveys and 
studies. The following sections of more than 250 pages 
described the researchers procedures, his analysis of the 
data collected, and his conclusions in greater detail. 

Those persons who do not have these last sections 
attached to the first section of the study are invited to 
review the research at the Housing Office. 



-31- 



ANNUAL REPORT 

June 30, 1966 

Bureau of Government Research 

University of Massachusetts 



^ TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS (excluding 01 and 02 personal services) 

1963-64 1364-65 1965-66 

$6,785 $6,350 $7,975 

II PERSONNEL 



Director 


Assistant 
Director 


Staff 
Cor.sultant 


Statistician 


Research 
Associate* 


1 
1 
1 


2 
2 
2 


1 


1 
1 
1 


I 



Sept. 1963 
Sept. 1964 
Sept. 1965 



Senior Clerk Junior Clark 

fi Stenogr aphe r S StenopTapher 

Sept. 1963 1 1 

Sept. 1964 1 1 

Sept. 1965 I 1 



Staff: 

Irving iSowards, Director 

Edwin A. Gere, Jr., Assistant Director 

Robert A. Shanley, Assistant Director 

Jamieson Reid, Staff Consultant 

Carmen U. Saso, Resoarcii Assistant 

Sheldon Goldman, Research Associate* 

Mrs. Ruby Martin, Senior Clerk P, Stenographer 

Nancy Tulenko, Secretary 

Assigned from the GoverniEent Department on a part-tira© basis 



Ill ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 



j Dean, 

College of Arts and Sciences 



) Assistant 
I Director i 



aw »i i f .•~-fu.. 



Statistician 



I Director !■ - ■ 



T T "" 



Chaircjan, Government 
Department 



I Staff 1 
] Consultant ^ 



f™li?e~search | > Assistant | 
\ Associate* \ ! Director | 



I Senior Clerk 
■ Stenograsi^icr 



Junior Clerk i 

Stenog raphe r__ t 



Solid Line 
Broken Line 



.Immediate Supervision 
Intermediate Supervision 



•Assigned frons the Governssent Repartwent 



IV CLIENTELE 



A. Students 



a. Government majors instructed by Bureau personnel: 
September 1963 (100), September 1964 (45) September 1965 (26) 

b. Number of students taught: 

September 1963 (130), SepteKber 1964 (50), September 1965 
(44) 
During 1965 Bureau personnel taught 94 students in Governssent 
218 (Political Parties and Pressure Groups) in two sections. Students 
were also advised by Bureau personnel in connection with their graduate 
studies, senior honors work, and their requests for information on 
fedor&l and state government career opportunities. The Bureau library 



'I 



JiJi-XO"! 



-uTcoo :ovo^ :& iunaoax 



o- 



of soEO 4000 books and paiaphlets was utilized by students and faculty 
of the government and other University departsients , by civic organ- 
izations and by local government officials. 

^ • Service to clien t^^e le ^gr oup s 

As part of the Bureau's continuing service function to Massachusetts 
state and local govsrriment , a Governor's Conference on Education was 
held at the University of Massachusetts in January, 1966. Planning, 
prograia and arrangements for the conference were handled by the Bureau 
and the Lieutenant Governor's office. The principal purpose of this 
conference, attended by over 200 of the Coaraonwealth ' s leaders In 
education, business, labor, government and civic affairs, v»as to dis- 
cuss the irapleaentation of the Willis-Harrington Report on Massachusetts 
public education. 

Bureau personnel have worked in an advisory capacity with state 
and local officials on several projects. In recent months Bureau 
staff fflembers and University adiainistrators have been exploring with 
Holyoke municipal officials the feasibility of exatRining that city's 
governmental structure and functions. Bureau staff raeHibers have 
also consulted with the Morth Attleborough board of selactssen con- 
cerning the formation of a raulti -purpose regional planning district, 
have submitted a BeiaorandujB to the Coiasaonwealth ' s public library 
association concerning an analysis of yardsticks utilised in the 
state aid foroiula for local public libraries, and have consulted 
with a nurjber of professional governmental groups with respect to 
conferences on the University campus. 



t«i9V.Env? "it^.i Sa Me;! 



■^ r, 



O IflOf*? ''rtS 



>? It 



■ ♦■* f?n .-!;(» 



-•lte».r 



Another public service function perforniod by the Bureau personnel 
has been that of speaking on public issues. Bureau members have 
delivered lectures and/or speeches on the Cosamonwealth ' s public ser- 
vice, municipal home rule probleras, tax needs, town government 
structure and other issues at meetings of such civic and fraternal 
groups as the Massachusetts Selects«ens Association, town finance 
coraniittees , local Leagues of Women Voters, Lions Clubs, and the 
American Association of Women's Clubs. Bureau staff moBibers have 
also worked with the University of Massachusetts Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service and the Massachusetts iiomeiRakors Council, serving as 
resource personnesl and panelists in their 1965 study of county 
governiaent. 

The constitutional horse rule ajnendment which goes to the voters 
next November raises raany questions about its practical isipleroentation , 
In June the Bureau Director participated in the program of a special 
conference on hoiae rule sponsored by the special legislative com- 
nission on hone rule. fiureau members are also on the local prograsi 
committee for the National Municipal Leagues' national conference 
on "The Future State of the States" to be held in November, 1966, 
in Boston. 

^ • Other Pro fa ssion al Activit ies 

The Bureau director served on a University Committee to explore 
the possibility of establishing a law school on the University of 
Massachusetts-Ainherst carapus. 

Bureau personnel attended conferences of the International Con- 
ference on Public Personnel Administration, the American Political 
Science Association, the American Society for Public Adroinistration , 
as well as a number of conferences of professional and civic 



ass 



ociations in Massachusetts. 



>0 

X oiaA 



JT!i J 



. I'.i. 



V>tt 



1 1»); :J/f5.a ascM 



-::>■ 



V PUDLICATIONS 
Monographs : 

1. The Massachusetts^ Constitut ion^ A Problem in Simplification 

(in press) 

2 . Th e Lej^i s la tlvg P ro cgss and Divided. Government ; A Case 

Study of the 36tJ^ Congre ss^ (in pross^ 

' • Sonie Notes o i t R e i^ o nalisra %'i th Particular References to 
Naw En gland (,in pre^s) — — — — . 

4. T he Chall enge of I nt c rde p endtjn ce (Proceedinsrs of the 196S 
Governor's CurTfereiicc on State-Local Relations) 

5 . M a s s a c h u s ^ 1 1 s T o vn E xp fc n d it u re s , 1 96 4 

Articles : 

"Massachusetts Passes Law on Public Bargaining," Na tion al 5.^v.\*^,. 
Review , Vol. LV, No. June, 1966, pp. 332-353. 

Research and Publications in Process: 

The Massachusetts Racial Iiobalance Law: Its Efficacy and 
Ijcplications for Urban Public Education 

The Sales Tax and the Massachusetts Legislature 

Governor's Conference on Education (Proceedings of the 1966 
Conference held at the University of Massachusetts) 

Party Competitiveness and Local Power Structures in the 
Massachusetts CoKiaunities 

Municipal Services and Local Govorniaent Power Structures 

Special Legislation and Legislative Process 

Collective Bargaining in Massachusetts Local Government 

New England Regionalism 

Massachusetts Town Expenditures, 1965 



-6- 

VI., VTI MAJOR ACCOMPLISH MnNTS, SPEC IAL PROJECTS^ 

During the past year the scop© of the Bureau's operation expanded 
in several ways. Its organizational location within the University's 
adrainist rative structure was altered, its library resources were re- 
viewed and improved so as to accommodate its research prograa, and 
possibilities for cooperative research with other New England 
University Bureaus were explored. 

A, The Bureau's Relocation in the College of Arts and Sciences 
From 1956-1965, the Bureau structured as a separate department 
with the director reporting to the University provost. In July, 
1965, the Bureau became a unit of the College of Arts and Sciences, 
with the director reporting to the Dean o^" the College of Arts and 
Sciences, through the chairman of the Government Oepartraent . Con- 
sequently, most Bureau staff ffiembers now hold concurrent academic 
appointiaents in the Govoraraent Departraent and have teaching re- 
sponsibilities in their fields of specialization. The Govorniaent 
Department in turn has shared the time of one of its professors 
with the Bureau in research assignments. Office space and library 
resources have been made available to two other Government Uepart- 
inent professors for the summer of 1966. The new relationship with 
the Government Department has resulted in the joint submission to 
the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences by the Government De- 
partment and the Bureau of a proposal to join the Inter-University 
Consortium for Political Behavior, associated with the Survey Research 
Center of the University of Michigan. 



B . I rap rove went o f Bure au Librar y Resourco s 

Since the success of every research is vitally dependent upon 
the breadth and quality of its library resources, a Bsajor effort 
was made durinj? the past year to improve the Bureau's library 
fRcilities. Its classificstion systess was wodified, hundreds of 
publications were either eliminatsd or were transferred to Goodell 
library, and an indexing systew was initiate*;-. When this operation 
is coffl;)l©te index cards of t'ao Bureau's 450 booi:3 arid 3S00 pamphlets, 
reports and monographs will be mads available to Goodell Library and 
to the University community. In its efforts to build up its aqui- 
sitions and inforraation upon Massachusetts state and local government, 
the Bureau has converted one of its rooms into a depository ex- 
clusively for Massachusetts documents and studies. In addition, a 
newspaper clipping service on Massachusetts politics and government 
WBS initiated for the benefit of researchers, students and faculty. 

^' Cooperative^ Re^f ional Research 

Possibilities for interstate cooperation in Naw England have 
recently been enhanced by new federal prograias such as ths Public 
??orks and Economic Development Act of 1965 and th© Higher Education 
Act of 1965 which encouraged broader federal-state cooperation and 
Hiulti-state regional planning. Responding to opportunities in 
these prograsis, the Bureau has been a leader in exploring th© possible 
establishment of a New England Research Center, either as an as- 
sociation of the six bureaus of government research or as a broader 
entity embracing private as well as public universities and colleges 
in New England. The University of Massachusetts Bureau sponsored in 
March a conference for the six New England Bureaus of Governraent Re- 
search at Araherst to exsjosine the possibilities of establishing such 



iiiil 



i •$ 



a center, without sacrificing the responsibilities of each bureau 
in servicing and studying its own state needs. Bureau staff nejabers 
have cOQictencsvl rcsQ&rch in the concept of regionalism with a pilot 
study whicii exaaines the ^-^aTinp and viability of Uew England 
regionalisia, and seeks to identify its successful ingredients. 
VIII FUTURI: PLANS AND NEEDS 

In th-i yeurs ahead the i>ureau looks forward to a broadened and 
enriched program whicii it expacts will be of value to both the 
gove rumen till and acadeaic commuriities in the CoMiionwoalth . Specific 
features of the prograia will include an auj^msntat ion of research 
activities to be accomplished by present staff. Another development 
will be the expansion of those service functions \vhich may I'roporly 
be of value to the University, the Bureau and its clientele organi- 
zations. It is also expected that there will be an intensification 
of professional relationships at the municipal, and especially the 
state, levels of government as well as a continued staff commitment 
to teaching responsibilities in the Government Department. 

The philosophy of the Bureau is that any state university 
bureau of governrrent research worthy of the name raust include the 
entire Comroonwealth as its legitimate concern. Such a policy must 
focus the Bureau's interest upon the snetropolit an areas that 11a 
east of Worcester (where 65% of the population live) , as well as 
upon the problems of the western part of th3 state. Such a broadening 
of the Bureau's constituency will inevitably increase the research 
opportunities, publications output and service responsibilities of the 

staff. It will also increase opportunities for the Bureau to pro- 
vide isuch needed legitimate services to the state adwinlstration 



ifte 



/ o -i ::> ;: 



iJivlt^a 



•otc 



and tlte Genei'al Court in dealing with state problems. 

In order to obtain the goals of this philosophy, it is pla-.med 
to augmt-nt existing staff with additional research-oriented person- 
nel to continue to cooperate with the Government Department with 
loans of staff; to increase the Bureau's Identification with state 
and national research organizations and to enlarge the Bureau's 
research holdings and facilities. A concerted effort will be siade 
to investigate the availability of grant monies to iasplewcnt the 
Bureau research goals, and to make policy !r;akers throughout the 
state aware of the Bureau's availability for legitisate research 
and consulting activities. 



if HOP 



mmAL REPORT 
[covering the i>eriod July 1, 1965 to June 30^ 1966) 



OFFICE OF msiTsmimkh studies 

UMXVEESXT? OF mSSACBUSETTS 



0£fice of Instittttional Studies 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst 

June 30, 1966 



AliNUAL REFOEt 

OFFICE OF INSTITUTCOKftX. STUDIES 

WlVSRSm OF I4ASSACH08E1TS 

(covering the period July 1> 1965 to Juoe 30, 1966) 



lo ApDygmrtatlon for the fiscal year 1963" 64« 1964 "65„ i96S°66o The Office of 
Instituticual Studies does not have a separate appropriation of its ova 
hut rather cases under the geaeral appropriation of the Office of the 
Preeidento In past years fueds provided under this arrangement have 
been most adequate for the total operations of this Office of Institutional 
Studieso £t is hoped that sioiiar support will, continue throughout 1966'^676 

I^o P®ysoonelo In September 1963 the personnel of the Office of Institutional 
Studies consisted of a Msecter^, Assistant Sirector, and Senior Clerk and 
Stenographero In September 1964 the personnel included a Director^ Assistant 
Director^ Research Associate, and Senior Clerk and Stenographero In September 
1965 the staff included an Acting Director (Sean of Adolnistration);, Assiatsnt 
Director, Research Associate^ and Senior Clerk and Stenographero At the pre° 
sent time the position of Research Associate has been transferred to the 
Bureau of Government Research with the understanding that this position will 
later be added as the need arises and such position beeomes aval lab ICo A 
new full^tiiBe Director will begin his duties on August 15i, 1966. At the 
present oosoent (June 30, 1966) the staff personnel consists of an Acting 
Director, (Dean of Administration) « Assistant Director, and Senior Clerk 
and Stenographero 



III< 



Organigation Patteroe The Director of the Office of Institutional Studies 
reports directly to the President of the University of I^ssachusettSo He 
is assisted by an Assistant Director.. A Senior Cleric and Stenographer serves 
the professional staffs yfhen the position of Research Associate is restored 
this person vlll report to the Dlrectoro 



President of the 
University of 
Massachusetts 



Director of the 
Office of Insti^ 
tutional Studies 



H Assistant I 
D irector I 



Research 
Associate 



.2- 



r. clientele Served o The Office of Xnscitutional Studies serves a wide range of 
clientele, both within and outside the University of Massachusetts. It 
stands sready to assist both faculty and administrationj, as well as students, 
in the continuing analysis of our institutional practices and procedures and 
to exchange data with others engaged in similar activitieso As sn administra^ 
tive unit of the State Universi^s the Office also cooperates as a research 
source with various public and private boards and cooanissionsa 

Ao Wit^n the institutitan itself the Office served the following people 
ox groups during the year 1965«66 either as a data source or in an 
advisory c&pacit^s 

la President of the University of Massachusetts 

2o Chancellor of the University of Massachusett8<=>Bo8ton 

3o Trovost 

4o Secretary 

5« Treasurer 

€o Dean of Administration 

7« Personnel Office 

80 Admissions and Records Office 

9o Bousing Office 

lOe Alunni Office 

llo Can^s Security Office 

12. Faculty Senate 

13o Student Senate 

1A« UniversiQr Editor 

15« Deans and Department Heads 

I60 University Planning Office 

B« Since the Office of Institutional Studies handles all requests for general 
information from outside the Universi^ it provides data for literally 
hundreds of individuals and groupso The most prominent of these agencies 
or individuals wereg 

lo Uo So Office of Education 

2o American Council on Education 

3i> National Education Association 

4o American Association of University Professors 

5e Higher Education Facilities Commission 

60 Massachusetts Budget Bureau 

7o New England Board of Higher Education 

80 Me M« Chai^erse Visiting Professor of Higher Education, 
School of Education, Indiana University 

9o The Norld Almanac 

10 o Enqrclopaedia Britannica 

llo Association for Institutional Research 

Professional Activities and Publications ^ Aside from publications which will be 
mentioned later, peraoonel of the Office of Inatitutioiwl Studies served as 
members of several University coonittees which iocludads 

U Master Planning Cocasittee 

2o law School Couaittee 

3« Be»accreditation Coonittae 

4o Director of Institutional Studies Selection Conmittae 

So University Enrollment Growth Cosimittee 

In a similar veiOs staff members provided data and related materisl for the 



■•3*> 



Faculty Senate in the areaa of fringe benefits and curriculum evaluation 

as this group turned its attention to an analysis of policies and procedures 

in these tuo areaso 

The Assistant Director served as an advisor to the Student Senate in this 
body*'a iq>praisal of the University's publications policy and also the regular 
tions regarding alcoholic beverages on campuso 

Several publications were produced by the Assistant Director o These included s 

lo Average Net Cost to State of Instruction Per Student, Land Grant 
Institutions,, 1963«l964c 

2* Analysis of the Determination of the HaKisoum Salary of Members of 
the Faculty and Administration at Fub!lic» State^Supported Colleges 
and Unlversitleso 

3o Analysis of Faculty Salariess February 1966, University of Massachusetts^ 
Anhersto 

4e Analysis of Faculty Salaries^ September 1965^ University of Massachusetts*^ 
AnharstQ 

5o Analysis of Faculty SalarieSs, February I9669 University of Hassachueetts^ 

fiOStOUo 

60 Analysis of Faculty Salaries^ September 19658 University of H&ssachusetts^ 
Bos ton a 

7o A Geographical Analysis of Massachusetts Residents Attending the 
University of Massachusetts^Aioheret^ Fall 1965« 

8» A Geographical Analysis of Massachusetts Residents Attending the 
University of Ma8sachusett8<'Boston(, Fall 1965« 

9o FACT BOC^» University of Massachusetts, 

lOo I<arge8t ilbrary Holdings in North AtR»rlc»n Colleges and Universities^ 
by Total Number of Volumes^ 1964>=>6So 

Although not directly responsible for the total publication^ the Assistant 
Director provided considerable etatistical oaaterial for the Annual Report of 
the President^ the Campus Guide Mannual, the University Graduate and Under^ 
graduate CatatogSf, and numerous budget analyses and studies o In like manner, 
data was also presented by the Office for visual aid prasentations before 
various cnanittees of the Geoaral Court &t the Conmonwealtho 

^'' M gJM AccoaylishaentCo While it is difficult to drat? a distinction between 
"" major and minor accompli shia&nts the major duties performed by the Office of 
Institutional Studies during the past year might include; 

1) Coi^llatlon, publication and distribution throughout the Aoiherst and 
Boston campuses of a University of Massachusetts FACT BOQKo 



2) Responses to approximately 300 requests for Inforaifition about 
the University from agencies and individuals outside the campuso 

3) Preparation and analyses of data for members of the administration 
and faculty in such areas as enrolliQ<ant groifth, tuition and fees, 
net coat per student, faculty salaries^ state support of higher 
education, faculty profiles, library growth and development, 
student publications, and University°State relations « 

4) Distribution to pertinent members of the achainistration of all 
legislation passed by the General Court of the Commonwealth having 
an effect on the University of Massachusetts, in particular, and 
higher education^ in generale 

5) Preparation of position papers dealing with legislation introduced 
in the General Court i^ich had a direct bearing on the institution 
Cautonoor/ and faculty salaries) o 

IXe Special PyolectSo Due to the main fact that the Office of Institutional Studies 
was staffed with only one full«time professional anployee {Assistant Director) 
during most of the past year, it was virtually impossible to undertake any 
"special" projects in addition to the normal work loado With the hiring of 
a full°time Director, it is hoped that additional projects can be undertakano 
Perhaps it might be proper to view the publication of a University FACT BOOK 
as a "special" project since no such publication existed prior to Office of 
Institutional Studies" action this yearo 

[lo future Plans c At the present time it is meaningless to predict future plans 
for the Office since the new Director, arriving in mid^August, will have 
his own long»range goals and programs of imp lamentation c However, it can 
be assumed that the Office of Institutional Studies will continue to serve 
in its present functions the needs of a growing University while at the same 
looking for new areas of endeavor and eoncentrationo 



UKIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



ASttJUAL REHSRT OF THE DE^ OF WOMEN 






1965=66 






As^roppiatiOR 










1963-6t* 


196U-65 


1965=66 


Servl'^es = Hon Employees 


$ 27,256 


$ 37,865 


$ 50»69ii 


Travel 


300 


300 


Si^S 


Printing 


- 


210 


» 


Repairs 


125 


170 


130 


Specisl Supplies 


175 


250 


650 


Office & Administrative 


750 


SOO 


900 


Telephones 


«a> 


1^350 


2,115 


Equipiaent 


221 


500 


91 



Personnel 



1963»6H 



195«t=65 



1965-60 



Dean of Wossen 1 

Assto Degn of Women I 
Assti to Dean of Wooseit 

Heads of Residence 13 
Graduate Coimselors (part-time) 2 

Senior Clerk & Steno, 1 

Junior Clerk St StenOo 1 



1 

1 

1 

15 

«^ 
1 

1 



1 
1 
1 
17 
5 
1 
1 



3<, Orgenissational Chart (see next page) 



Students or Clientele 







1983«SU 


196t+^65 

Mgrar>-.xr-,M-,-T7T. . 


Undergraduate f*l(^en 
Special or N. Co 
Stoekbridge 
Craduate 


2,757 

113 

20 

339 


3,360 
125 

20 
SSO 






1:229 


H,006 


65»66 Approxo 




8796 of undergraduate mmt 



1965^66 

3«861 

1S«^ 

21 

700 



residence halls 
8% of undergraduate %K3)aen lived in 10 

sororities 
5% of undergraduate women were canmtters 



m 



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rt O 

•4 a 



pi sf 

3 ©«C 



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rj- 3 »* 

C ft <& 

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CiS ic 



So Professional Aot ivitlgs 

Having served in recent years on Stste and llationsl Comnittees of 
the Wot^n Deans and Counselors and of AkW 1 am grsteful for the experience 
it has given ice both in sc^aintsnce with personnel and the sharing of 
cGimmn concerns and resolutions of probles)8« At present I em resisting 
assvmdng heavy outside professional duties because of the continual 
needs on our own caiRpuSo I maintain active tsembership in MUWe in 
Massachusetts Association of Women Deans and Counselors (serving on the 
prograKi committee) and in the National Assoeietion of Women Daans and 
Counselors o I serve on the Deaifs Advisory Co^ssittee to the ^Sassachusetts 
Society for the University Education of womsn and as an Xncorporator of 
the !forace Smith Fundg both scholarship granting groups. Through 
attendance at the Convention of the National Association of Women Deans 
and Counselors (this spring in Washington ^ Do Co) I also keep in touch 
with the national Councils €>f Mortsr Board and Alpha Lambda DeltSo 

6» Major Accomplishments 

The Dean of Women's Office serves as the focal point for information, 
counseltngg records and administration of women's affairs = to extend and 
help women fully to utilise their opportunities for education^ 

The professioiial staff in the office snd the Heads of Residence in 
17 women's dormitories^ whom we select and train, serve as "general! sts", 
counseling essd serving hursdreds of students whose need for information^ 
encouragement a»d hel^ is **normal" and usually temporary c With close 
colleague relations %7ith Health, Mental Health, Counseling Center and other 
specialists we refer to them the smaller number of students in need of 
particular or continued help. T}ie Dean of Women ^s office and Heads of 
Residence are very frequently called upon for background infomttation by 
the specialists and by faculty members 9 advisors » scholarship donors » 
or employers o 

It is important for the University „ and for women students themselves « 
to he cognizant of the varied end changing roles of women so that in the 
perspective of their whole lives the y ars in college can be most valuable 
in terais of their personal and social growth as well as intellectual 
achievemento It is cair objective to help women students to fulfill their 
best potentialities and establish firmer ccmmitis^nts to good values and 
staitdards. 

Values, standards end University expectationsj particularly as 
reflected in women's i-esidence regulations » have been under attack this year 
in colleges across the country. (an objective of the Kational Student 
Association). Segimiing with SWAP Conference « October *65, the University 
of MassaclMsetts experienced this attack spearheaded by the University 
Reform Consnittee, a smell unrepresentative but vocal group of men and a 
few women e encouraged and augmented by some faculty members ^ The Dean ©f 
lfe>men*s staff, especia3,ly the Heads of Residence and to seme extent the 
student Counselors ^ bore the brunt of criticisms, much of it exaggerated 
and unjust o 



Refisctio?a» objective evaluatioK, and the setting of oew objectives 
is esseRtial to keep any department viable and responsive to chafiging 
needs. An effoi-t has been made for this to be a continuing process 
in our work and an s?mual review and revision of women* s regulations 
with elected women student leaders has in the past striven to preseE-vs 
values with flexihtlity<. In view of the asw student protest $' hewever^ 
and lacking administrative support « % ecnGeded thst liberal changes 
were indicated* Agreeing thst it is educationally sotjend for an adult 
to carry resiminsibili-^ foi? his own decisions and the consequences 
of those decisions I have joined other's on s Student Life Cojmaittee to 
reconsnend that University of Massachusetts students be regarded as 
responsible young adults and be given freedcwa for deoision-sRakiriig includisiji 
self=i3fiposed curfeeso l^ether- our students are ready for this or not 
I feel there is no tui-ning backa There is urgency for University 
administrations student personnel staff, and faculty to work together 
to help students to respond wisely to this new freedora and assu!E|»tiOK of 
adult rolssc 

A major gain in the University's stesee -^^ith students can be 
achieved if we csn implenjent present agreement that all rssidences for 
men and woinen, including fraternities and sororities, will close to non^ 
residents st the same closing times (midnight Sunday-Thursday^ one 

•©* clock Friday arid Saturday) and that the Universi-Jry grant no parietal 
privileges^ These policies and. a new es^hasis on more student participation 
in house govenaaeat conJbiEted with our present well^deve loped residence 
hall Counselor program can benefit student lifeo 



The "Residential College" is p2?ovlBg to be an exciting concept 
a successful way of enriching the residence environsnent with cultural 
activities and of providing particular advantages of ^ssore personal 
association of stu.dents and faculty o It is gratifying to note that many 
students are increasingly saore at ease with fscult-y and are responding 
to opportunities for stiteulating convsrsstlon and prcsgrasHEc The special 
talents of Mrso Teresa deKsrpely brought distisaction to the Oniversity @nd 
to our staff with her publication of "Black iSigiitshade" ^ prison measoirs 
of Eose Valic Stoierous student discmssicsns with the author and Professor 
and Mrso Vali related t© this event and the subject of Cwmmmlsm added 
sigiTiificant values in the Orcham Rc^sidentiai College prograswo 

The traditional reside?icss for woj^en have continued msny sociaJ. and 
cultural activities conducted by student coKmjltteas advised by the Heads 
©f Residence and student Counselors o Faculty are frequent guests for 
social affairs or talks and discussions c See attached reports ©f typical 
"traditional houses" a Lswls and Crabtree, Resourceful Heads of Residence 
snd imaginative student coiraaittees have done exceedingly well with sneager 
fimds and liiiisited equigsassit to conduct valuable activities in th© wsKsen^s 
r-ssidenceso Kore money is laeededo We look forward to new davelopsassats In 
the distribution of vending machine profits as a source ©f funds to augment 
and extend residence hall cultural and educational programs o 



,» !{. .^ 

A majot* achievement each year is to secure well qualified women 

as Heads of Eesidenae and to maintain the high calibre of thin professional 
staff in our njomen^'s residences » E>.perieneed Heads of Residence were 
helpful advisers to seven new membexs «ho were added to fill vacancies 
by retirement and to staff new resicence hallso Desirable as it is to 
have faculty closely related to residence halls it is to be realized 
that they have neither the ti!ne» training, nor interest to oari'y on the 
individual counseling as needed 9 day or night, at unpredictable times 
throughout the year^ It is the Head of Eesidence who, working with her 
Counselors 9 knows th@ residents well enough to give guidance in the 
frequent emergencies and problems of students as they adjust to the 
freedom and demands of the University » especially in their first year 
away from homeo Mesibers of the Counseling staff have contributed^ along 
with other resourceful people, in the Dean of W«M!sen®s staff meetings » The 
attached memorandum fvcm Dr, Aspy and Hr^ Douds, who continued discussions 
with one group of Heads of Residence ^ is quoted as it expresses very well 
the significance of their roles » 

The addition of Miss Margaret for«i (July ^65) as Staff Assistant 
has been a great asset particularly '«itH office interviews end also as 
advisor and liaison with sororities and Panhellenic, relieving ^rso Gonon 
and me for frequent conferences and meetings both in and away from the 
office and for administrative worko 

Offine procedures were complicated this year because both Senior 
and Junior clerks were new end transient and because of moving the offices 
to a different location at an awkward titmSo A reorganization of files 

and development of some streamlined procedures he'ife hsen aceoraiplished, 
however, and competent new secretaries are now established. 

Respectfully submitted. 



//. 



Helen Curtis 

Deart of Women 



attaclauentss 

Reports of two san^le "traditlcjnal dormi1»ry" Heads of Residence 

Copy aisd men» from DVo Aspy anc. Mro Douds 

Directory of women *s residences; 

List of W(Mnen student leaders 

Report of the Assistant Dean ol Women 



I 



Annual Report tif Hesd ©f Rss1d8?^C9 
Le*«1s House 1955-S6 

Lewis HoMS© Is one of the older houses on Campus md has a special charm. 
Our pine panelled center Is a wara welcome to sIT who ef»ter. The student rooms 

are tirjted In various colors and the closets ere gene?'oys with stout doors. 
The girls especially like the odd shaped poonss - for they are more Interesting 
when decorated. ?^ost &f our girls spend all foisr years 1ir« lewis by chofcs. 

For the ■ past eight years we have been over-cr<wded. Msny double rooms h&w 
been tripled. However, we have bssn encoweged to believe that the normal 
capacity can be expected during th® year 1966-1967. 

There tmPB 39 elected officers 1n Lewis H©ase th'?s past yeBr^ who took 
charge of the prograrasilrsg and business affairs of the dormitory. There were 
seven counselors, who lived on the corridors with the girls and eeting as 
friends, counselors m4 advisors. The coiincfl worked closely with the girls Ofi 
the corHdors_.and the Head of Residence. The aim of all was t® create a pleasa^jt 
home awj^y'frosn hosae - a place In which to s'slaKs 1'ive, m6 study. The e1eet1o??s ■ 
of officers for next ye&r and the massing of the pnjposed budget took p1aee 
fn May. They will be ratified In September. 

Many activities took place in Levels House last year such as breakfasts i dinners, 
£ uppers, receptions., parties, teas, open house ^ and ansTjal House p1c??1c. 

The program of visiting professors was a very successfyl one. The following 
'.■acuity and staff members took part In the discussions and panels ; Dr. Gage, 
Dr. Stanfleld, Professor Ollkes, Dr. Burke^ Dr. Wellman and M1ss7\nt9;ines, Movies 
of India ffijid Germany were shovm by foreign and American students followed by 
discussions of the cultural and academic ojctlook In the two countries., 

The Scholarship Chairman did an excellent Job of stimulating not only the 
Freshmen but also some of the upper-claj?s women. Many of the ypper-class women 
ga^fe their time and energy to help the Frishraen with thsir academic probleffls. 

Lewis Hoisse also took part In the Wiamen's Sing, won first place on the 
Hois?ecom1ng Float parade m\d had a woRderfyl evening of fo'fk singing. 

As Heads of Residence, we av::t as a coordinator between the students, 
the Counselors and the various departments and Deans on campus. Without our 
cooperatlosi, many departa^ants such as Housing » ^'lalntenance md Health and Safety 

would be helpless. We are available at all times to respond to the needs of the 
students to talk over their pi"cble?i(is» to tell of their, achievements or just to 
share their dally experiences,. 

Respectfully submitted, 

?^6r1on Cycling 



Report of Head of Residence, Crabtrae House 

The past year, seen In retrospect, was a busy. Interesting one at 
Crabtree. As a resident couple, we faced a new eKperlence which v/as chall- 
anglng for us and for the dorm. Vlith the Counselors, we developed a v«;ell- 
coordlnated team which carried us through tlis year vdth good results. They 
were a particularly fine group of girls with whom we formed lasting friend- 
ships. Th^y worked hard to help make the experiment work; I doubt that It 
viGuld have been so wonderful without their maturity and sense of resposislb-fllty, 
as well as their lively personalities. The girls In the dorm responded well to 
having a couple, and a good rapport v/as established. By Christmastime, we 
knew practically all the q1r1s by name, and found our living room frequently 
filled with enthusiastic students. They came to talk, listen to our record- 
player or borrow classical records for Music courses, to borrow books from our 
library (predominantly that of two English majors), to ask advice, report on 
their latest boyfriends » or ask to be taken to the Inflrmai'v, (We had three 
cases of appendicitis during the winterl) The Counselors kept high stsndards 
on the^r corridors, reflected In the fact that quiet hoors were seldom broken, 
ThG dom became a good place to study or sleep, or to work numerous perianal 
problems. The Counselors helped many girls in dGc1s1on--mak1nq situations which 
i^nabled growthj v^hlle i helped guide by be-Jn 'indlng-boards never a "director 3 
"mother", or authoritarian". In cosinssling, :;wr:- serious problems occasionally 
emerged, and 1n tvm cases I was v^orklng closely with Dr. Janowltz B.nd Mr. Douds., 
This was Invalufible experience in learning the art of referrals and In becoming 
a lay counselor who works primarily vrlth the envlT'onment of the dormitory and 
the relationship between the Individual and her environment. I feel that these 
contacts with p^-ofesslonal counselors ara a "m;,ist" for the enrichment of the 
training of the Head of Residence. Often we would be closest to the actual 
living situation of the distressed student, hence the most available halper during 
crises. Our Counselors showed great perceptivity In dealing with emotional upsets 
on their corridors. One girl, for example , showed marked Improvement acadenncally, 
socially, and esjotlonally after vforking intensively with Mr. Douds and me during 
the year. This was a happy outcoma to a difficult period. 

My husband, though busy with his graduate Morks participated when he could 
1n Ti\my a, creative bull session^ helped fr-eguently with advice on English papers 
.and speeches., and often treated a group of girls to large Ice-cream sundaes. I 
found 1t possible to counsel girls privately In my Inner apartment at all hours 
of the night and day. The kitchen held a ready pot of coffee &nd standard eaulr)- 
ment - a kleenex box for those occasional emotional situations. We came to enjoy 
our life Immensely and to look forward to another rewarding yedr. 

Among successful dorm activities carried out largely throuah efforts of 
dorm committees aiid guidance from Counselors and Head of Residence^ the following 
were notable: 

A mock football game In the fall, held In the middle of the ?lorth auad v-nth 
Thatcher men, complete with male "chearleaders" dressed In outlandish female qarbj 
a cheering section for each "team," and msny spectators °, 

A faculty dimer with hostesses for each guest - the girls themselves made 
everything. Including my favcrita hom.-imade spaghetti recipe and homemade cookies; 
the after-dinner coffee hoar Included the entire dorm and was a great success; 



A cokfi party In the rac room to iiein us qet scquelntsd, advertised as 
"Meet Mr. Sllva" coke party and v/ell "attended; 

A float, v;liich was small and rain-drenched, but supported loyally by 
Its architects, for the homecominq parade; 

A trim-a-limb party at Christmastime, v-flth cocoa and cookies; 

A dance, vdth rented jukebox whfch v^as popular; 

A faculty dessert (ice-cream sundaes, aqainS) in the sprinq; 

A surprise bon-voyage party for us qlven by the whole dorm In which they 
presented us with handmade tokens and v/on us completely by recltinq poetry 
written for the occasion and sinqinq sonqs adapted especially to the moment. 

Academically, we had an excellent record, v/ith ^0 qirls on Honors, for v/horn 
\m had an Honors Tea, traditions! in most doms. The Scholarshin Comrnlttee ?)osted 
lists of the majors In the hoyss, so that qlrls who \^ere havirn difficulty could 
seek out helo. The dorm vras prGud to tie for second nlace 1n the scholastic 
averages of women's dorniltories: we were lucky to have severs! Phi Kappa Ph1 students 
two Ph1 Beta Kapnas, and one new Mortar Board, our House Chairrrsan. 

Education qoes forward In domitories In all fields; in many, there are 
informative lectures scheduled by commveteeE v/hlch cover a wide ranqe. We v/ere 
appreciative of the time devoted by the Health Service to show tv/o movies, one oti 
venereal disease and one on narcotics, with discussion sessions lastinq on into 
the niqht. These are valuable, srid often very v/sl1 attended. 

All in all, v/e had an axcelle'it experience, with unusual cooperation and 
high dorm spirit. There vi/as only one esse 'where b. qirl miqht have qone to Judiciary 
Board, had she piot wlthdravm from the University. Othan'/ise, all discipline was 
handled capably and well by the House Council. Very few infractions were noted, 
and Council meetlnqs rarely draqqad on and on over trivia. They viere mainly planrrinq 
sessions for the weeks to come, v/lt!^ qood discussions of counsellnq techniques. 
The main work of the Head of Residarice, ! found, was In conwuni cation with this 
key qroup. Toqether we sorted out the important matters of the Meek^ and than 
they v/ent out and implemented ideas qalned through this teamvv'ork . 

I found that our Head of Residence Staff meetinqs with the Dean of '.-fomen 
Viere very helpful to me ir\ their eirinq out of Ideas and r>roblems, In their frenisent 
use of resource people, and In the constant and unfallinq support they provided for 
each of us. It 1s a pleasure to have the opnortunity to v/ork with this fine nrouD 
of people. 

Respectfully submitted, 
•Irs. Ann G. Silva 



COPY 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MEMORANDUM 

From: John J. Douds and David N, Aspy June 1,1966 

To: President John Lederle 
Subject: Heads of Residence 



After having worked closely with the Heads of Residence for the past 
year we have come to appreciate both the Importance and demands of this position. 
We wish to acknowledge their valuable contribution = 

A Head of Residence carries many roles; everything from counselor, group 
leader, advisor, administrator, scapegoat, and even an occasional janitorial 
task. They are often bombarded by conflicting demands from students, adminis- 
tration, faculty and parents. It is common to feel pulled upon In several 
different directions simultaneously. They exist In the "front lines" and often 
bear the brunt of student unrest and conflict which comes with a University In 
transition. It Is not unusual to be up until aarly morning with an upset student 
while all others are safely separated from their responsibilities. Unfortunately 
they are taken for granted and their beneficial effects often remain behind the 
scenes. 

In short, the position entails vast responsibilities and competencies and 
yet It receives less constructive support than the more spotlighted positions 
within the University's community. If the University is to realize the huge 
potential of this position It behooves all concerned to understand the role and 
Invest It with the recognition It deserves. 



John J, Douds 
Senior Counselor 



David H, Skspy 
Psychological Counselor 

JJD/ga 

cc: Dean William F. Field 
Dean Helen Curtis 







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UNIVERSXTy OF HiiSSACHDSETTS 
Reference List of Moraen Student Leaders for 196S<=>66 



Wwaen of l^he Student Senate? 
(*WoiBen^s M fa Irs Comnittee ^snbers) 
•Karen Gavin ^66^ V-»Preso Senate 
^Catherine Walsh '66» Chmo Women's 
Affairs; Bette Chaiabers '67 
*Janet Charles ^67; Edith Doyle '67 
♦Ellen Fiske ''S6; Jacqueline Hall »68 
Elaine Lipson ^67; Vera Mysyshyn *66 
Mary O'Connell "671 Linda Perlstein '56 
•Michele Potvin '665 *Carole Rudge '67 
Linda Shapiro '66* «Bonnie Stokes '66 
Margaret VanderBurgh '67 

Mon<° Senate Members of Women *s Affai rs 

Coiamitte eg 

Brenda Bryan '56j Janst Charles 'G7 

Michele Feldman "^67; Alice Hill «66 

Carol Holtzman '66, Mary Hart ^66 

Mary Ann McAdams '66; Gail Meran '66 

Brenda lieugeboren '66 

Wogen's Judiciar y Board? 
Marion Smith '&6» Chief Justice 
Bette Butler '67; Susan Meet 'v7 
Leslie Lszin '66; Stephanie Leach '68 

House Chainnen g 

Arnold: Nary Knight <'66 
Brooks s Janet Decker '66 
Crabtrees Eileen White '67 
Delights Elizabeth Johnson ^67 
Hamlins JUdith Belcher '66 
Johnsons Mary Ann McAdaots *^66 
Knowlton: Mary Sweeney '66 
Leech? Ruthanne Batcheller '66 
Lewi as Marylou Hiurener -66 
Msiry Lyon: Susan Heine '66 
Van ifeter North: Linda Ferreira '67 
Van Meter South: Linda Leen '67 
Emily Dickinson: Sally Shea '66 
Eugene Field: Nancy Jansen '66 
Southarest A: Dar-ia Montanari '66 

D: Natalie Clapp '66 

Ds Marie Arruda ^66 

Inter^'dorw Council : 
Itorotii^ "Corenflo "'67 



Sorority Presidents; 

Al^ha Chi binega: Sharon Merrill '66 

Chi Onega: Frences«Dee Burlin '66 

Iota Ganfoa Ifpsllon: Elaine Malley '67 

Kappa Alpha Theta: Ellen Garvey '66 

Kappa Kappa Gainna: Patricia Seibert^S^ 

Lambda Delta Phi: Evelyn Weaver '66 

Pi Beta Phi: Bonnie Stokes '66 

Sig^ Delta Tou: Elizabeth Venerl '66 

Si^na Kappa: Gail Noran '66 

Sig^ Sigma Sigpna: Carole Walkvitz ^6C 

F^nhellenic Coimc il ,-; 
Jacqueline Qtms ^66 

Phi Beta Kappa « Nat' 1 Schol. Honorary: 
"Carol Hemisdorf ^t7i Marlloiu Prentice 

'66; Janet Kay Smith '66; Joyce 

Stowell '66 

Phi Kappa Phi» Nat 'l Schol» Honorary: 
Joan Eracker '66; Patricia McNally '61 
Flora Mueller ^66; Stephanie Rofefland 
'65; Janet Kay Smith ''66 

Mor tar Board ^ Senior Honor Society : 

Roberta Bernstein; ioan Bracker; 
Mary Ann Brady 5 Elaine Corsi; 
Karen Garvin; Sandra Haynes; 
Nancy Jansen; Teresa Joseph; 
Lesley Lagin; Mary Ann ^kiAdams; 
Daria Montanari; Gail Moran; 
Anne Schwslenstockeri Janet Kay Smith 
Elizabeth Venerl; Carol Woodcock 

Sc,rol,l ao SophtHaore Honor., Society: 
Vellsa Alegar; Linda Badavasi 
Dorana Beer; Cheryl Bogie | 
Linda Camevale; Lorraine Contuzzl; 
Deborah Dearborn; Jane Delano; 
Denize Deleeuuw; Claudia Oemskyi 
Celine Dumont; Cheryl Eliot; 
Mary Vennessey; Althea Gould; 
Joanne Goulds Canaen Crosse; 
Cynthia Iftint; Karen Kane; Pamela 
Koppt; Edwina Kuja; Elaine Laukkanen; 
Judith Maxwell; Linnea Nelson 
Elizabeth Neufeld; Auralie 
Falu&beckas; Julia Quincyi Phyllis 
Rlamwr; Cynthia Roseborouth 
Sherry Rudsten; Paula Russo; 
Bonalyn Sampson; Karen Schmidt 1 
Marianne Schmoyer; Kathleen Smith; 
BariMisrai Sullivan; Brenda 
Swithenbank; Debra Tildan 



Anrsual Report of Asslstamt Oean of Women 
1955-66 

I regret the delay In submitting this report. I hope I bring to It the 
objectivity gained from a holiday completely removed from the arena. 



It has been a year of political activism on the part of a vocal mi 
of students, faculty, and staff members. The Impetus seems to have come 
from the National Student Association on the one hand and, on the other hand^ 
from the sc-called S conm1tt.ee of the A.A.U.P. which enlarged its concern about 
academic freedom for faculty to Include a concern for tlie civil rights of 
students. Existentialist anxiety is In the air. Mass medle have contributed 
to a growing concern for "authenticity" and the "freedom to learn". Certainly 
the very real problems of civil rights for negroes and the Berkeley incident 
have contributed to the assumption that protest rather than concensus fs the 
way to effect change. 

It became clear at S.W.A.P. that the chief target for the year here, as 1n 
many colleges and universities over the country was to be an attack against 
women's regulations and women's "subservience to the establishment". The session 
on women's residence regulations should have been recorded for Its example of 
group process In the hands of skilled social scientists, A pandora's boK was 
opened. The University Reform Gommittee held open meetings with faculty 
participation and encouragement. Though these were poorly atten'led by women 
students. Residence Hall coffee hours lead by mismbers of the University 
Reform Committee kept the issues alive. The concept of a University acting 
In loco parentis was challenged as indeed It has been challenged In court 
rulings In some states in recent years. Challenged too were University 
rtiTings forbidding the consumption of alcoholic beverages on Uirhersity property 
or in any dwelling other than home where students are In residence. 

A Reform Conralttee petition asking for ths abolition of curfews was signed 
by an overwhelming majority of women students on the plea that "even if you 
don't want freedom for yourself you don't want to spoil It for others." 

Certainly it is naive to thir^k that by requiring curfew the University Is 
legislating morality. Our concern has been for the safety of students and the 
protection of property. If the University takes the responsibility of providing 
a night attendant for both men's and women's residence halls, security of person 
and property can be provided for ell students without the need of a eyrfew. 
It the University feels that a eurFew is necessary for Freshmae during this period 
of transition to the University with all the pressures which they must meet, it 
is equally Important for frestean men as for fpeshman women to ha?e a curfew^ 

■ Faculty Senate Conroittees fomed ynder the Senate by laws encountered JJtyderst 
Senate resistance to changes which gave them less proportionate representation 
than had been accorded them in the past. The foraatlon of a joint Ad Hoc Committee 
of the Faculty Senate and the Student Senate has resulted in a dialogue which 
has served as a learning process for its members. In. the meantime the status of 
the R.S.O. Committee has been left 1r limbo and the mechasdcs of carrying out the 
involved charge of the University Discipline Board remain still to be worked out. 
The frame of reference of the Discipline Board has been taken almost verbatim frcm 
the report of the S consnlttee of A.A.U.P. with provision for a legal or faculty 
advisor for the appellant and for a tape recording of procedlngs as wsll as for a 
mandatory review of all student suspensions recoimiended by an administrator or by a 
lower court. 



In many ways It has been heartening to have rtudents, faculty and adminis- 
trators carry on a dialogue. This car? ccmtHbute to Increased understanding of 
«11 segments of the University and to the matyrlty of our students,. It may be 
too that at this, moment in the development of tho University a dramatic confron- 
tation was necss^ary. 

What Is disheartening Is the little tlms In v^hfch to help students to pro- 
vide for adequate orients tlon to sudden change. The absence of many wrnen stu- 
dent leaders during the summer makes pi arts for Implementation necessary without 
taking them adeqyately Into the pl3nn1ng= 

The denigration, by the University Reform Consjiltteej of Heads of Residence 
as a group on the basis of Isolated incidents which were accepted by some activists 
as the norm did not give an example to students of suspended judgj^ent pending 
examination of the validity of the source and the scholarly weighing cf evidence. 

The roles of the Heads of Residence as advisors to Individual students and to 
student leaders In' their hcyses rsther than as enforcement officers needs to 
be better understood by the campus at large. Certainly this office has emphasised 
In our training of Heads of Residence their advisory capacity. They are rsswree 
people to whOTi students can look for help In finding answers to questions' from 
the most trivial to the most critical » The Heads of Residence, recognizing a 
student's possible need of more clinical or special help than they can g1ve» 
suggest other agencies for referral. Their role with counselors and elected officers 
should be advisory only. They take no part, nor. am they physically present. 
In disciplinary deliberations conducted by a house council of students^. . 

Student agitation has helped staff msmhers as Individuals evaluate the 
.extent to which they have been facilitators of democratic process. This Is gooc'. 
On the other hand there should be a graator recognition of their effectiveness In 
reducing the ve?y sense of "alienation" that students are lead to expect they 
.should feel In a multiynlversltyc Students can sense that they are people close 
't.hand who care and who are avsilable to help them to look for ways to meet . 

ituatlons at whatever ho'jr of the .night they seek them out. The morale of Heads 
of Residence as a group Is wrthy of more consideration even 1f only for the 
^^fect on the morale of a house in -which al«icted officers cm meet their respon- 
. abilities with enthusiasm because of the confidence the Hssd of Residence places 
In. them and In which counselors can respond pos1tl¥f?^j» to her calm 'and confident 



As I worked as the liaison with Orchard Hill from this office I was gratified 
tc 'note the strides made 1r the Orchard HI'll Resldsntlal College this year with 
each Residence Hall developing a style of Its own. I can attest to the enthyslasm, 
the 1m?i§1native thinking md the coheslveness of. the preceptor and fellows^ the 
Head of Residence and the student committee chairmen of E5«gens Field with who® I 
met each ■week. Dr, Varley from, the ©utset M% respected the responsibility of 
th© Heads of Residence to this office at ths -same tlsn^ as they functioned ©*; m 
Integral part of the total hoyse ©rganlgsidsn spsarhetded by the preceptor= 
\lher& Tlries.of commmlc^tlosii haw been pnmif&ei at all levels harwjsloMS re'atlojjs 
mi coiiistnsctlve Ijsterpretatfon siaturally ensised. 



^Ti 



This has not been clearly enoygh yrsderstood in each of the 'low rise 
r&sldencs halls In the Southwest CoRiplsx. A Rsutual ynderstanding of each 
other's roles was difficult to achieve beeaose of the newness of the eRpsrl- 
ment with cowRselors isnfamlltar for the !?iost part, with e resldentlsil colleges 
with Heads of Residence new to the casnpys, md with a stydent population 
composed largely of Freshmen. Our office in sio wsy wished to hamper the aKperf- 
ment. On the other hand lass confusion would hsvs ensued for the Heads of 
Residence and for their counselors had there been »re rml sharing of Inforraa- 
tlon between our office and the Master and precsptors. 

It Is encouraging that a Southwast Planning Coimslttee has been set yp to 
Include representatives from the offices of the Deans of Men and Women to 
afford coissnunlcatlon and mutJial understanding before the opening of the high 
rise Residence Halls in the Fall. With a supers truetwre of faculty membsrs in 
the residences there should be provisions. In the organizational schetna of 
each house, for adequate cosOTunl cation betweers thsm and the one full t1rae staff 
meraber. Then everyone conni€SG«3 t/lth the eKperlment can bs part of a mytaally 
supportive team promoting slisjilar objections and aware of each one's responsi- 
bilities. 

The Student Life Committee chaired by Dr. Noffslnger has contributed t© 
understanding between cosuBnlttes members jsiid a mutual respect for each other's 
philosophy and goals revealed as shared' rather than divergent. It was u?"^0nt to 
coordinate -our efforts to obviate the '"divide md conquer" techniques of which 
the University had an aTarflslsig example .this past year. ^ Students need to be aware 
that it is riot politically advarstesgeous to play oae agency against the, other nor 
political suicide for them or for us to si't dowfn md talk with each other. 
Denigration becomes contagious, When people are threatensd It becomes easy to 
fight back or to retreat and to give 1@ss thsR the best of themselves. 

I personally have little sense of accoFnpllshensrjt this year except Insofar 
as J have tried to help those Heads of Residence with whom I have worked to keep 
their equanimity and perspective, Tfie^^e are si^ns pointing to a more productive 
year ahead In which we can all work together constructively for desirable objectives 
In which students can take a more active part responsibly in their student gover?i» 
ment at the grass roots level. ■ Ther© will be mych to do to help them to meet ths 
challenge of freedom with responsibility. 

Respectful 1y subml tted , 

) 



August 1 , 1966 




sabelle Gofk^n 



Deparlniient of !^;)blic Health 

immL RE?QRf 
July 1» 1965 » June 30 ^ 1966 



University of Massachusetts 
Anherstg Mass, 



lo Appi^opriatioii 



03 



06 



1963-68^ 
(Appropriations) 



$i,tJ50,00 



10 


200,00 


11 


- 


12 


100 o 00 


13 


600 o 00 


W 


100 o 00 


lUol 


- 


IS 


l«t|00,00 



196«f.65 
CApp£N3pt>iatio£is) 



$2,H00=00 



SSOoOO 



200 o 00 

1,500.00 

250 o 00 

300 o 00 

6«200o00 



1965-66 
(Appx^priatioas) 



$5, 250 o 00 



950^00 



200c 00 

300.00 
2^000.00 



lie Pe3?so!mel 



I 

I 



Chairman, part-time 



Professor 



I 



Associate Professof' 



1963-6» 1964-65 1965-66 



2 



Assistant Professor 



Assistant Professor, part-tiine 
0)ireetor ErVo Health & Safety) 



Instructor 



Adjunct Professor (Peterson) 



Seeretary (Jro -Clerk Typist) 
(Jro -Clerk Stenoo) 



*% tis^ 



I 

% 



!."•% 



*pilus considerable extra tiane o& liourlj basis. 



a ^ 




o o 

m fit 



fij H» ffi 
OS" ft 

»• © 

9 . •< 







8»^ 






iCfll 



IV o students 



1963-4 



196i».S 



196S.6 



(a) Majors: 



lo Medo Tech, S3 



Pyblie Health 30 



36« 



70** 
26*« 



3. Public Health 
(Gred.) 



11 



m 



15 



(b) Students taught i 



lo llniVo ef H&sso 

Ist seiao .175 

2nd sem. 26B 

2o Stockbrldge 35 



219 
3U 

86 



283 
336 

64 



*0n basis of curi'ent records g 4/30/65 « 
**0r basis of eurv^nt records ^ 4/05/6iic 



Vo mCm,Tf HJBLICATI05SS Pjm M0FESSIOMAL ACTIVITIES 

DARITYs WILLIAM Ao,, HioDcg Associate Professor 

Pmblications 

"Health Education in a Faiaily Planning Progs^ara" « Health Ediacators 
at Wogk , Voio 16 9 1965 « ppo 51-S8o 

"The Clients Reaching and Keepings Public F»aily Planning Clin- 
io8$ How to pa?gmLlge||i ^^ to OpegateT °^~Confegence Reports New 

Yosic; Se'ai»'ie"Refaranee'''and Ressuree Program, 1966 g, ppo 29- 30^ 

Ao Riblicati 



"Healths A Slobal View" ^ chapter in The World Today in Healths 
Physieal,,,,£diaoat ion an^„ Reepeatiori o Authors, Vendien^ Oaramck 

aSiaKSxono Jofi^iy "wi'S ' Je's^e""s „ Peterson » To be published 

by Prentice-Hallo 

"Staying on »The Pill' - A Study of Patients in a Public 
Health Contraceptive CixniG", Heal t h Education Monographs » 
Jointly with Stephen PoIgsTj, RioDos Director io^ Researt^', 
Planned P3j:>enthood Federation of America ^ Inco 

Research 

Director and principal investigator of a research projects "A 
Study of the Health Aspects of Sex Knowledge and Attitudes Assjong 
College Students" o Others include Julian Janowits^ N.Do^ Psychi3~ 
tristj IMiversity Health Services Thoinas McBride^ McDoj Stsff 
Physician, University Health Services | Eugene Piedmont,, PhoD=« 
Assto Professor of Anthropology and Sociology i and Alan Romanellas 
PhoDog Assistant Professor of Education. Faculty grant of $2^700 
received to initiate this longitudinal study, (PR-°Wll-67-DarityCl} 

Other Professional Activities 



Paper on "Analyssing Failures; Some Realms for Ncm»°Particio 
pation or Failure t© Continue to Use Family Planning Services" « 
Fall Conference on Fam ily Planning, Hew York j, Sept 09 195So 

Speechs ''A Hoo^assker^s Fi?ograni: What It Can Do for ^ifiraunity 
Health Iifa^roveasent" o Main speaker at the 6gth Animal Cele-° 

brati on of -dse Visiting,, Nurse Association, 'oWW^^^e^ January ^ 
1956. 

Paper on "Educational Preparation in Public Health and Health 
Education at the University of Hassachusettss Present Pro- 
grams and Future Plans" „ Kiew England Heal th _EduGatieR. Assoeia- 
tion. 



for''''puQ)irGatien' in Proceed 



^Itorthro^tong ""May '""S'l" 1'96'6'„ Requested" 



Vo FACUSaY ACTIVITIES (eosit^do) 



DARITYs WILLIE Ao (cont'd. 



Paper ong "Motivational Factors in Family Planning As Re^ 
lated to Health Education" <, Se Jaainara Sehool of Publi c 



12, igetr 

Lecture on "Culturally Disadvantaged and Coimnmity Health 
Services" o Signmer H eads tart Orienlation fraininn^ PgograW a 
Jime» 1966 o 

Bo Otiter aetivlties g 

Board of Trustees » Society of Public Health Educators ^ InCo^ 

and Convener of S^eeial, ,,CpiBani ttee to Assess Present Pgo° 
f ession al Pregiarati cm' 'and Acad etaic Requliretnents '.jfe'r Coi«" ' 
naanity HealtSi Ed&icatorSo Hew York c May^ 1966 » 




Served as Ifoderator of special panel at the First, ^^ National 
Dental Ifealth Assembly g Ernph asls Fluoridation « Wa^iington^ 
Do'Co .""February, "i'^ed'o " 

Elected to Advisory Councils Searle Reference and Resource 
Program » Attended meeting in Chicago t© discuss new ap- 
proaches in Family Life Education , February » 1955 » 

Conducted Seminar on Sex Education with a special group of 
graduate students and advanced undergrsditate students ^ Svnith 
College e Northampton^ April, 1966, 

Assisted in conducting a W orkshop on Scho ol Health Education 
held at South Hadley High'"'s'ch«w»lV'«lan«m'ry'r'i^^^ 

Assisted State Board of Health in preparation for organiza<° 
tion of Inseryice T raininig for Dental Hvgienists and other 
auxiliary' workers of the State Departntent'oiE^'' Health, Boston ^ 
in January and Februarys 1966 o 

Conducted se^nars with youth groups in both Conway and 
Ashfield, Spring, 1966. 

Served as faculty ajesaber, Duke IMiversity T raining Program 
for Peace Corps Hhysicians , Ai^sta 1965 » 

Served as Cosisultant t© PartiwMith College Peace Corps Train- 
ini^ ppo^Bcea for Ivor y C oast and Senei^ alT June, 1966 <, 

Served as Consultant to CoagBonwealth Ser vice, Corps ^ Mii^snt 
Education Proffl'ain » May<° June ,' 1966, 'Massachusetts" "' 



Vo FACIILTir ACTXVITIBS (Conf^do) 



DJVRrry. willim^ Ao (ContM.) 



Served as Consultaat to Onlted Pj?e8byterian Church ^ U.ScAos 
national Board of Missions ~ ConHnanity Education and Health 

Development Program in. South Georgia' ,, Cor^eJe^ "<a'a'c,"«""Magch» 
1966o 

Served as Consultant to The B torth Carolina Fund (Poverty 
Program) » Durham, SJ^C.^ 



PERRXEIXiDs B03ERT Co 9 Associate Professor 

Other Prof essiona l , AGti yities 

Ao Kajor papers iiresent ed and speaking: en^ai^paents ; 

Presented pagers "^e Stattss of the Sanitarian" at the 30th 
Ara aial Eduoatipnal Conference of the National Association of 
Sanitarians, June^ 1966 « 

Bo Other activities s 

Chaiz^fmn,, Massaclmsetts Board cf Registration of Sanitarians c 

Chaix%um» Profgram C^aBlttee a Massachusetts Milk Inspectors ^ 
Association^ International Association^ 

HeiBber Education CoBmittee ^, Massachusetts Sanitarians'' As- 
sociation » 

Hember Public Health Disciplines Cowadttee of National As- 
sociatimi of' Sanitarians o 



PETSIS9 HOWARD Aoj RipDos Assistant Professor 

Other Frqfessiog al Actiy ities 

Ao Speakinjg engageBients s 

Speaker at Western MassachusetTts,, Public Health Assooiatioa 
Meeting^ , Novefnber^ I96So 

Speaker at Massachusetts As^siatio n of Sanitarians^ gleeting^ 
Deceinbere 19'ifeSl """ ' " " 

Speaker at School Cafeteria Stspervisorjs Training Course 
sponsored by State Heel-di bfi^emrt»ent. May, 196^ 



i 



Vc FACULTY ACTIVITIES (ContMc) 

PEfERSa HOWARD Ao (csonfd^) 

B, Other aotlvitiess 



Attended the First New Enjglan d Oonfepence on ,lfa|ban Planniii^ 
for Envlroraaentai"" Health at'TuiPts 'Oniversity,,' 'SepteBberj, ' 
1965o 

Attended Joint 'ge Gtmioal^, Meeting of the Northeastern Section 

o f the AiBerican ^^lferclea r Society 'aad'/t^Jtew^l ^iand Cha| »ter' 
of the T^ea^Ltfa' '^i^si^^^^^^ aiet;^^, l&T "W^^ ^— --^r^ . . - - . -.-..i.-- . 

Presided over Enyiron aantal HealtSi Section Con ference at the 

New England Pubric""Heai''t^" Association 'AnnuaJT'Efe'eting^" JusiBg 
1966 o 

Elected to ^tedbership in Phi Kappa ghi « national sdbolastic 
honor society, April » 1966 o 

fteaibev, ^aer^ n cy Preparedness Infoiwnation Cog»»it tee,a Sehsol 
of Agriculture o 



PETERSON^ jmOME So 9 MoDo, M0P0H09 Adjunct Professor 

Publications 

Ao Publications in proeess s 

"Healths A Global View", chapter in The Worl d ^ T^P'^Y. A^ Health,, 
Physical Educati on and Rec rea, tiono Authors 9" Veiidieng CarK®ek 
and Nixonc Jointly with Mllians A<, Darityo To be published 
by Prentice-Hall «, 

Other Professional Activities 

Ao Speaking enij^^asaentss 

CoBBRtenceoient address «, Co@ley Dickinson Hospital School of 
Ifursingo 

Luncheon speaker. Annual Meeting of Pittsfield Visiting g^rses" 
Association o 

Dinner speaker. Annual Bfeeting of Springfield Visiting Hsjg'ses'' 
Association o 

After dinner speaker^ Annu al M e eting^ Hampshire Blstrict Hedi- 

* '' iiMliiiiiMMiiiiiiiiili'l'i'ilBtnii>iiiiiw*iiiji«Bi>wJwig nil i m il f%l i w iiwiiiwiiiiiii f i [ ■" iii m ■ m iniiriwiiin n iiiiiiiii mu m — • n infinn-T 

cal Society (with W<nien^s Auxiliary) c 

Luncheon speaker ^ Leonard Club„ 

Lectures at Smith College on Heal'Hi Aand Educ ation °^ Interna"- 
tional Health Work for Children„ 



V. FACUKnr ACTIVITIES (CoBtM.) 

PETKSON9 JSR(»IE Sos (Conf^do) 

A. Speaking eng^iptenlfs s (cont^d,) 

lecture at Sinanons Collegia School of Hursing on Interaa^ 
tidwial Health Work c 

Lecture at Boston College, School of Social Work^ on In^ 
ternational Health Worko 

lectured to American Association of Retired Persons 
anpten) on Health Problem in Advancing Years c 

Lectured to teachers of Basic Adult Education at Westfield 
State College 9 on Mealtihc 

Bo Other aotivities g 

Testified on Voltmtary Fawjly Plannin g;^.J ti ll » before Joint 
Legislative CoBaaittee on 'RiblJc" Hea lthc' 

Ihsmel Haanber before several associations of Boards of Ifealih 
to discuss Medicare e 



REIKISOH9 EDITH Ho 9 Instructor 

Publications 

"A Rapid Miorotechnic Applied to the Heterophils Antibody Test 
for the Detection of Infectious Itononucleosis" 9 Reinischg Edith 
and Halls LeOo AmoJoCllxiieal Patho, Vblo«J59 #6^ 1956„ 

Research 

Collaborated with Lao Hall (Infircnary) ©a "A Micro»serial Dil«» 
tion Technique Applied to a Test for Infectious Mononucleosis o*^ 
^Faculty Research Grant fR-Wll-65-Reinisoh(l) ) Report pisb= 

lishedo See above o 

Other Professional Activities 

-■■wirinM^-TiiiTiniiii iiii»iw ill III I— I Miiiiiiin— wiiMiwiiiii himi 

Ao Speaking en^ageinents ; 

Lectured to Holyoke Hospital nursing students on Tubercul osis c 

Be Other activities s 

Presidents Pioneer Valley Medical Technologists^ Society o 
Director^ Holyoke Tuberculosis & Health Asssciationo 



Vc FACIE.rf ACTIVITIES (Cont^do) 

REINISCH9 EDITH Ho (Cont^do) 

B° Other activities gfcont''do'i 

Chfiiraoan^ Seal Sale,^ Tubepculosis and Health Association „ 

State C^aimian of Recmitmentj, Massachusetts Association 
of Ifedical Technologists, 

Consultant, Tufts lung Station;, Boston City Hospital a 

Moderator of Medical Tedhnology Seclnar with Dr-o Charlotte 
Campbell CHarvalr^ ' 'tUniversityjl as principal speaker ^ UniVo 
of Massachusetts, March, 1966 » 

Moderated Syropos ium on Stedical Technolei^ Education viith 
Professor Alice ^eidirai^""|j^ikrqustte University) as principal 
speaker a QniVo of Massachusetts, April ,» 1965 « 



WISMESKIs KAROL S„, Assistant Professor 

Other Professional Activities 

Ao Speaking engagements ; 

Prepared and presented supplenental rrasarks on paper 9 
^Undergraduate Training of Sanitarians*' by Dwight Bissells 
MoDo at section naeeting of the 93rd Ann ual Meeting of Aineri° 

can PubSlic JHeal't^' As'soo iation,' Octc,'' i^-°'iia~l"^B"^'B' Cliicago'c 

Speaker;, Rhode Island Asso c iati o n of Sanitarians > on 
^Educational Requirements Tor '#uS>iic ifealtli Sanitarians*' s 
Aprils 1966 c 

Bo Other activities g 

Presidents Massachusetts Public Health Associationp 

Field Coordinator, Massaclmaetts Migrant Health Pro ject 
#55 administered by 'Massachusetts, suomer l9'65o ""^ 

Prepared "Annual Progress Report" » Massachusetts Migrant 
Health Project s 1955 o 

Moderator, panel on tode rgraduate C^rrlculuaa for Public 

Healti* Sanitarians B "3i'Stli""'Ed'ueation '"Kiif erinceT" ' 'itetiena't' 



Association of Sanitarians, Chica^a June. 

Chairman, Peogpam (towK8itte e« Hew Emi^l and Public Health 
Association ^ University o'f "'Mass'aohusettis^' June!,, 1966 0°°" 



V, FACULTSr ACnVITIES (ContMc) 

WXSNIESKI, KAROL So (Conf'dc) 

B, Other activities g (oonfdo) 



Partieipated in Short Course on BasJe Hospital Hausekeepinjg « 
July 6«169 1965 at IKoiversity of HassachuisettSo 



Consultants and Special Visitors to the Departaaent i 

HZSCOCK9 IRA9 MoDos Professor fino^itus, Yale University 

Visited the Department of Public Health in January to discuss teaching 
procedures and methods in the area of public healtji practice and public 
health prograinmingo 



BQA3MAN9 RALFH9 fhpD^s Professor end Chairmang Depto of Health Education; 

University of Itortii Carolinag and Chairsan of the 
MWl C^amittee on Professional Education 

Visited the Departseent of Public Health in March to discuss -Oie it^n<» 
power needs and methods by %rhich the University could develop a first" 
rate professional program in "diis area. 



VI, Major AccssM^lishsBeRts of tiie Departsnent p.96S-66]) 

^o Cupglcoltaa e The yeas? saw additional ela3?ification of the 
pisblia health eiMwiduIuira ^th its divisiosig at the undergraduate levels 
into an ©sssphssis upon environa^ntal health and t^pon ctsmamlty healtit 
<@nd health educati^no Seves^l of the basic eemrses for each of tibese 
options were reviewed thoroughly and reorganized for next yesro In 
edditiosie l^e previous course in PoHo Administrations <^ic^ will be 
required ©f all students g w^s reorganized into PoHo 38 3 9 Introduction 
t© Public Heelt^s Practice and WJl. SSif, Organisation and Adjsinistration 
of Public Health Programs o In additions courses lirsre added in School 
Healthy Principles of Cooanunity Health Education^ CoesiBinity Developatent 
and Health Educations Introduction to Occupational Health, and Intro- 
duction to Air Pellutiono At -the ^aduats levels also^ there has been 
clarification of objectives, currietilumg and requireaents» t«hieh will 
result in a considerable elavatioa of the level of study and degree r@" 
guireiaents. 

It has been clarified 1±iet all undergi?adi.iates reajoring in public 
health will be expected t© ecaoplete 30 junior-senior credits in depart- 
SKoital courses, or approved substittates from other departments c 

Bo Medical gechfiologV o Tliere ne%» sre abeut 80 students majoring 
in this prGgran, ^«hich places it asiong the laziest of all programs in 
New England c Ifhis is a developntent which is somet^at remarkable in 
view of the fact that there has been no active proaitotion of tibis major 
until the past year^ the results of isliich will not be evident until 
fresIvQen in t3re class of 1970 indicate their Eiajor preferences » 

There now are three hospitals affiliated with the Department in 



- 2 - 

ps?eseJitiEg the course in Clisiieal Laboratory Pi?act£ces»— •-llercy Hospitstl^ 
Springfield havisag joined us dixring Hhm pest year^ St shmsld be vmit&V" 
ated that t3ie SI*-! ^vugpsm is t© be restricted to those students ^® have 
an academic avenge at the end of three years of at least ScO^ and ^ha ii^ 
general are considered to hs ©f above average competenee in the srea of 
their special interest o It is est^ected that.^ as tix& nuotber of majors in 
this area increases, the nnsnber selected for t^e 34>I program will ba 
sosBswhat less than half of -ae totalo It is a source of basic sstisfae- 
tion to note that a substantial osajority of students elect the i^ll four 
year program on caucus o 

Co E nyiroBmental Kejalth o InstTuction in this area has been strength^ 
ened considerably by the addition to the faculty of Professor Bernard 
Bergerj, Director of the Water R@soux>ce@ Research Center and Professor of 
Public Kealtho Professor Be'jr^er brings ttJi1± bins extensive experience in 
one of the iPBost important areas of environmental healthy that of water 
supply and quality control = His experience will be especially valuable 
as a basi® for the guidance of ^aduate studants in this area of study » 

^° Cg>«aainity„ Kealtfa,,,, and, , Health Edtication o The saost signifi«2ant 
davelopi^nt in the Departaient during the past year has been the iiitro- 
duction of realistic opportunities in this area of study c The Depart^ 
went is ©xtreassly fortunate t© have made the appoiatsBejEit of Associate 
Professor William Ac Darits,'^ who has infused considerable vitality into 
this program «rit±t his energy and unique creativity a Considerable interest 
has been Bhami in this rapidly developing subject area^ which %d.ll be &f 
increasing importance in keeping departmental studies in touch t^ith the 
roost recent developments in public heali3i practice » 



- 3 - 

In this area 8 ooissidemble SBjpliasis will be placed on eoiismmity 
liealth asislysis and eeamjRity research peojeatSc Undergraduate students 
imd graduate students working coope3?ativeIy in .Pyingigles of ^ Cgamaunit)^ 
Healtii Eduoation «aid CtaaBttMitv De velop ment and Hea lth Educatioa are re- 
quired to work out designs fos> co^imsnity analysis and to mke actual 
studies in otaaaumitieso In the finest year students laede oo^r^ensive 
studies of the aesssmaity sti*uctui*e in four c^s^^snities in aisd ar«mnd the 
Oiiversitye ni^ily, INherst, Mortliaiii^tons Easthsis^tons and Eadleyo These 
studies g^ve H&e students ssi oppo£>tunity to is»et <K»nmnity leaders, to 
interview citizens in the cosnsiunity en a vm^dsm basiSg and to analyse 
data. All of these projects had hat one ©bjeatives t® teaseh the ^r©» 
cedure and methodolo^ necessaKy in establishing public health progrsaiSo 

It should be not&& f^sat a sound background in statistical isethods 
is necessary for students to carry out thess types of studies o Thare» 
fore it is a departmental recoaroandation that all majors t^e University 
courses in the general area of statistics » 

In addition to the cofmnunity health education courses offered sgie- 
cifically for public health majors ^ ISie DepartmeBt will be responsible 
for teaching a course in Principles of Stealth Education (PoHo 123) for^ 
non»publiG healtSi majors „ This course was carried by the Sdiool of Fhy- 
sical Education until the present s^eporting year^ when it was tais^t by 
of the Department of Rablio Health faeultyo 



. if » 
YIIc Spetslal Projects in 1965-66 « 

Ao A j^ort esourse in Basic Hospital Housdceeping^ presented hy 
faculty fvum fublic Healths ^Umq EoonmdQB ^^ and Business Actoinistratiorag 
attracted 39 executive hospital housekeepers fvmt the nor-dseast region 
of 1!^e IMited States. This course «»as presented in cooperation with the 
ExeGutive Hospital lousekeepers' Assoeiatiorjo The esarse 'Sims received 
enthusiastically and met with wide approval ^ indicating a need for re- 
peating the course and possibly supplaoenting it at an advanced level 
in the near future o 

Bo One Riasber of the faculty was involved as a field coordinator 
for th^ Massachusetts Migrant Health Pro j set g the purpose of T^hieh is 
to develop a continuing program to study and meet the health and welfare 
needs of migrant laborers o In add-ition,, several students fv&m tha Depart- 
loent ■&&T& involved in significant 9 related sujss!«»r i^"orko 

Co In Aprils the Department was host to a Syi^osium on Medical 
Teehiiology Education ,= This was attended by a large representation &i 
persons froai states in the eastern part of the ossuntry and was received 
%fith considerable enthusiamao 

Do In Junes the Nevj England Public Health Association laet on the 
campus o Although this was not an official activity of 13ie Department g 
several menibers of ths fstculty were instnasental in setting up and par- 
ticipating in the prograffio 

Eo fkie of the most significant developesents was the consuassis^tion 
of an agreessent for establishing an Internship in Public Health Practice 
in cooperation with the Boston Depar^isent ©f Health sssd Hospitals o It 
is anticipated that those students who elect and ere selected for this 



« s - 

progr^n will spend a year in graduate study with the Boston Department 
of Health and Hospitals., at first in a rotation through various public 
health services 9 and then in involvement in a aaajor public health pro^ 
jectc Support of this internship iowgrcufi has been virtually assured 
by ffiembers of th@ UcSoFcHoS, It is plffimed to subnit a major grant pro° 
posal for support of this project before another yearo 

Fo A tmuh&r of our faiculty was naisied as director and principal 
investigator of a research projects "A Study of the Health Aspects ®f 
Sex Knowledge and Attitudes S^nong College Students^ „ in collaboration 
with staff laeihbers frc^ tfiii varsity Health Services s l^e Departs^nt of 
Anthropology and Sociology, and the School of Education o This grant ,> 
FR-Wll»67-DarityCl) for $2e700j> initiates a longitudinal study « 

Oo Adniinistration o After considerable discussion^ both by the 
Public Health Planning Coasnittee and mentbers of the Department with 
the Adrainistrationa it has been decided finally that developsaent of 
the Department should proceed independent of the Hedical Scl^olg but 
in close cooperation with ito Dean Soutter had inade the generous offer 
of api^inting a Chairman for the Department of Preventive Medicine of 
the School of Medicines with the suggestion th^t this individual could 
serve as head of l^e Department of Public Health on a tasporary basis 
(for approxiinately five years or until such tiioe as the School of 
Medicine was ready to open) o The proposal had man^ attractive features 
and was given serious consideration both by the Public Health Planning 
Ccsmittee and by members of the Department <, 

After a conference with Provost Tippo^ it finally was decided that 
the Department should r@siain autorEO^mius and seek a permanent Head of 
Department for itself o The basic consideration in reaching this de- 



I 



— 6 — 

-clsion was the fact that the trend of development iit ptsblic health has 
been predcHniimntly in tb@ area of social sciences rathex* than in issedi-^- 
einso fha greatest pz^obleais feciiig the public health profession in the 
near future are -^lose related to the org&nis::ation and distribution of 
Biedical careo The most useful resources in seeking solutions to these 
problans will be fcnmd in association ^ith nesibers of departments of 
social and natural scieeiceso 

ks a results steps are being taken to screen candidates for the 
position of H6ad of Department o There has been sooie difficulty in setting 
«sp a clear concept for qualifications for this position ^ ^ith sonie ambi* 
valence over the overriding importance of having tliis person trained 
basically in medicine, 

VIII o EeccMBuendations for the Future « 

Ac Head of DeisartBiento Top priority for future activities nmst be 
a vigorous search for a perscm who will have the ability and can meet 
the challenge ©f leading the developssent of the Department „ The oppor<» 
tunity is unique and virtually unliisaitedo ^e proliferation of public 
health problems and the plethora of opportunities for piiblic health «®rk= 
ers have made it quite clear titat no longer can we rely solely upon the 
established schools of public health for conducting the research,, giving 
•&ie instruction B and providing the service \^ich will be necessary in 
the iiisKsdiate future » There are very few undergraduate schools in as 
favorable a position as we for initiating new prograiES ®f study ®nd 
instruction o We have a genuine opportunity to deiaonstrats leadership 
in developing new approaches to reesolving public healtSi problems 



4 



^ 7 - 

&£>8 largs^ an<^ store complex than any %^Mch have faced us in ths pssto 

Bo Space o As is true of noasE^ly sll oi^ev departmants in the tMivezv 
sitys the Separ"£sBent of Pisbllc Health has critical need for new space 
in the future » It has been a significant help to take over the offices 
find ser^ of the laboratoxy space vacated by the Department of Micrabio-^' 
logyo However, this preseat allocation is not sufficient for meeting 
oiar present needs and will fall far si^rt of steeting tnininium realistic 
needs for asty si^iif leant developatsnt in the future <> It is recaeBoendedg 
therefore e that the laboratories im the second floor (Rtos, 326 and 330) 
be assigned for use by this Itepartjnent, Que is critically needed as a 
health education laboratory ^ the other will be needed for developnent of 
a realistic graduate research programo 

Co Clerical Staff „ One of the osost serious deficiencies in the De- 
partisent is the inadequacy of clerical service » At present the Departoient 
has only one position for Junior Clerk-fypistg the resiainder of clerical 
service being provided by part-time t«©rkers on a seiai^ejnergenay basis » 
!!fhi3 is a terribly inefficient aystsm which uses poorly -die ti£se and 
talents of faculty members o It is reccBSiended, therefore, tiiet in tlie 
very near future the Departsient have assigned a position of Senior Cleric 
on a regular full-time basis » 

In this connection, it is note^/i®rthy that the Department "s activi- 
ties will continue to be predominantly on a twelve-month basis o This 
will be even more true in the future » as & program of continuing in» 
struction is developed » 

Do Envi ronmental Health and Sa fety c The relationship of the Direc» 
tor of Environmental Health and Safety (and his service program for the 
entire University) to this Department, is one which is of particular 



< 



import^i^coo Increasing concentration of students, faculty, and ensployees 
on t±!9 caifnpus^ with the accoffipais^ing increase of food services end waste 
disposal probleaiSg will present a progressively more serious haasard to 
the piablic health if effectual control measures are not instituted and 
iJiaintainedo In addition^ the rapid increase of occupational hazards in 
laboratories 9 etCo presents a new area of concern <> Itost notable aaMs»ng 
these is the proliferation of both the nu^er and intensity of sources 
3f ionisiing radiation on caioptas^ fhis is a facet of development ^ich 
can be projected t© continue at a rapidly aecelerating rate and is an 
essentia], factor in. an educational ommmity such as ous'So It is an ab^* 
solute reqttirement that the use and disposal of radioactive laaterials 
follow closely ths regulations of the Atmoic Energy Cons^esiono Failure 
to do so will result in a loss of 13»e University's license for use of 
these materials 9 and an abrupt and uncompromising cessation of all use 
af these materials on caucus <> 

Following a visit to the caa^us during the past year^ represent®" 
tives ©f the MC observed seme violations of their regulations j, and amde 
reconanendations for improved management in the future o None ®f these 
violations was critical in presenting a health hazard to m^fibers of the 
coimminityo, However, it maast be made clear tSiat these violet ions __a«usit be 
corrected o 

Prevention of future problems requires that the University have on 
its staff a full~time^ s'^^,^ ^ assista nt to the Direct©s» of EnvirosiHMatal 
Health and Safety ^ yfa& will have the tiaies as well as the knowledges to 
effect proper controls „ Qualifications for this person should include 
trainisag in radiological healtji at the Master *s degree level » H@ need 



~ 9 » 

Slot have a basic facislty appolnfeaent hut eertsinly he would be useful as 
an fissistant to faculty nsenibers la ^s^esenting cc^urses of instraction in 
tbis area. 

In addition, there is orltieal need for a fjall-time saa itayiaB to 
attend the details of inspection of vending oiachiness, food seir^rice 
opex^tiemsg on c^j^ias housing » and fraternities and sororities eff ea«» 
^KSo The availability ©f the Bii?ect®j? of Envirom^ntai Health and Safety ^ 
«i'di a liinited staff of |»ax>t«tims gs^dimte assistants ^ has brought t@ 
liS^t repeated carelessness and deplorable oonditionsg particularly In 
some fraternity kitchens, Sevezal kitchens have been closed for short 
periods during the past year to allo^ for adequate cleaaingj, etc. It is 
apparent l^tat if these g2x«ups {fraternities and sororities) are t® be 
pexwitted to continue food service operations in the future , thei?e ssust 
be suich closer supervision of sanitation if we are to avoid outbreaks 
of illness with the attendant hazard to the health of students and dans^ 
age to the public image of the University o 

In this connection « a strong re cogsBsendation is made that a separate 
account (tW-12) be established , and that a basic allotment to support 
fully the service functions of the Director ©f Environiaental Health and 
Safety be made to this aecounts independent of the allotrosnt sKide to the 
Department of Public Health for its instruction and research activities o 
Only tdien such a basic adininistrative decision for aIlot!sent of resources 
has been siade to tMs account can the activities of the Bepartment (En- 
vironjisental Health and Safety) be carried on i^ithout coisproodse to our 
Instructional services o 




Robert W, Sage, HoBo 
Chairaan, Departnent &f 

Public Health 



UHIVERSiinr OF" MASSA^I^USSTTS/AJahorsK 



ficomt Hugh Montgoaier^j, Unxvorsity Librariari 

To: Robert Jo KcCartneys Secretory of £h© University 

Subject? Aisriual SeporCf I July 19SS Co 30 June 1966 = 



30 June 1966 
RevolX Aususfc 1966 



lo Approi^riaSions 12^11^ _mA/65 

Professional $165t,3S0 $163,8S0 

Gra<S®d 219^9^^0 237^263 
03 Hourly 

03 StudsnE 31,1^7 51, 3r/ 

■Josrk/Study Sfciadent ______ _^^^ 

Tctai Personnel $416,537 $452»54(J 

Materiais 

Boobs/Poriodicals |468s,0§4 $53l»000 

Binding ^JlaSU — Jl-^^ 

total Materials $484^059 $560^650 

Supplies and Expenses $.12-155 125„030 

Total Appropriations $9129761 $1^038^040 



1965/66 



$236, 374^13 

233^491=83 

95,399o?7 

. 659739*57 

247 » 12 

$63lft252c.42 



$749s,833p95(U 
40. 337 o 13 (2) 
$7l0st9iai 



$i*467»495c34 



State Funds 8266^.13-00 



TlT"Sooka7Perlo<i Ic e 1 s Appropriations and Expenditures 1963/66 

Appro .'^gj at ions 
StatQ Funds 133a»0i«.i3 

Sudgot 7/20/6Ss «/§/S5, 12/15/65 
Addad by transfer 4/13/65 
Md®d by trsasfes" 6/16/66 



$10-3„000,00 
250e000o00(d) 
lOO^OOOoOOCd) 



2oo»oao»oo 



Expenditures 



$lOO,ODO,00(a) 
250s000o00 

I06#163o61 

200«000o00 



Fadaral !Jankhead~Jojies Furtds 

Balances from 1963/64 and i©84/63 
Allocation 1965/66 

Lttss total non-book eKpanditures* see note(d) 
Nat Boolts/Periodleals Estpsndlturess 



122/i78«5i 

20QbQ00o00 

$9723378o5i 



122^378., 5 Kb) 
12,^793 o64 



$791^342*76 

4l^3{^,o80Cffi) 
$749,833 o96(s) 



for additional footnotes 9'e<st pags ISo 



university Library 

Anmtal Raport 1965/66 

30 June l§66/Eev, 31 Augiise 1966 

Page la 



(2) Binding Espendltares 1955/66 

II Account Funds $16,606 e08 

Bankhead/ Jones Funds 23»7gl«.0? 

Total $40^357 » 15 

(3) Supplies and Expanses Sjspendituras 15S5/6S 
10«l25l4^l4a9l5si5,i5,l6 Account $l8j.838ii58 
13 Account 3?.!pplie3 sscpendiEur© 17^757 e73 
13 AccouKfc niLC Du®s and Use Fse 8»400«00 
flonoraria .._.1^0S5«3O 
Total $469051*81 

(a) Includes sisppii®s cosfcs of $17^751 ^li 

Cb) Jncludes 'ainding costs of SZSaJJUO?; 

(c) Total noR»book axpsmSiture $4i6508«80 

<d> A total addition by transfer of $450,,. 000 to fch« Sooks/Pex-iedicais Aliotsaesttf 
was proposed in Msrcb l%6o Th@ Univsrsifcy Libsrasy eoasaitted by placing 
orders in Aprils May and June 1956 ^n ssoant squalli'ng sipproslHiafcely 
$ii86s&32o00o A total addition bf transfer of osftly .^SSO^OOO isjas actual Ij' 
transfesTsd during ths fiscal yisn* to th© Librasry*s allotmeitt* See also 
not® Ce)s 

(e) At thes and of the 1965/66 fiscal year th© foilcftrlng vrore carried forward 
into tto next fiscal year; 
(i) Invoicos on hand ready to tm paid $ 90^^31^35 

(2) Offd@rs outstanding in vendors* lm?sds i^S^STO*?? 

(3) Orders oa hand (y) rsady to b® plstt®«J -.=JiiLE2Z^.§X 
<4) Total lien® carsried forward Jntc a®w Ff $ SOS^SO^J"?© 

Cy) Of the 20.^000 ordejcs on handj, 15^000 are for out of print iteras requiring 
extensive seareh for copies in t'ha second hand bcok trsde* 



University Library 
30 June 1966 
Annual Report I965/66 
Page 3 



I Prov_osjt_| 

University Librarian 
Assoc, Libn, - Admin, 
Administrative Secretary 
2 Secretaries 



Technical Processes 
Division 



Special Collections Reader Services 
Division Division 

1 



Assoc, Libn, - TP j Assoc. Libn. - Sp.Coll. 
Secretary j j Secretary 



Asst,Libn, - Acquisition 
Asst, Acq, Libn, P-^ 
Staff G-l^J- 

03-7 



Asst, Libn. - Monog, Cataloging 
Asst. Head P-10 
Staff G-16 

: 03.7 



1 Asst. Libn, - Serials Cataloging 

J Asst, Head P-^ 

i Staff G-7 

j 03-6 



Organization Chart 
University Library 
Univ. of Mass, Amherst 
30 June 1966 







Vacancies 


33 


Professional Staff 

1 - University Librarian 

3 - Associate Librarians 

4 - Assistant Librarians 
1 - Staff Associate 

^ - Staff Assistants 
20 - Catalogers.a 


3 


60 


Graded Service Staff 

13 - P XI 

5-9 

21-7 

6-6 


3 


*5o 


15-2 
03 Account Staff 
50-03 


15 



143 



21 



*0f the 50 > 03 Account positions, 8 are part- 
time and have the full-time equivalency of 
4,43 positions. 



|Asst,Libn. - RS i_ 
[ Secretary i 



Circulation Librarian 

Staff P-1 
G-8 
03-15 



Reference Librarian 

Staff P-6 I 
Documents G-3 j 
03-0 [ 



Reserve Desk 

Staff P-0 

G-3 

03-4 



Departmental Libraries 
P-3 
G-4 

03-10 
1 





Business Admin, RR 



Education Librarian j 
Staff ! 



Engineering 



-[Home Economics 



— [Land, Arch, 



-j Morrill Sci, Libn, 
L_S t a f _f 



I 



Music Librarian 
; Staff 



'Physics 



-lVet, Science 



Asmiial Report 19o5/66 
30 Jmv3 ISSS 

k. St?;dsut6 or Glieate'ie Served 

The Vnlv&xalty Llbrasy feas tiss xesfsoissibility to aeqwirej ataz&g aad 
service bcokSj joarfxalsg ajsaps^ pieture.s,, sjassjiseriptSj and ofclser librarw ajsJzeriala 
for the atud>',5, teacliiasg^ sad research »ie©ds of stitdaatSp f^c^lty^ and staff of 
the University.. Every effort lo atasle fcy £&e library adssiaistratloa and staff 
to laaet taeae as«fcls wit&iE t3j^- meaBS avsilafcle^ 

A sarvay conducted is >fei-;x^ IS^^ ^y ti^s Senate Library Ooaeaitee® Sal>eoaaad.tCe© 
oa Uaeargraduate Scrvleaa digcl^ssd tliat 1?»3 per seat of tli© st^eafe resp«>s2deA£c 
fait tJaat tke Ilbrexy mis the best place 'ce study; 8iv,6 per caut make ssse of tlis 
reser\,'e book colletttxosi* 

Tlie data on registered barrc^-?ers and isse of tiie library aad its eollecatoas 
are reported in the statlstii&al s^^pleiEsat, 

5* ?wbXisatioas.»_R!B3®ard3 Grcnts* Easearch ^ra-jects aad Otiier Frofe^sa^iaal Actiirities 

Tfce Refereace Depsrtmaat g>rejiared for t1i@ BoatoB Clmjiterp Spaelal S,iferarles 
Association iS I.Ig'c of iamoTtetit ites} refesessce books la Agriealtsaris sad Bouos EeoSf 
ocrJ.cs issued slaea IS^SE* I'he Assistsat Librarians (Reader Sesvices| ssrved oa fclie 
Gci'iol&rslilp CojsE!itts«3! of £&e HassscfeseiitS Idbraxy .4s3oci<atiois« !33be Misaie Li" 
brariaa revie'sed coacerts aad recitals fos- th& Sasmi^lre Gasafefre^ 

Tlia Uaiveraitji' tibr^rian contimied to coa^ult ts»it& t&e other stete mtiv&xaitf 
libr^sriaj-js of Uew iRglsEd e.ad the Sseeutiv^a Biractor of t&ie Sew Sssglaad ^mrd of 
Biglisr Edueyj-tlcm oa osKJfferative Kssaas So tazther cos^t^iter ^pplicatloas £0 Ithvavi&sp 
aajjecially £ot eard prodwctio% serlais raeordsj, aad <»>dp@7ative Jfeook sjsffidjases., 

Seaiaif sjeajbers of the ataff^ partlcsilLarly tfee Associate J,ifesarisa (Teds»lcai 
pro ceases )J^ <M>iiti3Q3s;ed to Bttea^d c®nfsrefficscy workshops^, ajad sspc^sia on date 
prccsesiag ■ssrid co2S?>uter appXlcaSi«>sa to libraries., "S&e Baivarsity Librarian^ th© 
l&dical X»ibraria% aad the Associate iibraxifia (lec!i»ical Freeesscs) variowslj* 
attended aaetlaga at Yala Uaiveraii::^ aad at Ssrvard Baiversity en coa^ater appli- 
eatiotxs to medical libraries. Staff ■aemljers attended s.mms.1 ©oafereoBes of tfee 
AEBsisiaa txVox&vy 4ssocia£io% Special Librarias Asaociffltlora^ Medieal Ijibiaxy 
AaffiC5;i!S.tio%, rfew Ssiglaad Mferary Associatioa* Sfessmctmsetts Litjrairs? &sso«i«.ti©B^ 
Society of ^auarlesa Ardliivlsts,, sad «s£feer groups o 

At t&e sia^estioia of the Provosfe s q^sestiossisire tsss seat to 120 'oaiverBity 
lihr:&zies la tbe Haifced Sfcatea smd (Ssaads In Deceisjljer 195^ to secttre iaforasstioa 
o!5 ?-15>3.-ary laEdicsg ruleis sad fine syetesaja for faealty Ksmbars «ad grffldnsate stsfadeatSo 
A draft &-«s3aiSrf report ^a&s prepared -In Feaatary om the basis of S^ re£«nas» Ko 
cl^ar i^ittera for ® lossa policy was revealtsd aad filssost every ki»d of poliey aad 
practice fo«ad ^dliereaee la ciora® ^[uartera 

■^e UisivQrffifcy Librarian sad the. A&Bo<&i^te. Li?;>rariai» (Speaiel Collactioaalp 
as aii alcertsats far fhe 'tfaiversity Librfiiria^ stteaded lles8|>sMre later'l.ibrary 
Caiater esecswfciiTe cs>traltta«a sssatisgs asid ^dvL^ed om HIlG'e adEsiitid.6trstioffi and 
collection ?j^ildiiitgc TIk» Caiv-ersity Librarian att^sadad thu saEa-esrassal ssaeatiisss 



AssjHsal Beport I565/6S 
Page 5 

©f the Board ©f Direeters of HILC tke laajo'^ ©arsossl '^oistsidss*' activities 
af tfeia year for tlxe AssoeS^te Librsrlaa (Special Colleetioas) te-'tfe lieea teo 
iis Huoijer, airing the sttistEar of 1^3 Ss,© rejirase^Ced the diversity Li&rary 
tferoa^ gsirsoEssl visits to ssveral oiatstassdisg Etssopssaa ■feook dealers to es* 
tsbiisla & pxofet h&^la for ©ooferstl.aj§ to £;b All Books Csrrest prog»aaa for d»e 
library. Se tos beea Isrtfolved i#lth tlse varlmis proof lags ©f his ^^C^ck^,i>is£ 
of tlie F^llcsr.iens of ^oa^s Bird lfeslisr« desired sad printed. Iw ths Geheima 
Press (lieosard Bsskiajj, sad to bs pisbllsfesd by the Uaiversity of MsssacSiwseSfcs 
Frass probably isi. t&e fell ox 15661, 

6., Major Aecosplisl^E^atsi ©f t&a l-itesw dtsrlag l$65/66 

(1) Afpno-val by efea B^ard ©f Tn^^staas of ^kete&ss 1^ Sd^raEd Buz®ll 
Stoiitei, ArdiltesSj, for a&>? sajor ^sgiversitj lifesry teildisjg ®f 320^? 000 sq* fto 
for tfja AsE&ars£ csj^-«s So feo«tsa 2_j06Q3,0OS vslsjssa, ApfsopxiatioE of ajosay for 
tfee i3aa:r, p!»sse of plasaiisg 'ess dafarsriad by the s'cate 5«3s£ll i:li« aesc fiscal yeara 



tratles of Sis All Bodies ^irieni. {&3Qj frogssjs ■^h&rmh^ & 
selii-cfcsd gs©w# of book sellera sad vendors ssspplj ths: £?ai%'erslty S-ilsrssy atito- 
jsaticalif wlL'li tmivarsltj le^srel Iffersry ssatgrlals as pKfelisjfeedft Isa £lse ease of 
the. Amsrlcau aiarkeS a large hook jo^fear sliips 03 aa SKeosaatic ^sis books as 
p«iblisli&d» ^lie forelga boisksallers (^losea £0 s^jp^lj' £es Ssssofseast saatsrials have 
served as the latarRStlcaal agents for Xiferaries participatisg issider t2a« Fansiagtos 
Fla»3L. !^© plain kss provea £0 bs a diafcijscfc ad-v-sssce over t&e fac^lej- j^ltiaeed 
pssrcliasa progr&ia» 

(3) IspaiEdltsares of |4<M>s,0OO- la tisres EESKths (S&r^, Aprils '.May 1^6) 
fshea state ekjhcj aJjaesst d<ra£tliag t3ie libr&rj'^s Issjok/serlal JmdgfSt: wse sml^eal^r 
saade s-yalIsM©». ■jfcn>a3. es-i>SBditiares for books &u4 sariaX® totaled oves' $^kgQ&0> 
for the j-ear* 

{k} Preparation of a coasijjseer produced book ^salog of t^e p«rlodicels 
aad othar aerials held by the Batversity Library , ^s ^ork ©a t&is sarials Si^ld- 
issgs lisS: t^s liegtiai Ic Jmy 196^ ead dlstrib^.tloa of elt@ serials ^Idisgs iiatal&g 
is plai^jed for tiie ijegiaaing of the fall seiaester I966/67. , 



Sisrvey of t&e »ssfeie stack sfcsce ia tte Saiversi&y |,ifcsrary« lS»e 
conclusion ^ss resstiied t:1ia<: vlrtt^lly all sl^alf capacity sraitsld h& oee»;»ied if 
J-«S£!3 1$£>7. As ixcolc stseka 1}e<K3:@e IssreaBisigly c»c^edp aiiasist eoastastt a%&iftiss>g 
of uKa collection is ascessaryj caaaitsg msm.f eoi^lcists smoss lifcrary «2ser9« 



BG!a$ses.@ii^S!.t of dep^r'oi^Btal library poliey. Following £tcig£i!s^ 
with departaKsatSjj Mtfe rspreseafcsfclve ^ rotips of ^aesjlty sad sttgdeatft^ asid follosaN 
iog tlie study by i;%ie Sessstte Li&rsr^y <kim?lttBm S'sbcomsit.te® oa l^mrta»attal Itibrariee^ 
the couclcsiojs has jxecoisa cleor tli^E: th& seliiiave^seat of a oosiproiEise b«C»e(^ sesf* 
ttraliaatioa aed deoeatrallstattoa ir* th^ University Library systeis coatiaaes to be 
saost diffic«lto 'BtexQ. re?iaai«8 smeh fco te d.^ss to provide a sessaible «ad fiscally 
SGismd jiolisy to govei-ia tfee developE»a'K of a ds^jartBiea^al library eysfeass. 



University 'Lihsarf 
Axmiaal Eepart 1955/66 



Sra^'tb of tfes iiijrsry st:=ef£ froas 100 £a I33 staff ss^siljera dmrisg 
die year, Tks •s&ai-iglag ©f 'clae finaacisl ^sfctesH of hookjm^^ij&l esgpaaditisre £a 
ISoveasber 1$S^ fraaj tlie ;8iKte3a tamsSss of ateja<Jisse® ©Edteg on ftlsat dasre^ aud tfee 
coasneGCSEjest sheia, of a i^erlod of ec^faigltioa s^ssterity esadiag isa Hsr^ 1^6 ®itSi 
tJi© asiHjuaeasEBaf: of -as. additional bwb of #250;, CM^ sad & £@m ?ss®ks tater of 
§150^ 000 ssre ciraatad lia-«j'3e la ord^rlj- roiutiises of ®el@eS:i®% ©trdsriagj, rscel'vi©^ 
aed oroeessiag of ae^ ssaterlals,, ?se©aciQS! w®£s i®fs ©lafllied aatdi reerssitsssssfc 
of Eew staff Biembars cajae to a e£asciat:lll ferii^ filas saiddle naatfes of 5ijs ye®rp 
Ifevembar to April-, 'stth &a result tkaS t&a ^^crj^slj*' a©i|KlslS:ioB pro®s«sa beg^m 
is Apx-il lsro^^-^ll; ^itli it drastic disloea&ioas of staff ®asig«8!Bsata« 

l&e eeeassd lis If of tise ^a«r also mm else Xll>r®Ey admi^is&arlss ae ®^£©re 
stsffiag sitastloa fessed on 03 e^ooHSt f^ads- ^Sjiie t&e libssry sselies oa tisis 
source t& piece Q-at £'sa lliaiead ^z^efsssiosal essd gsr^ded s@rs?lee fosisioas assipssd 
£0 It^. tlia issjor Istcressa ia aee ©f 0$ fsjads aasfisssifcated :&f Sise «c^aasloa ®f 
library ae'£iT?it;y tl^ls fsi&v ss coing'St^d ^jiSlj fireviess jssss© co^ld siot: be eo«atimsed 
at the ags@Btia1. rate darli^ th& sscosd sl^e Bio^tlaB ^3® still igreafcer esKgaasisa 
is library &cti.vi'cy ^as esseatial to esri^ cmt Slie 3C4jBisitieK/«stsl®gi8sg progrsm, 
the sotetlos 'CO tai© ptolslea is e^ssata^.llj' l4is assigasBsat £0 g^ liJhvaxy of 
adidifciciael atat© gradsd positlojss ^^€fl«iasst to Sis^si^sdae;® ail fsall-elass 03 Aesc^at 
houxlj staff 8is®bers, St?sli sa agtissi ■«oBi4 e^t'^j ^it& it £fee added virCae of fl'^clsg 
'die li&rssry isi -s co^3s£itive |Msal£toa for tfes **g&©i^ ajsplisajaSs rafssraed ^ tl^ 
Uftivcrsitj fexsoKSsl Offlce„ ©ss^teal; parscaz©! eossis^ae £© iesv© for pes^E.^Bfe 
|r©sitlosj3 c^rEyisg ■spiels tljaa bepsfits Es?t S'^ails&le ©a si® ©3 s£®S:sis. 

{%} £ifcsasy lisiXdisg piasmicjig ssiosay, Plszmiag E!Of»y la orgeoel^ 
needed to fesmit fiaal Btvuctssxe,! glaas for tbe developssBt of a aew ?mlve*»ity 
libr^.Tj l^uil<Si3^ for tliis ^isiierst: css^s£S« T'l&js&iss ^&s &8®a ot s staadeftiil siisea 

( (2) ABS f r©g33Si®.. fejiita^a £fee emfcstssadlsja' @v©at: ®f t^ y&&v ^s t&@ 

ij^lej^atsitioijj, bogiuuteg J«ly 1^5^ <»f tlisa All 3ook& Ocsxeafc (Ald| fsegrasi 
foXIowisig @»nt^si of sssgsstiQti^a s&S s^sscili^tloa. Ulas; S@sa&e M-hxssfsy Csxm^tt&® 
and S'he tfaiverslty A^-^lul&tt^^ttsm agreed to tlsa ^otmswsB.&msmZ of s®3.&t:io<Bs trLtla 
sslectsd veisdors in tMs co«^t:r^ ffia<d abroad (se^g list of '^e$^or@ isk stfiadbs^^t] » 
Uuivasalty lsv@l Isoctlus an4 serials t&lllmQ islt^isk clearly deflis^d a»bj<ee£ aresss 
9f cutrleular siM r^sear*^ isit4a:£^3t £t tJ^ {diversity of I^sofi^lmseees axe et^lisd 
mitomsittc&lty &a ptsblis^d*- Faosltj fcisss de-voted £0 ^Ms piase ©f «5era»st iKwk 
selection eo^ld lie gt^&tXf re<$i3c®de €^ tfse *«^l% the px^gztas! s-iaas bsve Inaea 

£iso@QLr. of staff tisKst; pax-gicaL^rly £>f aealox professional stsff la^M^irs^ is eo^> 
stssed by tills prograa la order to teske it ftsstctioas li)g|»lesE8al;&ticBS xevieviegj^ 
isodifyiisg^ aad c&aagis^g ths t&ehsiij(imia emd routiSies coztdtaeted bf Acquis it ioos^ 
M©aogrsg& Cstalogia^Ss &nd Serials Catalsgiog DepartsstBts; aualysia assd snstrol 
of it&£^ received from AEC vendors; oad s(9le«tiosi of ttisms s^roprlste to the 
llbr<5i:i:y colleetieme b^t »>t recelvad on ABg l^rogracsis TSie &e<|^sitlo»s De^rtoseat 
issitiates isodlflcatioaa ia tka gjrograK folle^^ag sted^ a&d vitii the appro'sal of 
tSte Biiiversity I,ibrarlaa« 



Diitversitj ld.h'£&'£^ 
Asssusi Report 1065/66 

PagQ 7 



^sidgetiag fo? Bc-ok/Seriai Bsjseaditere. Kise orderly sad ajstemetic 
gro'5#^, of t&e Ifeivers&tj ILihrary colleatiosis is depeadaat rapoa toao factors j fimds 
acid traisaed rescKsrce psrsoaaal* 

s» FttssdSe AiKilysis ©f Xlfexsry eswsadt&tssre ^ttsrses for books 
£i3d serials raves Is abat a #5^i.OQ0 by.dg®t for resources is sast sde^isata fc© fi» 
aaaee £&© AES BrogrsiBy tae reaeisal' of csArgeat josraal assd serisl ssabscriptioas;, 
site ac^ijisi'ciois of itesss sre-<|®esfcsd by tfee fasxslt^, asd tfee suppleJEaatasf iaiti®«' 
tioB of orders saad® by the librsrf staff la reco^lfcios of ioSig term ccaaaisaaeiits 
tm-ds: by tka faculty la teacfeissg sad ressarcfe aad la dsvelopiag research collectidne^ 
£o Gjeafi t&a psessst ^d fi?tera E8i@d3 of tfc.® si^lariy coaasrsmity« #300>0CM) to 
#5005 000 a^re ea«& year is ossjsssaxy £c psrslt the Ualversity Library to aeqaire 
essesSlal tssSerials. S^ieli isaterisis aust fee idssatified as to desirability aad 
&Mi&i.ta'bttitf'"-"& tlse cos-siialag asd alalsorafee series of procedures coadueted by 
Tseli cjaaXifled seaior zt^tt B^mtjers. 

^is ;^sr sSie librerj? staff 'sss eble t:© survive a'^crssh^ aac^ssieieioa progi^m 
of s^jor proporti©3S ever a sljort period of 'dires assatfes tiaroiigli a cosabisiatloa ©f 
forttsaate clrc:^iss ts12c.es? Ksii-^ted sss^ds^ large ssartsats of aioBeyg large amossaea- 
of t^'carials Ima^diatalf avallsbl© ia 'cl:..a reprint o^rkaSj, aad espeditio^s proeess- 
isg of orders % e&3 library sad ifee bo-ok dealers « A reffeftitlois of s erasli prs* 
grast Best year iKowld be lass saeosssfal* !lSiere is a lisElt £© s smss lasyisg program, 
WiehoBt iaetltjj&lag a ssleesioa program «f great degds aad brsadt^ sad o®s s©Ij» 
staaSl^ll^ fissded sad scsffed iss advaace^ £h@ librarisias caKmot feaild a scholarly 
reeasreli ebllectloE f®r tlis Balvar-siSy eoEass-mity?. SysSesatle pljsasiffis ia fsmdiag 
as,d staffiiig of £lje Uaiiy-ersity LUsrary's sc£|aisitloa progr®Ei ia of tfee 'titasost 
i£^rta©ca aad urgsafil;;^ siegdsd ct «»si«e* A coatimsiBg pregrsia of sasrseEiS and 
re£rospeetive ©ci^^ialti©© t-sliicfe Is f®res«st- five :fesra ia ad'^aaca' sEd &an.t.imimi&\y 
tiRdar study aad ravlsioa is aa ©sseatl?sl req-aireHseat for tfee sjsccass cf tfee 
^Taiverst^y *i4.brary, . 

b. Staff* file iHJildiag ©f as effective lifers ry stsff requires 
EsaEiage3S£K£ t:aeJaisiuea of a hi«^ order as ^mll as ^psiifled appii©aB£s» th& li" 
braxy's ©dEai.siserat5_.ve e:K|!eriea<»s tisis yaar dsisisesSriSSed the &kigi» ^^ffllity of Its 
■isasage^tsit stsfg ia revising ©Id sad sstaafellsliiiiig Efe^se te^dmi^^s is deiialopiag 
orgSBxs-agiost aad roatisea, Iisswffieieae sssi^iB©s£ of graded p©»iti®sas to sise 
lil>r£iry s^d ssi smeer&siia fssadis^ piG£ier@ created gra?@ i&o9>s&ist@n&ies ia st&ti 
©jjeraeioaa.. &e IMiverslty Ferdoaaal Office f re^tsoBSly t^as sis^illisg t® send 
good caadidafesa £© tlie lll>rarw for 03 aoeeieae kmrly vacaaci®® sslssss ssans graded 
giositloaa ^£lj ftsll friage beaef ifcs -Kana ^vallaMe elseia^^re oa cas^s* ■ Aa ordarly 
©fiquisttioa p-^ograai is readered diffisult ^idi "feast ©r faffiise'^ fesdgesisgo Sfiafjf 
nsise l>e d:ci»^>ped feriag Slie f^jsiae asd fessfclly re«-a«i^red aatd tra&lasd dariag else 
feast. A staff 'isg predica£e<2 oa a a.'BeS-vft iseatfe psogrs® its t^ ceatest of a fiyc. 
yaar plasi garaaifca satisfscfcor^ s'tsff applicatiosii «:« a ooatimsi^ sork process. "' 
Ifee «cbiev«5Sffi»t of © loss £srsi plan ^lefe sla>rt eerra is^leu^istofeics i^volvijsg & 
uaifons ieval ©f suaastiag Is aa- eassatlal featiire 'o'f aatisfaeSory 'S^vessitjr Ll&rsry. 



6 



University hlhTe,Ty 
AsssRial Ee|s©rt I$65/^^ 

Pa^ 8 



7, J^«i^|;,,,^22Jaot9„0£_P,r^rs^ 
A, Lifessri? BaildiBg PlsiEmiag 



"&& diversity LiBrasri-aa worked clo-aely isitla die library arctii^ecfe.^Sg 
Sd'ward Bureil S£9Be^%sssistaa£a te devislsg ske'cefes for & ae® imiversity library 
teildijag 'iiilda ®sre ssabssqaeatl;^ approved fey slae Board s»£ fmst&mv All plesmls^ 
has stopped psa^^iag th^ appropriatioE of pisaaiag imvBf ia t;lie capital ossfelay 
appr€)|jria&iosas for 1.96S/6f« 



Aseissaut I.i1>rsri£m (Bsader Services }p ^ith th& assisSsmse 
of tfee ^^ssogiafes Mbssisriasi (Admliiistratiosi}^ preseatad ©osjBiaa'irs sad a criticise 
of iSxe -library plssaad for the Qrad^aafce Bsseardi Ceater* litis faclllfcy is far 
altort: of sn adsfaate Ithx&vf fax 'che. Vhy&tc&l Seiesees o^iiig largely £0 lssdec|isaee 
fmads for plasai^« 

(3) For tlie. proposed Pine Arsa Biiildisag, Gors^l&t s prograia fof the 
architecCa^ coTmnsntBs S5ad a critique %^t^ preses£sc for £&« plamrXag of ttet li» 
brAry* ii^la the Ithraviims f?er® asked to rectify g»ess plasaiag errors «ri£li«s«3t 
suSficiene planrdag xsoney £0 do so* 

■ (ii-l For tlie salargeEEent of e&e Sfcririll Scieisee Iii^rarj^ smea In Gl®sk 
Hall was CQCsldered sad the aBtie.TJi.tton of adjaeeae space £0 tiss ^rsseat isjeerters 
la the Kor^ill Seieace CEoffiplex sso pro^osedo Coasidar^tioa isa© givea t© She lst« 
oa^porstioii of suitable librszy ^oarters ia ttte plaafsiEig of tSsa assss'l; totidlag 



(5) ^©'<^ aaeergvaduase llfexsrf services a variety of teildisg ples^^^ag 
was disciis.S2d§ 

Se Tiie refisr&isltlag ©f c%e Gossdsil feaildi^g .as ss sssdergKSdsafcs 
library. 

Is* ^ts deaigaatioa of- spaes la a tssta fl©®r losseloa is U^ 
soi&tlMest <3ox!slti5r:f cos^les for a reserve bc©k ©-©rvica for iQKdejrgra'di^£«s« 

e« fSie segra@ffit:ioa of ®a area ia £li« l8orS;% Diaiisg CosMoas ©r 
otStei? appropriat:® ©res is £lie fej!aea*a Bj>ifsii£®Ey or Ordaaxd Htll ®r®as f®sr x^* 
serve fcook isarvice» 

d« H&c desigs of librasy servlse for Saivsrsit;^ Gallege. 

fclis Saca£e Lifetaxy CoissltgQ© eoasidared t^e dsvelopsesc of ssEtdergrad^aate librasy 
services, ^A^ eitf^^^'^sive f^es&icatiQire t& sss^le s£«tidest: opinioas s^s coasen^-etedj^ 
isa^^edji EiOid tli0 results t^ahul&tad* t^ q^estiosmaisre 8$it^pc»££@d 'dbe repoirs of i^^e 
Seaata ttthv&Ty GoaaeitSe© Sabcc®aait£ai@ oa Uadergradaate Sjiferasy Services, !SfaB 
Assistsaat: Libx^riea (Beadsr Services} eoatrllsjted «©rkia§ papers s®d colieeted 
data for titis aisfeco^altt©®* "Sm ereatriojK of S3sre@ to fotur r«sidea£ial area' li- 
braries tsas favored Isy e^e swl>coisM.fe£e© to swpplissBaat: SSse 6ood©li &iail<3iii® a£ ab 
sjadergrate^ta libwar;^^ hat ma clear gtside llE®a ®s fco tfee sise^ costj, aad satssr® 



Anauffil Repcrt 1965/66 
30 Jiroe l^S 
Page 9 

G«. Speeisl CtoilestaioKS Division, iSiis «31viel©o. ®S3 or^aised as s 
separate activity ^itlila tae Isiiversity Library te Aiss^st 1^5 wi£:li Mr, Benfcoa L* 
EatcSig Associates Lil?rarias3,> ia dbsrge. He la aaeiffltad by Mrs« Soge Pribram. 
•iite area;5 Sooaa 609^ is ojses. Ksadsys tSiro^e^ Fjridaysj 8s30 ffi»sn« So 5sO0 p.m. 

l!fee Speeial Collectlo^xs BlvisioK is a placs for siapeirvised sjse sad for 
control of scares &nd espsasiire ssaserialaj; ia effect;^ 4i vtt&l esSeasioa of tise 
resources in tiie general coilectloEs of £b.e library* As opportJSBity aad f?aads 
perszjit^ it Is iioped to teil4 sl^ificaat ai^tlior fii^-d aubiect collectiOES ??itls 
fha itsEss la as aeer aint coacitioa &e possible is order £feat biMiogsspkers 
loay joake sigsificsaft t3,se of tiie eollectioBS, BiBliograglij^ gr&^ie ar£Ss ffiad 
priatisg sfecsuld <^e'/(Blop as cviwtcxsl-mi ittteT&eta in a proper gradssfee progrsja. 
This eolIecfei«a ahovld beeoEje evea sssre ics?ortarit In sl^e siasr fuesjrso 

iMs fe&t h&a Issea devoteiS to assasngiag asfceyi&ls 1» tSie Speeial Collectiosas 
areSj, to sortlsg tise old Trees^re Itoesa titles and traaaferslsg sosas items to tlie 
geaeral collecticsj t^j recatalogiag aad recleissif:fiag itesss t® tlia Special €oIi®c« 
tioas daslgiiatio% asd to sccRtirins aaterlsls as faads as.d itaa® bacssEa avslla&le* 
All refussts f©r use of ssaterisls have h&ms. ser'.s'lssd » "Sbare is s® i®CEei.^siag 
semls^ar ;su3d clasi^ -use^ &$ ^^ell @s is^dividsml $^% la coaaeo^icsi ^1^ t'SrxQ aad 
sQsd.aar ^pera« 

A raeapit^latios^ to be fomid ia ths append is^ of sosae of tb® slg^iifissat 
titles or colieatlons^ Mth eC'SassatSj, affords a «<Daelae presaatatl^B ©f ttus 
poteatials of tlie Speeisl Colleetioes lnoldie^o l^ile the ^£o£«l'* eovarage ©f 
tbs Spacisl Colle^^tions area is efctll vesy spotfey^ certata sig^iifisaat sggrega- 
tioas of subject ssatariftls -or autltor material© are tegiassissg Sa e«^rge^ tkis 
baing eapecl&il^ trise Ie tha aa^isitlosja sEadiS i® Apiril tkrou^ Sws& as a xestsic 
of ssjney becossJ-ag ^tvailaole aad istsrested dealers providiag 5^ ii&rsry M.tfe tis© 
opportufiity of first srefaasl-^a v«sj ii^tortaat factor is th& ae^ulriEg of 8i^,i£i« 
cant sctsriels^ 

Cards lisve ba^ia. keyp^Baelied for all t^ie eataloged sjetsrlal Ie t&e Special 
Collectlcas jsrea^ asd it is Isspsd to less© s. s»ppis3BB2SEt to tfee Asgassicas List 
coataiaiag thi.& "ciBtiaiog* ia Septes^rj, prafQced fey a stateas^st ©a lSii9 feoars 
asid tlie grouad rules for sse of thiS^ siata^lals»-a*^kiek<»of£" for tlie fonesal op«KlS£ 
of t!ie arefitt 

8« Fttt^re ?las£s aad_.^#d a 

^kJhile tl3« ijaiversit^ Library staff is coastaatly coaeerj®^ ^lf3i ii<^no»VTjffi3Sts 
ia cenj-ioeSif, tke foll^ffiistg ssatgers ao» recsive tfea Easat: eoiie&&tvat&6 «fc£esjti©as 

&.« Fcreimse ia ijE^r&aas;© is «5is fertlieEi^ cf s-^ary st«j> ssesEsary to tSae 
cojBplctioji Of tlia asw usaiiversicy library biiildisg at tSia earliest goasiMe data* 
i:lie 5>res«atly leatailed stack aqwipiraimt thnrnghsist tSate SSaiver»l6y ^ili h& coat* 
oletely filled Isy Jsme 196T» Ever iacsssffisiag sErollEsaats predicate t&e «»rasffiB3»ss©te 
iKGrease ia lihtavf seatiag capeciUyo JSs^Jor (Esspeaditaras estcfe year for ewer greater 
Eisabers «»f foooks ajod jo^arsjals i^ssded for teajs&iag^ atiidy asjd ressareis assuoe timt 



Ifelversitf Library ^ , 
AejsjsI Eepoxe lS65/6fi 
30 Jme 1366 
fage 10 

eeisveaieat sad effielesst ll&£®2y facilities for aeoxags sssd Kse of resotarces 

•will bs psxjvlded* This rs§ivireassa£ Is present at all i®vels«*«»f'a€S£lty^ giadiiatay 

A moat; ia^oxtaat eosislderatioa is the ss&a6 for fseiiltles aad servieea to 

of sfi^esits in. labe So-ufi&'sest Borsitory Coiaplers;, ic Ualvsraitj CcilegSj. la the 
WosKja^s Dormltossp are% ^aiad ou Orsljard Hill impose os tfes Caiij'ersity tl^e jnaqalre- 
sssbS to deceatrsXisa esseafcial lihx&xf services for sisdargrsdijssasj. partlctaXsriy 
the reserve' Isock services and siaSi libisry materials ss are refiairsd darisjg the 
fresferass and soplioxaore years ^liicli sssy easily he ideatif ied aad do^lleated ia 
atsssljers of copies* 

B« !S3ie provisiisa of loeg raaga 1nsidge€;iBg policy to a^Eppore tlie li&mrjj'^s 
3c«[uislt:ioa pssgram is esseatiai to cs£a.|jlish prspar pleaslag ^isla \sill essisre 
adequate otsffiag and effeetive ssrvlees. 

^o "Jlja developmesit of methods for llbrai^ ©Kieatatioa, for f restee% o£^er 
cadergradsiatesj grad^mSe sfcudsKts^ sad £&C3ilty sasmbers is ssseaaitial to perndt 
effective use of library services and resoisrees. Issvelved are tSie vrltiag of 

h2adba<5k% tfes cseatiloa of fiaadio-viisiBal aids^ the eailorlEg ©f ite^ss t® stssdsBt 
la'cerasts and seed% ®isd tlie eooparatio® end ixavolvesseffifc of £lae faessXty as 's?©!! 
fis £!ie librsry staff ia departa^atal lil>rarie8» 

|S« ?!liS faeulti' sad the libKa2:j^ mast coatimi^ -die slow aad asdiKias search 
for &n ffidmiaistxatlvelyj, politically^ asd ecsjaosBically feasllsis getfiera of da- 
issrtjssatal library orgaaisetioa aad davelopsaat. ^is iscltsdaas dje f lading 
of aex'? s'^ea for tl:s i'&rriil Sciesee I,ibsasy; tfje resolisttoa cf t&s iapasse over 
tfcs coastltUEEc^ ©f th'z ?%-3ieaI Scieaee Suibrary; tlie st&£ttng ©f existiag simll 
dGpar£fiieu.tal lil^srarics ; the iacoxgojjatica ©f seT? demands i&v def-arfcjKaatal li- 
braries iato esisfcing er siswly ersated patterns ©f oEgSiiisafcioa sad gsowfc&j aod 
tlie facivig «.p tS9 t&e ri2a.iit5.es of fiaassiai support for & decsatsstised library 
syatsss» 

So full-tisffi positiosss ssf jiortsd frojs tfea 03 Aesgrnial; asset M araesfersed 
as ao&u &3 poesibXe to 8i:st;a graded @3r'<rlc® positions. Rscfui^asasse &s&d £i&t£isitic& 
of (^alified sSafg receive adverse effect f ro® tiie taii^jorsry hlriag sitaoatios 
iavolviag eaeaatial positions vttSsa^t fsiage liessefit©* 

F« i'Saass puBt: be feuisd to fiaaace a»d staff tfce Haiversity ttihr&xy^a eos^sster 
program. Of fifes©Iu£e ivs^xixm&t ta «3ie saed £0 aaSosaaee lifetasy isjBtlaes ©f 
ac<gKisii:io% eatslogi^gj, &u6 clrca'iatisa. Staff sssa&ersj, s^eSa aa a systeais fi&8l3>^t 
aad & ^x©gr«iaiiaerji sre re<^uired to stedy tits Xiforasy's pxxjeefflses^ select ItawSwaie^ 

devslop sof tssai^j, sis'aax'vise the tressfer £0 siatonMiaed pEiocs<3isreSj> s^ Revise and 
apply revisions .sad tsiSxyv&t-lonQ ia tSse s^£®a. fekile ake SfelvaralSsr I,ibsarj 

systea of llljraiy conss^ter «ippllea£:?i0a®o tfes BM'^sS'sifcy Itibrasj- ssgst fiad €&e 
zassns to coopesffite laidi &sid eake ad^wasstsge ©f £&» aatioasl, resiosffllj, asd ' le»ca^I 
cosspsiter developaeafca as spplisst to iibr^iriss» 

Hotea Agj^adis to follow &t s. Istei: data* 



I 



roiVERSIfY OF ^k^SSACI■•iUSE^rs/AalJr.®Irs^: 

uNivERsrrv library 



15 Septaasber l%6 



Fr<Mas Hugh MosiCgoaeryft University Librarian 

lot SoberC Jo MeCartrjey^ SecxetBty of tha U«lverslS:y 

Subject: Appendix to Ualvearsifcy Library Annuai Hsport I July 1%S fco 

30 Jun© 19S6« 

The encios®d Appendix is supplied in further response to your reqaasC of 
25 April 1966o This AppsndiK shoisiti b's attefihed to eh® Library Anmiai 
Saport dated 30 June i966„ ravised 31 August l966o 



miVESSITY OF J'aSSAGHOSETIS/Aa&srst 



2^ A^s^sst 1966 



CoRtaate of Appendix to t&e Ualverslty Lifersrlaa 
Report., 1 Jaly 1965 to 30 J^ise 1966 



A. Stfeff Sester (See Page 2 of ABSs&al Report for Persoaael 

as of Septe^sber) 

B. Ussiversl£y Llhxaxf Orgassisatioa Ctert (See Page 3 ©£ 

Aisasjal Report) 

■C«!fl. Ac^lffiitlosss Bepartsjsst *• As-imai StaMaary of Statistics 

C~2. Gataleglffig BepsrtJ^ats " AEsat^al SJiSEsar^ of Statistics 

C-3. Special ColleetloBs Bl vision - Statistics aad Sigaificasat 
Aeqisisltions 

G-^. Voiaises Added to Active BefartjMatal Librsrias 

&-1. Gir««*lsfc^^a Statistics 

B-2. IJepartmeaeal Library Statistics 

B"3. First SessioB Sisss^sr Ssfeasol «• GlrcsXatloa «Hd Reader Use 

Statistics 

^k, Secoad Sessloaa Sssisser Sclsiool - CiraaXatioa asd Reader Kse 
Statistles 

B-5. Seser-ve Bo-ok Statiatica (See Appeadia S-1) 

E. SLeadsr 13se Statistics 

?, Isster-Ltbrsr^ Lossi Statistics 

S. EK^saditisre for Book© sskI Pesl^clicsls^ JisXf 195^ »- Jeue 1966 



Appeadlx C~l. 






25 Ati^^t 19^ 

Seq«e»£s Received SSj^^^ 52j>667 

Searefa Statistiess 

Eeqeasts Searched 42^^ 122 

:feioks Searehed 27j>950 

15esler Cat«log8 Searched 33^ B3^ 

Total Ite^ Searched 103? 936 (^ 

IShmhBT of Orders Placed 62^877 k2pQ2B 

All B©«>k8 CtirreBt (ABC) PrsgraiH 

?<&isiaaa Eeeeived 13,815 (Kaae) 

Ksa^jsr of B?saplicates Ret?5n>Ed 

to Ifepartasaats 3s 559 6gQkl 



UNI'S/EPvSITf Of MASSACHUSETTS/Aslierst 
UM?SSSiTf LI BEAK 



25 AagMst 1966 




Titles Catsioged 

S&aograp&le Title© 4ij>8ll 

Serial Titles L 



71^838 


6Ji^88i4- 


2^652 


1,CS2 


1*2?, 9^ 


358^610 


117*^1^ 


98A90 



Ibtel Titles 10,682 . C^ figure] 

yolyeses. jS.ega£al^^ed^ an d Rec laaelfled 



Perceatage 



Total Titles i«-3»329 35,22^8 23 

VolaEas Cataloged 

Serisl VbliEses 22^^51 

Total ?olfeT!^8 71*838 6Jis88i4- 11 

Total VblttESQS Wlt&drawa 

Total VolssjEea ia tSsiversity SysEe® 

Total Voliasea ia Bsparts^iatal Lllb-raries 

Titles Seeatal*ged and ReelsBsified 

Moaograplsie Titles ?>591 

Ssriai Titla© : 



Serial 1?©1h®ss 


10, lh2 

24^202 








Total Volmssts 




S^v^S^ 


21,?S9 


55 


Total V©k«ae8 Procesead 




1C^,7J*1 


^,653 


22 



Appeadix C"3- 

23 Asagast I5 

Spec'tei Cteilectiosae Dlvisioa 
Statistics aad SigBiflcSBt Ac«?sisi£ioas 




Volssssas m-T Fleces 



A . Statistics 

Cataloged Iteass ia the Slviaioaj 



. !lans3scripts 2 2 

Period leels S? ™_^ 

All iteas fe.ave lss@a cataloged Kiase Aasgast I965 sad eoasist of recstsl©gsd 
Bssterials fresa £«ie aid Treaaare B^jc® eollectlosa aad SK?re receat purc&aaea, 

S. Slgalflcaat Aoauisifeisas 

A TBcmpi.tuls.tion with coEsssat ©f sigrslficaat titles aad caliectfesis presents 
a coHciae ssaaaary of the poteatiaig for reaesrcli aad stssdy of t'fee gre^-jiag reso^srcss 
of tSie Special GaZlectioas Divistsiai It gasat be eE^&asisee £feat ifet: we fesve Is 
oaly tite .fe^liS^lggSj avca Cko^^ soass sub jest areas are already becoadmg collec- 
tijoas "ia depfcfel,'^' '.aotS3l>' t&e combiiastljoa of So, 4 wifcSi Sfo®. 5''3 feelow. 

1. !i. S. Co»grQS8._ roCT,?sa&Eits of the first fourteen cosxgresses. 

Ctor oollectiop.of soae fowr Issadred sad geveaty~flve origisssl docis^satE 
of tfes first ■ fourteen Csssgresses of tfee Uaited States Isss h&^m ■shacked 
agalast dfee osa avallsble ;bti»liograp&yj Greel^^^s^^ ^^blle^^ DeiejaiBeRt s c£ 
the first fo»rteea Coagressss^ 1789" I8I?- the Speeial ijolleetiosas copj 
of t&is tes ■feaea aasotstas^ witu ©^ar fes»Ti<iSiagi5, and th& docaiaiBSits te^e 
te@B arraaged ia ciiroaoicgisaX order by Goagres® sa^ seaslsja. Abossfc 
fealf &f o»r fea!l«il0.^ bave isofc hftesi repria£ed ia Ai^rlcaa State Ba^^o 

2. Aatisl^very feooka laad paa^Mets-'^sosiK 3S© titles cKsstly relatlssg to 
sfea II » S. aad the Ifest ladies. 

A calendar r^ill be coBStrw-cSed for tfee paa^Met material 'la this c®ilee- 
tioa, aad tlie bouEd volwjsea s-.'ill fee is2divid\=ally cataloged. Soata of tiba 
titles ia the lattar category are already cataloged, assd Isibliograp&lcal 
iavastlgatioa fees disclosed claat maay of tlie titles are scarce. ■ "Jlje 
. 'fac^bletj or mslsoimdj,, sBteriaX iQcludas fragmeotaacy nms of abolifcioBisfc 
•serial pulsiicafcioitis. OrigisMlly it feao besa tlso'ss^^jt to calendar these/ 
wltli tlis rest of the isa'bouma Iten^^ b«3t a check la the 3^3 edition of 
tSie pglQg^' _ Lijif t , of ^ Sfs ti&le reveals tlisfc asjt only ere there iaf resjiseRt 
locations for souse of these titles^ ^t also t&e larger ©aivsrsity 
lilsraries freq^esEtly report very broken SioidiEgs. In view of tfeis^ it 
h&® hmiu decided to catalog tliese serial titles^ f ragEsntary tlsfflis^ 
&e-f.&vsg a© tbiat otsr feoldlsga Esy aveisttiffllly get late a«r owa serials 
list,, Rad ssltisDKtely into t'fee "fo«sr- col lege** one. 



Uaiversity Ll&rsxy Assmsal Se|w»rfc 

3. Pasipfeleta hf l!assa<;^taet:£8 persoES or- reiatiisg to Ma8sacfej.isetts activities. 
AJseast 2^000 tifclesj, eighfce^ath tlsray^ saostt of tjlse SLlsaatasatljt eefttisry, 
a&are p©ssS,Me^ tliese 'siXl Ise asraagad by category seeli a.s felsctloo aerajoas.. 
etc.., «Bd eadi group cl«s8®d aad ealeadared. 

!{•. Bra!>aat SevoS.Ktioa sisterlsl. 

Tvj« ne^^^ly Btjrcljased collect ioas l»ave Ije^a cascked and asarged sstd ^'"fe i» *^e 
process of Iseiag aaXea^ared. Tijsse coateiaasrajy aJEteirials rslstlag to the 

, Atesffi. gigaJflesat iadividual titles ^lli M eataloged iadivldiysllys audk 

as t&e estfrcEBely scarce Secsseil ces resreseatatieas* aasteasatioras et rsclasBS;? 

tiotes faltes -^ S.M.X.. par les rapreseiatssjs et Sj:«£s des dis Fr-s-vliaceg dea 
,^gay§-Bas Autrieliisias assembles, Brtscfillfes. l?W"lt90 Cl'T'?- isi lil. 



91 of lO'^- .sjaal&ers p^bils^ed ^ts ths 'Pro^pecttss* and 5 sagf lesseate . 
Aa eKtraJsaly sc^aree rmi. Cstalogad* lacidesstsll^^ tlia j^^i„?^£Lj'J»^SSl£ii* 
3r^ ec*? reports ©aly f.oux cos^leta sets of tSiis jotinaa.r'Mte3^S©Etg tiSus iasossf^ 
pleta sets gnly eae other librEry^y garvasdj, with a beteer sst tton o^srsj, and 
tbat by only oae asjiober, 

6. Kevolisstioais de ParSs (?r*sd!j0®H^)3, ITv, Cataloged. 

> II i» III ifiiuwiiM iB>iii'ii*i»niiiin»«i'!i M"!*!!'!^ "I I ^ . . ' # * ■ mf 

*t. H. E. H. BisaeC i?renc!i Eevol'atiQa sollectiea. 

Afeout K'^Q feoofeSjy pa^&lsfcSj,, ete.^. ^>stiy c0Btesaporasyy iscl?sdiffig a eallectioa 

99* -B es sfcsoiately irsrspXsceaM-s «oilectlasa. ^is will be satsloged iadi- 

■« ^ "^ iii>Wi»'ii*ti7Mniiwi|iitn>— Mi—jnn iim I i^»w ' ftu <ii iijiiaii n»i( I mill iwiMjiia i umi „ ^*' 

vid®aliy aad eaieadajrad^ ; t;&e slgaif icaat Woks will be cataloged (sobss sets 
^xll go to elaa geiaeral l^ferary colleceioa) ssad tiae SJKj^&iets^ ©fcc^ als© c«i- 
eiadered, Tfels is a x&xf xmpevtBat. acqut^ttton. Is £r«sjsi-t t© ns Smm abroad. 

A EP^iific'eat set o^ tisis ia^rtjsat joursal. f'iSj® Illustrated repriat of tfes 
l^easa if 89*1'?^ of t&isy ttader eitle Ag^^sa^^^Mtsiarj ia t^a Biisst colleetioa, 
^iil tsa ©aa esf" tfee tiiiiss goiag to the geaeral. sollectloas). Ib trasasia £® ss® 
frcsi abroad. 

9. Freai^ sec©adary asstters coilectioja. 

Over a £fe»Msaa<3 -valasss-a^. ssasss'' 5,b apecial issess asad ia origtesl tsirappiers. 
Every t&tag saȣ- elreadj? arepresaatc^S iist&e geEaeral collectiosss ttast caa poEsibl^' 
1^ seat tk^xa wisfeottt dseHmoyiag valsalsls- bi&liograp&le iaforamti©® will be. 
Ia aaj' c«se^ «a ij^sortsat aogsasBtstloa 60 the field of late alaeteaath aad 
easier iRsisaeietfe caatisrf^ Freaali litarafe^ire. !&« for^ar «w?affir was ^a ij^ort«st 
of.fleial iR ©ae of fefee Fresicla slBleterias. ?v%es a cos^lalat wa* aade al5©t%£ 
hia a®£ae bslag clipped frca'atttl'scv's autograph preaoffitetiiOB tassripticaSj, the 
esplaisEtlon was aade tiset aSii© ^jas-doae la order to get tfee eolle-. tiosa oct sf 
Fsr*ace. Ix^xfe -^-sij^ald tiave Is-aaE refused if t&e licessse^s eossl'd .feave ideatifisd 
tk« owner . CstalsgiBg of tk«ose tltlea resMlaisg isS^aeisl OsXlaetloEss is a 
task £©r jsext ye«r. 

10. Crccsr collection. 

The library ©sis offered first Sefasal of issfcerials s»y isEd abosat Gr®cs eotalliag 



University Library Aasaaal Report 
Appendix C-Sjs Fag© 3 
25 A«sg«st 1^6 

alBost ei^t fessRdred iteais. T&is very sco^refeesssiva coilectioB was ordered 
on th& basis of thss priced catalog ©at sot received b/ tlie ead of tfee year, 

11. Iteliac Literature. 

One issp&ztaut and s^pleseatlssg purchase %/Ms coissaitted at jear^s ead^ tlist of 
alnsost aa satire dealer's cstalag of Italiaa literatore of th& period 1850-1^0. 
I&is mil fjEovide the UsKiversity with sabstaatlal, ia so^ eases evea ■msd.qu&f 
holdiags of zuf&L csiatroversial figsires ais F'^Amsmslo atid atacy of his co&test- 
poraries . 

X2. Serials. 

We have &lsc ■pur teased wk&t vii'i be the best file isi tlsJ^ cossstr^ of tlse verj 
ia^rtfiat hs. Clg f _ .^^.^ .cj||>|;'^^^£§^ ,Ry.^^f.,?...fe„A,!.lyj2^. ^^'^ ^^^ coatiosaatlon^ 
Jogrsal ^ ^ia torl^jaSs t&e collection ,^|8t<?jl;yf. ^B^J^}:...§'.f„^^.?^\'^.' ^ ©f S^s ^ vols. 
piebliafeed; a very isEtartasat Selvetiea swllectioa of about 3*000 vol«., & Geaea- 
logie^Heraldiejisa-Kobieasa collsctioa iscIadlEsg ssbj very ii^ortaat setS;, a ioag 
ruQ of ttse Al^ssascli de Gotlm^ a i^od aet of tke controversial QeTB&n aaesslee. 
Per Spigjijsla assd a aice colleetioa of ebonst 230 tracts on t&e Psaritsa Revolwtio% 
SBostly lio&ions I6^2»l64^. Soisza of these titleS;, such as tl^s X«i®t s^atioisedp 
&ze. Speei'^l Collections, b^st la th& sssis tliese are geszeral eoileetions pttre&aa^s. 

13- Eosl^^^ literature. 

Qtte of £ke verj ^esk areas, Cho^s^ with soaie scares itei^^ a Hillifim Harris 
collectica (Bo3»lsmou) iBsistdips ssa^y of the scarce e^es^rsi titles aed soaae 
fidsociatloa ite!se-><>a good iiegj-a^iag, &xu? e fair repraseatetioot of «orks by 

Aldous WsKl&y. 'She TriacoB ?res3 William Bl&ke facsiaailes are all. here^ ex~ 
cepting o^a^ Includlag the vezy scarce J&m &&lem freas tfee imi^pis Stirling 
colored copy and botli io^ortact editions of M.8 ^wsrkSji the Sllie~Yeat:S£ aiicl 
the Noa&suela edited by Keym&s* ife sta^ o^^ the setsosul e41t£oQ of Joftnsoa's 
Jj^jCtlfl^RrgS and A. B. Gisosaart'^s pcG£&is»&l^ is sttes c£ lassi^ yse or v^rj rare 
bo ok s j a seveateea volusss coltectSan of tfelrty-aeves iste sixte^sstb aad early 
&eveatss&t& Esglisfe literary "^Torks ia reprint, of ^icli tiaere ^stxe oaly tfeirty 
cos^lete sets p^bliahed;, oise of v^^icb «e bave. 

14. Astarlcafi literature. 

Acother veak area but ^itli a sosiet^at broader spread of authors. A collectiosa 
recently fjwrdiased of -approxiaateiy six imadred titles will add early «©rks of 
3ueh sut&ors ae Ifilla Catber^ Doa Pasaoa^ Sicslalr Levis^ a o«ai>er of titles 
of Graos; SgglestoOj; and aese otiter alaetesat&i ceatvry a^tSi^rs, &ud a fairly 
extensive Hastlisii Carlassd collectioa iocl^ing hie first m»rk3 is paperj, and 
mSQy presentation titles. 

1$. Ilie Maoa-Sdiwetaer eollectioa. 

Xnslt^es pseaent&tlost copies of vj^rks of thoases Hasm £o Richard Schweiser 
ajBd also from otl^ar meetsera of t&e faaily ^aad froai associates ia his "cirele** 
ist exile in Sv;itzerla&d. (All aasirautographed volusaes will go to the genstraX 
collections). Also ieclssded is SckK7eiser's diary of & trip to tlie Orient^ 
and his day hooks frosi 19^ into 1^^, the year of hia death, and typescripts 
of a few versioEs of his f llaas as well a® the origiaal printed text— soise hiSj; 
sosae by otfeers— lapoa ^ich the film versions "siiere based. I&e day hooka are 
a priasry sotsrce^ the existesce of 'uhich la cot yet kaown outside his own 
familyj, not ouly tracing the development of his filsas biat also recording 



Uaiversity library AsjEsaal Seport 
Append ix C"3jp ^^ge ^' 
25 AttgBflt IS66 

CQ&verB&ttona witis Msasj^ lil.» family, aad frleads. Thl© ssay prove a fnait- 
ftti source aot oaly for foreigji filis Mstory and Rld?^rd Schweizerj b«t also 
for Sfeoesss Maaa. 

16. Karl Krssis. 

A sigalficaiit coliection ©f tlae vrorks of Karl Era«s sms ordered and receivedj, 
and partly checked. IMs fits in nicely with our cos^lete set of EJgJg^e^lp 
a» ise^-sirtagtt pre^Eifcler Atsstriasa socialist periodical of tefeicii Kraus "is&a both 
editor se^ contrictitor, ^e collection lacl«.das sotsB nsssssorabilla ssostly 
collected by fais friend aad associates Gabriel Eosei^rawch^ inclssdlag «a iadex 
is njaaa^criptj to Elg^^Faekela. made % Eosaaraucli . 



17 » Art and arshitectare saaterials. 

Hjea^ spotty aed m3iave% this saabject area Inclsides vesy im^xfMut titles, 
as for 'exsiBpiep fclie Bsrlisi/lJljIjoff defi&ltive editioa of Albrecht JKSrer 
(6 felio vfflliaiEes}^ tiss definitive Leonardo ds Viaci as far as published, t&e 
Sovisskii <jollectloj3« of etcliiags of Rembraadt ssmJ his school, (Csarisf. Eisssiaa 
p«blicatieQs), th& 25v. history of Italiaa art by VeaUir^ LippassB®' 8 vevf 
sesr^ &eQ vol^asis eollscCios of ^»}£H eeatuxy eagravis^ assd '^Toodcuts, 
reps^duetlosss so perfectly eseeuted tliat the ptsblisher Stsad*3t$^@d '^Faeeisile^ 
oa t^e l»s^ o£ each pl&te £0 prev@»£ «mscs«i|^islous iBsdifid^sl® sellisf; tke® 
off as origi@als^ a^d <%sa^ is^ortast tltlss on arcMtes^'sre^ eerauies Bn.d 
pottery, «ilijer8^tl4Ss ete., «8 «©il as' '^aodenf arSi»es<, Ex©spt fos tl^« 
"esafts" titles, ®sts« card sets liave feeesi prepared tse &s ii&sotpo rated ie 
title fisie Arts Mbrasy «a£slog «:s aa aid to losatlag eapessiv® sad 8«sayce 
titles ^t(S^ SKS fees® Ik tfee Special Collections Di'i?isi©Ko 
IB-Blbliogsapfef af«3 Isistosy ot pvt^tl&§,, 

!^e basis of this ^ath&xts% ot expsttsl^® awi scarce biMiograj^ was tibe 
fomaar "^ <$e»ltae&ioa, «rit^ eipisific&at {sddltioos saade dusiztg l&ls pass jb&t, ■ 
l&e eo^lete set «f f3ie .^lo|^«^ sad' tlae oom^l&te set &£ SJ^atg^e egaas oo£ 
oS tfes StQ^eas "lilsrars'® lot |mx<^sed soass ^aars ago.. One is^rtaat additioisi 
to t&is area ^Mc^ ties ia witii ©tlias" s^fcerisl is the Kepsee Bl&ke bibliography^ 
sa eststestelf scasrce book, 

19>0t&er ffiatlvif^o We have addad si^&ifieaat materials, ms^ «>.€ it eritligis% 
aad sesie of It Sp«elel Collestlei^ beeatase of rarity or fragility,, oat Fro^s^tj, 
Go&fl;, ^tktg Tm^fjOf Tolsto^ va^oue see&uid&vf Russian smthova^ £a£0|»ea» 
Itistory, SGseoSiSarj s€mvc& ssaterials (s.ix ^ffs^ilattonB »liid» slgaifleai&tl;f 
iSu^Besit our I'ress^ Bsvolutiosa bdldisigs, imucludlas $p«&. Coll«!eo 5»3), frea^ 
'^little sage,^*"' e&a& o£ «!)i<:& bear epoa th@ sac^ v&vohazijssmxf period,, etseh 
se t&s sKtres^lj^ ist^rtarat atsd very eeax%@ is%rs@ali&t m&^stia&g Mit^fcaaagB 
of iH^i<g^ v& h&vi all but tao lesfses^ _'5^ i^?'^-*) Cote^ ri^w ass^ OeaJtigj,, sosse 
C^^'saiia ''little i^g®^^ Susopeast ^Bklsss^ biasissees lalstor^;^ asd other aspects 
o£ eo^Siocsl^si. @u(^ se tlieor^r of aon^y^ ete>^ as^ eolleetloffiie of e^ m>£ks of 
aad <srltl&i@s ung ^'^'^ S'st^a-Qe^sasas. autbors as BitzuiSj, Kieller and Majfero 



Appeadix C-U. 

ffiI\?ESSIT? €XF mSSACHUSElTS/An&erst 

wmmissirT mbsary 



25 Augast 1966 
Vol'Uisssa Added to Aeti-^e IDsoax'ts^afcal Libraries 





Voliisies Added 


Toeal ¥olsisses 


Active Bepartsaseatsi Libraries 


Jialj l^ijLjj^gJ^^ 


1 j«ly l;^ 


Agricisltsral Isaglsefiriag 


88 


5ao 


AEiasl Ifessbaadr]? 


1? 


2,193' 


Arb®rifi«slt«ira 


3 


102 


GS^ioistry 


h^9 


12j,2Gi 


Daiiry 


6 


1^58 


E<fi»£ati«3B 


Ip35^ 


9*il5 


Eagiaeerlag 


2^«^8 


9s 881 


Ea£©K©iogy 


232 


6^390 


Food TeefeaolciSy 


5i^7 


^^^3 


Fores £xy 


6iB 


2^991 


"Bosss Ea»iS0mies 


42lt 


%n5 


Lalj®r 


2?*3 


223 


.!,«stdsefipe Archltsctare 


i^39 


1*851 


Hathisii^tics 


1,61^2 


^.?3T 


Iferrlll 


4,1^1 


17^833 


i&gi3le 


1,?5T 


2,151 


Pfej'sics 


8^ 


5.339 


plant & Soil Sciesjces 


320 


K&ik 


?««2l£ry 


18 


l,^i3 


Psjctoiogy 


lsl(^ 


5, cm 


Sfeade Tree 


k 


135 . 


Vetsrl-Ejasy Scleocs 


169 


1^3^ 


Off Ca3S3Spt?sS 






Crattberey 


63 


3^ 


Wsltliaja 


1^028 


2j.T13 



Toi:al Voiuaas is Sagartaseatal Libraries^ I JFuly I966 llT^^JiSO*^ 



wi»Knfn»MCnv***t-l«» 



^Igmre for ^tsl volmses t& depsrfcs^satal libraries iacludee mslwaea hsztd 
In several inactive departiseEital librffiriesj, as well as voltssss lield i^ the 
active departisaatal libraries . itesalaed above. 






Appeodix: !>-l. 



25 AKgssae 1966 



Ctrcaiaeioj^ Statlseica 



JJaiE Library 



Eegslsr Be©ks 
Reserve S©oks 
Pay^asXogy Books 

Ttetal 

Deimrtiaeatal Libraries 
Grand Tot&l 



■nirtwrlan'rnwrMiii- 






of Cfesioae 



113.199 

l60j,3T3 
63^689 


85,3^1 

l3^/?^3 


32.6 
19 
163.T 


337.^^6 


2^2,528 


34.9 


6S^8J^5^ 


55,^1^ 




JKjSff Hi 


25^,019 





Averasge S?al iy Ciraslatica 

SegBlfir Books 
Reserve Bbdks 
Vay^aole^ Books 



332.3 
§01.1 

^3 



256.2 

kctk.6 

6?.U 



Htigber of Bag^a Library Was Opaa 



■ <- ! ' PW >W<gl l| 



3^0 



333 



a. Librariss reportii^: Sdneatles, Engisieerlag; Bi&ta& EsoBoadcSj, 

Laadsespe ArcSiitecti^rej, Morrill, Masle^ 
VhyatsBg ^eterta^ry Scieace. 



b. LthTATt&& reportlag: EdtiSeation^, Eogiaeerisis;; Ijbrrill. 



tfmm «nj/iiuiim 



l,an4. Arm. 



Tafcale 






BaaartE^atal Liteari? Statistics 



Befervea 



€«223 




Books 







,^5 



25 Aistgust 1966 



1965 



To&al 



22^3^*1 



3251^6 



13j?59 



35*569 
5,151 
J^^833 

lSj,266 

Sii5 

3^5VT 



6B.8i^5 



385397 
3^291 



139803 



55,i^9S. 



&. Open s&elf^ ivtrhTztWiz 

c, Periodicals 

d. 3 laontlis oal:f 



^£e of resfirves 



T}WiWBSl'n OF I14SSACHUSErSS/Affifeers£ 
DTSlVEHSXTt LIBRARY 



Appendix 0-3. 



25 Asagssst 1^6 



Firat Sessioa Sissssar Seltool 
Clgcalg^tjoa and Reader Use S£atisties 



1. Clrealafcioa 

Haiu Desk . 
Reserve Desk 

Total 






h,657 
it, 228 



10,780 



3*7^^3 






1^595 



Ferceat 
of chaBga 



463.9 



•4-i^2. 



Mala Sesfc 
Reserve Beak 

Psydsolo^ Stooffl 

Total 



125.9 


116.9 


llif.3 


80.6 


51.2 


29.8 



291 A 



237.3 



2. Reader Use Statistics (AverasBes 

Moaaday ~ Ifearsday 
9:30 a.sa. 

3S00 p. 83. 

Tsl5 p.Es- 
8s^5 p.sa- 

Total average pev day 

Friday 

9*30 a. 01. 
3? 00 p.aj» 



"JtotsI everage j>er day 
Saeurdaty 

IJotfil average per day 

Stseday 

jj-sOO p.sa. 

8?co p.ffi. 

Total average per day 



69.6 
71.7 

62.5 



.1 



6T.3 
112. 



16.6 
29.2 



46.5 



^7.3 
1M5.3 

32.9 
11.1 

131.7 



U.3 

34.3 



13. 

13. 

S6. 



18. 

IT. 

35 • 



Appehidix I'fk 






Se&®pid Session S'jmnBr S&'sopl 
CireulatloiiJ and Reader Ijse Statistics 






A^eragjs &«! day 



Ma?.j> Bask IQSA IQQ.h 

Reserv-s IS-ssk S9 = 7 ^-3 J 

F,s yeh© ! ©gy R?:)©*s 3 K. 2 12/^ 



_Rea4®rJi'S5?: Statlstf'r-S (Avsrages/ 

9s3Q a.ra, 
3'.'.S*0 p-,mo 

Aversf® per d&y 
Frldsy 

Average 5>er day 
A-'/erscse per sfsy 



%;00 p.m. 50.6 

8;45 p.w, 23.8 



52 J 
59 
50 .,8 


45 -S 
39 > 6 

26, J! 


2? 
75,5 


hi 

23 ..5 
64,-5 


n 





25 August 1966 



CI real. St !««?." iSM <> XSMt %.JshmBS. 



^385 


4017 


•s- ad: 


339s 


172^ 


-^53K7 


J250 


i&S2. 


■^IS9»3 


9361 


-S223 


■J- 58.8 



OKSVERSITY OF HASSACHUSETtS/AiriTerst: 
UNIVERSITY LIBRAE? 



Appendix E 



Reader Usa Sta£:t sties 



S$ Avtsast 1966 



Total Us@ 

Library opsn (ssissster dsjrs) 

Daily s^srsg® 



196S»68 
339 



196^65 

344,191 
307 



Houyly Averages 



Mono «.Fraft. 

5? 30 a.sa* 

3:00 p«m<) 

7*15 psESo 

10;30 p»sBo> 



Saturdays 

10(00 iBeSHo 

3s45 p«sso 



•^>Jon«.-.thwsrsi. 



2l3o4 
201 o 5 

Rofio 



47 oO 

66 o4 



200,1 
272«l 
279.4 

303*4 
a07o5 
i08»5 



lis.o 

l77o4 



Sundey: 



4:00 p»ia« 

8:45 p«®» 

10:30 p«si» 

11:30 p«si« 



219.8 
2l6o3 

R.-iBc 



334«5 
363^7 

226.»3 

ii5«& 



U'-nvSilSIT? OF MAS^IACHUSiTIS/AsnhJjrst 
UNIVERSITY LISRASY 



Appendix F 



25 August 1966 



I^.terlibrasry Loan Sec^tiatlcs 



VoluESQs borrowed and lent 



YEAE 


BORROWED 


1%5«.66 


3873 


1964-63 


3610 


1563^64 


2S13 


1962«.63 


217? 


195U62 


I960 



1260 

754 
613 
370 



VoIwEvss borrca^ed and lent by iasR ittgt lons 

I ■<■■ MiiiiT^ii ii minHT i H i [ I I II — I II — I — i -f — nn 1 i— rii> n riiii-n-nrT » i ... .. — . -... 

I 

Porbas 

HILC 

Mtc ilolyok® 

SEslth 

Other 



Lent Co Universlt:?- 
832 


Borrowed f arora Univ 
193 


47 


367 


55 




701 


226 


857 


250 


138 1 

3B73 


224 

1260 



Books borrowed by borrower 

II lll«BIB»lli|i»il ■■Ili l lWili H I II !■» I II if Ml I II iDHii liinlMiiiwiii III 

Faculty 

GrsduaSe 

Undergraduates 



1188 
2231 
„454 
5873 



Total transact ioas for Universlt);;^ bprrowa^^ 

8ooks borrowed and lent 5133 

Fzfe® jfiiotocopies 354 

KicrofilE and photag bought 343 

Fr®e XeroK copies supplied by UnlTo 206 

TOTAL 6038 



Append iss Q 
UKI?ERSir? OF M.\S3A:HUSCITS/ABih©rsfc 
UriIVERSITT LIESARY 

25 Augisst l%6 



Es spen ditmyQ of Sooks &.ml Pssriodleals 

July 1954 « Jarrfa 1966 
(AiS figures rotsndad 



1954/55 $ 30^633oaO 

1955/36 4S8 313..00 

1956/57 34,570^.00 

1957/58 8Ss?75«00(l) 

S958/39 ■ Sa5630-,.30 

155^/60 85,706aOO 

1/60 « 3/61 100p000«00(2) 

1960/61 nOe834oOOC3) 

i.961/62 2B«075.,00 

1962/63 200e 901.00 

1963/64 468,094c00<4) 

i964/65 53lo000..03(5) 

196S/66 749p834<.00(5) 



All totals Includ® acma a3cpendi£u2r©si Sttm TnxsC 
and Resoes^h Funds „ far th« latter just ehroisgh 
1960/61* 

(1) Includes $25j,000o00 spseial appropriatlonso 

(2) SjEomut tsreKsf^sryec! ffreas Building upproprl anions 

which ''eitplred" Juvrn 1%1* 
<3) Includes $iOOj,OOOoOO special appropriatlcnso 

(4) Includt&s $250^900 Federal 3ai:iMi®ad»Jone® Funds « 

(5) Ifielud@s $200,000 Sca&e spdcial appropriation 

and $200^000 Federal S^enlchctad^ones Funds « 



^+++^H-+^-+^^-++^••!-+++^-i '.4-^+4-^^-++-;-+++++++-H-+++++•+^-^-^4-^+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 

t 

+ 
+ 



■ • 
-- 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 



+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 
■- 



ANNUAL RERORT 
UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICES 

Robert W. Gage, M, D, Director 
1965-66 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 



+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 

+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 

t 



+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 

t 

+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 
+ 



+ 
+ 
+ 

+ 
+ 






I. FINANCIAL SUl^^IARY 

A. Appropriation 

401 Salaries, permanent posi- 
tions 

403 Wages, misc. personnel 

404 Food 

405 Housekeeping Supplies 
407 Medicine & lab supplies 
410 Travel 

414 Administration 

415 Equipment 

Other Accts: Clothing, Repairs, 
Printing Refunds, Perm. 
Reserve 

Total Appropriations 

B. Total Expenses 

C. Balance Carried Forward 
(Needed for July -August 

expenses) full operation 
in 1966 

vi/ Includes balance from previous year. 



1963-64 


1964-65 


1965-66 


$321,106^ 


$395,800 


$499,650^ 


254,347^ 


298,710^ 


379. 95(5^ 


2,50^ 


2,50P 


3,50^ 


1,600 


5,35^ 


10,50CK^ 


6,600 


2,15(P 


4,50IK>^ 


35,100 


38,500 


39.000 


2,900 


2,400 


3,000 


3,600^ 


6,20^ 


8.000 


— © 


6,000© 


6,750® 


14,453 


33,990 


44,450 


321,100 


395,800 


499,650 


295,625^ 


310, 48^^ 


400,050^ 
99,60^ 


25,475 


85,319^ 



Does not include: retirement contribution, health insurance contribution, 
and assistance from other sources. 

Does not include assistance from other sources. 



® 
(Vi 

V^Does not include telephone charges. 

Vw^Does not include credit from University Boarding Halls 

'_^Some additional equipment from other sources. 

UJ Estimated 6-1-66 

® 



® 



Not included in operating expenses are: maintenance of building, 
utilities (heat, light, water, sewer), and amortization of cost of 
building and original equipment. 

Cash Balance 



PERSONNEL 



A. Professional Staff 1963- 6M- 

Director, University Health Services 1 

Staff Physicians, full time M- 

Staff Physicians, part time 

Staff Physicians, part time (Specialists) 4^ 

Director, Mental Health 1 

Principal Psychologist 1 

Clinical Psychologist, full time 1 

Clinical Psychologist, part time 
Director of Environmental Health & Safety 

Supervisor of Nursing Services 1 
Staff Assistant, Business 

B. Ancillary Service Staff 

Research Assistant (Lab & X-ray) 1 

Research Assistant (Lab) , part time 1 

Research Assistant (X-ray) 

Lab Assistant, part time 

Supervising Physical Therapist 1 

Physical Therapist, full time 

Physical Therapist, part time 

C. Nursing Sta ff 

Hospital Supervisor 

Assistant Hospital Supervisor 1 

Head Nurse 3rd Floor, full time, 9 mos. 

Head Nurse OPD, full time 

Graduate Nurses, full time 3 

Graduate Nurses, part time 14- 

Graduate Nurses, full time, 9 mos. 

Licenses Practical Nur^e, part time 

Hospital Aides, full time «+ 

Hospital Aides, full time, 9 mos. 

Hospital Aides, part time 1 



19 54-65 

1 
5 



1 
1 

1 


1 
1 



1 
1 

1 



3 
7 
7 

1 
If 
2 



1965-66 



1 
5 

1 

1 
1 
2 
1 

i 

1 
1 



1 
1 
1 
1 



1 

1 
1 

4 
7 

6 

1 

5 
4 



(1) 



D. Secretarial Staff 



Administrative Secretary 
Principal Clerk 
Medical Sec :'etaries 
Senior Cleik-Stenographer 
Medical Records Clerk 
Secretary, part time 



1 
4 

1 

1 



1 
5 

1 

1 



1 

6 
1 
1 

1 



E. Food Service Staff 



Head Cook, full time, 9 mos. 

Cook, full time 

Assistant Cook, full time, 9 mos, 

Assistant Cook, part time 

Kitchen Helper 

Kitchen Helper, part time 



2 

1 
2 
2 



1 

1 
2 



1 

1 
2 



3. 
PERSONNEL 

F. Maintenance Staff 

Janitor, full time 2 2 2 

Housekeeper, full time 2 11 

Housekeeper 2 - - 

^^^ousekeeper, full time, 9 mos. - i| q. 

Housekeeper, part time - - 1 

G. Student Workers 

Clerk (visitor) - 2 2 

Janitor 12 2 

Kitchen - 1 2 

Laboratory 1 12 

Orderly - 1 2 

(1) Psychologist (2nd position) vacant until April, 1966. 



CO 

w 

M 

w 

CO 

K 
H 



U4 

O 

o 

H 

w 

M 

Q 



4-' 
Sm 
CD 

.x; 
a 

c 

•p 
ra 

N 

•H 

CO 

bO 
u 
o 

« 
M 
M 
H 



•P 
C2 
ra 
■p 
w 

•H >, 

cn CO 

<C I 

ro X3 

0) (0 

a; 



.-1 






U3 




•P 
CD 


or of 
1 Heal 


Psycholog 


rect 
enta 


■H T,, 




Q' 


! 



C 
•H 
tn 
u 
d 

o 
w 

•H 
> 



cn 

QJ 
CI 
H 
> 

OJ 

0) 

3 
CO 







■p i 


tn 1 




'H 




> bO 




u o 


« 




O r~i 


■P 




■P O 


cn 




tn c 


cn 




?< s:. 


<C 




o o 

Xi CD 


c; 




CD H 


o 




^J 


!-t >, 






m to 
0) u 








to 1 




cu X 




ai 




<^ 




•p ,o 


— — — _ 


CD CD 




CD J 

<: 









-P 




0) 


rH 


•H 


CO 


a. 


O 


03 


•H 


!^ 


03 


cu 


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X, H 1 


(l4 






"TO ,-~, 
C U) 
CD -P 

•H 0} 
O -H 

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05 CD 
>,'H 

X O 

, ^ 
tp CO 

cp -^ 

CD 
■P 
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■p 

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bO 
o 

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•H 

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03 

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•P 
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03 
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QJ 
03 

3 
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to 
•p 

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a> 

03 

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w 

+J 
c 
to 
+j 

03 
•H 
03 



p 
o 

03 
•H 
> 

OJ 

d 

CO 



v/ 


r-1 




p 


to cp 




OJ 


•P M-l 


03 


r-\ 


P to 


U 


a 


to -P 


o 




■P CO 


■p 


r-l 


Q) 


•p 


to 


U 


c 


& 


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to 


•H 


0) 


•-3 


a 


CO 




C 






•rl 






U 

a. 











+j o: 

t/T 03 

03 0) 

< c 

•H 

tp 03 

tp d 

to CT 

■p 

CO 



Q) 
O 
•H 
> 

QJ 
CO 

t3 
o 
o 



c 
o 

OJ 

bO 
U 

d 

CO 



QJ 

o 

•P 

O 



03 




c 




to 




<H 




O 


/— \ 


•H 


r^ 


03 


CD 


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P 


^ 


a» 


(l^ 


c 




0) 


tp C3 1 


tp 


v_/ 


to 




+J 




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P"^ 



IV. utilization of Services 



© 



A, Students Enrolled 

B^ Services Rendered (Estimated 
for June 1966) 

I. Outpatient Visits 

2 regular semesters 

Summer sessions 

Total July 1 - June ^0 

II. Mental Health Department 
Visits, individual 
Group therapy (patient 
hours) 

III. Laboratory 

Number of determinations 

IV. X-ray Services 

Number of Patients 

V. Physical Therapy 

Number patient visits 

VI. Inpatient Services 

Bed Patients - total 
Patient days in Infirmary 



l96c^-(:.3 


19b^j-b'< 


1964-65 


1965-66 


7,67b 


8,811 


10,400 


11,859 

Q 


i^,705 


40,18.^ 


48,517 


* 


c',102 


26S 


2,552 


* 


;S,807 


40,448 


51,069 


* 


i,8S6 


2 , 6 I f ) 


2,665 


2,893 




121 


827 


367 


9,236 


12,411 


16,295 


23,745 


1,231 


1,742 


2,323 


2,775 


2,875 


2,473 


3,423 


* 


1,269 


1,777 


1,799 


* 


5,072 


5,582 


6,206 


* 



© 



VII. Adminis tra«tve Services V^ 2,682 4,780 * 

NOTES 

Includes: Undergraduates and graduates, Sept. 1965, including special and part- 
time students, some of whom are not eligible for care by Health Services, 
Estimated number of students served: 11,300 

,A11 figures in these columns include extrapolation for June 1966 

Administrative Services: This includes an enumeration of significant communica- 
tions concerning student problems, evaluations for modification of school 
program, referrals from administrative officers, and other visits or services 
not directly related to health care. 

* Data processing is so delayed that not even approximate figures are available at 
this time. 



6. 
V. STAFF PUBLICATIONS AMD PROFDSSIONAL ACTIVITIES 

ALLEN, DEAN., Ph. D. 

Publications : 

"Withdrawal from College for Severe Psychiat'^ic Disturbances". 
With Julian F. Janowitz, M. D. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN 
COLLEGE HEALTH ASSOCIATION , Vol, 14, pp. 301-304, 1955. 

Other Professional Activities : 

Chairman, Orchard Hill Evaluation Committee 

Member, Committee on Rulebook revision. 

Member, Provost's Committee on Planning for the Northwest 
Residential Complex. 

Faculty Advisor to student group Protestant Christian Couiiell. 

Major speaker: 17th Annual New England Conference of Inter- 
national Association of Student Unions, 
November 14, 1955. 

Major Speaker: Massachusetts Association of Women Deans and 
Counselors, Longmeadow, Massachusetts, 
April 30, 1956. 

Instructor: Honors Colloquium, Fall and Spring semesters, 
1955-66. 

Reviewer and abstractor of articles in Journsl of t he College 
Health Association for Personnel and Guidance Journal . 

BRANDFASS, CARL P., JR., M. D. 

Research Grants and Projects : 

"Electrophoretic Analysis of Serum Proteins in Patients with 
Infectious Mononucleosio". University of Massachusetts 
Faculty Research Grant #FR-VII-56 (1). 

Other Professional Activities : 

Postgraduate course in Dermatology, Postgraduate Medical 
Institute, Boston, October 13 and October 20, 1955. 

Meeting of Americal College of Sports Medicine, November 
19-20, 1965, University of Massachusetts 

Postgraduate course in Adolescent Medicine, Harvard Univer- 
sity, May 9 through 13, 1956. 

Chairman, Disaster Committee, University Health Services 
Chairman, Laboratory Committee, University Health Services 



-7- 

GAGE, Robert W. , M.D. 

Professional Activities t 

Executive Committee , American College Health Association. 

Chairman, Cofrimittee on Standards, American College Health Asso- 
ciation. 

AMA-ACHA Liaison Committee, A-nerican College Health Association. 

Vice-President, American College Health Association, 1966-67. 

University Health Council, Chairman 1965-66 

Review Committee for Human Subjects in Research 

Student Personnel Activities Council 

Board of Admissions and Records 

Fourteen th Annual Symposium for General Practitioners on Re- 
spiratory Diseases, including Tuberculosis, American Thoracic 
Society, Saranac Lake Medical Society, American Academy of General 
Practice and College of General Practice, Canada, at Saranac Lake, 
New York, July 12-18, 1965. 

Board of Governors, Massachusetts Chapter, American Academy of 
General Practice. 

Research Committee, Massachusetts Academy of General Practice. 

• ■ 'Medical SchoM" tiaisSn^Cortimittee-, -^Jassachusetls ,CJiapterV*?Ame,i!iican 
Academy of General Practice. 

Medical-Dental Subcommittee, Special Commission on Radiation 
Protection, Sommonwealth of Massachusetts, 

GERMAIN, Beatrice 

Professional Activities ; 

Hospital Kousekesping Seminar, University of Massachusetts, 
July 5-19, 1966. 

New England Hospital Asser.bly, Prudential Center, Bosr^on, Massa- 
chusetts, March 28-30, 1C55. 

HALL, Leo B. 

Publications ; 

"Observations Regarding the Usefulness of a Rapid Heterophile 
Procedure" . JOURNAL OF jH S /i^EIRTCAN ^EDICAL TECHNOLOGISTS , 
December, 1965, pp 504--505. 



i 



-3- 

Research Grants and r ^^oj oGt s : 

"A Rapid Microtechnique Applied To The Heterophile Antibody Test 
For The Detection Of Infectious Mononucleosis". University of Massa- 
chusetts Faculty Research Grant Reinisch FR-Wll-65. 

"Electrophoretic Analysis of Serum Proteins in Patients With In- 
fectious Mononucleosis". University of Massachusetts Faculty 
Research Grant Brandfass #FR-Vll-66 (1) . 

Other Professional Activities : 

Exhibit at Annual Meeting of the American College Health Asso- 
ciation, San Diego, California, May Z^.-S, 1966. 

HAVENS, Joseph D. , Ph.D. 

Member Personnel Committee, United Christian Foundation of University 
of Massachusetts, 1965-66. 

Speaker, Friends' Conference on Religion and Psychology, Haverford, 
Pennsylvania, June 10-12, 1966. 

JANOWITZ, Julian F. , M.D. 

Publications ; 

"Withdrawal From College For Severe Psychiatric Disturbance". With 
Dean A. Allen, Ph.D. JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE HEALTH ASSO- 
CIATION , Vol. m, pp. 301-301+, 1966. 

Other Professional Activities : 

Consultant School of Nursing, University of Massachusetts. 

Program Director, M— College Personnel Guidance and Mental Health 
Group . 

Consultant, Amherst Counseling Group. 

Consultant, Research Study conducted by William Darity, Ph.D. 

JENNINGS, Richard K. , M.D. 

Professional Activities : 

Board of Governors, Massachusstts Chapter, American Academy of 
General Practice. 

Medical Consultant to Peace Corps Ecquador Project, and to VISTA, 
June 19 -August 31, 1966, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana. 

Postgraduate course, "Immunologic and Clinical Aspects of Allergy", 
March 17-19, 1956, Buffalo General Hospital, Buffalo, New York. 



•9- 



MCBRIDE, Thomas C. , M.D. 

Publications ; 

"Chronic Illness in the University" - submitted to the Journal of 
the iAmerican College Health Association for publication. 

Other Professional Activities ; 

Attended Annual Meeting of The American College Of Physicians, 
New York City, New York, April, 1966. 

Research Grants and Projects ; 

"A Study of the Health Aspects of Sex Knowledge and Attitudes 
Among College Students". University of Massachusetts Faculty 
Research Grant #FR Wll-67. 

RALPH, James R. , M.D, 

Professional Activities : 

Duke University Post-guaduate Medicine Course, July, 1965, 1 week. 
Medical Lectures series - Cooley Dickinson Hospital - 1965-56. 
Medical Lectures series - U. S, V.A. Hospital, NcKthampton, 1965-66. 
Four-College Health Association Clinical Meetings, 1965-65. 
Consultant Attending Physician, U. S, V.A, Hospital, Northampton. 

SCHOENEERGER, HENRY B. , M.D. 

Publications ; 

"Cerebellar Ataxia Associated with Infectious Mononucleosis", 
JO URNAL OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE HEALTH ASSOCIATION , Vol m pp 213 
2' 5, February, 1965. r » f. 

Research Grants and Proiects ; 

"A Study of a System for Coding and Recording Outpatient Diagnostic 
Data in Anticipation of Factor Analysis by Digital Computer". 
University of Massachusetts Faculty Research Grant #?R-Vll-65-(l) . 

Other Professional Activities ; 

"Computer Applications To A University Health Service", presented 
at Annual Meeting of the Ameri-jan Crllege Health Association, San 
Diego, California, May 3-6, 1966. 



-10- 



University of Colorado Postgraduate course in Internal Medicine, 
Estes, Park, Colorado, August 9, 1956-August 13, 1965. 

Chairman, Section meeting, University Honors Program, University 
of Massachusetts, Fall and Spring Semesters. 

SNOOK, George A., M.D. 

Publications ; 

"Interposition of the Joint Capsule in Traumatic Posterior 
Dislocation of the Hip". JOURNAL OF TRAUMA , Vol. 5, No. 3, pp. 
358-361, May, 1965. 

"Company Aid Men, E.T.O., 19il5". MILITARY UNIFORMS IN AMERICA , 
article accompanying painting, Plate No. 266, with Eric I. Manders, 
Copyright 1965 by the Company of Military Historians. 

Other Professional Activities ; 

Sports Conference, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, Rhode 
Island, August 18-19, 1966 

PETERS, Howard A. , Ph.D. 

Professional Activities ; 

Attended joint technical meeting of the Northeastern Section- 
American Nuclear Society and the New England Chapter-Health 
Physics Society, Dedham, Massachusetts, May 5, 1966, 

Presiding officer for the Environmental Sanitation Section of the 
New England Public Health Association Annual Meeting, June 15-17, 
1966. 



-11- 

Section VI ACTIVITIES 

A, Health Care 

' The past year has been a busy one, with outpatient utilization in- 
creased slightly above the amount anticipated on the basis of increased 
enrollnent. Ihe increase this year ccmfirms the change noted last year 
by which the rate of utilization showed a lesser increment than during 
any of three previous years It appears, therefore, that our outpatient 
service utilization has reached a relatively level and stable rate at 
which it may be anticipated to continue, barring scane unusual circum-> 
stance, for the years immedietely ahead. 

Although a wide variety of health problems were met during the year, 
there were no startling developments or epidemics. A brief series of 
mild cases of influenza was recognized during February and March but at 
no time did these reach epidemic proportions and no serious consequences 
were noted. The diagnosis of Influenza was made with reasonable cer- 
tainty for about 204 patients. 

There has been an apparent slight Increase in the number of preg- 
nancies among students which have been brought to our attention. The 
extent and significance of the increase is difficult to measure or inter- 
pret. It may only represent an Increase in confidence on the part of 
student patients in bringing their intimate personal problems to the 
attention of the staff of the Health Services. Insofar as this may be 
true, it clearly reflects credit upon the staff and the manner in which 
personal problems are handled. We would like to believe that this ex- 
planation is valid. 

The outpatient service continues to serve a large number of patients 
with a waiting period which, althou^ regrettable, probably is not in 
excess of t^at which patients would find necessary in the office of 
private physicians. We continue to make a sincere attenpt to encourage 
students to establish a relationship witii a physician of his or her choice 



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-12- 
Thls is done partly by posting physicians* outpatient hours well In 
advance and partly by encouraging the student to Indicate the physician 
of his choice when visiting the Outpatient Department. 

One of our most difficult problems continues to be that of scheduled 
routine physical examinations, such as for Intercollegiate athletics, 
students in the School of Nursing,etc. , at a time which will encourage 
reasonably thorough examination, will not encroach upon the time of 
patients who are acutely ill, and will be at hours which are reasonably 
attractive to the staff. Largely because of the busy and crowded con- 
ditions in the Outpatient Department, we have elected to perfonn these 
examinations out of scheduled clinic hours, usually by appointment in the 
evening. This is not an entirely satisfactory answer, but it is clearly 
preferable to perfonning these examinations at locations other than at 
the Infirmary (such as at the Athletic Field House) and probably superior 
to having them interspersed among patients with acute medical problems. 

It is our hope that with reasonable increase of staff in the future 
there will be more opportunity for seeing patients by appointment. In our 
circumstances, however, it seems virtually impossible to anticipate satis- 
faction with a system which is primarily on an appointment basis. 

Although final figures for the year are not available at this time, it 
appears that inpatient services, although increased, have not increased so 
rapidly in proportion to the student population as have outpatient ser- 
vices. 
MENTAL HEALTH 

With the addition of members of the professional staff, the Mental 
Health Service has continued to Increase both individual and groi^ psy- 
chotherapy services, the increase being in general proportionate to the 
increase in the student body. 

Preventive mental health activities have engaged an increasing pro- 
portion of staff time and have moved in the direction of attempting to 



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-13- 
catalyze analysis by administrators, faculty, and students of policies 
ccmceming t^e arrangements under which students live. Throu^out the 
year there has been nearly continuous ccmsideration and re -evaluation of 
University and student regulations, especially those involving residential 
living conplexes. Faculty interaction has been stimulated throu^ both 
planned and spontaneous meetings with key administrators and faculty 
personnel. 

%>ecial attention has continued to be directed toward work with the 
pre -professional training schools, especially nursing and education. The |> 
joint appointment with the School of Education of a psychologist has giveli^ 
some indication of the possibilities of co<^erative effort in this area 
and has raised considerable hqpe for additional developments in the 
future. With the School of Nursing cooperative activity has been mainly 
at the faculty level with members of our Ptental Health staff assisting 
with grouqp interaction meetings which have resulted in a considerable in- 
crease in understanding of faculty-student relationships. The program 
of participation in the practical teaching of graduate students in psy- 
chology has been continued, with three students serving their practicum 
with us during the past year. 

Research activity has been initiated in a cooperative study with the 
Department of Public Health of sex attitudes and behavior of college 
students . 

Initial plans have been made for establishing a New England Regional 
Mental Health Treatment and Training and Research Institute, which will 
be devoted primarily to studying and meeting the needs of college age 
students who have emotional problrans. It is hoped that this Institute 
can be established at a University center where student patients will be 
able to utilize the many tberapatic advantages of the University 
community . 



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B. Environmental Health and Safety 

The most significant develq;>ment during the past year has been the 
consistent increase in the use of radioactive materials on canpus, an 
increase which apparently will continue at an accelerated rate in the 
near future. Inspectors of the Atomic Energy Connission, during a 
routine visit, brought to li^t a few discrepancies between our methods 
of controlling hazards and those prescribed by the AEC. These plus the 
anticipated rapid escalation in the use of sources of ionizing radiation 
point V5) the need for additional personnel, on a full-time basis, for 
controlling this problem. 

Other activities of E.H. &. S. during the year have been an overall 
survey of residence hall kitchenettes and a housing survey of fraternitiea 
Sanitary conditions in the kitchenettes were found to reflect the degree 
of use to which the kitchenettes had been subjected, with those being 
used for more conplete meals generally in poorer conditlnn. This 
finding is significant, especially when considered in the context of the 
reconmendation that there be more freedom in the use of residence hall 
kitchenettes in the future. 

Sanitary conditions in fraternities have on several occasions been 
found coii5)letely unsatisfactory, necessitating closing food service units 
until conditions were improved. Part of the problem is attributable to 
the necessity for using renovated, poorly designed, and totally inadequate 
units for food preparation areas. Part of the difficulty, however, can 
be attributed to nothing but inadequate supervision of common sanitary 
practices. This problem warrants more detailed attention in the future. 

A course of instruction for all food service personnel was held during 
the year. This was well attended and seemed to serve a useful function. 
A course of this sort should be presented if not every year at least on 
alternate years. 



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Alr sampling equipment has been aqulred. This permits the evaluation 
in a more objective manner of the con